A fierce song for halyard: Bully in the Alley

Leggi in italiano

“Bully in the Alley” is a halyard shanty with origins referable to the black slaves involved in loading and unloading cotton bales in the ports (cotton screwing).
The bully here is a boozing sailor left in an alley by his still “sober” companions, who will move on to pick him up when returning to the ship.

Shinbone Alley is an alley in New York but also in Bermuda, but metaphorically speaking it is found in every “sailor town”. More generally it is an exotic indication for the Caribbean, the alley of a legendary “pirates den” , where every occasion is good for a fist fight! (first meaning for bully). Or it is the alley of an equally generic port city of the continent full of pubs and cheerful ladies, where if you get drunk, you end up waking up “enlisted” on a warship or a merchant ship (second meaning for bully). So our victim in love with Sally instead of marrying her, he goes to sea!
And finally a last interpretation: a “very good”, or “first rate” sailor (the rooster of the henhouse!)
According to Stan Hugill “Bully in the Alley” has become a seafaring expression to indicate a “stubborn” ship that wants to go in its direction in spite of the helmsman’s intention
This song is nowadays among the most popular “pirate songs”!
Take a look to these bully boys!

Assassin’s creed IV black flag

Chorus
Help me, Bob(1),
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Help me, Bob, I’m bully in the alley, Bully down in “shinbone al“!
I
Sally(2) is the girl that I love dearly,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl that I spliced dearly(3),
Bully down in “shinbone al
 II
For seven long years I courted little Sally,
But all she did was dilly and dally(4).
III
I ever get back, I’ll marry little Sally,
Have six kids and live in Shin-bone Alley.

NOTES
1)  God
2) Sally (or Sal) is the generic name of the girls of the Caribbean seas and of South America
3) also written as “Spliced nearly” means “almost married”, and yet the meaning lends itself to sexual allusions
4) to wastetime, especially by being slow, or by not being able to make a decision

Morrigan: Text version identical to the previous one but with an additional stanza before the last closing that says:
“I’ll leave Sal and I’ll become a sailor,
I’ll leave Sal and ship aboard a whaler.”

Three Pruned Men from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys  ANTI 2006.

Text version identical to the previous one but with a closing stanza that says:


Sally got down and dirty last night,
Sally got down and she spliced (5),
The sailors left last night,
The sailors got a ball of wax (6),
NOTES
5) in slang to splice it means having sex (uniting parts of the body in sexual activity) but also uniting with marriage
6) It is an idiom that means the totality of something; a hypothesis on the origin of the term: This is a form of initiation of freemasons. The freemasons took it from the scarab beetle, which is said to roll a ball of earth, which is a microcosm of the universe. I believe it is thought to spring from the ancient mysteries of Egypt. There was much amateur Egyptology during the 19th and early 20th century. The ball of wax has transcendental meaning. It represents a mystery of human godlike creativity which a person aspiring to the mystery of masonic lore carries with him. In the initiation, the person was given a small ball of earwax or some such, which would represent the cosmos. Reference to this ball of wax was a secret symbol of brotherhood. (from here)

Paddy and the Rats

Short Sharp version

The curators of the project write: “It feels as though this version is far closer to a cotton-screwing chant than the Hugill version. (Carpenter makes a note beside the version from Edward Robinson that it also was for ‘cotton screwing’).  There is only one complete verse and a couple of phrases from Short to Sharp, so the additional words are from Hugill’s version but ignoring location aspects and reworked to fit Short’s significantly different structure” (from here)

Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 ♪ 

I=V
So help me, Bob ,
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Bully down in an alley
Chorus
So help me, Bob, 
I’m bully in the alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
(solo) Bully in Teapot alley
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
II
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Sally is the girl down in our alley,
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
Have you seen on Sally?
Chorus
(solo) I could love her cheerly
Way, hey, bully in the alley!
III
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
Sally is the girl that I love dearly
She is the girl in the alley
Chorus
Oh I’ll spliced to nearly
Way, hey, bully in the alley
IV
I’ll leave my Sally go a sailin’
I’ll leave my Sally go a wailin’
One day I’ll wed Sally
Chorus
Wedding bed my Sally
Way, hey, bully in the alley

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/sally-brown/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/bullyinthealley.html http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bully-in-the-alley.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31335
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=43912
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm#bully%20alley

Hanging Johnny : hang, boys, hang

Leggi in italiano

“Hanging Johnny” is an halyard shanty in which we talk about the hangman who hangs all those who bother him! Immediately, the scholars wanted to find a historical figure who incarnated this executioner in Jack Ketch notorious executioner in the seventeenth century London.

But for the sailors the phrase “hanging Johnny” has a whole other meaning.

THE WORK OF THE HANGED SAILOR

In order to hoist the heavier sails, they followed a strange procedure : the younger and nimble sailors (and less paid as they were apprentices) climbed up on the masthead and, after grabbing a halyard, jumped in the air, hanging like so many hangers. As they descended, they were helped by the efforts of the remaining sailors to slowly reach the deck.
Joys explained that “hanging Johnny” did not refer to a sheriff’s hangman, but instead to nimble young sailors who, when a topsail was to be hoisted, would climb to the masthead and “swing out” on the proper halyard. They would then ride to the deck as the men at the foot of the mast brought them down by their successive pulls. Joys recalled one chanteyman who would always tell the boys when to swing out by shouting up to them, “Hang, you bastards, hang!” Then, while the boys were hanging on the halyard fifty feet or more above the deck, he’d start his song and the crew would make two pulls on each chorus. When the boys hit the deck, they would tail on behind the other men and pull with them until the work was finished.
Joys added that the word “hang” was “the best goddamn pullin’ word in the language, especially on a down haul.” Ashley said the tune was “a bit mournful, but a good one for hoisting light canvas,” noting that the words enabled the sailors to find fault, good-naturedly, with all their real and fancied enemies, “if the work lasted long enough.”
 (from “Windjammers: Songs of the Great Lakes Sailors” by Ivan H. Walton and Joe Grimm, 2002 here)

So on Mudcats a heated debate has opened up: “The words “Hang, boys, hang,” are used in a topsail-halliard hoist, when sweating up the yard “two blocks” where, in swaying off, the whole weight of the body is used. The sing-out, from some old shellback, usually being words such as “Hang, heavy! Hang, buttocks! Hang you sons of ——-, Hang.” After setting the topsails, we gave her the main-topgallant sail, which was all she could carry in a heavy head-sea. The decks were awash all day. “…. the chantey was sung with a jerk and a swing as only chanteys in 6/8 time can be sung. While the words were of Negro extraction, yet it was a great favorite with us and sung nearly every time the topsails were hoisted.” (from Frederick Pease Harlow, 1928, The Making of a Sailor, Dover reprint of Publication Number 17 of the Marine Research Society, Salem, MA here)

Definitely a perfect “pirate song”! I found this piece of film about the golden age of the great vessels in which the song is sung.

Oh they call me hanging Johnny.
Away, boys, away.
They says I hangs for money.
Oh hang, boys, hang.
And first I hanged my Sally
and then I hanged my granny.

JOHN SHORT VERSION

Sharp publishes a set of words in which the shantyman does not himself hang people and indeed sings, I never hung nobody. Hugill is adamant (as is Terry) that no shantyman ever claimed that anyone other than himself was the hangman, and that “Sentimental verses like some collectors give were never sung – Sailor John hanged any person or thing he would think about without a qualm.” Checking these ‘some collectors’, one finds several who elect only to hang the bad guys – liars, murderers, etc. – are these the verses Hugill means by ‘sentimental’ or is he having a go at Sharp for the shantyman not being the hangman himself? Sharp’s notebooks show that he recorded from Short the same as he published. It could be that Short is self-censoring but it seems unlikely given that Short seems happy, in various other shanties, to sing text that might not be regarded as genteel (e.g. Nancy, Lucy Long, Shanadore). Short was, however, a deeply religious man and, if this is not simply an early and less developed form of the shanty, then he may have deliberately avoided casting himself as hangman – we will never know! Notwithstanding, and contrary to Hugill’s assertion, there was at least one shantyman who actually sang I never hung nobody.

Collectors’/publishers’ reactions to the shanty are curiously mixed: Bullen merely notes that “shanties whose choruses were adapted for taking two pulls in them… were exceedingly useful”, Fox-Smith that it had an “almost macabre irony which is not found in any other shanty”, and Maitland that “This is about as doleful a song as I ever heard” but, in an almost poetic description points out that “there’s a time when it comes in. For instance after a heavy blow, getting more sail on the ship. The decks are full of water and the men cannot keep their feet. The wind has gone down, but the seas are running heavy. A big comber comes over the rail; the men are washed away from the rope. If it wasn’t for the man at the end of the rope gathering in the slack as the men pull, all the work would have to be done over again.” – Horses for courses! (from here)

Tom Brown from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1


They called me hanging Johnny,
urrhay-i-, urrhay-i-,
They called me hanging Johnny
so hang, boys, hang
They hanged me poor old father
They hanged me poor old mother
Yes they hanged me mother
Me sister and me brother
They hanged me sister Sally
They strung her up so canny
They said I handeg for money
But I never hanged nobody
Oh boys we’ll haul and hang the ship
oh haul her ropes so neat
We’ll hang him forever,
We’ll hang for better weather,
A rope, a beam, a ladder,
I’ll hang ye all together

ADDITIONAL VERSIONS

Stan Ridgway from  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006. Masterful interpretation that transforms the shanty into a melancholy folk song

The Salts live in a jaunty version

 Stan Ridgway lyrics
I
They call me hanging Johnny,
yay (away )-hay-i-o
I never hanged nobody
hang, boys, hang
Well first I hanged your mother
Me sister and me brother
I’d hang to make things jolly
I’d hang all wrong and folly
A rope, a beam, a ladder,
I’ll hang ye all together
Well next I hanged me granny
I’d hang the wholly family
They call me hanging Johnny,
I never hanged nobody
II
Come hang, come haul together,
Come hang for finer weather,
Hang on from the yardarm
Hang the sea and buy a big farm
They call me hanging Johnny,
I never hanged nobody
I’d hang the mates and skippers,
I’d hang ‘em by their flippers
I’d hang the highway robber,
I’d hang the burglar jobber;
I’d hang a noted liar,
I’d hang a bloated friar;
They say I hung a copper,
I gave him the long dropper

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72779
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/hangingjohnny.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Hanging_Johnny
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/hanging.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/thycalme.htm

Heave away, my Johnny sea shanty

Leggi in Italiano

The second sea shanty sung by A.L. Lloyd in the film Moby Dick, shot by John Huston in 1956, is a windlass shanty or a capstan shanty. As we can clearly see in the sequence, crew action the old anchor winch.
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented on the cover notes of the album “Thar She Blows” by Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd (1957)”A favourite shanty for windlass work, when the ship was being warped out of harbour at the start of a trip. A log rope would be made fast to a ring at the quayside and run round a bollard at the pierhead and back to the ship’s windlass. The shantyman would sit on the windlass head and sing while the spokesters strained to turn the windlass. As they turned, the rope would round the drum and the ship nosed seaward amid the tears of the women and the cheers of the men. This version was sung by the Indian Ocean whalers of the 1840s“.

The song starts at 1:50, when the catwalk is pulled off and the old spike windlass is activated, model replaced by the brake windlass around 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) the curse of every sailor at the time of sailing ships: Cape Horn

This sea shanty presents a great variety of texts even with different stories, so sometimes it is a song of the whaleship other times a song of emigration. (a collection of various text versions here).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Dubbing Cape Horn was a feared affair by sailors, being a stretch of sea almost perpetually upset by storms, a cemetery of numerous unlucky ships.
The wind dominated the bow, so the ship was pushed back for days with the crew exhausted by effort and icy water that was breaking on all sides.

Louis Killen from Farewell Nancy 1964  “capstan stands upright and is pushed round by trudging men. A windlass, serving much the same function, lies horizontally and is revolved by means of bars pulled from up to down. So windlass songs are generally more rhythmical than capstan shanties. Heave Away is usually considered a windlass song. Originally, it had words concerning a voyage of Irish migrants to America. Later, this text fell away. The version sung here was “devised” by A. L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick

Assassin’s Creed Rogue

I
There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.
II
The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls, we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
III
Farewell to you, my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
IV
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.

NOTES
1) Kingston upon Hull (or, more simply, Hull) is a renowned fishing port from which flotillas for fishing in the North Sea started from the Middle Ages. In the song, the departing ships also head for the Indian Ocean (see routes )

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  from Just Another Day 2014, from the repertoire of the seafaring songs of Minehead (Somerset) collected by Cecil Sharp from only two sources – the retired captains Lewis and Vickery.

trad and Tom Brown verses
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.

NEWFOUNDLAND VERSION

Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook # 49) was released by Pius Power, Southeast Bight,  in 1979 Genevieve Lehr writes “this is a song which was often used to establish a rhythm for hauling up the anchors aboard the fishing schooners. Many of these ‘heave-up shanties’ were old ballads or contemporary ones, and very often topical verses were made up on the spur of the moment and added to the song to make the song last as long as the task itself.”

The Fables from Tear The House Down, 1998 a cheerful version with a decidedly country arrangement

I
Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
III
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
IV
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”

NOTES
1) duds in this context means “clothes” but more generally the large canvas bag containing the sailor’s baggage
2) Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova for the Marconi experiment, is a city in Canada, capital of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located in the peninsula of Avalon, which is part of the Newfoundland island
3) clearly a “flying” verse taken from the many farewells here is Nancy answering

 

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
 emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/default.htm

Blow Boys Blow (Banks of Sacramento)

Leggi in italiano

“Blow Boys Blow” or “Hoodah Day Shanty” but also “Banks of Sacramento” is a popular sea shanty with several versions.

JOHN SHORT VERSION

With the title “Blow Boys Blow” the version of John Short mixes the verses of “Banks od Sacramento” with the minstrel song “Campton Races” written by Stephen Foster in 1850. But some scholars are inclined to believe that it is the sea shanty on Golden Rush in California, to precede the minstrel song for a few years
Tom Brown Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1  
The authors write in the project notes “Neither Sharp nor Terry published this shanty.  All the other collectors give it as a capstan song, Hugill, in particular, says it was a favourite for raising the anchor.  Short gave it as a capstan shanty, and sang Sharp one verse only – straight from Stephen Foster’s Camptown Races which was written in 1850.  Doerflinger credits the Hutchinson Family, a famous New England concert troupe with the song Ho For California!, the chorus of which ran: “Then Ho Brothers Ho! To California go, There’s plenty of gold in the world, we’re told, On the Banks of the Sacramento” and dates it to the 1849 gold rush when, between 1849 and 1852, over ninety thousand emigrants shipped ‘round the corner’ (Cape Horn) in the hopes of finding riches in the gold fields. It was Sharp’s editorial policy that made him omit this shanty from his publication: as he said in the introduction to English Folk-Chanteys, “I have omitted certain popular and undoubtedly genuine chanteys, such as ” The Banks of the Sacramento”, ”Poor Paddy works on the Railway”, “Can’t you dance the Polka,” “Good‑bye, Fare you Well,”,etc.,… on the ground that the tunes are not of folk-origin, but rather the latter‑day adaptations of popular, “composed” songs of small musical value.” Doerflinger quotes three different sets of words that have been used for this shanty: we have expanded Short’s verse with others that relate to the message of the chorus. It is another of the many shanties that ultimately derive from contemporary song-writing for the stage in concert-troupe and minstrel show – and this is reflected in our use of fiddle and banjo.”


I
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah(1), to my hoodah,
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah, hoodah day,
It’s round Cape Horn(2) in the month o’ May
now around Cape Horn
we are bound to straigh
Blow boys blow,
For California O,
There’s
plots of gold
so I’ve been told
On the banks of Sacramento (3).

II
It’s to Sacramento we ‘ll go
For we are the bullies (4) who kick ‘er through.
Round the Horn an’ up the Line
We’re the bullies for to make ‘er shine.
III
Around Cape Stiff (2) in seventy days
it’s two thousand miles or so they said
Breast yer bars (5) an’ bend yer backs,
Heave an’ make yer spare ribs (6) crack.

 NOTES
1) or Doo-dah! From  “Who da hell is dat?” Who-Da…hoodah
2) Cape Horn said by the sailors “Cape Stiff”, is often mentioned in the sea shanties, it’s the black cliff at the end of South America, where the masses of water and air from the Atlantic and the Pacific collide, causing winds that they range from 160 to 220 km / h and an almost prohibitive ascent to the west. Several factors combine to make the passage around Cape Horn one of the most hazardous shipping routes in the world (cemetery of numerous unlucky ships): strong winds, waves and wandering icebergs.
3) the Californian gold rush began in January 1848 right on the banks of the Sacramento
4) “bully” has many meanings: in a positive sense a “very good” sailor, or “first rate”, but “bully” is also the troublemaker always ready to fight.
5) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars.
6) “spare ribs” are pork ribs

LINK
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/addition-song-with-recordings/banks-of-sacramento/
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sacramento/index.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/singandh.htm
http://cazoo.org/folksongs/BanksOfSacramento.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14644
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=497

Whip Jamboree sea shanty

Le versioni folk (in primis gli Spinners) di questo sea shanty sono state modellate sul testo raccolto nel 1914 da Cecil Sharp dal marinaio John Short di Watchet .
Si ritiene che lo shanty derivi dalla minstrel song Whoop Jamboree (cantata da Daniel Emmett circa 1850).

ASCOLTA Robert Shaw Chorale

ASCOLTA United States Navy Band live su arrangiamento di Robert Shaw e Alice Parker

ASCOLTA Roger Watson, Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify) seconda parte della traccia Santy Anna / Whip Jamboree

Versione Short Sharp Shanties
I
Now my lads be of good cheer
For the Irish land will soon draw near
And in few more days
we’ll sight Cape Clear (1)
Oh Jenny get your oatcake (2) done
[Chorus:]
Whip Jamboree
Whip Jamboree
Oh you long- tailed sailor(3)
poke it up behind
Whip Jamboree
Whip Jamboree
Oh Jenny get your oatcake done
II
Cape Clear it is in sight
We’ll be off Holyhead
by tomorrow night
And we’ll shape our course (4)
for the Rock Light
Oh Jenny get your oatcake done
[Chorus]
III
And my boys we’re off Holyhead
No more salt beef or weevily bread (5)
One man in the chains for to heave the lead
Oh Jenny get your oatcake done
[Chorus]
IV
And now my lads we’re round the Rock,
All hammocks lashed and sea-chests all locked
And we’ll haul her into the Waterloo Dock
Oh Jenny get your oatcake done
[Chorus]
V
And now my lads we’re all in dock
We’ll be off to Dan Lowrie’s (6) on the spot;
And now we’ll have a good roundabout,
Oh Jenny get your oatcake done
[Chorus]
Traduzione italiano  Cattia Salto
I
Ora ragazzi state di buon umore
perchè la terra irlandese presto si avvicinerà e in pochi altri giorni avvisteremo Cape Clear
Oh Jenny ha preparato il tuo biscotto
Coro
Whip Jamboree
Whip Jamboree
oh tu marinaio dalla lunga coda
spingilo dietro
Whip Jamboree
Whip Jamboree
Oh Jenny ha preparato il tuo biscotto
II
Cape Clear è in vista
supereremo Holyhead
entro domani notte
e terremo la rotta
per Rock Light
Oh Jenny ha preparato il tuo biscotto
Coro
III
E ragazzi miei quando saremo lontano da Holyhead, niente più carne salata o pane secco, un uomo nelle file per tirare la drizza
Oh Jenny ha preparato il tuo biscotto
Coro
IV
E ora ragazzi miei stiamo doppiano il Faro
tutte le brande fissate e le casse tutte chiuse
e la porteremo nel molo di
Waterloo
Oh Jenny ha preparato il tuo biscotto
Coro
V
E ora ragazzi miei siamo sulla banchina
andremo al Dan Lowrie per divertirci
e poi faremo una bella baraonda
Oh Jenny ha preparato il tuo biscotto
Coro


NOTE
1) Cape Clear Island è una isoletta a 8 miglia dalla costa occidentale del Cork il luogo abitato più a sud dell’Irlanda.
2) tipici dolcetti scozzesi e chi vuol fraintendere, fraintenda
3) la versione di Short “black man” è stata rivista secondo il politicamente corretto
4 anche scritto come courded
5) oppure more salt bread
6) teatro di Liverpool in in Paradise Street vicino al Waterloo Dock

FONTI
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149468
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/whipjamboree.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/whip-jamboree.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46744
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=7862

Lucy Long sea shanty

Derivata da una minstrel song in voga nel 1842, la versione sea shanty è al contrario piuttosto rara. La versione di John Short come sempre è particolare, Short sembra mettere insieme una verie di versi non correlati. Così scrivono i curatori del progetto: Indeed, Short’s text for Won’t You Go My Way, feels more like deliberate positive reworking of the Minstrels’ original than this set. It wasn’t until we started selecting shanties for each CD that we realised that Short’s tune for Lucy Long is actually closely akin to So Early in the Morning although it’s deceptive!
Ovviamente Miss Lucy è una “signorinella allegra” e l’incontro con il marinaio appena sbarcato è squisitamente carnale.

ASCOLTA Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


To my way-ay-ay ha, ha
My Johnny, boys, ha ha
Why don’t you try for to wring[1]
Miss Lucy Long?

I
When I was out one mornig fair
To view the views
and take the air.
II
‘Twas there I met Miss Lucy fair,
‘Twas there we met I do declare.
III
Oh, I raised my hat and I said “Hello”
Hitched her up and I took her in tow
IV
Well, I wrung her all night and I wrung her all day
I wrung her before she went away
V
Oh she left me there upon the quay
Left me there and went away
VI
Now Miss Lucy had a baby[2] ,
She dressed it all in green-o
VII
Was you ever on the Brumalow[3] ,
Where the Yankee boys are all the go?
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
A me ay-ay ha, ha
mio marinaio, ragazzi ha, ha perchè non provi a “corteggiare”
la signorina Lucy Long?
I
Sono uscito un bel mattino, per ammirare il panorama
e prendere il fresco
II
Ecco che t’incontro la bella signorina Lucy, fu là che c’incontrammo così dico
III
Oh sollevai il cappello e dissi “Ciao”
l’afferrai e la presi a rimorchio
IV
La corteggiai tutta la notte e la corteggiai tutto il giorno,
la corteggiai prima che se ne andasse
V
Mi lasciò là sulla banchina
mi lasciò là e andò via
VI
Ora la signorina Lucy ha avuto un bambino e lo veste tutto in verde.
VII
Sei mai stato a Broomielaw? Dove i marinai americani sono tutti a passeggio?

NOTE
1) un eufemismo molto esplicito: Hugill dice “ring” trovato anche “woo”
2) mettere incinta la ragazza con cui si è fatto sesso era un tempo sinonimo di grande virilità maschile, così nelle canzoni del mare i marinai parlano con noncuranza delle loro paternità!
3) Broomielaw è il vecchio pontile di Glasgow sulla sponda settentrionale del fiume Clyde

FONTI
http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/lucy-long–see-also-rock-the-cradle-lucy-.aspx
http://bluegrassmessengers.com.temp.realssl.com/miss-lucy-long–version-2-stan-hugill-.aspx
https://www.paddlesteamers.org/scottish/last-paddle-steamer-at-the-broomielaw/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/miss-lucy-long.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=119975

Blow Boys Blow (Banks of Sacramento)

Read the post in English

Anche con il titolo “Hoodah Day Shanty” ma anche “Banks of Sacramento” è una sea shanty che presenta svariate versioni dovute alla sua vasta popolarità.

LA VERSIONE JOHN SHORT

Con il titolo “Blow Boys Blow” la versione di John Short mescola i versi di “Banks od Sacramento” con la minstrel song “Campton Races” scritta da Stephen Foster nel 1850. Ma alcuni studiosi sono propensi a credere che sia la sea shanty sulla Golden Rush in California, a precedere di qualche anno la minstrel song
Tom Brown Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1  
Nelle note del progetto gli autori scrivono “Né Sharp né Terry hanno pubblicato questa sea shanty. Tutti gli altri collezionisti la danno come una canzone all’argano, Hugill, in particolare, dice che era per l’alzata dell’ancora. Short la classifica come capstan shanty, e ha cantato a Sharp solo un verso- direttamente dalla Campbell Races di Stephen Foster che ha scritto nel 1850. Doerflinger l’accredita alla famiglia Hutchinson, una famosa compagnia concertistica del New England con il titolo “Ho For California !”, con il coro  che recita “Then Ho Brothers Ho! To California go, There’s plenty of gold in the world, we’re told, On the Banks of the Sacramento” e la data alla corsa all’oro del 1849 quando, tra il 1849 e il 1852, oltre novantamila emigranti navigarono” round the corner “( Capo Horn) nella speranza di trovare la ricchezza. È stata la politica editoriale di Sharp a fargli omettere questa sea shanty dalla sua pubblicazione: così disse nell’introduzione ai English Folk-Chanteys “Ho omesso certi canti popolari e indubbiamente genuini, come ” The Banks of the Sacramento”,” Poor Paddy works on the Railway”, “Can’t you dance the Polka,” “Good‑bye, Fare you Well,” ecc., per il fatto che le melodie non sono di origine popolare, ma piuttosto l’adattamento dell’ultima ora di canzoni popolari, “composte” di scarso valore musicale.” Doerflinger cita tre diverse serie di parole che sono state usate per questa sea shanty: abbiamo ampliato il verso di Short con altri che si riferiscono al messaggio del coro. È un’altra delle tante sea shanty che derivano in ultima analisi dal cantautorato contemporaneo per il palcoscenico vaudeville dell’avanspettacolo – e questo si riflette nel nostro uso del violino e del banjo


I
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah(1), to my hoodah,
I went out with my hat caved in
Hoodah, hoodah day,
It’s round Cape Horn(2) in the month o’ May
now around Cape Horn
we are bound to straigh
Blow boys blow,
For California O,
There’s
plots of gold
so I’ve been told
On the banks of Sacramento (3).

II
It’s to Sacramento we ‘ll go
For we are the bullies (4) who kick ‘er through.
Round the Horn an’ up the Line
We’re the bullies for to make ‘er shine.
III
Around Cape Stiff (2) in seventy days
it’s two thousand miles or so they said
Breast yer bars (5) an’ bend yer backs,
Heave an’ make yer spare ribs (6) crack.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Uscivo con il mio berretto floscio
Hoodah, to my hoodah,
Uscivo con il mio berretto floscio
Hoodah, hoodah day.
A doppiare Capo Horn nel mese di Maggio
verso Capo Horn
siamo diretti
Forza ragazzi forza
per la California
c’è un sacco d’oro
così mi hanno detto

sulle rive del Sacramento
II
A Sacramento andremo
perchè siamo noi i maschioni che la fanno divertire.
A doppiare l’Horn e oltre all’Equatore
siamo i bulli che la faranno risplendere.
III
A doppiare Capo Stiff in 70 giorni
sono duemila miglia o così dicono.
Petto sulle aspe, e piegate le schiene
tirate fino a rompervi le costole

 NOTE
1) hoodah ha diversi significati gergali, anche  scritto come Doo-dah! Dall’esclamazione  “Who da hell is dat?” Who-Da…hoodah
2) detto dai marinai “Cape Stiff”, il temuto Capo Horn è spesso menzionato negli shanties, la nera scogliera all’estremità dell’America Meridionale dove si scontrano le masse d’acqua e d’aria dell’Atlantico e del Pacifico, provocando venti che vanno dai 160 ai 220 Km/h e una risalita verso Ovest quasi proibitiva. Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, per i forti venti, le grani onde e gli iceberg vaganti, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
 “Grandi Naufragi” impossibile stabilire il numero delle navi che sono andate perdute in queste estreme acque tra le onde alte anche 20 metri. Tempeste di neve, violenti uragani, nebbie e pericolosi iceberg alla deriva, fanno capire quanto sia stato difficile passare indenni per la via di Capo Horn. I pochi naufraghi dovevano affrontare oltre all’inospitalità di quelle terre anche l’avversità degli indigeni che aggredivano i superstiti per depredarli di alcool ed armi. (tratto da qui)
3) la corsa all’oro californiano ebbe inizio nel gennaio del 1848 proprio sulle rive del Sacramento
4) bully è un termine da marinai con molti significati: in senso positivo per dire che il marinaio è un tipo “very good”, o “first rate”, ma bully è anche l’attaccabrighe sempre pronto a fare a pugni.  Quando il comandante dava del bullies alla sua ciurma gli appellava come degli “sbruffoni”
5) Breast the bars: leaning deeply so as to push the weight of the body at the chest against the capstan bars.
6) spare ribs sono le costine del maiale

FONTI
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/SSSnotes.htm
https://mnheritagesongbook.net/the-songs/addition-song-with-recordings/banks-of-sacramento/
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sacramento/index.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/singandh.htm
http://cazoo.org/folksongs/BanksOfSacramento.htm
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14644
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=497

The bully boat is coming

Per questa canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) è più corretto parlare di famiglia, si collega infatti al vasto filone contenente la parola Ranzo nel ritornello. (vedi)
La versione di John Short dal titolo “The Bully Boat” (Ranzo Ray) è quella che circolava lungo i grandi fiumi del Sud (USA) tra gli equipaggi dei battelli che portavano il cotone lungo il Mississipi o l’Alabama verso i porti della costa: Another capstan shanty often called Ranzo Ray.  It probably originated from Negro chants that were used in the Southern USA ‘cotton ports’ to work the jack-screws that compressed cotton bales into the holds of ships.  These songs often started with the crews of the river-boats that brought the bales of cotton down rivers like the Mississipi or the Alabama to coastal ports like New Orleans or Mobile. (tratto da qui)
Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


Ooh the bully boat is comin’
don’t you hear the paddles rollin'(1)
Ranzo (2), Ranzo, hurray, hurray!
Ooh the bully boat is comin’
don’t ye hear the paddles rollin’
Ranzo, Ranzo Ray!
Ooh, the bully boat is comin’
down the Mississippi floatin’;
As I walked down one morning (3)
for to hear the steamboat rolling;
There I met a maiden
with her basket she was laden
Ooh, I’m bound away to leave you
I never will deceive you;
when I come again to meet you
it’ with kiss I will greet you
Ooh the bully boat is comin’
don’t ye hear the paddles rollin’
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Oh la nave dei bravacci è in arrivo
non sentite il rollio delle pale
Ranzo, Ranzo urrà, urrà!
Oh la nave dei bravacci è in arrivo
non sentite il rollio delle pale
Ranzo, Ranzo urrà, urrà!
Oh la nave dei bravacci è in arrivo
e galleggia sul Mississippi;
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino per sentire il rollio del battello a vapore
incontrai una fanciulla che era carica del suo cesto
“Oh sono in partenza e ti lascio
ma non ti tradirò mai;
e quando ritornerò per rivederti
ti saluterò con un bacio!”
Oh la nave dei bravacci è in arrivo
non sentite il rollio delle pale?

NOTE
1) scritto anche come “paddles roaring”, è la grande ruota a pale utilizzata come sistema propulsivo sui battelli che navigavano in acque relativamente calme.
2) John Short dice Rando
3) chi canta rifersice il dialogo sentito “per caso” tra il marinaio in partenza e la sua ragazza

FONTI
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=4885

Impiccalo Johnny, sea shanty

Read the post in English

“Hanging Johnny” è una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) del tipo  halyard shanty  ( i lavori di tiro di scotte e drizze per issare e ammainare vele e pennoni) in cui si parla di un presunto boia che impicca (ovvero manda a quel paese bonariamente) tutti coloro che gli danno fastidio! Subito gli studiosi hanno voluto trovare una figura storica che incarnasse questo boia giustiziere e così è spuntato il nome di Jack Ketch famigerato boia nella Londra seicentesca.

Ma per i marinai la frase ” hanging Johnny” ha tutto un altro significato.

IL LAVORO DEL MARINAIO IMPICCATO

Per issare le vele più pesanti si seguiva una strana procedura:  i marinai più giovani e agili (e meno pagati essendo degli apprendisti) si arrampicavano sui pennoni e dopo aver agguantato una drizza  saltavano nel vuoto restando appesi come tanti impiccati. Man mano che scendevano erano coadiuvati dagli sforzi dei restanti marinai che li facevano arrivare piano piano sul ponte.
“Joys ha spiegato che “hanging Johnny” non si riferiva al boia di stato, ma piuttosto agli agili giovani marinai che, quando una vela doveva essere issata, si arrampicavano sull’albero e “dondolavano” sulla relativa drizza. Correvano poi verso ponte mentre gli uomini ai piedi dell’albero li portavano giù con le loro prese successive. Joys ha ricordato che uno chanteyman avrebbe sempre detto ai ragazzi quando dondolare urlando loro: “Appendetevi, bastardi, appendetevi!” Poi, mentre i ragazzi erano appesi alla drizza cinquanta piedi o più sopra il ponte, iniziava la sua canzone e l’equipaggio faceva due tiri su ogni coro. Quando i ragazzi raggiungevano il ponte, si sarebbero accodati dietro agli altri uomini e tirato con loro fino al termine del lavoro.
Joys ha aggiunto che la parola “hang” era “la miglior maledetta parola per tirare una drizza”. Ashley ha detto che la melodia era “un po ‘lugubre, ma buona per sollevare delle vele leggere”, sottolineando che le parole hanno permesso ai marinai di prendersela, bonariamente, con tutti i veri e presunti nemici, “se il lavoro durava abbastanza a lungo”
  (tradotto da “Windjammers: Songs of the Great Lakes Sailors” Ivan H. Walton e Joe Grimm, 2002 qui)

Così su Mudcats si è aperto un acceso dibattito tra chi interpreta l’hanging come una vera e propria esecuzione e chi invece propende per il gergo marinaresco: “The words “Hang, boys, hang,” are used in a topsail-halliard hoist, when sweating up the yard “two blocks” where, in swaying off, the whole weight of the body is used. The sing-out, from some old shellback, usually being words such as “Hang, heavy! Hang, buttocks! Hang you sons of ——-, Hang.” After setting the topsails, we gave her the main-topgallant sail, which was all she could carry in a heavy head-sea. The decks were awash all day. “…. the chantey was sung with a jerk and a swing as only chanteys in 6/8 time can be sung. While the words were of Negro extraction, yet it was a great favorite with us and sung nearly every time the topsails were hoisted.” (tratto da Frederick Pease Harlow, 1928, The Making of a Sailor, Doverristampa della pubblicazione numero 17 del Marine Research Society, Salem, MA qui)

Sicuramente una  perfetta “pirate song”! Ho trovato questo spezzone di film sull’epoca d’oro dei grandi vascelli in cui viene cantata la canzone.

Oh they call me hanging Johnny
Away, boys, away.
They says I hangs for money.
Oh hang, boys, hang.
And first I hanged my Sally
and then I hanged my granny.
Mi chiamano Johnny“patibolo”[1]
tirate ragazzi, tirate
e dicono che mi appendo per denaro[2]

appendetevi, ragazzi, appendetevi
per prima impiccherei Sally
e poi impiccherei  mia nonna

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Sharp publishes a set of words in which the shantyman does not himself hang people and indeed sings, I never hung nobody. Hugill is adamant (as is Terry) that no shantyman ever claimed that anyone other than himself was the hangman, and that “Sentimental verses like some collectors give were never sung – Sailor John hanged any person or thing he would think about without a qualm.” Checking these ‘some collectors’, one finds several who elect only to hang the bad guys – liars, murderers, etc. – are these the verses Hugill means by ‘sentimental’ or is he having a go at Sharp for the shantyman not being the hangman himself? Sharp’s notebooks show that he recorded from Short the same as he published. It could be that Short is self-censoring but it seems unlikely given that Short seems happy, in various other shanties, to sing text that might not be regarded as genteel (e.g. Nancy, Lucy Long, Shanadore). Short was, however, a deeply religious man and, if this is not simply an early and less developed form of the shanty, then he may have deliberately avoided casting himself as hangman – we will never know! Notwithstanding, and contrary to Hugill’s assertion, there was at least one shantyman who actually sang I never hung nobody.

Collectors’/publishers’ reactions to the shanty are curiously mixed: Bullen merely notes that “shanties whose choruses were adapted for taking two pulls in them… were exceedingly useful”, Fox-Smith that it had an “almost macabre irony which is not found in any other shanty”, and Maitland that “This is about as doleful a song as I ever heard” but, in an almost poetic description points out that “there’s a time when it comes in. For instance after a heavy blow, getting more sail on the ship. The decks are full of water and the men cannot keep their feet. The wind has gone down, but the seas are running heavy. A big comber comes over the rail; the men are washed away from the rope. If it wasn’t for the man at the end of the rope gathering in the slack as the men pull, all the work would have to be done over again.” – Horses for courses! (tratto da qui)

Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1


They called me hanging Johnny,
urrhay-i-, urrhay-i-,
They called me hanging Johnny
so hang, boys, hang
They hanged me poor old father
They hanged me poor old mother
Yes they hanged me mother
Me sister and me brother
They hanged me sister Sally
They strung her up so canny
They said I handeg for money
But I never hanged nobody
Oh boys we’ll haul and hang the ship
oh haul her ropes so neat
We’ll hang him forever,
We’ll hang for better weather,
A rope, a beam, a ladder,
I’ll hang ye all together
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Mi chiamano Johnny patibolo
urrhay-i-, urrhay-i
Mi chiamano Johnny patibolo

appendetevi, ragazzi, appendetevi
Impiccarono il mio povero vecchio  e impiccarono la mia povera vecchia
Si! Impiccarono mia madre,
mia sorella e mio fratello,
impiccarono mia sorella Sally
l’appesero, così scaltra
dicono che mi appendevo per denaro
ma non ho mai impiccato nessuno.
oh ragazzi isseremo e appenderemo la nave tireremo le drizze per bene.
Lo appenderemo per sempre
lo appenderemo per il bel tempo
Una cima, una trave e una scala
e vi appenderò tutti insieme.

ULTERIORI VERSIONI

Stan Ridgway in  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006. Magistrale interpretazione che trasforma la shanty in una canzone folk un po’ malinconica

The Salts live in una versione sbarazzina

VERSIONE Stan Ridgway
I
They call me hanging Johnny,
yay (away )-hay-i-o
I never hanged nobody
hang, boys, hang
Well first I hanged your mother
Me sister and me brother
I’d hang to make things jolly
I’d hang all wrong and folly
A rope, a beam, a ladder,
I’ll hang ye all together
Well next I hanged me granny
I’d hang the wholly family
They call me hanging Johnny,
I never hanged nobody
II
Come hang, come haul together,
Come hang for finer weather,
Hang on from the yardarm
Hang the sea and buy a big farm
They call me hanging Johnny,
I never hanged nobody
I’d hang the mates and skippers,
I’d hang ‘em by their flippers
I’d hang the highway robber,
I’d hang the burglar jobber;
I’d hang a noted liar,
I’d hang a bloated friar;
They say I hung a copper,
I gave him the long dropper
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mi chiamano Johnny patibolo
yay(away )-hay-i-o
ma non ho mai impiccato nessuno.
hang, boys, hang
Così prima impiccherò tua madre,
mia sorella e mio fratello,
mi appenderei per far andare meglio le cose e impiccherei tutte le cose sbagliate e folli.
Una cima, una trave e una scala
e vi appendo tutti insieme; poi impiccherò la nonna e l’intera famiglia.
Mi chiamano Johnny patibolo
ma non ho mai impiccato nessuno.
II
Vieni ad aggrapparti e tiriamo insieme, vieni ad aggrapparti perchè il tempo migliori, aggrappati al pennone,
‘fanculo il mare e compra una fattoria!
Mi chiamano Johnny patibolo
ma non ho mai impiccato nessuno.
Impiccherei compagni e comandante,
li appenderei per le pinne;
impiccherei il brigante
impiccherei lo scassinatore; appenderei un bugiardo illustre
appenderei un frate tronfio,
dicono che ho impiccato un poliziotto e l’ho purgato

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72779
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/hangingjohnny.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Hanging_Johnny
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/hanging.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/thycalme.htm

HAUL ON THE BOWLINE

On-a-bowline-215x300Haul on the Bowline [in italiano ala la bolina] è una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) utilizzata come “Short-drag” o  “Short-haul” chantey (shanties).

Alare è un termine nautico che si dice per tirare con forza una cima (per i terricoli un cavo) orizzontalmente o verticalmente “alare la bolina”   è quando si tira verso prora il lato verticale sopra vento delle vele quadre, in modo che prendano il vento il meglio possibile, così l’andatura di bolina, nella navigazione a vela, è la rotta di una nave che naviga stringendo al massimo possibile il vento. Con il termine bolina oltre che una cima si indica anche un tipico nodo marinaresco, la gassa d’amante (il nodo a occhiello).

hauling-hugill

UN CANTO D’EPOCA TUDOR?

Gli studiosi vogliono far risalire il brano all’epoca di Enrico VIII proprio perchè l’importanza della cima di bolina è venuta a diminuire con l’evoluzione del galeone nel vascello e l’introduzione delle vele di straglio (o di strallo) (in inglese staysails)..
A. L. Lloyd writes in his Folk Song in England that the shanty may also be so old ‘because the words ‘Hail out the Bollene’ occur – but as a command, not a shanty – in the Compaynt of Scotland (1549)’ but claims that ‘There are no firm grounds for imagining that the shanty rose earlier than the nineteenth century’ and that it is more likely based on the Irish air ‘Savourneen Deelish’. Regardless, It’s catchy, work-paced tune meant that it was sung right up until the final days of sail, though it was applied to other more modern sailing ropes. The pulling of the rope came on the ‘haul’ at the end of each verse. (tratto da qui)
ASCOLTA A. L. Lloyd

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed III
ASCOLTA Bob Neuwirth in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI– 2006 interessante l’aggiunta ritmica e la melodia del violino

Haul on the bowline,
homeward we are goin’
Haul on the bowline, the bowline Haul!
.. before she start (the -bully- ship she is) a-rollin’
.. the captain (1) is a-growlin,
.. so early in the morning
.. to Bristol (to London) we are going
..Kitty is my darlin’
..Kitty lives in (comes from) Liverpool,
..It’s far cry to payday
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
ala la bolina, che a casa stiamo andando,
ala la bolina, la bolina ala!
(prima che) che la nave sta rollando,
che il capitano sta brontolando,
già di buon mattino,
che a Bristol stiamo andando,
Kitty è il mio tesoro
e vive a Liverpool,
è lontano l’annuncio del giorno di paga.

NOTE
1) old man, skipper, chief mate

Altre strofe con termini nautici più specifici sono:
haul the bowlin’, the wind it is a-howlin’
haul the bowlin’ the fore and maintop bowlin’
haul the bowlin’, the main-topgallant bowlin’
(in italiano: ala la bolina, che il vento sta soffiando, ala la bolina, la bolina di gabbia e di parrocchetto,  ala la bolina, la bolina di gran velaccio)

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Nel progetto Short Sharp Shanties il brano è abbinato in un set: Haul on the Bowline / Paddy Doyle / Johnnie Bowker
ASCOLTA Keith Kendrick, Jim Mageean, Tom Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


I PARTE: Keith Kendrick
I
Haul on the bowline,
Kitty you are my darlin’
Haul on the bowline, the bowline Haul!
A ghost ship had a foretop,
fore and main and bowline;
Haul on the bowline,
the bowline Haul!

A ghost ship had a maintop,
main and mizen to bowline;
Haul on the bowline, the bowline Haul!
CHORUS
Haul on the bowline,
the bowline Haul!

Haul on the bowline,
Kitty you are my darlin’
Haul on the bowline,
the bowline Haul!

II
Ten thousand miles to go boys,
hauling on the bowline
Ten thousand miles then back again and hauling on the bowline
CHORUS
III
A man on the topsyard to gang and royal,
a topsyard and to gang boys royal and this guys o
IV
We’ll take this yarm way up aloft and hang on a tie oh
all  your break ‘er back and sprad away freay o
CHORUS

II PARTE Jim Mageean
To me Way-ay-ay yah!
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!
We’ll all drink brandy and gin!
We’ll all shave under the chin!
The dirty ol’ man’s on the poop!
We’ll all throw shit onthe cook

III PARTE Tom Brown
Oh! Do, my Johnny Bo(w)ker,
Come rock and roll me over.
Do, my Johnny Bo(w)ker, do
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I PARTE
I
Ala la bolina,
Kitty sei il mio tesoro,
ala la bolina, la bolina ala!
una nave fantasma ha un albero di perrocchetto, con la bolina di gabbia e di parrocchetto
ala la bolina, la bolina ala!
una nave fantasma ha albero maestro con la bolina di gabbia e di mezzana
ala la bolina, la bolina ala!
CORO
ala la bolina,
la bolina ala!
ala la bolina,
Kitty sei il mio tesoro,
ala la bolina,
la bolina ala!

II
10 mila miglia da fare ragazzi,
da alare la bolina
10 mila miglia poi per ritornare

e da alare la bolina
CORO
III
in fase di elaborazione

NOTE
1) old man, skipper, chief mate

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/haulonthebowline.html
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/Doe009b.html
http://www.ammiraglia88.it/SEZIONE_NORMALE/PAGINE_SITO/velieri.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2539

http://thejovialcrew.com/?page_id=667