John Barleycorn must die!

Leggi in italiano

John Barleycorn (in Italian Giovanni Chicco d’Orzo) is a traditional song spread in England and Scotland, focused on this popular character, embodiment of the spirit of beer and whiskey. (see)
There are several text versions collected at different times; the oldest known is from 1460.
As often happens with the most popular ballads we talk about family in reference to a set of texts and melodies connected to each other or related.

The plot traced by Pete Wood is well documented and we refer you to his John Barleycorn revisited for the deepening: the first ballad that identifies a man as the spirit of barley is Allan-a-Maut (Allan del Malto) and it comes from Scotland .
The first ballad that bears the name John Barleycorn is instead of 1624, printed in London “A Pleasant new Ballad.To be sung evening and morn, of the bloody murder of Sir John Barleycorn” shortened in The Pleasant Ballad: as Pete Wood points out, all the elements that characterize the current version of the ballad are already present, the oath of the knights to kill John, the rain that quenches him, and the sun that warms him to give him energy, the miller who grinds him between two stones.

Originale screenprint by Paul Bommer (da qui)

THE DEATH-REBIRTH OF KING BARLEY

spirito-granoIt is narrated the death of the King of Barley according to myths and beliefs that date back to the beginning of the peasant culture, customs that were followed in England in these forms until the early decades of the ‘900.
According to James George Frazier in “The Golden Bough“, anciently “John” was chosen among the youth of the tribe and treated like a king for a year; at the appointed time, however, he was killed, following a macabre ritual: his body was dragged across the fields so that the blood soaked the earth and fed the barley.

More recently in the Celtic peasant tradition the spirit of the wheat entered the reaper who cut the last sheaf (who symbolically killed the god) and he had to be sacrificed just as described in the song (or at least figuratively and symbolically). see more

However, the spirit of the Wheat-Barley never dies because it is reborn the following year with the new crop, its strength and its ardor are contained in the whiskey that is obtained from the distillation of barley malt!

JOHN BARLEYCORN

“The Pleasant ballad” was set to the tune “Shall I Lie Beyond Thee?” on the broadside.63  This tune is quoted by a number of sources by a variety of very similar titles, including “Lie Lulling Beyond Thee” .  It is this writer’s belief from a variety of considerations, including Simpson 64 that these are one and the same tune.  There has been some confusion regarding the use of the tune “Stingo” for various members of the family.  Several publications say that John Barleycorn should be sung to this tune, (including Dixon), and some people have assumed this was the tune for “The Pleasant Ballad.”  These impressions seem to have originated from Chappell 65, who meant that “Stingo” was the tune for another member of the family “The Little Barleycorne”, a view which accords with his own comments on the version in the Roxburghe Ballads 66, with Simpson, and Baring-Gould who says ‘[Stingo] is not the air used in the broadsides nor in the west of England’ 67.  Two further tunes, “The Friar & the Nun” and “Twas when the seas were roaring”, are mentioned by Simpson.  Mas Mault has been suggested to be set to the tune “Triumph and Joy”, the original title of “Greensleeves”. 68 (Pete Wood)

In fact, as many as 45 different melodies have been used for centuries for this ballad, and Pete Wood analyzes the four most common melodies.

 MELODY 1

The 1906 version of John Stafford published by Sharp in English Folk Songs is probably the melody that comes closest to the time of James I
The Young Tradition

MELODY DIVES AND LAZARUS

The Shepherd Haden version became “standard” for being included in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs.T

Traffic (Learned by Mike Waterson)

Traffic lyrics
I
There was three men come out of the West
Their fortunes for to try
And these three men made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn(1) must die.
II
They ploughed, they sowed, they harrowed him in
Throwing clods all on his head
And these three men made a solemn vow
John barleycorn was Dead.
III
They’ve left him in the ground for a very long time
Till the rains from heaven did fall
Then little Sir John’s sprung up his head
And so amazed them all
IV
They’ve left him in the ground till the Midsummer
Till he’s grown both pale and wan
Then little Sir John’s grown a long, long beard
And so become a man.
V
They hire’d men with their scythes so sharp
To cut him off at the knee.
They’ve bound him and tied him around the waist
Serving him most barb’rously
VI
They hire’d men with their sharp pitch-forks
To prick him to the heart
But the drover he served him worse than that
For he’s bound him to the cart.
VII
They’ve rolled him around and around the field
Till they came unto a barn
And there they made a solemn mow
Of Little Sir John Barleycorn
VIII
They’ve hire’d men with their crab-tree sticks
To strip him skin from bone
But the miller, he served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
IX
Here’s Little sir John in the nut-brown bowl(2)
And brandy in the glass
But Little Sir John in the nut-brown bowl’s
Proved the stronger man at last
X
For the hunts man he can’t hunt the fox
Nor so loudly blow his horn
And the tinker, he can’t mend Kettles or pots
Without a little of Sir John Barleycorn.
NOTES
1)  the spirit of beer and whiskey
2) The cask of walnut or oak used today to age the whiskey

Jetro Tull live


Damh The Bard from The Hills They Are Hollow

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODY 3

The version of Robert Pope taken by Vaughan Williams in his Folk Song Suite
version for choir and orchestra

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODY 4

from Shropshire
Fred Jordan live

Jean-François Millet - Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868
Jean-François Millet – Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868

JOHN BARLEYCORN BY ROBERT BURNS

The version published by Robert Burns in 1782, reworks the ancient folk song and becomes the basis of subsequent versions

The first 3 stanzas are similar to the standard version, apart from the three kings coming from the east to make the solemn oath to kill John Barleycorn, in fact in the English version the three men arrive from the West: to me personally the hypothesis that Burnes he wanted to point out the 3 Magi Kings … it does not seem pertinent to the deep pagan substratum of history: Christianity (or the cult of the God of Light) doesnt want to kill the King of the Wheat, unless you identify the king of the Grain with the Christ (a “blasphemous” comparison that was immediately removed from subsequent versions).

History is the detailed transformation of the grain spirit, grown strong and healthy during the summer, reaped and threshed as soon as autumn arrives, and turned into alcohol; and the much more detailed description (always compared to the standard version) of the pleasures that it provides to men, so that they can draw from the drink, intoxication and inspiration. Burns was notoriously a great connoisseur of whiskey and the last verse is right in his style!

The indicated melody is Lull [e] Me Beyond Thee; other melodies that fit the lyrics are “Stingo” (John Playford, 1650) and “Up in the Morning Early”
The version of the Tickawinda takes up part of the text by singing the stanzas I, II, III, V, VII, XV

Robert Burns
I
There was three kings into the east,
Three kings both great and high,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn should die.
II
They took a  plough and plough’d him down,
Put clods upon his head,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn was dead
III
But the cheerful Spring came kindly on,
And show’rs began to fall;
John Barleycorn got up again,
And sore surpris’d them all
IV
The sultry suns  of Summer came,
And he grew  thick and strong,
His head weel   arm’d wi’ pointed spears,
That no one  should him wrong.
V
The sober Autumn enter’d mild,
When he grew wan and pale;
His bending joints and drooping head
Show’d he began to fail.
VI
His coulour sicken’d more and more,
He faded into age;
And then his enemies began
To show their deadly rage.
VII
They’ve taen a weapon, long and sharp,
And cut him by the knee;
Then ty’d him fast upon a cart,
Like a rogue for forgerie(1).
VIII
They laid him down upon his back,
And cudgell’d him full sore;
They hung him up before the storm,
And turn’d him o’er and o’er.
IX
They filled up a darksome pit
With water to the brim,
They heaved in John Barleycorn,
There let him sink or swim
X
They laid him out upon the floor,
To work him farther woe,
And still, as signs of life appear’d,
They toss’d him to and fro.
XI
They wasted, o’er a scorching flame,
The marrow of his bones;
But a Miller us’d him worst of all,
For he crush’d him between two stones.
XII
And they hae taen his very heart’s blood,
And drank it round and round;
And still the more and more they drank,
Their joy did more abound.
XIII
John Barleycorn was a hero bold,
Of noble enterprise,
For if you do but taste his blood,
‘Twill make your courage rise.
XIV
‘Twill make a man forget his woe;
‘Twill heighten all his joy:
‘Twill make the widow’s heart to sing,
Tho’ the tear were in her eye.
XV
Then let us toast John Barleycorn,
Each man a glass in hand;
And may his great posterity
Ne’er fail in old Scotland!
NOTES
1) the condemned to death were transported to the place of the gallows on a cart for the public mockery

Steeleye Span from Below the Salt 1972


I (Spoken)
There were three men
Came from the west
Their fortunes for to tell,
And the life of John Barleycorn as well.
II
They laid him in three furrows deep,
Laid clods upon his head,
Then these three man made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn was dead.
III
The let him die for a very long time
Till the rain from heaven did fall,
Then little Sir John sprang up his head
And he did amaze them all.
IV
They let him stand till the midsummer day,
Till he looked both pale and wan.
The little Sir John he grew a long beard
And so became a man.
CHORUS:
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Fa la la la lay o
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Sing fa la la la lay
V
They have hired men with the scythes so sharp,
To cut him off at the knee,
The rolled him and they tied him around the waist,
They served him barbarously.
VI
They have hired men with the crab-tree sticks,
To cut him skin from bone,
And the miller has served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
VII
They’ve wheeled him here,
they’ve wheeled him there,
They’ve wheeled him to a barn,
And thy have served him worse than that,
They’ve bunged him in a vat.
VIII
They have worked their will on John Barleycorn
But he lived to tell the tale,
For they pour him out of an old brown jug
And they call him home brewed ale(1).
NOTES
1) The oldest drink in the world obtained from the fermentation of various cereals. The beer originally was classified out as “beer” (with hops) and “ale” (without hops) . Its processing processes start with a spontaneous fermentation of the starch (ie the sugar) that is the main component in cereals, when they come into contact with water, due to wild yeasts contained in the air. And just as in bread, female food, EARTH, WATER, AIR and FIRE combine magically to give life to a divine food that strengthens and inebriates.
The English term of homebrewing or the art of home-made beer translates into Italian with an abstruse word: domozimurgia and domozimurgo is the producer of homemade beer in which domo, is the Latin root for “home”; zimurgo is the one who practices “zimurgy”, or the science of fermentation processes. The domozimurgo is therefore the one who, within his own home, studies, applies and experiments the alchemy of fermentation. Making beer for your own consumption (including that of the inevitable friends and relatives) is absolutely legal as well as fun and relatively simple although you never stop learning through the exchange of experiences and experimentati
on
see more

And finally the COLLAGE of the versions of Tickawinda, Avalon Rising, John Renbourn, Lanterna Lucis Viriditatis, Xenis Emputae, Travelling Band, Louis Killen, Traffic

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/barleycorn.htm
http://www.musicaememoria.com/JohnBarleycorn2.htm
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/j_barley.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14888
http://www.omniscrit.com/2013/01/who-was-john-barleycorn-folk-song-and.html

WHISKEY YOU’RE THE DIVIL

whisky-devilWhiskey You’re The Devil” è una drinking song resa popolare negli anni 50 dai Clancy Brothers e dai Dubliners: la canzone è accreditata a Jerry Barrington che l’ha pubblicata nel 1873 a New York. Molto probabilmente si tratta di una canzone che gli immigrati irlandesi e scozzesi hanno portato in America, forse dalle origini settecentesche.
Ma furono The Pogues a trasformarla in una drinking song immancabile per i festeggiamenti di Saint Patrick!

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers (strofe I, II, III)

ASCOLTA The Pogues (strofe I, III, II)


Whiskey, you’re the devil,
you’re leadin’ me astray

Over hills and mountains (1)
and to Americae

You’re sweeter, stronger, decenter,
you’re spunkier than tae

O whiskey, you’re my darlin’
drunk or sober

I
Oh, now, brave boys,
we’re on the march
and off to Portugal and Spain
The drums are beating, banners flying , the devil a-home will come tonight (2)
Love, fare thee well, (3)
with me tithery eye
the doodelum the da
Me tithery eye the doodelum the da,
Me rikes fall tour a laddie oh
There’s whiskey in the jar. Hey!
II (3)
Said the mothe (4): “Do not wrong me, don’t take my daughter from me
For if you do I will torment you,
and after death a ghost will haunt you
Love, fare thee well,
with me …
III
The French are fighting boldly (5),
men dying hot and coldly
Give ev’ry man his flask of powder,
his firelock on his shoulder
Love, fare thee well,
with me …
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whiskey, sei il diavolo,
mi mandi alla deriva
per mari e monti
e fino in America
sei più dolce, più forte, più buono,
sei più grintoso del tè!

oh whiskey, sei il mio amore,
ubriaco o sobrio.

I
Forza valorosi,
siamo in marcia,
verso il Portogallo e la Spagna
i tamburi rullano, sventolano i vessilli, stanotte il diavolo tornerà a casa
Amore addio,
con me tithery eye
the doodelum the da
Me tithery eye the doodelum the da,
Me rikes fall tour a laddie oh
c’e’ whiskey nella boccia, hey!
II
Dice la mamma: “Non farmi torto,
non portarmi via la figlia, perchè se lo farai, ti tormenterò e da morta ti perseguiterò come un fantasma
Amore addio,
con me …
III
I francesi combattono con valore,
gli uomini muoiono a destre e a manca,
date ad ognuno la sua fiasca di polvere
e il suo moschetto a tracolla
Amore addio,
con me …

NOTE
1) letteralmente “colline e montagne”
2) nella versione di Barrington dice “colors flying, divil a home we’ll go again”
3) The Pogues dicono “with a too da loo ra loo ra doo de da
a too ra loo ra loo ra doo de da
me rikes fall too ra laddie-o
c’e’ whiskey nella boccia, hey!”
3) questa strofa sembra essere presa pari pari da una ballata scritta su broadside dal titolo “John and Moll” (Bodleian Lybrary ballads 1790-1840)
O mother dear, I will not wrong you,
Neither take your daughter from you,
If I do, you shall torment me,
After death your ghost shall haunt me
4) The Pogues dicono “old woman”
5) nella versione di Barrington dice “Now the drums are beating boldly”

LA MELODIA: Off to California

James O’Neill ha registrato un’hornpipe dal titolo “Whiskey, You’re the Devil,” (ovvero la stessa melodia di “Off to California”)
ASCOLTA la melodia con la chitarra
ASCOLTA la melodia con il violino

Una precedente versione pubblicata a Filadelfia da A. Winch (scritta e cantata da Frank Drew) nel 1865 dal titolo “Whisky, You’re a Villyan” è quasi identica a questa tranne per la strofa II chiaramente proveniente da una precedente ballata sulla guerra.

VERSIONE DI FRANK DREW
Whisky you’re a villyan, you led me astray,
Over bogs, over briers, and out of my way,
You wrestled me a fall and you threw me today,
But I’ll toss you tomorrow, when I’m sober.
I
Still whisky you’re my comfort by night and by day,
You’re stronger and sweeter and spunkier than tay,
One naggin of spirits is worth tuns of bohay,
But above a pint I never could get over.
II
Sweet whisky, you’re a coaxer, I’d best keep away,
If your lips I once taste, sure its wid you I’d stay,
So I’ll make up my mind, and my mouth too, this day,
To drink no more whisky till I’m sober..
III
So goodbye whisky jewel, it’s the last word I’ll say,
Shake hands and part friends, now I’ll stick to bohay(1),
There’s a bade on your lip! Let me kiss it away-
Acushla, you’re my darling drunk or sober.

NOTA 1) Bohay = Bohea (Chinese black tea)

In effetti il testo sembra un frullato di canzoni sull’emigrazione, di bevute e di protesta (anti-war songs)

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=105491
http://thesession.org/tunes/30
http://folksongcollector.com/whiskey.html

John Barleycorn lo spirito del grano

Read the post in English

John Barleycorn (in italiano Giovanni Chicco d’Orzo) è una canzone tradizionale diffusa in Inghilterra e in Scozia, incentrata su questo personaggio popolare, incarnazione dello spirito della birra e del whisky. (vedi) Esistono diverse versioni testuali raccolte in varie epoche; la più antica che si conosce risale al 1460.
Come spesso accade con le ballate più popolari si parla di famiglia in riferimento ad un insieme di testi e melodie collegati tra di loro o imparentati.

Il diagramma tracciato da Pete Wood è ben documentato e si rimanda al suo John Barleycorn revisited per l’approfondimento: la prima ballata che identifica un uomo con lo spirito dell’orzo è Allan-a-Maut (Allan del Malto) e proviene dalla Scozia.
La prima ballata che riporta il nome John Barleycorn è invece del 1624, stampata a Londra “A Pleasant new Ballad.To be sung evening and morn, of the bloody murder of Sir John Barleycorn” abbreviata in The Pleasant Ballad: come sottolinea Pete Wood, tutti gli elementi che caratterizzano la versione attuale della ballata sono già presenti, il giuramento dei cavalieri per uccidere John, la pioggia che lo disseta, e il sole che lo riscalda per dargli energia, il mugnaio che lo macina tra due pietre.

Originale screenprint by Paul Bommer (da qui)

LA MORTE-RINASCITA DEL RE ORZO

spirito-granoSi narra la morte del Re dell’Orzo secondo miti e credenze che risalgono all’inizio della civiltà contadina, usanze che sono state seguite in Inghilterra in queste forme fino ai primi decenni del ‘900.
Secondo James George Frazier ne “Il ramo d’oro”, anticamente “John” era scelto tra i giovani della tribù e trattato come un re per un anno; al tempo prestabilito era però ucciso, seguendo un macabro rituale: il suo corpo veniva trascinato per i campi in modo che il sangue imbevesse la terra e nutrisse l’orzo.

Più recentemente nella tradizione celtica contadina lo spirito del grano entrava nel mietitore che tagliava l’ultimo covone (e simbolicamente uccideva il dio) e doveva essere sacrificato proprio con le modalità descritte nella canzone (o quantomeno in modo figurato e simbolico). continua
Tuttavia lo spirito del Grano-Orzo non muore mai perchè rinasce l’anno successivo con il nuovo raccolto, la sua forza e il suo ardore sono contenuti nel whisky che si ottiene dalla distillazione del malto d’orzo!

JOHN BARLEYCORN

In merito alla melodia Pete Wood osserva:
“The Pleasant ballad” was set to the tune “Shall I Lie Beyond Thee?” on the broadside.63  This tune is quoted by a number of sources by a variety of very similar titles, including “Lie Lulling Beyond Thee” .  It is this writer’s belief from a variety of considerations, including Simpson 64 that these are one and the same tune.  There has been some confusion regarding the use of the tune “Stingo” for various members of the family.  Several publications say that John Barleycorn should be sung to this tune, (including Dixon), and some people have assumed this was the tune for “The Pleasant Ballad.”  These impressions seem to have originated from Chappell 65, who meant that “Stingo” was the tune for another member of the family “The Little Barleycorne”, a view which accords with his own comments on the version in the Roxburghe Ballads 66, with Simpson, and Baring-Gould who says ‘[Stingo] is not the air used in the broadsides nor in the west of England’ 67.  Two further tunes, “The Friar & the Nun” and “Twas when the seas were roaring”, are mentioned by Simpson.  Mas Mault has been suggested to be set to the tune “Triumph and Joy”, the original title of “Greensleeves”. 68

In realtà ben 45 diverse melodie sono state utilizzate nei secoli per questa ballata, e Pete Wood analizza le quattro melodie più diffuse.

 MELODIA 1

La versione di John Stafford del 1906 pubblicata da Sharp in English Folk Songs è probabilmente la melodia che più si avvicina all’epoca di Giacomo I
The Young Tradition

MELODIA DIVES AND LAZARUS

La versione di Shepherd Haden diventata “standard” per essere stata inclusa nel The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs.
Traffic (nel video con molte antiche stampe e immagini in tema) una versione che non ha perso per nulla il suo smalto! Imparata da Mike Waterson

 

testo Traffic
I
There was three men come out of the West
Their fortunes for to try
And these three men made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn(1) must die.
II
They ploughed, they sowed, they harrowed him in
Throwing clods all on his head
And these three men made a solemn vow
John barleycorn was Dead.
III
They’ve left him in the ground for a very long time
Till the rains from heaven did fall
Then little Sir John’s sprung up his head
And so amazed them all
IV
They’ve left him in the ground till the Midsummer
Till he’s grown both pale and wan
Then little Sir John’s grown a long, long beard
And so become a man.
V
They hire’d men with their scythes so sharp
To cut him off at the knee.
They’ve bound him and tied him around the waist
Serving him most barb’rously
VI
They hire’d men with their sharp pitch-forks
To prick him to the heart
But the drover he served him worse than that
For he’s bound him to the cart.
VII
They’ve rolled him around and around the field
Till they came unto a barn
And there they made a solemn mow
Of Little Sir John Barleycorn
VIII
They’ve hire’d men with their crab-tree sticks
To strip him skin from bone
But the miller, he served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
IX
Here’s Little sir John in the nut-brown bowl(2)
And brandy in the glass
But Little Sir John in the nut-brown bowl’s
Proved the stronger man at last
X
For the hunts man he can’t hunt the fox
Nor so loudly blow his horn
And the tinker, he can’t mend Kettles or pots
Without a little of Sir John Barleycorn.
Traduzione italiana di Alberto Truffi
I
C’erano tre uomini che venivano da occidente,
per tentare la fortuna
e questi tre uomini fecero un solenne voto:
John Barleycorn (1) deve morire.
II
Lo avevano arato, lo avevano seminato, l’avevano ficcato nel terreno
e avevano gettato zolle di terra sulla sua testa e questi tre uomini fecero un voto solenne
John Barleycorn era morto.
III
Lo lasciarono giacere per un tempo molto lungo,
fino a che scese la pioggia dal cielo
e il piccolo sir John tirò fuori la sua testa
e lasciò tutti di stucco.
IV
L’avevano lasciato steso fino al giorno di mezza estate
e fino ad allora lui era sembrato pallido e smorto e al piccolo sir John crebbe una lunga lunga barba e
così divenne un uomo.
V
Avevano assoldato uomini con falci veramente affilate
per tagliargli via il collo
l’avevano avvolto e legato tutto attorno,
trattandolo nel modo più brutale.
VI
Avevano assoldato uomini con i loro forconi affilati
che l’avevano conficcato nella terra
e il caricatore lo trattò peggio
di tutti
perché lo legò al carro.
VII
Andarono con il carro tutto intorno al campo
finchè arrivarono al granaio
e fecero un solenne giuramento
sul povero John Barleycorn.
VIII
Assoldarono uomini con bastoni uncinati
per strappargli via la pelle dalle ossa
e il mugnaio lo trattò
peggio di tutti
perché lo pressò tra due pietre.
IX
E il piccolo sir John con la sua botte di noce (2)
e la sua acquavite nel bicchiere
e il piccolo sir John con la sua botte di noce
dimostrò che era l’uomo più forte.
X
Dopo tutto il cacciatore non può suonare il suo corno
così forte per cacciare la volpe
e lo stagnaio non può riparare un bricco o una pentola
senza un piccolo (sorso) di grano d’orzo.
NOTE
(1) John Grano d’Orzo, personificazione del whisky e della birra
(2) La botte di legno di noce o di rovere usata tutt’oggi per invecchiare il whisky

Jethro Tull live

Damh The Bard in The Hills They Are Hollow

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODIA 3

La versione di Robert Pope ripresa da Vaughan Williams nel suo Folk Song Suite
versione per coro e orchestra

JOHN BARLEYCORN, MELODIA 4

come collezionata nel Shropshire
Fred Jordan live

 

Jean-François Millet - Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868
Jean-François Millet – Buckwheat Harvest Summer 1868

JOHN BARLEYCORN, LA VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS

La versione pubblicata da Robert Burns nel 1782, rielabora l’antico canto popolare e diventa la base delle successive versioni (vedi inizio)

Le prima 3 strofe sono simili alla versione standard, a parte i tre re che arrivano dall’oriente per fare il solenne giuramento di uccidere John Barleycorn, infatti nella versione inglese i tre uomini arrivano dall’Ovest: a me personalmente l’ipotesi che Burnes volesse indicare i 3 Re Magi … sembra poco pertinente al profondo substrato pagano della storia: non è certo il Cristianesimo (o il culto del Dio della Luce) a voler uccidere il Re del Grano, a meno che non si voglia identificare il re del Grano con il Cristo (un “blasfemo” paragone che è stato subito rimosso dalle successive versioni).

La storia è la dettagliata trasformazione dello spirito del grano, cresciuto forte e sano durante l’estate, mietuto e trebbiato appena arriva l’autunno, e trasformato in alcol; e la molto più dettagliata descrizione (sempre rispetto alla versione standard) dei piaceri che esso fornisce agli uomini, affinchè essi possano trarre dalla bevanda ebbrezza ed ispirazione. Burns fu notoriamente un grande estimatore di whisky e l’ultima strofa è proprio nel suo stile!

La melodia indicata è Lull[e] Me Beyond Thee alte melodie che si adattano al testo sono “Stingo” (John Playford, 1650) e “Up in the Morning Early
La versione dei Tickawinda riprende in parte il testo cantando le strofe I, II, III, V, VII, XV

Testo di Robert Burns
I
There was three kings into the east,
Three kings both great and high,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn should die.
II
They took a  plough and plough’d him down,
Put clods upon his head,
And they hae sworn a solemn oath
John Barleycorn was dead
III
But the cheerful Spring came kindly on,
And show’rs began to fall;
John Barleycorn got up again,
And sore surpris’d them all
IV
The sultry suns  of Summer came,
And he grew  thick and strong,
His head weel   arm’d wi’ pointed spears,
That no one  should him wrong.
V
The sober Autumn enter’d mild,
When he grew wan and pale;
His bending joints and drooping head
Show’d he began to fail.
VI
His coulour sicken’d more and more,
He faded into age;
And then his enemies began
To show their deadly rage.
VII
They’ve taen a weapon, long and sharp,
And cut him by the knee;
Then ty’d him fast upon a cart,
Like a rogue for forgerie(1).
VIII
They laid him down upon his back,
And cudgell’d him full sore;
They hung him up before the storm,
And turn’d him o’er and o’er.
IX
They filled up a darksome pit
With water to the brim,
They heaved in John Barleycorn,
There let him sink or swim
X
They laid him out upon the floor,
To work him farther woe,
And still, as signs of life appear’d,
They toss’d him to and fro.
XI
They wasted, o’er a scorching flame,
The marrow of his bones;
But a Miller us’d him worst of all,
For he crush’d him between two stones.
XII
And they hae taen his very heart’s blood,
And drank it round and round;
And still the more and more they drank,
Their joy did more abound.
XIII
John Barleycorn was a hero bold,
Of noble enterprise,
For if you do but taste his blood,
‘Twill make your courage rise.
XIV
‘Twill make a man forget his woe;
‘Twill heighten all his joy:
‘Twill make the widow’s heart to sing,
Tho’ the tear were in her eye.
XV
Then let us toast John Barleycorn,
Each man a glass in hand;
And may his great posterity
Ne’er fail in old Scotland!
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre re dall’oriente,
tre grandi re e potenti
e fecero un voto solenne:
John Barleycorn deve morire.
II
Presero un aratro e lo ararono,
gettarono zolle di terra sulla sua testa
e fecero un voto solenne
John Barleycorn era morto.
III
Ma la dolce primavera venne
e la pioggia scese dal cielo
John Barleycorn si alzò di nuovo
e lasciò tutti di stucco
IV
Venne il sole afoso d’Estate,
e lui crebbe robusto e forte
con la testa irta di lance appuntite
e che nessuno gli dia torto.
V
L’Autunno serio arrivò mite
allora lui divenne pallido e smorto
piegato alle giunture e la testa cadente
aveva incominciato a deperire.
VI
Il suo incarnato sbiadiva sempre più,
lui iniziò a invecchiare
e i suoi nemici cominciarono
a mostrare la loro furia mortale.
VII
Avevano preso una falce, lunga e affilata,
per tagliarlo al ginocchio;
poi lo legarono in fretta su un carro
come un ladro per il patibolo.
VIII
Lo hanno adagiato sulla schiena
e colpito con un randello;
lo hanno appeso prima del temporale
e lo hanno rigirato ancora ed ancora.
IX
Hanno riempito una fossa buia
con acqua fino all’orlo
e ci hanno gettato John Barleycorn
lì lo lasciarono a nuotare o ad affondare.
X
Lo hanno gettato sul pavimento
per procurargli ancora più dolore,
e ancora, mentre lui dava segni di vita
lo hanno gettato avanti e indietro.
XI
Hanno bruciato sulla fiamma
il midollo delle sue ossa;
ma il Mugnaio lo trattò peggio di tutti
perché lo pressò tra due pietre
XII
Ed essi avevano preso il suo sangue d’eroe
e lo bevvero rigirando (il bicchiere)
e ancora più lo bevevano
più gioia ricevevano.
XIII
John Barleycorn era un eroe coraggioso
di nobile ardire
perciò se tu assaggerai il suo sangue
il tuo coraggio crescerà.
XIV
Egli fa dimenticare all’uomo il suo dolore,
aumentare ogni sua gioia:
egli fa cantare il cuore della vedova
sebbene abbia le lacrime agli occhi
XV
Allora brindiamo a John Barleycorn
tutti con un bicchiere in mano
e che la sua grande discendenza
non possa mai mancare nella vecchia Scozia!

NOTA
1) i condannati a morte erano trasportati sul luogo del patibolo su di un carro per il pubblico dileggio

Steeleye Span in Below the Salt 1972 (la versione inglese)


I (Spoken)
There were three men
Came from the west
Their fortunes for to tell,
And the life of John Barleycorn as well.
II
They laid him in three furrows deep,
Laid clods upon his head,
Then these three man made a solemn vow
John Barleycorn was dead.
III
The let him die for a very long time
Till the rain from heaven did fall,
Then little Sir John sprang up his head
And he did amaze them all.
IV
They let him stand till the midsummer day,
Till he looked both pale and wan.
The little Sir John he grew a long beard
And so became a man.
CHORUS:
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Fa la la la lay o
Fa la la la, it’s a lovely day
Sing fa la la la lay
V
They have hired men with the scythes so sharp,
To cut him off at the knee,
The rolled him and they tied him around the waist,
They served him barbarously.
VI
They have hired men with the crab-tree sticks,
To cut him skin from bone,
And the miller has served him worse than that,
For he’s ground him between two stones.
VII
They’ve wheeled him here,
they’ve wheeled him there,
They’ve wheeled him to a barn,
And thy have served him worse than that,
They’ve bunged him in a vat.
VIII
They have worked their will on John Barleycorn
But he lived to tell the tale,
For they pour him out of an old brown jug
And they call him home brewed ale(1).
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I (Parlato)
C’erano tre uomini
che venivano da occidente,
per tentare sia la fortuna
che la vita di John Barleycorn
II
Lo hanno steso in tre solchi profondi
e ricoperto con zolle di terra
e quei tre uomini fecero un giuramento solenne,
John Barleycorn era  morto.
III
Lo lasciarono giacere per un tempo molto lungo, fino a che scese la pioggia dal cielo e il piccolo sir John tirò fuori la sua testa e lasciò tutti di stucco
IV
Lo lasciarono riposare fino al giorno di mezza estate, e fino ad allora lui era sembrato pallido e smorto e al piccolo sir John crebbe una lunga barba e così divenne un uomo
Ritornello
Fa la la la, che bel giorno
canta fa la la la lay
Fa la la la, che bel giorno
canta fa la la la lay
V
Avevano assoldato uomini con falci veramente affilate
per tagliarlo all’altezza del ginocchio,
l’avevano avvolto e legato tutto attorno ai fianchi,
trattandolo nel modo più brutale.
VI
Assoldarono uomini con bastoni uncinati
per strappargli via la pelle dalle  ossa
e il mugnaio lo trattò peggio di tutti
perché lo pressò tra due pietre
VII
Lo hanno spinto qui
lo hanno spinto là
lo hanno spinto in un fienile
e lo trattarono peggio di tutti
perchè lo tapparono per bene dentro un tino
VIII
Hanno fatto la loro volontà su John Barleycorn
ma lui visse per raccontare la sua storia,
che lo hanno versato in un boccale di coccio
e lo hanno chiamato birra fatta in casa!

NOTA
1) la birra si distingueva in origine in “beer” (con il luppolo) e “ale” (senza luppolo). La bevanda più antica del mondo ottenuta dalla fermentazione di vari cereali. I suoi processi di lavorazione partono da una fermentazione spontanea dell’amido (ossia lo zucchero) prevalente componente nei cereali, quando essi vengono a contatto con l’acqua, a causa dei lieviti selvatici contenuti nell’aria. E così come nel pane, alimento femminile, TERRA, ACQUA, ARIA e FUOCO si combinano magicamente per dare vita a un cibo divino che fortifica e inebria.
Il termine inglese di homebrewing ovvero l’arte della birra fatta in casa si traduce in italiano con un’astrusa parola: domozimurgia e domozimurgo è il produttore di birra casalingo in cui domo, è la radice latina per “casa”; zimurgo è colui il quale pratica la “zimurgia“, ovvero la scienza dei processi di fermentazione. Il domozimurgo quindi è colui che tra le proprie mura domestiche, studia, applica e sperimenta le alchimie della fermentazione. Fare la birra per il proprio autoconsumo (compreso quello degli immancabili amici e parenti) è assolutamente legale oltre che divertente e relativamente semplice sebbene non si finisca mai di imparare attraverso lo scambio delle esperienze e la sperimentazione continua

E infine il COLLAGE  delle versioni di Tickawinda, Avalon Rising, John Renbourn, Lanterna Lucis Viriditatis, Xenis Emputae, Travelling Band, Louis Killen, Traffic

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/barleycorn.htm
http://www.musicaememoria.com/JohnBarleycorn2.htm
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/j_barley.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14888
http://www.omniscrit.com/2013/01/who-was-john-barleycorn-folk-song-and.html

(Cattia Salto – integrazione 2012 e agosto 2013)

THE WILD ROVER

wild-roverThe Wild Rover è una classica canzone da marinai, da cantare durante le colossali bevute nei pub. Le sue origini sono controverse, ma gli irlandesi Dubliners l’hanno resa famosa in tutto il mondo.
Il wild rover è un  vagabondo donnaiolo a cui piace bere e in una semplice parola (dato il contesto) il termine si può tradurre come “ubriacone”

Scrive Malcom Douglas su Mudcat “The Wild Rover as we know it today started out as an English broadside song of the early 19th (just possibly late 18th) century; this however was a re-write, much shortened, of an earlier song by Thomas Lanfiere. Lanfiere wrote a whole series of sermonising tavern or “goodfellows” songs in the latter part of the 17th century” (tratto da qui)
Il “sermone” in questione s’intitola “The Good Fellow’s Resolution; Or, The Bad Husband’s return from his Folly” come trascritto in Roxburghe Ballads (vol VI 1889).

UN RICHIAMO ALLA TEMPERANZA

Il brano ci consegna un’immagine un po’ stereotipata dello spirito irlandese gran bevitore e ricco di sarcasmo, ma un’altra lettura propende a voler credere ai buoni propositi che il ragazzo esprime nel finale e quindi a prendere la canzone come un richiamo alla temperanza, per la verità non seguito dagli ascoltatori che cantano la canzone sorseggiando svariati bicchieri di birra. In effetti il brano è immancabilmente eseguito negli spettacoli dal vivo nei pub irlandesi, con il ritornello da cantare con il coretto del pubblico.

Il protagonista passa le giornate al pub spendendo tutti i soldi in whisky e birra: perciò è sempre al verde. Il ragazzo descrive, con toni scherzosi, l’imbarazzante situazione di chiedere credito e di vederselo negare, così promette a se stesso di cambiare stile di vita, ma quando si trova ad avere qualche soldo in tasca, non riesce a rinunciare alle attenzioni della proprietaria del locale.

ASCOLTA The Dubliners

ASCOLTA The High Kings

I
I’ve been a wild rover for many’s the year,
And I’ve spent all my money on whiskey and beer,
But now I’ve returned with gold in great store,
And I never will play the wild rover no more.
CHORUS
And it’s no, nay, never
No, nay(1), never, no more,
will I play the wild rover
No never, no more.
II
I went into an ale house(2) I used to frequent,
And I told the landlady(3) my money was spent.
I asked her for credit, but she answered me “Nay.
Such custom like yours
I could have any day.”
III
I took from my pocket ten sovereigns bright,
And the landlady’s eyes opened wide with delight,
She said, “I have whiskeys and wines of the best,
and I’ll take you upstairs, and I’ll show you the rest (4).”
IV
I’ll go home to my parents, confess what I’ve done,
And I’ll ask them to pardon their prodigal son.
And if they caress me as oft times before,
I never will play the wild rover no more (5)!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sono stato per anni un ubriacone,
e ho speso tutti i miei soldi in whiskey e birra,
ma ora che sono tornato con una palata di soldi,
non farò più l’ubriacone,
mai più.
RITORNELLO
E no, no, mai, no,
no, mai, 
non più
non farò più l’ubriacone

No, mai, non più.
II
Entrai nella birreria che ero solito frequentare,
e dissi alla padrona che avevo speso tutti i soldi,
le chiesi di farmi credito, ma lei mi rispose: “No,
di clienti come te
ne posso trovare ogni  giorno”
III
Tirai fuori dalla tasca dieci sovrane luccicanti,
e gli occhi della padrona si spalancarono dalla gioia,
lei disse “Ho whiskey e vini
dei migliori,
ti riporto al piano di sopra,
e ti faccio vedere il resto.”
IV
Tornerò a casa dai miei genitori, confesserò quello che ho fatto,
e chiederò loro di perdonare il figliol prodigo,
e quando mi coccoleranno come ai vecchi tempi,
allora non mi verrà più voglia di fare l’ubriacone!

NOTE
1) nay: forma arcaica e colloquiale della negazione no
2) alehouse: letteralmente, “casa dei distillati”; si tratta di una antica forma dialettale, sinonimo di “pub”, “bar” o “birreria”
3) landlady: colloquiale per “padrona”, “proprietaria”
4) oppure dice: And the words that I spoke sure were only in jest (stavo solo scherzando!)
5) il ragazzo è certo che, tornando a casa dai suoi genitori, il loro affetto unito al perdono gli farà smettere di condurre uno stile di vita così sconsiderato: o è solo una promessa da marinaio?

La stessa situazione è ripresa anche in un canto in gaelico irlandese Níl sé ‘na lá.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31678
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thewildrover.html

NANCY WHISKY I CHANCED TO SMELL

La canzone “Nancy Whisky”, anche detta “Calton Weaver”, narra di un uomo che lascia il lavoro di tessitore per darsi al commercio ambulante; ben presto a Glasgow incontra  “Nancy Whisky” cioè la bottiglia di whisky; dopo sette anni di una vita dedita all’alcol,   ritorna a fare il tessitore a Calton (o si ripromette di tornare a lavorare) per convincere i suoi compagni a non rovinarsi con il bere.

La prima data di pubblicazione di questa canzone è il 1907,   come compare nella raccolta scozzese di Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection   vol.3, # 603; molte sono però le varianti tramandate e riprodotte nelle   interpretazioni di un buon numero di artisti: in alcune versioni Calton è sostituita con la città di Dublino e la scrittura di whisky prende la e come il tradizionale irish whiskey.

ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm, la versione più gettonata ai nostri tempi, che inizia con un lungo reel strumentale e poi sviluppa la canzone con il solo ritmo incalzante e più veloce delle percussioni

ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl dall’Lp “Second Shift” 1958, per un sapore più d’antan, pare sia stato lo stesso MacColl ad abbinare l’attuale melodia al testo

Il ritornello che segue ogni strofa sembra esortare Nancy  a versare ancora del whisky da bere!:
Oh. whisky, whisky, Nancy whisky,
Whisky, whisky, Nancy, oh!


VERSIONE STANDARD
I
I’m a weaver, a Calton (1)  weaver
I’m a rash and a roving blade
I’ve got siller in my poaches(2),
I’ll gang(3) and follow the roving trade
II
As I cam’ in by Glesca(4) city,
Nancy Whisky I chanced to smell,
So I gaed(3) in, sat doon beside her,
Seven lang years I lo’ed her well
III
The mair(5) I kissed her the mair I lo’ed her,
The mair I kissed her the mair she smiled,
And I forgot my mither’s teaching,
Nancy soon had me beguiled.
IV(standard)
I woke up early in the morning,
To slake my drouth(6) it was my need,
I tried to rise but I wasna able,
For Nancy had me by the heid.
IV (Gaelic   storm)
Woke up  early in the mornin’,
lying half way off the bed.
I tried to rise but was not able
Nancy damn near knocked me dead
V
C’wa, landlady, whit’s the lawin'(7)?
Tell me whit there is to pay.”
“Fifteen shillings is the reckoning,
Pay me quickly and go away.”
VI
As I gaed oot by Glesca city,
Nancy Whisky I chanced to smell;
I gaed in drank four and sixpence,
A’t(8) was left was
a crooked scale(98).
VII
I’ll gang back to the Calton weaving,
I’ll surely mak’ the shuttles fly;
For I’ll mak’ mair at the Calton weaving
Than ever I did in a roving way.
VIII
Come all ye weavers, Calton weavers,
A’ ye weavers where e’er ye be;
Beware of whisky, Nancy whisky,
She’ll ruin you as she ruined me.

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un tessitore, un tessitore di Calton (1), un giovanotto spericolato e vagabondo, ho fatto un po’ di grana (2)
e seguirò il commercio ambulante.
II
Mentre venivo a Glasgow, il Whisky di Nancy mi capitò di annusare,
così andai a sedermi accanto a lei, per sette lunghi anni molto l’amai.
III
Più la baciavo,
più l’amavo,
più la baciavo,
più lei sorrideva
e dimenticai gli insegnamenti di mia madre, Nancy mi aveva subito sedotto.
IV (versione standard)
Mi svegliavo all’alba, avevo bisogno di spegnere la mia  sete, cercavo di alzarmi ma non ci riuscivo, perchè Nancy mi teneva per la testa.
IV (versione Gaelic Storm)
Mi svegliavo all’albastando mezzo fuori dal letto. Cercavo di alzarmi ma non ci riuscivo, Nancy maledettamente vicina mi stendeva come morto.
V
“Allora, signora, quant’è il conto?
Mi dica quanto c’è da pagare”
“15 scellini è il conteggio,
pagatemi subito e andatevene”
VI
Mentre andavo via da Glasgow,
il Whisky di Nancy mi capitò di annusare, mi stavo ubriacando con quattro (scellini) e sei penny, tutto ciò che lasciai furono sei penny falsi.
VI
Ritornerò alla tessitura di Calton,
di certo farò volare quelle spolette,
perché farò più da tessitore a Calton, di quando feci come ambulante
VIII
Così venite tutti voi tessitori di Calton,
venite tessitori ovunque voi siate,
attenzione al whisky, al whisky di Nancy, lei vi rovinerà come ha rovinato me

NOTE:
(1) Calton, erroneamente  scritto come Carlton in alcuni testi, è un villaggio-comunità di tessitori inglobato a  Glasgow all’inizio del 20° secolo, noto per essere stato nel 1787, il luogo del primo  sciopero operaio,  e teatro di ulteriori proteste durante l’800. La  canzone però non accenna a questioni salariali o sociali.
(2) siller: silver, money letteralmente “ho soldi in tasca”
(3) gang – gaed: go
(4) Glesca: Glasgow
(5) mair: more
(6) drouth: thirst
(7) lawin: bill in an inn
(8) a’t: all that
(9) scale: sixpence

Un’altra versione non fa riferimento all’attività di tessitore del nostro protagonista, ma si evidenzia la sua dipendenza dall’alcol.

ASCOLTA Shane MacGowan & The Popes in The Snake 1994 (il primo album da solista dell’ex Pogues)


I
As I went down through Glasgow city
Just to see what I might spy
What should I see but Nancy Whiskey
A playful twinkle in her eye
Whiskey, Whiskey, Nancy Whiskey
Whiskey, Whiskey, Nancy Ohh
II
I bought her, I drank her, I had another
Ran out of money, so I did steal
She ran me ragged, Nancy Whiskey
For seven years, a rollin’ wheel (1)
III
The more I held her, the more I loved her/Nancy had her spell on me
All I knew was lovely Nancy
The things I needed I could not see
IV
As I awoke to slake my thirst
As I tried crawling from my bed
I fell down flat, I could not stagger
Nancy had me by the legs
V
Come on landlandy (2), what’s the owing
Tell me what there is to pay
Fifteen shillings that’s the reckoning
Now pay me quickly and go away
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre oltrepassavo Glasgow,
solo per curiosità,
che ti vidi se non Nancy Whiskey
dagli occhi che brillano maliziosi?
Whiskey, Whiskey, Nancy Whiskey
Whiskey, Whiskey, Nancy Oh

II
L’ho comprata, bevuta e preso un’altra,
finiti i soldi, ho allora rubato, mi ha ridotto a uno straccio Nancy Whiskey, per sette anni, una girandola
III
Più la stringevo, più l’amavo, Nancy mi ha stregato, tutto ciò che conoscevo era la bella Nancy, le cose di cui avevo bisogno non riuscivo a vedere
IV
Appena mi svegliavo per placare la sete, provavo a sgattaiolare fuori dal letto, ma cadevo disteso e non riuscivo a mettermi in piedi, Nancy mi teneva per le gambe
V
“Allora, signora, quant’è il conto?
Mi dica quanto c’è da pagare”
“15 scellini è il conteggio,
pagatemi subito e andatevene”

NOTE:
1) lettaralmente “una ruota che gira” banderuola, girandola
2) la locandiera

FONTI
Lo sciopero a Calton del 1787: il primo sciopero industriale di Glasgow contro la riduzione dei salari continua

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=125898
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50701

MOUNTAIN DEW, IL WHISK(E)Y AL CHIARO DI LUNA

In Irlanda con mountain dew (letteralmente “rugiada di montagna”) ma anche moonshine si intende il whiskey illegale, detto anche Póitín o Poteen, distillato abusivamente dai contadini irlandesi o dagli spiriti liberi in luoghi solitari, sulle alture o nelle paludi, al chiaro di luna (cioè di nascosto). Per non pagare le tasse imposte dal governo britannico sull’alcol.
La produzione di Póitín ancorchè clandestina è stata una discreta fonte di reddito in Scozia e nella parte occidentale dell’Irlanda più povera o presso le comunità dei pescatori anch’essi assoggettati ad una vita grama.

Una leggenda narra di come San Patrizio avendo finito il vino per celebrare l’eucarestia lo sostituisse con del distillato d’orzo, d’altra parte proprio al Santo si attribuisce la paternità del whiskey avendo portato l’alambicco in Irlanda dall’Oriente nel V sec: l’alambicco, all’epoca utilizzato per produrre i profumi, fu convertito dai monaci irlandesi in divina macchina per distillare l’Uisce Beathe (in gaelico “acqua di vita”).

Irish Poitin StillPer preparare il Póitín (dal nome dell’alambicco che assomiglia ad una specie di tinozza portatile detta pot still) a fronte di una buona dose di esperienza e pazienza, ci vogliono pochi ingredienti e pochi strumenti, facilmente smantellabili al primo segno di pericolo. Gli ingredienti sono: orzo (ma anche patate o altri cereali), acqua pura di sorgente, lievito, zucchero grezzo o melassa (e/o frutta molto zuccherina) . Attualmente in Irlanda solo alcune distillerie hanno ottenuto la licenza per produrre il Poitin inglesizzato in Pothcheen o Putcheen con gradazione alcolica che parte dal 40% e arriva al 90%: quello di produzione casalinga può arrivare anche al 95% di grado alcolemico (la liberalizzazione risale al 1997).

Di sapore più floreale e fruttato rispetto al whiskey, anche con sentori di erba, le varianti nella lavorazione sono molteplici e segrete, tuttavia in rete ho trovato varie ricette sul sito di homedistiller.org, dal quale si stralciano le osservazioni dell’autore tradotte in breve: “Credo che il Poitin inizialmente fosse prodotto dal whiskey di malto d’orzo con la torba come fonte di calore. Poi per abbattere i costi (come nella prassi scozzese) si utilizzò il malto d’orzo o di altri cereali (frumento, avena, segale). Nelle ricette antiche è indicato l’uso di melassa e di zucchero integrale (una nota dice dal 1880). Oggi si usano orzo, zucchero, o anche barbabietola da zucchero. Immagino che si utilizzassero le patate non buone da mangiare. Una volta le patate erano alla base della dieta irlandese (nel 1845 il consumo pro capite era pari ai cinque kili giornalieri) e anche oggi giorno sono consumati annualmente 140 kg pro capite. Un acro di terra potrebbe sfamare una famiglia per un anno. Grandi fattorie coltivavano il grano utilizzato anche come moneta di scambio. Quindi la materia base del poitin è tutta una questione di convenienza e di economia. Dubito che le patate fossero utilizzate prima del 1900, l’epoca in cui divennero l’ingrediente principale della vodka in Estonia. Come per il moonshine americano e il samogon russo. L’alambicco irlandese e quello scozzese sono simili e hanno in pratica semplificato la forma dell’alambicco degli alchimisti. Una forma simile si trova anche negli U.S.A. probabilmente importato dagli emigranti celtici.”

poteen_still

Terra d’elezione del poitin è Connemara, un’area particolare della Contea di Galway nell’Ovest dell’Irlanda, in parte montagnosa, solitaria e ricca di fiumi, laghi e torbiere. continua

RARE OLD MOUNTAIN DEW

Il testo di questa canzone irlandese è stato scritto nel 1882 da Edward Harrigan per  il dramma inglese “The Blackbird” la musica riprende una melodia  più antica dal nome “The Girl I Left Behind Me” nota anche come “Brighton Camp”.
In questa canzone si decanta la limpidezza di un ruscello (in un luogo segreto) da cui il nostro contadino prende l’acqua indispensabile per la produzione del distillato, ben felice che ci sia molta torba nei pressi per riscaldare l’alambicco, e ci dice, tutto contento:
By the smoke and the smell you can plainly tell
that there’s poitin brewin’, nearby
purtroppo  proprio  i segnali di fumo che si innalzavano nei luoghi solitari erano l’indice, puntato nel cielo, che i poliziotti seguivano per scovare i distillatori abusivi! Così   i giorni preferiti per la distillazione erano quelli ventosi o nuvolosi.

ELISIR DI LUNGA VITA

Al poitin si attribuiscono poteri di guarigione da tutti i mali (utilizzato più comunemente come digestivo o per la cura del raffreddore), è considerato più genericamente un elisir   contro l’invecchiamento, ma il suo scopo principale è quello di “deliziare il cuore” o più   poeticamente “bring a shock of joy  to the blood” ( in italiano: “dare una scossa di gioia al sangue”).

Numerosissimi gli interpreti della canzone a partire dai Dubliners
e l’altra versione che vi propongo è quella di Foster&Allen   (storico duo irlandese di musica folk), in uno scanzonato video in cui due allegri contadini, al posto del latte, bevono e producono il mountain dew!!


CHORUS
Hi the dithery al   the dal, dal the dal the dithery al, al the dal, dal dithery al dee (x2)
I
Let grasses grow and waters flow in a free and  easy way (1)
Give me enough of the rare old stuff that’s made near Galway Bay
And policemen(2) all from Donegal, Sligo, and Leitrim too
We’ll give them the slip and we’ll take a sip of  the Real Old Mountain Dew.
II
At the foot of the hill there’s a neat little still where the smoke curls up to the sky
By the smoke and the smell you can plainly tell that there’s poitin brewin’, nearby.
For it fills the air with a perfume rare and betwixt both me and you
As home we stroll we can take a bowl or a bucket of Mountain Dew.
III
Now learned men as use the pen have writ the praises high
Of the rare poitin from Ireland green distilled from wheat and rye
Away with your pills, it’ll cure all ills, be ye Pagan, Christian, or Jew
So take off your coat and grease your throat with a Bucket of Mountain Dew.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Hi the dithery al   the dal, dal the dal the dithery al, al the dal, dal dithery al dee
I
Che l’erba cresca e  i fiumi scorrano secondo natura, datemi quanto basta della roba vecchia e rara che si fa vicino alla Baia di Galway e a tutti i  poliziotti dal Donegal, Sligo e anche Leitrim, gli daremo il  benservito e ci prenderemo un sorso della buon vecchia “Rugiada di Montagna”.
II
Ai piedi della collina c’è un ruscelletto limpido, dove il fumo si arriccia verso il  cielo, dando un’annusata al fumo si  può chiaramente dire che c’è il poitin in preparazione nelle vicinanze. Perché riempie  l’aria con un profumo raro e tra te e me in cammino verso casa,, possiamo berci una boccia o un secchio di  “Rugiada di Montagna”.
III
Ora giacchè gli uomini saggi usano la penna, scrivendo alte lodi del raro poitin dalla verde Irlanda, distillato dall’orzo e dalla segale,
buttate via le vostre pillole, (il poitin) cura tutti i mali, che siate pagani, cristiani o ebrei;
così prendete il vostro giaccone e bagnatevi la gola con un secchio di “Rugiada di Montagna”.


NOTE
1) letteralemente “liberi e come vogliono” la frase è allusiva, anche il nostro moonshiner vuole essere libero di fare come gli pare, secondo natura
2) in alcune varianti la parola  “poliziotti” è sostituita con “gougers” termine dialettale irlandese che indica  dei compagni di bevute “tosti”

FONTI
http://homedistiller.org/grain/wash-grain2/poitin
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/mountain-dew.htm

THE MOONSHINER: THE LAST FREE SPIRIT

moonshinerMoonshine è un tipo di whisky fatto in casa e moonshiner è colui che fabbrica il whisky da sé, ovvero abusivamente, al chiarore di luna.
Dimenticato dopo il proibizionismo il “moonshine” è ritornato di moda, specialmente in America e non è mai tramontato in Irlanda.
Un po’ come la proliferazione delle microbirrerie anche le microdistillerie si stanno diffondendo man mano che vanno a cedere le restrizioni sulle licenze e i monopoli.

WHITE DOG OR MOUNTAIN DEW?

Il whisky dei moonshiner è chiamato in gergo “white dog” più simile all’acquavite, perché finisce in bottiglia senza invecchiamento in botte, e quindi è “bianco” cioè trasparente.
Da noi nel Nord Italia per tradizione si produce la grappa per autoconsumo (con tutte le “graspe” che avanzano dalla produzione del vino!), mentre in Irlanda il Póitín o Poteen, è illegale dal 1661.  Secondo la tradizione, oltre che dall’orzo si distilla da more e altri frutti del bosco, ma anche dalle patate -per inciso dalle patate si ricava anche il vino, leggetevi “Vino, patate mele rosse” – Joanne Harris (titolo inglese Blackberry Wine). La sua secolare tradizione di segretezza e proibizione è divenuta parte del folklore rurale irlandese. continua

Così nella canzone THE MOONSHINER non c’è solo la spensieratezza di un vagabondo girovago, ma anche lo spirito di ribellione dell’irlandese verso l’Inghilterra che aveva il monopolio sul whiskey o le leggi sul Proibizionismo in America.

poteen_still
La canzone è nata probabilmente in America da emigranti irlandesi ed è poi tornata in Irlanda a far parte della tradizione popolare (ma l’origine potrebbe benissimo essere irlandese e poi trasportata in America). Il tono è quello di uno spirito libero che vagabonda per il paese senza radici e al di fuori dalla società civile, il suo unico interesse è il liquore distillato illegalmente!!

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: THE MOONSHINER

ASCOLTA Tommy Makem + The Clancy Brothers La melodia è molto alla “Popeye saylor man” la canzoncina cantate da Braccio di Ferro nei suoi primi comic cartoons.

ASCOLTA Maureen Carroll in una versione meno cadenzata e più sognante


chorus
I’m a rambler, I’m a gambler,
I’m a long way from home
And if you don’t like me,
Well, leave me alone
I’ll eat when I’m hungry,
I’ll drink when I’m dry
And if moonshine don’t kill me,
I’ll live til I die(1)
I
I’ve been a moonshiner
for many a year
I’ve spent all me money
on whiskey and beer
I’ll go to some hollow,
I’ll set up my still
And I’ll make you a gallon
for a ten shilling bill
II
I’ll go to some hollow
in this count-er-y
Ten gallons of wash
I can go on a spree
No women to follow,
the world is all mine
I love none so well
as I love the moonshine
III
Oh, moonshine, dear moonshine,
oh, how I love thee
You killed me old father,
but ah you try me
Now bless all moonshiners
and bless all moonshine
Their breath smells as sweet
as the dew on the vine 
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
CORO
Sono un vagabondo, sono un giocatore
sono molto lontano da casa,
e se non vi piaccio,
beh, lasciatemi in pace.
Mangerò quando ho fame
e berrò quando ho sete
e se il liquore non mi ammazza prima,
vivrò tanto a lungo (1).
I
Sono stato un contrabbandiere
per molti anni
ho speso tutti i miei soldi
in whiskey e birra.
Andrò da qualche parte
a metter su la mia distilleria
e ve ne farò una damigiana
per 10 scellini.
II
Andrò da qualche parte
in questo paese
con una damigiana di roba
a prendermi una sbronza.
Non ho donna da seguire
e il mondo è tutto mio,
niente mi piace così tanto
quanto il liquore di contrabbando.
III
Oh liquore oh liquore
quanto mi piaci!
Hai ucciso il mio vecchio,
inoltre ci provi con me.
Benedetti tutti i contrabbandieri,
benedetto il liquore di contrabbando,
il loro fiato è dolce quanto
la rugiada sulla pianta dell’uva

NOTE
1) letteralmente “vivrò fino alla morte”

VERSIONE AMERICANA: THE MOONSHINER

Nella versione americana ripresa da Bob Dylan e molti altri artisti dell’ambito folk-rock, il canto diventa più lento, quasi un lamento.

ASCOLTA Punch Brothers, in una versione più vicina alla root music e tra i loro live in rete quello che si sente meglio oppure dal Cd “Ahoy”

TESTO Punch Brothers
I
I’ve been a moonshiner
for seventeen long years
I spend all of my money
on whiskey and beer
I’ll go down to some hollow
and set up my still
I’ll sell you a gallon
for a ten dollar bill.
II
I go to some bar room
and drink with my friends
Where the women can’t follow
and see what I spend
God bless that pretty woman,
I wish she was mine
Cause her breath is as sweet
as the dew on the vine.
III
Let me eat when I’m hungry,
let me drink when I’m dry
A dollar when I’m hard up,
religion when I die
The whole world’s a bottle
and life’s but a dram
When the bottle gets empty
it sure ain’t worth a damn.
IV
I’ve been a moonshiner
for seventeen long years
I spend all of my money
on whiskey and beer
If whiskey do not kill me
Then I don’t know what will
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Sono stato un contrabbandiere
per 17 lunghi anni
ho speso tutti i miei soldi
in whiskey e birra.
Andrò da qualche parte
a metter su la mia distilleria abusiva
e ve ne farò una damigiana
per 10 dollari.
II
Vado per bar
a bere con i miei amici
dove le donne non possono seguirmi
e vedere quello che spendo.
Dio benedica quella bella ragazza,
vorrei che fosse mia
perché il suo fiato è dolce
quanto la rugiada sulla pianta dell’uva.
III
Lasciatemi mangiare quando ho fame ,
e bere quando ho sete,
un dollaro quando sono al verde,
la religione quando muoio.
Il mondo intero è una bottiglia
e la vita è solo un bicchierino di whiskey.
Quando la bottiglia è vuota
di certo non vale una cicca.
IV
Sono stato un contrabbandiere
per 17 lunghi anni
ho speso tutti i miei soldi
in whiskey e birra.
e se il bere non mi uccide
allora non so che sarà

ASCOLTA Cat Power dal Cd Moon Pix-1998 (unico traditional dell’album) in versione rock-blues unita a una vena malinconica, cifra stilistica della cantautrice statunitense

TESTO Cat Power
I’ve been a moonshiner
For seventeen long years
I spent all my money
on whisky and beer
I go to some hollow
And set up my holy holy still
If drinking do not kill me
Then I don’t know what will
I go to some bar room
And drink with my friends
If women and men would come to follow
To see what I might spend
God bless them handsome men
I wish they was mine
Their breath is as sweet as
The dew on the holy holy vine
You’re already in hell,
you’re already in hell
I wish we could go to hell
When the bottle gets empty
Then life ain’t worth the drown
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
Sono stata un contrabbandiere
per 17 lunghi anni
ho speso tutti i miei soldi
in whiskey e birra.

Vado da qualche parte
a metter su la mia distilleria
e se il bere non mi uccide
allora non so che sarà.
Vado per bar
a bere con i miei amici,se donne e uomini volessero farmi compagnia,
vengano a vedere come me la spasso.
Dio benedica quegli uomini belli
voglio che siano miei,
il loro fiato è dolce quanto
la rugiada sulla pianta dell’uva.
Sei già all’inferno,
sei già all’inferno,
vorrei che potessimo andare all’inferno quando la bottiglia diventa vuota
allora la vita non vale una cicca.

Seconda parte continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/mountain-dew.htm
http://www.repubblica.it/esteri/2010/05/04/news/bentornati_moonshiners-3815860/

WHISKEY IN THE JAR

beggar-opera“Whiskey in the jar” è tra le più cantate irish pub song, conosciuta  anche come Kilgary Mountain, è la storia di un bandito, (un goliardico Robin Hood) che dopo aver derubato un possidente  inglese è tradito dalla propria donna. Le sue debolezze: il succo d’orzo e le belle donne!

Alan Lomax, storico della musica folk, nel suo libro The Folk Songs of North America, ritiene che questa canzone abbia influenzato “The Beggar’s Opera” commedia scritta da John Gray nel 1728.
“Gli strati popolari delle isole britanniche nel diciassettesimo  secolo ammiravano i briganti locali; e in Irlanda (o Scozia) quando i  gentiluomini della strada rapinavano i possidenti inglesi erano considerati  patrioti. Questi sentimenti ispirarono questa allegra ballata.”

fuorilegge-diligenzaLa vicenda risale probabilmente al 17° secolo e riecheggia la figura di Redmond O’Hanlon (c. 1620 – 1681) conosciuto come il Robin Hood dell’Ulster (Irlanda del Nord) perché oltre a derubare gli inglesi (o a fargli pagare una “tassa” di protezione perché nessuno li rapinasse), restituiva gli affitti pagati dai contadini irlandesi, rubandoli ai ricchi proprietari terrieri inglesi ai quali erano stati appena versati. Della ballata esistono varie versioni con diverse strofe, ma la storia mantiene sempre la stessa struttura e il finale è sempre la prigione.

Il protagonista della canzone è probabilmente Richard Power, che lascia la contea di Kerry per unirsi ai fuorilegge capeggiati da O’Hanlon e deruba un soldato inglese (tra i bersagli preferiti), ma è catturato perché ingannato dalla bella Jenny (amante o fidanzata): durante la notte, mentre Richard smaltiva la sbornia, lei gli nasconde la spada e mette la polvere da sparo nell’acqua. Circondato dai soldati e impossibilitato a difendersi, Richard si arrende. L’unica sua speranza per evitare l’impiccagione è un fratello arruolato nell’esercito, che potrebbe riuscire a farlo fuggire!

LA VERSIONE FOLK (STANDARD)

Numerosissimi gli interpreti, a partire dagli storici The Dubliners e The Clancy Brothers..

Da seguire con il video animato da Francesco Guiotto

Tra le tante (ma proprio tante) versioni folk la mia preferita è quella dei The High Kings


I
As I was going  over the far famed Kerry mountains
I met with captain Farrell and his money he was counting.
I first produced my pistol, and then produced my rapier(1).
Said “stand and deliver, for I am a bold deceiver”
musha ring dumma do damma  da
whack for the daddy ‘o (2)
whack for the daddy ‘o
there’s whiskey in the jar (3)
II
I counted out  his money, and it made a pretty penny.
I put it in my pocket and I took it home to Jenny.
She said and she swore, that she never would deceive me,
but the devil take the women, for they never can be easy
III
I went into my  chamber, all for to take a slumber,
I dreamt of gold and jewels and for sure it was no wonder.
But Jenny took my charges and she filled them up with water,
Then sent for captain Farrel to be ready for the slaughter.
IV
It was early in  the morning, as I rose up for travel,
The guards were all around me and likewise captain Farrel (4).
I first produced my pistol, for she stole away my rapier,
But I couldn’t shoot the water (5) so a prisoner I was taken.
V
If anyone can aid  me, it’s my brother in the army,
If I can find his station down in Cork or in Killarney.
And if he’ll come and save me, we’ll go roving near Kilkenny,
And I swear he’ll treat me better than me darling sportling (6) Jenny
VI
Now some men  take delight in the drinking and the roving (7),
But others take delight in the gambling and the smoking (8).
But I take delight in the juice of the barley,
And courting pretty fair maids in the morning bright and early (9)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre stavo attraversando le famose montagne di Kerry
incontrai il capitano Farrell che contava il  suo gruzzolo.
Prima tirai fuori la pistola e poi lo spadino,
dissi “Fermo o sparo, perché io sono un bandito.”
Mush-a ring dum-a do dum-a da
Whack for my daddy-o
Whack for my daddy-o
C’è del whiskey nel boccale
II
Contai i soldi e facevano un buon penny,
me  li sono messi in tasca per portarli a casa da Jenny.
Sospirava e giurava che non mi avrebbe mai ingannato,
ma  il diavolo si prenda le donne, perché sono delle traditrici.
III
Andai nella mia camera, per farmi un pisolino,
sognai di oro e gioielli, c’era da spettarselo
Ma Jenny prese le cartucce e le bagnò nell’acqua,
poi invitò il Capitano Farrel a tenersi pronto per l’agguato.
IV
Era mattino presto, quando mi alzai per mettermi in viaggio.
ero circondato dalle guardie
Capitano Farrel compreso,
prima presentai la pistola, perché lei mi aveva rubato lo spadino.
ma ha fatto cilecca, così mi hanno fatto prigioniero.
V
Se c’è qualcuno in grado di aiutarmi, è mio fratello  nell’esercito,
se trovo dov’è di stanza, a Cork o in Killarney.
e se lui venisse salvarmi, andremo a zonzo per Kilkenny,
e sono certo che mi tratterà meglio della mia cara avversaria Jenny.
VI
Ad alcuni piace
bere e vagabondare,
ad altri piace il gioco d’azzardo e il fumo.
ma io traggo diletto nel succo d’orzo e nel corteggiare ragazze graziose la mattina di buon’ora

NOTE
1) rapier ovvero lo “spadino” vedi qui
2) alcuni vogliono trovare un senso nella frase e la traducono come “Lascio una parte (dei soldi) a mio papà”
3) In Gran Bretagna, “Jar” è  un barattolo dal collo largo, adatto per conservare marmellate e sottaceti,  ma anche un vaso rastremato a collo di bottiglia. Anticamente era utilizzato per lo stoccaggio di liquidi, e doveva essere consuetudine berci direttamente, e tuttavia il termine si usa più spesso per indicare un bicchiere: “I’ll have a jar” si traduce infatti con ” berrò una pinta di birra “. (anche se c’è più di un modo per misurare la pinta! vedi)
Gli Irlandesi si attribuiscono l’invenzione del whiskey partendo nientemeno che da San Patrizio che nel V sec, avrebbe portato dal pellegrinaggio in Terra Santa, l’alambicco, all’epoca utilizzato per distillare solo i profumi, e convertito dai monaci irlandesi in divina macchina per produrre l’Uisce Beathe (in gaelico acqua di vita).
Whiskey con una e aggiuntiva che lo differenzia dal cugino scozzese, sia per la sua lavorazione che per le sue caratteristiche organolettiche. continua
4) i Dubliners cantano invece “Up comes a band of footmen and likewise captain Farrell” (ero circondato un gruppo di soldati Capitano Farrel compreso)
5) letteralmente dice “ma non potevo sparare con l’acqua”
6) scritto anche come “ole a-sporting Jenny” nel senso della sporca traditice, letteralmente “vecchia rivale”
7) i Dubliners cantano invece “There’s some take delight in the carriages a rolling (c’è chi si diverte ad andare in giro in carrozza)
8) i Dubliners cantano invece “and others take delight in the hurling and the bowling”  (e chi si diverte a giocare a hurling o a bowling
9) è un modo di dire Bright and early (di buon ora)

LA VERSIONE FOLK-ROCK

Anche i gruppi rock si sono impadroniti di questa canzone e cito The Grateful Dead (ASCOLTA che peraltro hanno realizzato una godibilissima versione acustica un po’ bluegrass) e i Metallica (ASCOLTA una versione decisamente metal, ma ricordo che il riff della chitarra e l’arrangiamento è dei Thin Lizzy )

ASCOLTA The Thin Lizzy – 1972/73 (gruppo hard rock irlandese nato a Dublino nel 1969 e attivo fino agli anni 80)

In questa versione la bella si chiama Molly e la storia si ferma alla sparatoria con il quale il bandito cerca di sottrarsi alla cattura. La morale però è sempre la stessa: il succo d’orzo e le belle donne rendono l’uomo debole! Questa versione riveduta dai Thin Lizzy più che una”rebel song” sembra una storia di corna!

VERSIONE THE THIN LIZZY
I
As I was goin’ over the Cork and Kerry mountains
I saw Captain Farrell and his money he was countin’
I first produced my pistol and then produced my rapier
I said stand and deliver or the devil he may take ya
Chorus
Musha ring dum a doo dum a da Whack for my daddy-o
Whack for my daddy-o There’s whiskey in the jar-o
II
I took all of his money and it was a pretty penny
I took all of his money yeah I brought it home to Molly
She swore that she’d love me, never would she leave me
But the devil take that woman for you know she trick me easy
III
Being drunk and weary I went to Molly’s chamber
Takin’ my money with me and I never knew the danger
For about six or maybe seven in walked Captain Farrell
I jumped up, fired off my pistols and I shot him with both barrels
IV
Now some men like the fishin’ and some men like the fowlin’
And some men like ta hear, ta hear cannon ball a roarin’
Me I like sleepin’ specially in my Molly’s chamber
But here I am in prison, here I am with a ball and chain yeah
Traduzione italiano (da qui)
I
Stavo andando sulle montagne Cork e Ferry,
ho visto il Capitano Farrel e il suoi soldi che stava contando.
Prima ho mostrato la mia pistola e poi il mio spadino.
Ho detto fermati e consegnameli o il diavolo potrebbe prenderti.
Ritornello:
Musha ring dum a doo dum a da
Lascio una parte (dei soldi) a mio papà- o, Lascio una parte (dei soldi) a mio papà- o C’è del whiskey nella brocca- o
II
Ho preso tutti i suoi soldi ed era un bella sommetta.
Ho preso tutti i suoi soldi sì, li ho portati a casa da Molly.
Giurò che mi amava, non mi avrebbe mai voluto lasciare.
Ma il diavolo prese questa donna, sappiate che mi imbrogliò con facilità.
III
Sbronzo e stanco sono andato in camera da Molly.
Ho preso i miei soldi con me e non ho mai saputo il pericolo.
Verso le sei o sette circa entrò il Capitano Farrel.
Son saltato su, ho sparato con le mie pistole e l’ho ucciso con entrambe le canne.
IV
Ora ad alcuni uomini piace pescare ed ad altri andare a caccia di uccelli.
Ed ad alcuni uomini piace sentire, sentire il cannone sparare con fragore. Io amo dormire, specialmente nella camera della mia Molly.
Ma qui sono in prigione, sono qui son con una palla (al piede) e una catena che mi lega sì

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3116
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=36987&lang=it

HOT WHISKEY: A JUG OF PUNCH!

Gli Irlandesi si  attribuiscono l’invenzione del whiskey a San  Patrizio che, nel V sec, avrebbe portato dal suo viaggio in Terra Santa l’alambicco, all’epoca  utilizzato per distillare solo i profumi, e convertito dai monaci  in divina macchina per produrre l’Uisce Beathe ossia “l’acqua di vita”, (dal latino “aqua vitae” pronunciata come “Iish-kee” e inglesizzato a partire del XII secolo in whisky).
Fu sempre un monaco, San Colombano, a insegnare i segreti della distillazione agli Scozzesi. Tuttavia gli Scozzesi si ostinano a dire che loro distillavano già tre secoli prima della nascita di Cristo!
Quella “e” di differenza non è solo un modo diverso di scrivere la stessa bevanda, ma è anche un modo diverso di produrla. (continua)

The irish whiskey still, 1840

COME SI BEVE IL WHISK(E)Y?

Sebbene sia sempre valida la risposta “come mi pare” c’è un modo però tipico, quello di servirlo in un bicchiere (il tumbler alto) pieno solo per un quinto, affiancato da una piccola brocca d’acqua pura a temperatura ambiente e poi ognuno ci mette la quantità d’acqua che vuole. Non per niente il noto proverbio irlandese recita “non rubare la moglie di un altro e non mettergli l’acqua nel whiskey

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARICETTA DEL PUNCH IRLANDESE: HOT WHISKEY

Scaldare un bicchiere di vetro,  aggiungere 2 fette di limone, 4 chiodi di garofano e 1 bicchiere di Whiskey  irlandese, riempire con acqua calda, aggiungere lo zucchero a piacere, e  mescolare.

The word punch is a loanword from Hindi panch (meaning five) and the drink was originally made with five ingredients: alcohol, sugar, lemon, water, and tea or spices. The original drink was named paantsch.
The drink was brought to England from India by sailors and employees of the British East India Company in the early seventeenth century. From there it was introduced into other European countries. The term punch was first recorded in British documents in 1632. At the time, most punches were of the Wassail type made with a wine or brandy base. But around 1655, Jamaican rum came into use and the ‘modern’ punch was born.“(tratto da qui)
[il termine punch deriva dall’hindi “panch” (che significa 5) e la bevanda era in origine fatta da 5 ingredienti: alcol, zucchero, limone, acqua e tè o spezie. Il nome della bevanda era paantsch. La bevanda fu portata in Inghilterra dall’India con i marinai e i dipendenti della Compagnia Britannica dell’India Orientale nei primi anni del XVII secolo. Da lì fu diffusa negli altri paesi d’Europa. La parola punch si trova trascritta nei documenti britannici nel 1632. All’epoca la maggior parte dei punch erano del tipo wassail, fatti con una base di vino o brandy. Ma nel 1655 il rum giamaicano divenne di moda e così nacque il punch “moderno”]

PRIMA VERSIONE: JUG  OF PUNCH

Il brano è un tradizionale irlandese risalente al 17° secolo e diffuso in almeno due versioni, l’ingrediente  principale del Punch è il whiskey irlandese così denominato per distinguerlo  dal whisky scozzese. Annosa guerra tra le due bevande che ha illustri  estimatori da entrambi i fronti!
Una classica drinking  song con molto irish humor e una struttura che è anch’essa  tipica: un ritornello non-sense e la ripetizione degli ultimi due versi  cantati precedentemente dal solista.
ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers, una versione decisamente lenta e cantata con il vecchio stile

ASCOLTA The Kilkennys una versione  con più ritmo


I
One evening in the month of June
As I was sitting in my room
A small bird sat on an ivy bunch
And the song he sang was “The Jug Of Punch.”
Chorus
Too ra loo ra loo, too ra   loo ra lay,  
too ra loo ra loo, too ra   loo ra lay
(A small bird sat on an ivy bunch
And the song he sang was “The Jug Of Punch.”)
II
What more diversion can a man desire?
Than to sit him down by an alehouse fire
Upon his knee a pretty wench(1)
And upon the table a jug of punch.
III
Let the doctors come with all their art
They’ll make no impression upon my heart
Even a cripple forgets his hunch
When he’s snug outside of a jug of punch.
IV
And if I get drunk, well, me money’s me own
And them don’t like me they can leave me alone
I’ll chune me fiddle and I’ll rosin me bow (2)
And I’ll be welcome wherever I go.
V
And when I’m dead and in my grave
No costly tombstone will I crave
Just lay me down in my native peat
With a jug of punch at my head and feet.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Una sera, nel mese di giugno
mentre stavo seduto nella mia stanza   un uccellino si posò su un ramo d’edera e la canzone che cantava era “La brocca di  punch”.
CORO
Too ra   loo ra loo, too ra   loo ra lay,
too ra loo ra loo,   too ra loo ra lay
Un piccolo uccello posato su un ramo d’edera e la canzone che cantava era “La  brocca di punch”.
II
Quale passatempo si potrebbe desiderare di più?
Che sedersi al fuocherello di una birreria
sulle ginocchia di una bella fanciulla (1)  e sul tavolo una brocca di punch.
III
Lasciate che i medici esercitino la loro arte, non mi faranno alcuna impressione, anche uno storpio dimentica la sua gobba quando è accolto con una brocca di punch.
IV
E se mi ubriaco, beh, i soldi sono fatti miei,
e coloro che non mi amano che mi lascino pure da solo;
accorderò il violino e impecerò l’archetto (2)
e sarò il benvenuto dovunque andrò.
V (3)
E quando sarò morto e nella bara,
desidererò una pietra tombale poco costosa, mi basterà giacere nella mia torba natia con una brocca di punch alla testa e una ai piedi.

NOTE
1) wench: una  giovane ragazza contadinotta o servetta
2) “to rosin the bow” (resinare l’archetto del violino) è un’espressione  che sta a significare bere troppo, evidentemente già nei tempi passati i  suonatori di violino popolari erano forti bevitori
3) l’immancabile sad verse che conclude questo genere di canzoni

SECONDA  VERSIONE: JUG OF PUNCH

La  seconda versione della canzone è quella interpretata dai Dubliners,  anche qui frasi non-sense intervallano le strofe: la struttura di ogni strofa  ripete i primi due versi.

Le  prime due strofe e l’ultima quasi identiche alla prima versione: qui si  specifica anche che il giorno di giungo era il 23 e che l’uomo era nella sua stanza-laboratorio intento a tessere al telaio. Alla sua tomba non dovrà  mancare una coppa piena di punch perché i passanti possano bere alla sua  salute!

ASCOLTA Altan in Island Angel 1993


I
Being on the twenty-third of June
Oh as I sat weaving all at my loom
I heard a thrush singing on yon bush
And the song she sang was the jug of punch
II
What more pleasure can a boy desire
Than sitting down, oh beside the fire
And in his hand, oh a jug of punch
And on his knee a tidy wench
III
When I am dead and left in my mold
At my head and feet place a flowing bowl
And every young man that passes by
He can have a drink and remember I
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Era il 23 di giugno, e mentre stavo lavorando  al  telaio, ho sentito un tordo cantare sul ramo e il canto che cantava era “La  brocca di punch”.
II
Il piacere più grande che un ragazzo  può desiderare, è sedersi accanto al fuoco con in mano una brocca di punch e sulle sue ginocchia una bella  servetta.
III
Quando sarò morto e sotto terra ponete alla mia testa e ai piedi una boccia  piena
e ogni giovanotto che mi passerà  accanto potrà bere alla mia memoria.

(Cattia Salto 2012, integrazione febbraio 2013)

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ajugofpunch.html
https://thesession.org/tunes/594
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/jug-punch.htm