Sailor’s farewell: on the sailor’s side!

Leggi in italiano

A further variant of “Sailor’s Farewell” is titled “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy” (aka “Swansea Town,” and “The Holy Ground”) found in England, Ireland, Australia, Canada, and the United States. It’s developed on twice directions, on the one hand it’s the typical and cheerful sea shanty, sometimes rough and with a lot of drink, and on the other it becomes a more intimate and fragile vein, which reflects on the solitude and danger of the sea. In these versions the sailor is enlisted in the Royal Navy.

Copper Family: Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy

Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy is one of the best-known songs from the repertoire of the Copper Family. It was published in the first issue of the Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol. 1, No. 1, in 1899, a version also released in Australia and entitled “Lovely Nancy”, in which it is only the handsome sailor who speaks during the separation on the shore.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 from Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger from a free session in front of the pub for “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”

ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) In the part of dialogue ometted Nancy wants to dress up as a sailor to go with him.
3) the reference is always to broadside ballad version in which our johnny (slang term for sailor) has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants Nancy to stay home waiting for him.

AMERICAN/ IRISH VERSION: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan from American Stranger 1997 “I learned this version from the Max Hunter Collection. Hunter was a traveling salesman and amateur folksong collector from Springfield, Missouri, who amassed an impressive number of field recordings from the Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks. When I was a teenager I learned many songs from the cassette tapes of his collection that were housed in the Springfield Public Library.
Hunter recorded this song in 1959 from Bertha Lauderdale, of Fayetteville, Arkansas. She had learned the song from her grandfather, who, in turn, had learned it from his grandmother, when “he was a young child in Ireland.” Since I recorded the song on American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, and Pete Coe have all added it to their repertoires.”

Altan from Local Ground, 2005

ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.

NOTES
1) Ring is a proof of identity of the soldier that will sometimes remain absent for long years
2) hearts of oak rerefers to the wood from which British warships were generally made during the age of sail. The “Heart of oak” is the strongest central wood of the tree.

000brgcf
Sailor’s farewell

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics

BRING US IN GOOD ALE

Bring Us in Good Ale è un wassail song di origine medievale.
Trascrizioni del brano risalgono al 1460 (fonte Bodleian Library di Oxford), il canto era nel repertorio medievale dei menestrelli girovaghi che intrattenevano il pubblico dei villaggi durante le feste e i matrimoni, ed è stato incluso in una raccolta di canti e carols di Natale al tempo di re Enrico VI stampato nel 1847dalla Percy Society di Londra “Songs and Carols”  a cura di Thomas Wright.

E’ un’evidente parodia di The Salutation Carol (carol dell’Annunciazione) i menestrelli infatti  iniziavano in tono serio con “Nowell, Nowell, Nowell this is the salutation of the Angel Gabriel” (eventualmente con qualche strofa del carol) e poi proseguivano con l’invocazione “Portaci della buona birra per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!“, una dimostrazione delle licenziosità che si prendevano i questuanti dopo aver bevuto troppa buona birra, ma anche del clima festoso e godereccio delle più antiche feste del Solstizio d’Inverno (Midwinter o Yule e i Saturnalia). I questuanti non vogliono carne, pane, uova o dolci, ma chiamano a gran voce della buona birra, indirettamente così facendo rendono grazie alla Madonna per l’abbondanza di cibo della stagione.

Ascoltiamo la versione medievale dei Night Watch con “The Salutation Carol” come incipit (continua)

Maddy Prior ha registrato diverse verioni del brano sia con Tim Hart  che con la Carnival Band

Green Matthews (Chris Green & Sophie Matthews) in A Medieval Christmas 2012 (vedi)Maddy Prior & Tim Hart in Summer Solstice 1996 e in Haydays 2003 con la sola voce di Maddy in una versione più lenta e con diversi versi saltati

Young Tradition in The Holly Bears the Crown 1995


Bring us in good ale (1),
and bring us in good ale;
For our Blessed Lady’s sake,
bring us in good ale.
I
Bring us in no brown bread,
for that is made of bran,
Nor bring us in no white bread,
for therein is no game(2);
Bring us in no roastbeef,
for there are many bones(3),
But bring us in good ale,
for that goes down at once
II
Bring us in no bacon,
for that is passing fat,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us enough of that;
Bring us in no mutton,
for that is often lean,
Nor bring us in no tripes,
for they be seldom clean
III
Bring us in no eggs,
for there are many shells,
But bring us in good ale,
and give us nothing else;
Bring us in no butter,
for therein are many hairs;
Nor bring us in no pig’s flesh,
for that will make us boars
IV
Bring us in no puddings,
for therein is all God’s good;
Nor bring us in no venison,
for that is not for our blood(4);
Bring us in no capon’s flesh,
for that is often dear(5);
Nor bring us in no duck’s flesh,
for they slobber in the mere
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Portaci della buona birra,
portaci della buona birra
per l’amore della Madonna Santissima, portaci della buona birra!
I
Non portarci del pane nero
perché è fatto di crusca,
non portarci del pane bianco
perché non è dei nostri.
Non portarci del manzo
perché ci sono troppe ossa,
ma portaci della buona birra,
che vada giù d’un fiato.
II
Non portarci della pancetta,
perché contiene molto grasso,
ma portaci della buona birra
e daccene abbastanza.
Non portarci del montone,
perché è spesso magro,
non portarci la trippa
perché raramente è pulita bene.
III
Non portarci uova
perché ci sono troppi gusci,
ma portaci della buona birra
e non darci altro.
Non portarci il burro
perché ci sono troppi peli,
non portarci carne di maiale
per quello che ci rendono i cinghiali.
IV
Non portarci dolci,
perché sono un bene di Dio,
non ci portare del cervo,
perché non è per la gente comune. Non portarci carne di cappone
per quello che ci è più caro,
non portarci carne di anatra
perché sguazza nel fango

NOTE
1) Nelle Isole Britanniche  si producevano birre non luppolate dette ALE; erano infatti le birre provenienti dal “continente” a contenere luppolo e quindi distinte con una parola diversa BEER! continua
2) trovato scritto anche come gain o grain, nella versione manoscritta invece come game: oltre a gioco, partita in senso colloquiale il termine si usa per dire “essere dei nostri” qui da intendersi come cibo che non si trova alla mensa della gente comune.
3) la carne di manzo non era consumata abitualmente nel Medioevo perché i bovini erano utilizzati nel lavoro dei campi e non allevati per la carne, quindi l’animale era ucciso e macellato solo una volta diventato molto vecchio e ossuto con la carne dura
4) our blood: letteralmente “nostro sangue”, la caccia al cervo era riservata al re e quindi la carne di cervo era mangiata solo dalla gente di sangue nobile.
5) il cappone è un gallo castrato per renderlo più grasso e più tenero

FONTI
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/bring_us_in_good_ale.htm
https://www.traditioninaction.org/Cultural/Music_P_files/P036_Ale.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/goodale.html

Bay of Biscay -Willie O

“Willie the Waterboy” (Willie-O) but also “The bay of Biscay” is considered an Irish variant of the ballad “Sweet William and Lady Margaret” (Child Ballad # 77) particularly widespread in Northern Ireland (Donegal)
Little else is there to say being a version handed down mostly orally
“Willie the Waterboy” (Willie-O) ma anche “The bay of Biscay” è considerata una variante irlandese della ballata “Sweet William and Lady Margaret” (Child Ballad # 77) diffusa in particolare nell’Irlanda del Nord (Donegal)
Poco altro c’è da dire essendo una versione tramandata per lo più oralmente 

Sean Cannon

Tim Hart $ Maddy Prior in Folk Songs of Old England Vol 2. , 1969
The album’s sleeve notes commented: An Irish song of the night visiting variety collected by Geoff Woods from James McKinley of Tra-Narossen, Donegal. Like so many of these songs the drowned sailor, after a seven year absence, appears to his girlfriend in the middle of the night; presumably an extension of the belief that unless a body received Christian burial the soul could not rest in peace.

Karan Casey & John Doyle in Exiles Return 2010


I
My William sails
on board the Tender
And where he is I do not know
For seven long years
I’ve been constantly waiting
Since he crossed
the bay of Biscay-O (1).
II
One night as Mary
lay a sleeping
A knock came
to her bedroom door
Crying “Arise, arise,
oh my dearest Mary,
For to earn one glance
of your William-O.”
III
Young Mary rose,
put on her clothing
And to the bedroom door did go
And there she saw
her William standing
His two pale cheeks
as white as snow.
IV
“Oh William dear,
where are those blushes?
Those blushes I knew
long years ago.”
“Oh Mary dear,
the cold clay has them.
I am only the ghost
of your William-O.”
V
“Oh Mary dear,
the dawn is breaking,
Don’t you think
it’s time for me to go?
I’m leaving you quite broken-hearted
For to cross the Bay of Biscay-O.”
VI
“Had I the gold and all the silver,
And all the money in Mexico,
I would grant it all to the king of Erin
Just to bring me back my William-O.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il mio William salpò
a bordo del Tender
e dove sia non lo so
per sette lunghi anni
l’ho atteso continuamente
da quando attraversò
la baia di Biscaglia -oh 
II
Una notte che Mary
giaceva addormentata,
venne a bussare
alla porta della camera dicendo
“Svegliati, svegliati,
mia carissima Mary,
per dare un’occhiata
al tuo William- oh”
III
La giovane Mary si alzò,
si mise le vesti
e alla porta della camera andò
e là vide il suo
William in piedi
con le guance pallide
bianche come la neve
IV
“Oh caro William,
dove sono le tue guance rosa?
Quelle guance che conoscevo
tanti anni fa?”
“Oh cara Mary,
la fredda terra le ha prese,
sono solo il fantasma
del tuo William – oh”
V
“Oh cara Mary,
l’alba si avvicina
non credi che
sia ora per me di andare?
Ti lascerò a malincuore
per attraversare la Baia di Biscaglia”
VI
“Ho oro e argento
e tutto l’oro del Messico
lo darei per intero al Re d’Irlanda 
solo per avere indietro il mio William”

NOTE
1) il luogo in cui si presume sia affogato il bel William

https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/bayofbiscay.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13440

Over the hills and far away: Tom the piper

A beautiful melody collected by Thomas D’Urfey in his “Pills to Purge Melancholy” still very current has returned to popularity with the TV series Sharpe’s Rifles. Already at that time, what was a romantic melody for a love story, it had become a captivating melody pro-enlistment for the Napoleonic wars (Part one e part two)
[Un bellissima melodia riportata da Thomas D’Urfey nel suo “Pills to Purge Melancholy” ancora attualissima è ritornata alla popolarità con la serie tv Sharpe’s Rifles. Già all’epoca quella che era una melodia romantica per una storia d’amore, era diventata una melodia accattivante e pro arruolamento per le guerre napoleoniche. (vedi prima parte e seconda parte)]

Jocky met with Jenny fair

In Thomas D’Urfey it is a somewhat tormented courtship story; in truth all the song follows the topos of the lover keeped on edge, that is desperate and begs for mercy, to obtain the favors of his Lady
But our Jock should not have been so desperate if he finally concludes
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play
[In Thomas D’Urfey è una storia di corteggiamento un po’ tormentata; in verità tutto il canto segue il topos dell’amante tenuto sulle spine che si dispera e supplica mercede, per ottenere i favori della bella.
Ma il nostro  Jock non doveva essere poi così disperato se alla fine conclude
Poichè è falsa colei che adoro
non mi fiderò più di un’altra donna,
dalla loro seduzione fuggirò via
e sul mio piffero suonerò allegramente”
]

ENGLISH OR SCOTTISH VERSION?
[VERSIONE INGLESE O SCOZZESE?]

The question already debated in the eighteenth century, since the publication of this song in the “Scots Musical Museum” has not yet been solved
There was debate at the time of this song’s publication as to whether it was an English song composed about 1700 or whether it was an earlier Scots song which was adopted in England. Unfortunately, there is still no conclusive evidence to answer this question although Burns was very specific about only including Scots songs. There is an alternative melody for these verses which is called, ‘My plaid away’, composed about 1710.” (from here)
[La questione dibattuta già nel Settecento, fin dalla pubblicazione di questa canzone nello “Scots Musical Museum” non si è ancora risolta
Al momento della pubblicazione di questa canzone c’era un dibattito sul fatto che fosse una canzone inglese composta intorno al 1700 o se fosse una canzone scozzese precedente adottata in Inghilterra. Sfortunatamente, non ci sono ancora prove conclusive per rispondere a questa domanda, anche se Burns era molto specifico riguardo solo alle canzoni scozzesi. C’è una melodia alternativa per questi versi che s’intitola “My plaid away’ “(il vento ha soffiato) via la mia coperta”, composta intorno al 1710. ” (da qui)]

Jockey’s Lamentation or O’er the hills and far away
OWER THE HILLS AND FAUR AWA’

Connie Dover  in “Somebody 1991 takes up the ancient text (without modifying it too much) and writes her own melody. [riprende il testo antico stralciando un po’ di strofe, ma senza modificarlo troppo e scrive una melodia sua.]


Tannahill Weavers in Arnish Light 2006
 “Here’s an old poem, which has been set to this nifty little melody by the extremely talented Connie Dover. A song about a piper who can play but one tune, “ower the hills and faur awa, and probably has the cheek to wonder why the girl left him. It is amazing how many pipers are actually asked if they can play “ower the hills and faur awa’”, but it is even more amazing how many of them take it as a request for the melody and not the more obvious request for them to take a hike.
(from here)

[Esilarante come al solito il commento allegato nelle note: Ecco un vecchio poema, che è stato musicato su questa piccola e graziosa melodia dalla talentuosa Connie Dover. Una canzone che parla di un suonatore di cornamusa che riesca a suonare solo una melodia, “ower the hills and faur awa ‘”, e probabilmente ha la faccia tosta di chiedersi perché la ragazza lo abbia lasciato! E’ ancora oggi sorprendente che sia richiesto a molti zampognari di suonarla, ma è ancor più sorprendente il fatto che molti di loro lo considerino una richiesta per la melodia e non la richiesta più ovvia di andarsene a fare una passeggiata.”]

The tea-table miscellany (Allan Ramsay collection)
I
Jocky met with Jenny fair
Between the dawning and the day
But Jocky now is full of care
Since Jenny stole his heart away
II
Although she promised to be true
She proven has, alack, unkind
The which does make poor Jocky rue
That e’er he loved a fickle mind
III
Jocky was a bonny lad
That e’er was born in Scotland fair
But now poor lad he does run mad
Since Jenny causes his despair
IV
Young Jocky was a piper’s son
He fell in love when he was young
And all the tunes that he could play
Was O’er the Hills and Far Away
Chorus
And it’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far
The wind has blown my plaid away
V
He sang “when my first my Jenny’s face
I saw she seemed so full of grace
With mickle joy my heart was filled
That’s now alas with sorrow killed
VI
Oh were she but as true as fair
‘T would put an end to my despair
Instead of that she is unkind
And wavers like the winter wind (3)
VII
Hard was my hap to fall in love
With one that does so faithless prove
Hard my fate to court a maid
Who has my constant heart betrayed
VIII
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play”

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Jock conobbe la bella Jenny
allo spuntar dell’alba
e ora Jock è preoccupato
da quanto Jenny gli ha rapito il cuore
II
Sebbene lei promise di essere sincera
si rivelò ahimè scortese
il che fece rimpiangere al povero Jock
di essersi innamorato di una mente volubile
III
Jock era il più bel ragazzo
che mai sia nato nella Scozia bella,
ma ora povero ragazzo è impazzito
da quando Jenny l’ha portato alla disperazione
IV
Il giovane Jocky era figlio di un pifferaio (1)
e si innamorò quando era giovane
e l’unica melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano sulle colline”
CORO
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
il vento ha soffiato via la mia coperta (2)
V
Cantava “Quando per la prima volta il viso della mia Jenny vidi, sembrava così piena di grazia,
di molta gioia il mio cuore si colmò
ma ora ahimè dal dolore è ucciso
VI
Oh se solo lei fosse fedele quanto è bella
potrebbe mettere fine alla mia disperazione
invece di essere scortese
e vacillante come il vento d’inverno
VII
Amara sorte innamorarmi
di una che così infedele si mostra,
amaro il mio fato di corteggiare una fanciulla
che ha tradito il mio cuore fedele
VIII
Poichè è falsa colei che adoro
non mi fiderò più di un’altra donna,
dalla loro seduzione fuggirò via
e sul mio piffero suonerò allegramente.”

NOTE
1) piper si traduce sia come pifferaio (colui che suona il piffero o flauto) ma anche come zampognaro (colui che suona la cornamusa)
The Tannies cite in the notes an old story widespread among the Scottish soldiers in World War I: “It reminds us of the old story about the regimental piper going over the top with his colleagues at the Battle of the Somme. It has for many years been the tradition that Scottish regiments are piped into battle; a tradition that is still honoured. Picture the scene, there he is blowing away furiously, right there in the thick of the battle. Bullets and shells are flashing past him and his fellow soldiers, bombs are exploding all around him, things are whizzing and whooshing all over the place. Suddenly out of the confusion of the battle the unmistakable loud voice of his sergeant major rings out. “For @#%$+* sake Angus, play something they like!”
[I Tannies citano nelle note una vecchia storia diffusa tra i soldati scozzesi nella I guerra mondiale: “Ci ricorda la vecchia storia del pifferaio del reggimento che ha superato il limite con i suoi colleghi nella battaglia della Somme. Per molti anni c’è stata la tradizione che i reggimenti scozzesi siano accompagnati in battaglia dalle cornamuse; una tradizione che è ancora onorata. Immagina la scena, eccolo che insuffla  furiosamente, proprio lì nel pieno della battaglia. Cannonate e proiettili stanno fischiando davanti a lui e ai suoi commilitoni, le bombe stanno esplodendo tutt’attorno a lui, cose che sfrecciano e sibilano dappertutto. All’improvviso, sulla confusione della battaglia, risuona l’inconfondibile voce del suo sergente maggiore. “Per l’amor di dio Angus, suona a qualcosa che gli piaccia!“]
2) the term is a euphemism, the blanket covers the modesty of the woman and is blown or thrown away = defloration [il termine è un eufemismo, la coperta copre il pudore della donna e viene soffiata o gettata via = deflorazione]

WERE I LAID ON GREENLAND’S COAST (JOHN GRAY)

The version reported by John Gay for “The Beggar’s Opera” is a duet between the protagonists (Air XVI, Macheath and Polly) with music adapted by Johann Christoph Pepusch (1728).
[La versione riportata da John Gay per “The Beggar’s Opera” è un duetto tra i due protagonisti (Air XVI,  Macheath e Polly) con musica adattata da Johann Christoph Pepusch (1728).]


Same Air in the film version of Gay’s work, directed by Peter Brook in 1953, starring by Laurence Olivier and Dorothy Tutin.
[Stessa aria interpretata da Laurence Olivier e Dorothy Tutin nella versione cinematografica del lavoro di Gay, diretta da Peter Brook nel 1953.]


I
Were I laid on Greenland’s Coast,
And in my Arms embrac’d my Lass;
Warm amidst eternal Frost,
Too soon the Half Year’s Night would pass.
II
Were I sold on Indian Soil,
Soon as the burning Day was clos’d,
I could mock the sultry Toil
When on my Charmer’s Breast repos’d.
III
And I would love you all the Day,
Every Night would kiss and play,
If with me you’d fondly stray
Over the Hills and far away
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I (lui)
Se fossi sulle coste delle Groenlandia
e abbracciassi la mia ragazza,
al caldo tra il ghiaccio eterno
troppo presto la notte polare(1) passerebbe
III (lei)
Se fossi sul suolo indiano (2)
appena il giorno cocente fosse finito
irriderei la fatica amara(3)
per riposare sul petto del mio innamorato
III (alternati)
Ti amerei tutto il giorno
ogni notte a baciarci e amarci
se con me appassionatamente vorresti girovagare
lontano oltre le colline

NOTE
1) letteralmente la notte del mezzo anno
2) americano
3) the sultry Toil  is the work of slaves (deportation) [si riferisce al lavoro di schiavitù dei deportati]

NURSERY RHYMES: Tom, the Piper’s Son

tom_10939_mdIn the nursery rhyme version Jock becomes Tom who knows only one melody “Over the hills and far away,” and it is precisely this version to become a popular song for children.
But Tom is the “Fool” in the Mummer playes, hence the idea that history is a medieval variant of the Pied Piper.

[Nella versione lullaby Jock diventa Tom il figlio del piper che conosce una sola melodia “Lontano oltre le colline” ed è per l’appunto in questa versione a diventare una popolare canzone per bambini.
Ma Tom è il Matto nelle commedie dei Mummer, da qui l’idea che la storia sia una variante medievale del pifferaio magico.]

If we really want to close the loop of this succession of versions, we can incidentally notice that the protagonist of the version of George Farquard was Tom, who left for the war to play the pipes in the British army.
[Ma se proprio vogliamo chiudere il cerchio di questo susseguirsi di versioni possiamo incidentalmente notare che il protagonista della versione di George Farquard si chiamava sempre Tom colui che è partito per la guerra a suonare il piffero (o la sua cornamusa) nell’esercito britannico.]

Hilary James & Simon Mayer in: “Lullabies with Mandolins
Tim Hart version that presents some variations with respect to the nursery rhyme for children.
[il testo è quello di Tim Hart e presenta alcune variazioni rispetto alla filastrocca per bambini.]


I
Tom, he was a piper’s son,
He learned to play when he was young,
the only tune that he could play
Was, “Over the hills and far away,”
CHORUS
Over the hills, and a long way off,
The wind shall blow my top-knot off.
II
Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they did dance when he did play
“Over the hills and far away.”
III
Now Tom did play with such a skill
That those nearby could not stand still
And all who heard him they did dance
Down through England, Spain and France
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tom era il figlio del pifferaio
imparò a suonare quando era giovane
e la sola melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano oltre le colline”
CORO
Oltre le colline e lontano
il vento scompiglierà il mio chignon (1)
II
Ora Tom con il suo piffero faceva un tale baccano
che piaceva sia alle ragazze che ai ragazzi
e danzavano quando lui suonava
“Lontano oltre le colline”
III
Ora Tom suonava con tale abilità, che coloro che gli erano vicini non potevano stare fermi
e tutti quelli che lo sentivano, danzavano
attraverso l’Inghilterra, la Spagna e la Francia

NOTE
1) più propriamente nastro annodato a fiocco come fermaglio sulla cima dei capelli delle signore nel XVII e XVIII secolo

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/england/faraway.html
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-062,-pages-62-and-63-oer-the-hills,-and-far-away.aspx
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiOVRHILL4;ttOVERHILL.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=95039
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1226lyr7.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom,_Tom,_the_Piper%27s_Son
https://clamarcap.com/tag/johann-christoph-pepusch/
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1524
http://www.anonymousmorris.co.uk/dances/valiant.html
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/10900/10939/tom_10939.htm

Sailor’s farewell: dalla parte del marinaio!

Read the post in English  

Un’ulteriore variante del “Sailor’s Farewell” è intitolata “Adieu, My Lovely Nancy”ma anche “Swansea Town,” e “The Holy Ground”, ed è diffusa  in Inghilterra, Irlanda, Australia, Canada e Stati Uniti.
Si sviluppa su un duplice registro, da una parte è la tipica e allegra canzone marinaresca, a volte sguaiata e inneggiante alle colossali bevute, e dall’altra assume una vena più intimista e fragile, che riflette sulla solitudine e il pericolo del vita in mare. In queste versioni il marinaio è al servizio della Royal Navy.

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY

Dal repertorio tradizionale della Famiglia Copper del Sussex la ballata è stata trascritta nel primo numero del Journal of the Folk Song Society, Vol.1, No.1, nel 1899. Una versione diffusa anche in Australia e intitolata “Lovely Nancy”, in cui è solo il bel marinaio a parlare durante la separazione.

Maddy Prior & Tim Hart 1968 in Folk Songs of Old England Vol. 1

The Ballina Whalers

Ed, Will & Ginger in una session davanti al pub per la serie “Ed and Will in A walk around Britain”


I
Adieu sweet lovely Nancy,
ten thousand times adieu
I’m going around the ocean love
to seek for something new
Come change your ring(1)
with me dear girl
come change your ring with me
for it might be a token of true love while I am on the sea.
II
And when I’m far upon the sea
you’ll know not where I am
Kind letters I will write to you
from every foreign land
the secrets of your heart dear girl
are the best of my good will
So let your body(2) be where, it might my heart will be with you still.
III
There’s a heavy storm arising
see how it gathers round
While we poor souls on the ocean wide are fighting for the crown (3)
There’s nothing to protect us love
or keep us from the cold
On the ocean wide where
we must bide like jolly seamen bold.
IV
There’s tinkers tailors shoemakers
lie snoring fast asleep
While we poor souls
on the ocean wide are ploughing through the deep
Our officers commanded us
and then we must obey
Expecting every moment
for to get cast away.
V
But when the wars are over
there’ll be peace on every shore
We’ll return to our wives and our families and the girls that we adore
We’ll call for liquor merrily
and spend our money free
And when our money is all gone
we’ll boldly go to sea.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
vado in giro per l’oceano, amore
a cercare l’avventura.
Vieni a scambiare l’anello
con me mia cara ragazza,
scambia l’anello con me,
perchè sarà un pegno di vero amore mentre sarò per mare.
II
Quando sarò lontano sul mare
e non saprai dove sono,
dolci lettere ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera,
i segreti del tuo cuore, cara ragazza
sono in cima ai miei pensieri,
perciò resta al sicuro dove
il mio cuore potrà stare di nuovo con te.
III
C’è una forte tempesta in arrivo,
vedi come si raduna tutt’intorno,
mentre noi povere anime sul vasto oceano combattiamo per la corona.
Non ci sarà nulla a proteggerci, amore
o a tenerci lontani dal freddo, nel vasto oceano che dobbiamo affrontare da allegri e coraggiosi marinai.
IV
Ci sono calderai, sarti e calzolai
che dormono russando,
mentre noi povere anime
sul vasto oceano solchiamo
gli abissi.
I nostri ufficiali ci comandano
e perciò dobbiamo ubbidire
aspettandoci in ogni momento
di essere spazzati via.
V
Ma quando le guerre saranno finite
ci sarà la pace in ogni terra
torneremo dalle nostre mogli e famiglie e dalle ragazze che amiamo,
ordineremo da bere allegamente
e spensieratamente  spenderemo i nostri soldi, e quando i soldi saranno finiti riprenderemo il mare con coraggio.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) letteralmente ” tieni il tuo corpo dove il mio cuore potrà stare con te ancora”; manca la parte di dialogo in cui lei dice di voler travestirsi da marinaio per poter andare con lui. Ma il bel Johnny la dissuade dicendole di restare a casa dove lui la saprà al sicuro
3) il rimando è sempre alla versione della broadside ballad il cui il nostro johnny (termine gergale per marinaio) si  si è arruolato nella Royal Navy e vuole che Nancy resti a casa ad aspettarlo.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA/ IRLANDESE: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY

Julie Henigan in American Stranger 1997leggiamo nelle note “Ho imparato questa versione dalla raccolta di Max Hunter. Hunter era un venditore ambulante e un collezionista amatoriale di canzoni folk da Springfield, Missouri, che ha raccolto un numero impressionante di registrazioni sul campo dal  Missouri all’ Arkansas Ozarks. Da ragazza ho imparato molte canzoni dalle cassette delle sue registrazioni catalogate nella Biblioteca pubblica di Springfield.
Hunter ha registrato questa canzone nel 1959 da Bertha Lauderdale, di Fayetteville, Arkansas. Aveva imparato la canzone dal nonno che a sua volta l’aveva appresa dalla nonna quando “era un bambino in Irlanda.” Da quando ho registrato la canzone in American Stranger (Waterbug 038), Altan, Jeff Davis, Nancy Conescu, Gerald Trimble, e Pete Coel’hanno aggiunta nel loro repertorio.”

Altan in Local Ground, 2005


I
Adieu, my lovely Nancy,
Ten thousand times adieu,
I’ll be thinking of my own true love,
I’ll be thinking, dear, of you.
II
Will you change a ring(1)
with me, my love,
Will you change a ring with me?
It will be a token of our love,
When I am far at sea.
III
When I am far away from home
And you know not where I am,
Love letters I will write to you
From every foreign strand.
IV
When the farmer boys
come home at night,
They will tell their girls fine tales
Of all that they’ve been doing
All day out in the fields;
V
Of the wheat and hay
that they’ve cut down,
Sure, it’s all that they can do,
While we poor jolly,
jolly hearts of oak(2)
Must plough the seas all through.
VI
And when we return again, my love,
To our own dear native shore,
Fine stories we will tell to you,
How we ploughed the oceans o’er.
VII
And we’ll make the alehouses to ring,
And the taverns they will roar,
And when our money it is all gone,
Sure, we’ll go to sea for more.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Addio mia cara Nancy
diecimila volte addio,
penserò al mio vero amore,
penserò mia cara, a te
II
Scambierai l’anello
con me, amore mio
scambierai l’anello con me?
Sarà un pegno del nostro amore
mentre starò lontano per mare.
III
Quando sarò lontano da casa
e non saprai dove sono,
lettere d’amore ti scriverò
da ogni terra straniera.
IV
Quando i contadini
ritornano a casa la sera
racconteranno alle loro ragazze delle belle storie di ciò che hanno fatto
tutto il giorno nei campi
V
Del grano e del fieno
che hanno tagliato
certo, è tutto quello che sanno fare,
mentre noi poveri allegri,
allegri cuori di quercia
dobbiamo navigare  per tutti i mari
VI
E quando ritorneremo di nuovo, amore mio, alla nostra cara terra natia
delle belle storie vi racconteremo
su come abbiamo navigato per gli oceani
VII
E faremo risuonare le birrerie
e rimbombare le taverne
e quando i soldi saranno tutto finiti
torneremo di nuovo per mare.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate anglofile tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) hearts of oak espressione marinaresca per le navi costruite nell’età della vela con il legno più forte nella parte più interna dell’albero

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
Sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/adieusweetlovelynancy.html
https://www.acousticmusicarchive.com/adieu-sweet-lovely-nancy-chords-lyrics