Archivi tag: Tony McManus

Bidh clann Ulaidh versus Song of the Exile (We will go home)

Leggi in italiano

Bidh clann Ulaidh (in English “The Clan of Ulster”) is a lullaby from the Hebrides, where the mother sleeps the baby (I imagine the baby is a female), telling her about the great wedding her family will organize when she arrives in the marriageable age. She mention the names of important Clans and also of the illustrious Irish relatives who will go to the wedding to celebrate the couple and honor the family .
Weddings between upper class families were famous events that people talked about and remembered for years, on which they wrote songs (here), in which the clan chiefs displayed their liberality and magnificence. Marriages allowed for alliances (though not always lasting) between clans and were contracts that involved the exchange of livestock, money and property, called tochers for the bride and dowry for the groom.

THE MELODY

The melody is something magical, there is a version that outclasses – in my opinion – all the others, that of the virtuoso (as well as Scottish) Tony McManus, the “Celtic fingerstyle guitar legend”

Tony McManus live

(I suppose the melody brings something to your mind … who has not seen King Arthur’s film?)
and if we add the violin too?
Alasdair Fraser & Tony McManus

and now we add the song..

Catherine-Ann MacPhee 2014

Can Cala 2014

English translation
I
My love, my darling child
The Clan of Ulster(2) will be at your wedding
My love, my darling child
The Clan of Ulster will dance at your wedding
Chorus:
The king’s clans, the king’s clans
The king’s clans will be at your wedding
The king’s clans playing the pipes
Wine will be drunk at your wedding
II
Clan MacAulay(3), a lively crowd
Clan MacAulay will be at your wedding
Clan MacAulay, a lively crowd
Will dance at your wedding
III
Clan Donald(4), who are so special(5)
Clan Donald will be at your wedding
Clan Donald, who are so special
Will dance at your wedding
IV
Clan MacKenzie(6) of the shining armor(7)
Clan MacKenzie will be at your wedding
Clan MacKenzie of the shining armor
Will dance at your wedding

I
Bidh clann(1) Ulaidh luaidh ‘s a lurain
Bidh clann Ulaidh air do bhanais
Bidh clann Ulaidh luaidh ‘s a lurain
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
Sèist:
Bidh clann a’ rìgh, bidh clann a’ rìgh
Bidh clann a’ rìgh air do bhanais
Bidh clann a’ rìgh seinn air a’ phìob
Òlar am fìon air do bhanais
II
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh nam feachd greannmhor
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh nam feachd greannmhor
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
III
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill tha cho neònach(5)
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill tha cho neònach
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
IV
Bidh Clann Choinnich nam feachd soilleir(7)
Bidh Clann Choinnich air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Choinnich nam feachd soilleir
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais

NOTES
1) the word “clan” derives from the Scottish Gaelic “clann” = “child” to underline the strong bond of blood between the chief and the families (descendants). The clans are territorial extensions controlled by the chief who lives in an ancient castle or fortified house. Not all members of the clan are also descendants of blood, because they could also have “affiliated” to the clan in exchange for protection. At Hogmany or at the time of the election of the new chief all the respective heads of the family swore loyalty to the clan leader. The leader is a Laird, a clan leader and a legal representative of the community
2 ) in Ireland the Ard Ri, the king of kings comes from the North, from the Ulaidh, the land of the warriors and the Clan of the O’Neils always remained a prestigious clan even after the English conquest.
3) Clan MacAulay is a Scottish clan of Argyll, among the oldest in Scotland that boasted its descendants from the king of the Picts: they are located on the border between Lowland and Highland
4) the Clan Donald is one of the most numerous Scottish clans and divided into numerous subdivisions. The Lord of the Islands is traditionally a MacDonald (Hebrides)
5) also written “tha cha neonach” = “it’s no wonder”
6 )Clan MacKenzie is a Highlands clan whose coat of arms reproduces a mountain in flame and the motto says “Luceo non uro”
7) also translated as “bright clothing”

VANORA – WE WILL GO HOME (ACROSS THE MOUNTAINS) -KING ARTHUR (2004)

The song titled “The song of Exile” is sung by Vanora (wife of Bors) to the men of Arthur – of the people of the Sàrmati, (but in reality it is addressed to the child in his arms and therefore it is to him, but also to the warrior-husband, who sings a lullaby -anna) in the imminence of the departure for a “suicide” mission; men want to return home, they have the safe conduct that frees them from servitude in Rome, but choose to stay alongside their commander, the Roman-Briton Artorius (the plot here).

This is how Caitlin Matthews writes“I am the arranger/translator of “Song of the Exile” which appeared in the film and wasn’t recorded on the CD. Disney won’t allow me to sing or record it as they now own the copyright

These are the words sung in the film:

I
Land of bear and land of eagle
Land that gave us birth and blessing
Land that called us ever homewards
We will go home across the mountains
We will go home, we will go home…
II
When the land is there before us
We have gone home across the mountains
We have gone home, we have gone home
We have gone home singing our songs


A whispered lullaby, sweet-sad together, short but with an intense emotional charge, not included in the soundtrack CD “King Artur.” As an author there are those who thought to credit (wrongly) Hans Zimmer who actually signed the soundtrack of the film and we have seen a lot of complaints from the fans for the exclusion of the song. Hans Zimmer (here) writes “Song of the Exile” is composed and performed by Caitlin Matthews” (see more)

ADDITIONAL STANZAS

III
Land of freedom land of heroes
Land that gave us hope and memories
Hear our singing hear our longing
We will go home across the mountains
IV
Land of sun and land of moonlight
Land that gave us joy and sorrow
Land that gave us love and laughter
We will go home across the mountains

So there’s a song (Bidh clann Ulaidh?) in Scottish Gaelic at the beginning, arranged / translated by Caitlin Matthews and an avalanche of super-charged versions have come out (and keep going out) on YouTube!

ShaDoWCa7

Leah

Maria van Selm

Karliene

Anna Cefalo

Stephanie Hill  Norse version (here)
LINK
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/macaskill/bidh.htm
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/clannulaidh.php http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/gaelicsongs/bidhclannulaidh.asp
http://www.hallowquest.org.uk/
http://www.terrediconfine.eu/king-arthur/

I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig by Robert Burns

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – by Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Leggi in italiano

The lea-rig (The Meadow-ridge) is a traditional Scottish song rewritten by Robert Burns in 1792 under the title “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig“.
The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows. These bumps could reach up to the knee and hand sowing was greatly facilitated: the grass grew in the lea rigs.

THE TUNE

We find the beautiful melody in many eighteenth-century manuscripts, known by various names such as An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber

THE LYRICS

rigsA “romantic” meeting in the summer camps declined in many text versions with a single melody (albeit with many different arrangements) that has known, like so many other Scottish eighteenth-century songs, a notable fame among the musicians of German romanticism and in good living rooms over England, France and Germany.

The oldest text can be found in the manuscript of Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, by anonymous author who starts like this:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

With the title “My Ain Kind Dearie O” it is published later in the Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (see here) on Robert Burns’ dispatch to James Johnson with the note that it was the version originally written by the edinburgh poet Robert Fergusson ( 1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson died only 24 years old in the grip of madness while he was hospitalized in the Edinburgh Asylum because subject to a strong existential depression (and yet there are those who insinuate it was syphilis); he had just enough time to write about eighty poems (published between 1771 and 1773) and was the first poet to use the Scottish dialect as a poetic language; he lived for the most part a bohemian life, sharing the intellectual ferment of Edinburgh in the period known as the Scottish Enlightenment, always in contact with musicians, actors and editors; in 1772 it joined the “Edinburgh Cape Club”, not a Masonic lodge but a club for men only for convivial purposes (in which tables were laid out with tasty dishes and above all large drinks); for Robert Burns he was ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn rewrote the poem in October 1792 for the publisher George Thomson, to be published in the “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in what will be the most commonly known version of The Lea Rig) published with the musical arrangement of Joseph Haydn (who also arranged the traditional My Ain Kind Deary version); and he also wrote a more bawdy version published in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” (1799) under the title My Ain Kind Deary (page 98) (text here)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

and in the classic version on arrangement by Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
english translation
I
When over the hill the eastern star
Tells the time of milking the ewes is near, my dear,
And oxes from the furrowed field
Return so lethargic and weary O:
Down by the burn where scented birch trees
With dew are hanging clear, my dear, I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
II
At midnight hour, in darkest glen,
I’d rove and never be frightened O, If thro’ that glen I go to thee,
My own kind dear, O:
Altho’ the night were  never so wild,
And I were never so weary O,
I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
III
The hunter loves the morning sun,
To rouse the mountain deer, my dear,
At noon the fisher takes the glen,
down the burn to steer, my dear;
Give me the hour o’ gloamin grey,
It maks my heart so cheary O
on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!

NOTES
1) the morning star
2) milking time is early in the morning
3) or “birken buds”
4) or irie
5) in the copy sent to Thomson Robert Burns wrote “wet” then corrected with wild: a summer night with severe air with lightning in the distance
6) or “I’d”

Compare with the version attributed to the poet Robert Fergusson

SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
english translation
I
Will you go the over the lea rigg,
My own kind dear, O
And cuddle there so kindly
with me, my kind deary-o!
At thorn dry-stone wall and birche tree,
we will make merry, and never be weary-o;
They’ll screen unfriendly eyes from you and me,
My own kind dear, O!
II
No herds, with sheep-dogs there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But larks whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for world’s riches, my sweetheart,
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
with you, my kind deary, O!

NOTES
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen.
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart, my dear

Scottish country dance: “My own kind deary”

The Scottish Country dance entitled “My own kind deary” with music and dance instructions appears in John Walsh’s Caledonian Country Dances (vol I 1735)


for dance explanation see

LINK
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

Bidh clann Ulaidh versus Song of the Exile (We will go home)

Read the post in English

donna-culla-WILLIAM-ADOLPHE-BOUGUEREAUBidh clann Ulaidh (in inglese “The Clan of Ulster”) è una ninnananna dalla isole Ebridi , in cui la mamma addormenta la bambina (immagino che il neonato sia di sesso femminile), raccontandole del grandioso matrimonio che la sua famiglia le organizzerà quando arriverà in età da marito. Vengono citati così i nomi di Clan importanti e anche dei parenti irlandesi illustri che andranno al matrimonio per festeggiare gli sposi e onorare la famiglia.
I matrimoni tra famiglie d’alto ceto erano eventi famosi di cui la gente parlava e che ricordava per anni,   sui quali si scrivevano canzoni (qui), in cui i capi clan sfoggiavano la loro liberalità e magnificenza. I matrimoni permettevano di stringere delle alleanze (anche se non sempre durevoli) tra i clan ed erano dei contratti che comportavano lo scambio di bestiame, denaro e proprietà, chiamati tocher per la sposa e dowry per lo sposo.

LA MELODIA

La melodia è qualcosa di magico, c’è una versione che surclassa – a mio avviso- tutte le altre, quella del virtuoso (nonché scozzese) Tony McManus il “Celtic fingerstyle guitar legend”..

Tony McManus live

(immagino che la melodia vi faccia venire in mente qualcosa.. chi non ha visto King Arthur?)
Insomma il brano è così bello già così ma se ci aggiungiamo anche il violino?
Alasdair Fraser & Tony McManus (e restiamo persi nel cielo)

E infine ascoltiamo il canto..

Catherine-Ann MacPhee 2014

Can Cala 2014

GAELICO SCOZZESE
I
Bidh clann(1) Ulaidh luaidh ‘s a lurain
Bidh clann Ulaidh air do bhanais
Bidh clann Ulaidh luaidh ‘s a lurain
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
Sèist:
Bidh clann a’ rìgh, bidh clann a’ rìgh
Bidh clann a’ rìgh air do bhanais
Bidh clann a’ rìgh seinn air a’ phìob
Òlar am fìon air do bhanais
II
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh nam feachd greannmhor
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Amhlaidh nam feachd greannmhor
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
III
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill tha cho neònach(5)
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Dhòmhnaill tha cho neònach
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais
IV
Bidh Clann Choinnich nam feachd soilleir(7)
Bidh Clann Choinnich air do bhanais
Bidh Clann Choinnich nam feachd soilleir
Dèanamh an danns air do bhanais

I
My love, my darling child
The Clan of Ulster(2) will be at your wedding
My love, my darling child
The Clan of Ulster will dance at your wedding
Chorus:
The king’s clans, the king’s clans
The king’s clans will be at your wedding
The king’s clans playing the pipes
Wine will be drunk at your wedding
II
Clan MacAulay(3), a lively crowd
Clan MacAulay will be at your wedding
Clan MacAulay, a lively crowd
Will dance at your wedding
III
Clan Donald(4), who are so special(5)
Clan Donald will be at your wedding
Clan Donald, who are so special
Will dance at your wedding
IV
Clan MacKenzie(6) of the shining armor(7)
Clan MacKenzie will be at your wedding
Clan MacKenzie of the shining armor
Will dance at your wedding
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Amore mio, mia cara bambina,
il Clan dell’Ulster andrà al tuo matrimonio,
Amore mio, mia cara bambina,
il Clan dell’Ulster  ballerà al tuo matrimonio.
Coro
Il Clan dei Re
il Clan dei Re andrà al tuo matrimonio
mentre suoneranno le cornamuse
e il vino sarà bevuto al tuo matrimonio.
II
Il Clan MacAulay, un gruppo esuberante, il Clan MacAulay andrà al tuo matrimonio,
il Clan MacAulay, un gruppo esuberante, ballerà al tuo matrimonio.
III
Il Clan Donald, non c’è da stupirsi,
il Clan Donald andrà al tuo matrimonio,
il Clan Donald, non c’è da stupirsi,
ballerà al tuo matrimonio.
IV
Il Clan MacKenzie dall’armatura splendente
il Clan MacKenzie andrà al tuo matrimonio.
il Clan MacKenzie dall’armatura splendente
ballerà al tuo matrimonio.

NOTE
1) la parola “clan” deriva dal gaelico scozzese “clann“= “bambino” per sottolinea il forte legame di sangue tra il capo e le famiglie (discendenza). I clan sono estensioni territoriali controllate dal chief (il capo) che vive in un antico castello o casa fortificata. Occorre sottolineare che non tutti gli appartenenti al clan sono anche discendenti di sangue del capo, perchè potevano anche essersi “affiliati” al clan che prestavano giuramento in cambio di protezione. Ad Hogmany o al momento dell’elezione del nuovo capo tutti i rispettivi capi famiglia giuravano fedeltà al capo-clan. Il capo  è un Laird, guida del clan e legale rappresentante della comunità
2 ) in Irlanda l’Ard Ri, il re dei re proviene dal Nord, dall’Ulaidh, la terra dei guerrieri e il Clan degli O’Neil rimase sempre un clan prestigioso anche dopo la conquista inglese.
3) Clan MacAulay è un clan scozzese di Argyll, tra i più antichi della Scozia che vantava la propria discendenza dal re dei Pitti: si colloca territorialmente a cavallo tra Lowland e Highland
4) il Clan Donald è uno dei clan scozzesi più numeroso ed articolato in numerose suddivisioni. Il Signore delle Isole è per tradizione un MacDonald (isole Ebridi)
5) scritto anche “tha cha neonach”= “it’s no wonder” che ha molto più senso per me
6) il Clan MacKenzie è un clan delle Highland il cui stemma riproduce una montagna in fiamma e il motto dice ” Luceo non uro” (in italiano: brillo, non brucio)
7) tradotto anche come “bright clothing”

Il brano mi ha richiamato alla mente la “Song of Exil” del film King Arthur di Antoine Fuqua (2004) (molto simili nella linea melodica)

VANORA – WE WILL GO HOME (ACROSS THE MOUNTAINS)

Il brano è cantato da Vanora (moglie di Bors) agli uomini di Artù – del popolo dei Sàrmati, (ma in realtà si rivolge al bambino che ha in braccio e quindi è a lui, ma anche al guerriero-marito, che canta una ninna-nanna)  nell’imminenza della partenza per una missione “suicida”; gli uomini vogliono ritornare a casa, hanno il salvacondotto che li libera dalla servitù a Roma, ma scelgono di restare al fianco del loro comandante, il romano-britanno Artorius:  “ognuno è artefice del proprio destino” (la trama qui).

Così scrive Caitlin Matthews “Io ho arrangiato/tradotto “Song of the Exile” che appare nel film e non è stato registrato nel CD. Disney non mi permettono di cantarlo o registrarlo perche hanno loro il copyright

Queste sono le parole cantate nel film:


I
Land of bear and land of eagle
Land that gave us birth and blessing
Land that called us ever homewards
We will go home across the mountains
We will go home, we will go home…
II
When the land is there before us
We have gone home across the mountains
We have gone home, we have gone home
We have gone home singing our songs
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Terra dell’orso e dell’aquila
Terra che ci diede i natali e ci ha favorito
Terra che ci chiamava sempre verso casa
Andremo a casa attraverso i monti
andremo a casa
II
Verso la terra è là davanti a noi
andremo a casa attraverso i monti, andremo a casa cantando le nostre canzoni


Una ninnananna sussurrata, dolce-triste insieme, breve ma dalla intensa carica emotiva , nemmeno inserita nel cd della colonna sonora “King Artur. Come autore c’è chi ha pensato di accreditare (erroneamente) Hans Zimmer (musicista e compositore tedesco e capo dello studio cinematografico DreamWorks) che in effetti ha siglato la colonna sonora del film e si è visto arrivare un mare di lamentele dai fans per l’esclusione del brano. Hans Zimmer (qui) scrive “Song of the Exile” is composed and performed by Caitlin Matthews” e che sarà rilasciato un nuovo cd con una bonus track o qualcosa di simile che comprenderà anche il brano incautamente “dimenticato” (eravamo nel 2008)!  (qui)

ULTERIORI STROFE


III
Land of freedom land of heroes
Land that gave us hope and memories
Hear our singing hear our longing
We will go home across the mountains
IV
Land of sun and land of moonlight
Land that gave us joy and sorrow
Land that gave us love and laughter
We will go home across the mountains
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Terra della libertà e degli eroi
Terra che ci diede speranza e ricordi
Ascolta il nostro canto e nostalgia
Andremo a casa attraverso i monti
II
Terra del sole e della luna
Terra che ci diede gioia e pianto
Terra che ci diede amore e allegria
Andremo a casa attraverso i monti

Quindi c’è un brano (Bidh clann Ulaidh?) in gaelico scozzese alla base (Caitlin Matthews dice chiaramente di aver arrangiato/tradotto “Song of the Exile”).

Nel frattempo sono uscite (e continuano a uscire) su YouTube una valanga di versioni supercliccate!!

Una giovanissima ShaDoWCa7

Leah

Maria van Selm

Karliene

Anna Cefalo
Stephanie Hill  versione in norreno (qui)
FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/macaskill/bidh.htm
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/clannulaidh.php http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/gaelicsongs/bidhclannulaidh.asp
http://www.hallowquest.org.uk/
http://www.terrediconfine.eu/king-arthur/

The Lea Rig (ti incontrerò tra i campi)

ritratto di Robert Burns
ritratto di Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Read the post in English

The lea-rig (in inglese The Meadow-ridge) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese riscritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 con il titolo di “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig”.
Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche”, una tecnica colturale che prevede la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate ovvero il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale di un tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio  e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare il Mugellese che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto la dimensione opportuna. Si formavano con questo tipo di lavorazione i corn rigs e i lea rigs ossia le porche di grano e gli argini d’incolto dove cresceva l’erba.

LA MELODIA

Troviamo la bella melodia in molti manoscritti setteceneschi, conosciuta con vari nomi quali An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber in Unexpected Songs 2006

LE VERSIONI TESTUALI

rigsUn incontro “romantico” nei campi estivi declinato in molte versioni testuali con un’unica melodia (sebbene con molti diversi arrangiamenti) che ha conosciuto, come tante altre canzoni scozzesi settecentesche, una notevole fama tra i musicisti del romanticismo tedesco e nei salotti bene  d’Inghilterra, Francia e Germania.

Il testo più antico si trova nel manoscritto di Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, di autore anonimo che inizia così:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

Con il titolo “My Ain Kind Dearie O” è pubblicata successivamente nello Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (vedi qui) su invio di Robert Burns a James Johnson con la nota che si trattava della versione scritta originariamente dal poeta edimburghese Robert Fergusson (1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson morì a soli 24 anni in preda alla pazzia mentre era ricoverato nel Manicomio di Edimburgo perchè soggetto a una forte depressione esistenziale (e tuttavia c’è chi insinua si sia trattato di sifilide); fece in tempo a scrivere appena un’ottantina di poesie (pubblicate tra il 1771 e il 1773) e fu il primo poeta a usate il dialetto scozzese come lingua poetica; visse per lo più una vita da bohemien, condividendo il  fermento intellettuale di Edimburgo nel periodo conosciuto come l’Illuminismo scozzese, sempre a contatto con musicisti, attori ed editori; nel 1772 aderì alla loggia “Edinburgh Cape Club”, non proprio una loggia massonica ma un club per soli uomini per scopi conviviali (in cui si imbandivano tavolate con gustose pietanze e soprattutto grandi bevute); per Robert Burns fu ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn riscrisse la poesia nell’ottobre del 1792 per l’editore George Thomson, affinchè fosse pubblicata nel “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in quella che sarà la versione più comunemente detta The Lea Rig) pubblicata con l’arrangiamento musicale di Joseph Haydn (il quale arrangiò anche la versione tradizionale My Ain Kind Deary); e scrisse anche una versione più bawdy pubblicata nel “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“(1799) con il titolo My Ain Kind Deary (pag 98) (testo qui)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

e nella versione classica su arrangiamento di Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Quando sulla collina la stella dell’est(1)
dice che l’ora (2) di mungere le pecore è vicina, mia cara
e i buoi dal campo arato
ritornano così svogliati e stanchi;
giù al ruscello dove le betulle (3)
profumate di rugiada pendono bianche, mia cara,
ti incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
II
A mezzanotte, nella valle più tenebrosa
vagavo senza mai avere paura (4)
perchè per quella valle andavo da te
mia cara amata;
anche se la notte fosse sì tempestosa (5) e io sì tanto stanco
t’incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
III
Il cacciatore ama il sole del mattino
che risveglia il cervo della montagna, mia cara;
a mezzogiorno il pescatore cerca la valle e verso ruscello si dirige, mia cara
dammi l’ora del grigio crepuscolo
che fa diventare il mio cuore così allegro, per incontrarti tra gli argini erbosi, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) è la stella del mattino
2) bughtin-time = the time of milking the ewes; il tempo della mungitura è di prima mattina (una bella descrizione qui)
3) in altre versioni “birken buds” in effetti la frase ha più senso essendo Down by the burn, where birken buds
Wi’ dew are hangin clear = giù al ruscello dove le gemme rugiadose delle betulle pendono bianche

4) scritto anche come irie
5) nella copia mandata a Thomson Robert scrisse “wet” poi corretta con wild: una notte estiva  dall’aria grave con lampi in lontananza
6) ma anche “I’d”

Si confronti con la versione attribuita al poeta Robert Fergusson

anonimo in SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Verrai tra gli argini erbosi (1)
mia cara amata
per stare abbracciati là con tenerezza
con me, mia cara amata.
Accanto alla siepe (2) e alla betulla
saremo felici (3) e non ci stancheremo mai;
ci schermeranno (4)dagli sguardi malevoli (5) mia cara amata
II
Nessun gregge con bastone da pastore o cani lì, mai verrà a spaventarti
ma le allodole (8) che cantano nel cielo
e corteggiano come me , il loro amore.
Mentre gli altri conducono gli agnelli e le pecore
e si affaticano per le ricchezze (9) terrene mia cara (10),
nei campi cresce il mio divertimento
con te, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen. (come si dice in italiano “infrattarsi”)
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart

LA DANZA: “My own kind deary”

La Scottish Country dance dal titolo “My own kind deary”con tanto di musica e istruzioni per la danza compare in Caledonian Country Dances di John Walsh (vol I 1735)
VIDEO
Le istruzioni qui

FONTI
The Forest Minstrel, James Hogg (1810) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

YE BANKS AND BRAES

TITOLI: Ye Banks and Braes, Ye Flowery Banks, Bonie Doon

Una canzone d’amore sfortunato, ambientata in primavera, sulle rive del fiume Doon (Ayrshire), è la triste storia d’amore di una ragazza scozzese abbandonata dal suo falso innamorato dopo essere stata sedotta. La storia si ispira ad un pettegolezzo locale sulla signorina Peggy Kennedy di Dalgarrock una bella e benestante fanciulla e un suo parente tale capitano McDoual di Logan.
“The subject of the song, Peggy Kennedy, was a niece of Mrs Gavin Hamilton, a born heiress to a considerable estate in Carrick, to which she ultimately succeeded. At the age of seventeen she was the betrothed bride of Captain Maxwell, the M.P. for Wigtownshire. However she had an affair with McDouall of Logan.” (in  “Robert Burns: the stories behind the songs” qui )
La versione è di Robert Burns, la musica è di James Millar ed è stata pubblicata  con il titolo di “The Caledonian Hunt’s Delight”(in “Second Collection” di Neil Gow 1788 ). La stessa melodia è trascritta con il titolo di “Lost is my quiet” in “Collection of English Songs” di Dale, 1780 ‑ 1794. Una seconda versione “Ye Flowery Banks o’ Bonie Doon” fu riscritta ancora da Burns nel 1791, ma pubblicata postuma in Reliques of Robert Burns (1808) sulla melodia “Cambdelmore”.

LA MELODIA
ASCOLTA Tony McManus arrangiamento per chitarra acustica e lezione

LE GIOIE CHE FURONO

Accanto alla felicità ridente della natura in fiore e degli uccelli in amore, l’infelicità della donna risalta con maggiore forza: ella dopo aver assaporato, con passione, i piaceri dell’amore e aver eufemisticamente “colto la rosa” con il suo innamorato, è stata lasciata con la spina, da intendersi nel doppio senso del dolore, ma anche della gravidanza indesiderata.
Nel ritornello la ripetizione departed joys, departed never to return [in italiano: gioie che furono – che non saranno più] c’è un misto di malinconia e di amarezza: con la verginità la donna ha perduto l’innocenza e la fiducia verso un mondo che non è quello che sembra!

Federico Andreotti (1847-1930)
Federico Andreotti (1847-1930)

In merito alla melodia è lo stesso Burns a scrivere al suo editore Thomson nel 1794: “Conosci la storia di quest’aria? E’ alquanto curiosa. Tanti anni fa, il Sig.Jas Miller scrittore della vostra città, si trovava in compagnia del nostro amico (l’organista Stephen) Clarke; e parlando di musica scozzese, Miller espresse l’ardente ambizione di riuscire a comporre un’aria scozzese. Il Sig. Clarke, in parte per scherzo, gli disse di suonare solo le note nere del clavicembalo e metterci un po’ di ritmo, e così avrebbe senza dubbio composto un’aria scozzese. Ciò che è certo è che in pochi giorni, il Sig. Miller produsse un’aria rudimentale, che il Sig. Clarke con qualche ritocco e correzione, trasformò nella melodia in questione
(il testo originale: “Do you know the history of the air? It is curious enough. A good many years ago, Mr. James Miller, writer in your good own (Edinburgh) … was in company with our good friend Clarke; and talking of Scottish music, Miller expressed an ardent ambition to be able to compose a Scots air. Mr. Clarke … told him to keep to the black keys of the harpsichord and preserve some kind of rhythm, and he would infallibly compose a Scots air. Certain it is, that, in a few days, Mr. Miller produced the rudiments of an air which Mr. Clarke, with some touches and corrections, fashioned into the tune in question…”)

ASCOLTA Madelaine Cave (una versione magica con sola voce, arpa e flauto, bellissime foto della natura. La voce e il flauto in alcuni punti modulano il gorgheggio dell’uccello di cui si parla nella canzone)

ASCOLTA Holly Tomas

Un brano che per la sua intensità emotiva è più adatto ad essere interpretato da una fanciulla, ma non mancano gli interpreti maschili
ASCOLTA Gary Cleghorn (nel video varie immagini in omaggio a Robert Burns)


I
Ye banks and braes o’ bonnie Doon,
How can ye bloom sae fresh and fair,
How can ye chant (2) little birds,
And I sae weary full o’ care!
II
Ye’ll break my heart ye warbling bird,
That wantons through the flowering thorn
Ye mind me o departed joys,
Departed never to return.
III
Oft ha’e I roved by bonnie Doon,
To see the rose and woodbine twine,
and ilka bird sang O’ its love,
And fondly sae did I o’ mine.
IV
Wi’ lightsome heart I stretch’d my hand,
And pu’d a rosebud from the tree;
And my false lover Stole my rose,
But ah! He (3) left the thorn in me
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO *
I
Voi rive e pendii del bel Doon (1),
come potete fiorire sì freschi e belli?
Come potete cantare (2), voi augelletti,
mentr’io son sì stanca e piena d’affanni?
II
Mi spezzerai il cuore, augel che gorgheggi,
saltellando fra lo spino in fiore:
tu mi ricordi gioie d’un tempo,
gioie che furono – che non saranno più!
III
Spesso ho vagato presso il bel Doon
per vedere la rosa e il caprifoglio intrecciarsi; ogni augello cantava del suo amore e teneramente cantavo anch’io del mio.
IV
Con cuore gaio colsi una rosa (3),
ricca di fragranza sulla pianta spinosa;
e il mio amor che m’ha tradita rubò la rosa, ma ahimè, lasciò a me la spina.

per la traduzione del testo in francese e bretone qui

e per la serie “non ci posso credere!” ecco la versione celtic-rock
ASCOLTA The Real Mckenzies


I
Ye banks and braes of bonnie doon,
How can ye bloom sae fresh and fair
How can ye chant ye tiny wee birds
And I sae weary and nae full o’ care.
Ye break me heart; ye birds that sing
That warble through the flowery thorn
Ye remind me of a departed joy
Departed forever tae never return
II
I’ve often roamed by bonnie Doon
To walk by the ocean, the wind and the sky
And like the birdees that sing o’ their love,
Sae fondly say did i of mine
With lightsome heart I spied a rose
So sweet and aglow on thorny tree
And my false love did steal that rose
And all she left me was but a thorn
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Voi rive e valli del bel Doon,
come potete fiorire così freschi e belli?
Come potete cantare (1), voi uccellini,
e io sono così stanco e preoccupato.
Mi spezzerai il cuore, uccello canterino
che gorgheggi fra lo spino in fiore:
tu mi ricordi le gioie svanite, svanite per sempre e non torneranno più!
II
Spesso ho vagato presso il bel Doon
per camminare il riva al mare, il vento e il cielo
e come gli uccelli che cantano del loro amore
così teneramente cantavo anch’io del mio.
Con cuore lieto colsi una rosa (3),
così profumata e  radiosa sulla pianta spinosa;
ma il mio amore rubò quella rosa
e lasciò a me la spina.

NOTE
*Traduzione italiana tratta da   “Poemetti e canzoni” curata e tradotta da Adele Biagi, 1953 G. C.   Sansoni – Editore – Firenze
1) il fiume Doon nasce dalle Gallow Hills nel cuore del Galloway Forest park al centro della contea di Dumfries e Galloway nella parte meridionale della Scozia, come dice la pubblicità ” Un incantevole paesaggio di limpidi laghetti, foreste che nascondono piccole cascate e brulle cime arrotondate formano il Galloway Forest Park, il più grande parco forestale della Gran Bretagna.” (qui)
2) chant nel suo duplice significato di canto e beffa
3) nelle versioni al maschile diventa un “she”, ma così si perdono tutte le sfumature sottese alla simbologia della rosa. Nelle ballate celtiche la rosa non è solo “una rosa” ma è il simbolo della passione amorosa; l’allusione al fiore più intimo e segreto della donna. Sebbene un tempo le fanciulle fossero educate a preservarsi caste e pure fino al matrimonio, la loro stessa ingenuità le poteva far cadere facile preda dei mascalzoni, che con false promesse matrimoniali, le inducevano a concedere il loro “pegno d’amore”, la verginità. Così la spina è la gravidanza ricevuta in cambio! (vedi scheda). Così quando sento Paul McKenzie cantare “And all she left me was but a thorn” mi viene da ridere!

HIRVOUDOÙ

La canzone è stata tradotta in bretone da Rev. Augustin Conq (più noto con lo pseudonimo di “Paotr Tréouré”)  con il titolo “Hirvoudoù” [in italiano un lamento], e pubblicata nel 1933 da Henry Lemoine in “20 Breton songs arranged by G. Arnoux”. (vedi) Eccola classificata così come “chanson bretonne” o “Une complainte bretonne”, e interpretata tra gli altri anche da Alan Stivell quale tributo al grande bardo della Scozia (nell’album “Brian Boru” 1995). Infatti nella versione bretone il testo si adatta sia al femminile che al maschile, mentre la traduzione francese nella raccolta di Henry Lemoine propende per un lamento maschile.

ASCOLTA Tri Yann

I
Penaos oc’h-c’hwi ker kaer gwisket
Traonienn ha prad leun a vleunioù
Penaos e kanit, laboused,
Tre ma ‘maon-me o skuilh daeroù?
Ho kanaouennoù dudius
Va c’halon baour din a ranno
‘N ur gomz eus un amzer eürus
Ha ne deuio biken en-dro!
II
Da c’houloù-deiz ‘vel d’abardaez
Me ‘garje mont war ribl ar stêr
‘N ur vouskanañ va c’harantez
‘Vel an eostig, an alc’houeder
Dindan ar gwez, laouen bepred,
E kutuilhen bleunioù dispar ;
Siwazh, setu-me dilezet
Ha rannet holl gant ar glac’har!

TRADUZIONE FRANCESE (qui)
I
Pourquoi êtes-vous si bien parés, vallées et champs couverts de fleurs ; pourquoi chantez-vous, oiseaux, pednant que je verse des larmes ?
Vos chansons merveilleuses
me briseront le coeur,
en évoquant un temps heureux
qui ne reviendra jamais !
II
De l’aube jusqu’au soir,
j’aimerais aller au bord de la rivière,
en chantonnant mon amour,
comme font le roitelet ou l’alouette ; sous les arbres, toujours joyeux,
je cueillerais des fleurs sans pareilles. Hélas ! me voilà abandonné,
et tout brisé par le chagrin
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Perchè siete così ben adornati
valli e campi ricoperti di fiori
perché cantate uccellini
mentre io verso lacrime?
I vostri canti meravigliosi
mi spezzano il cuore
ed evocano un tempo felice
che non tornerà mai più
II
Dall’alba fino a sera
vorrei andare sulle rive del fiume
per cantare il mio amore
come fanno lo scricciolo e l’allodola
sotto gli alberi tutto il giorno felice, raccoglierei i fiori senza eguali.
Ahimè? Sono qui abbandonato
e distrutto dal dolore

FONTI
http://www.robertburns.plus.com/Stories2.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/rosa.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/yebanksandbraes.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/636.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/chants/fripon.htm
http://per.kentel.pagesperso-orange.fr/frame_par_recueil.htm