Archivi tag: Thomas D’Urfey

I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig by Robert Burns

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – by Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Leggi in italiano

The lea-rig (The Meadow-ridge) is a traditional Scottish song rewritten by Robert Burns in 1792 under the title “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig“.
The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows. These bumps could reach up to the knee and hand sowing was greatly facilitated: the grass grew in the lea rigs.

THE TUNE

We find the beautiful melody in many eighteenth-century manuscripts, known by various names such as An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber

THE LYRICS

rigsA “romantic” meeting in the summer camps declined in many text versions with a single melody (albeit with many different arrangements) that has known, like so many other Scottish eighteenth-century songs, a notable fame among the musicians of German romanticism and in good living rooms over England, France and Germany.

The oldest text can be found in the manuscript of Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, by anonymous author who starts like this:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

With the title “My Ain Kind Dearie O” it is published later in the Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (see here) on Robert Burns’ dispatch to James Johnson with the note that it was the version originally written by the edinburgh poet Robert Fergusson ( 1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson died only 24 years old in the grip of madness while he was hospitalized in the Edinburgh Asylum because subject to a strong existential depression (and yet there are those who insinuate it was syphilis); he had just enough time to write about eighty poems (published between 1771 and 1773) and was the first poet to use the Scottish dialect as a poetic language; he lived for the most part a bohemian life, sharing the intellectual ferment of Edinburgh in the period known as the Scottish Enlightenment, always in contact with musicians, actors and editors; in 1772 it joined the “Edinburgh Cape Club”, not a Masonic lodge but a club for men only for convivial purposes (in which tables were laid out with tasty dishes and above all large drinks); for Robert Burns he was ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn rewrote the poem in October 1792 for the publisher George Thomson, to be published in the “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in what will be the most commonly known version of The Lea Rig) published with the musical arrangement of Joseph Haydn (who also arranged the traditional My Ain Kind Deary version); and he also wrote a more bawdy version published in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” (1799) under the title My Ain Kind Deary (page 98) (text here)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

and in the classic version on arrangement by Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
english translation
I
When over the hill the eastern star
Tells the time of milking the ewes is near, my dear,
And oxes from the furrowed field
Return so lethargic and weary O:
Down by the burn where scented birch trees
With dew are hanging clear, my dear, I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
II
At midnight hour, in darkest glen,
I’d rove and never be frightened O, If thro’ that glen I go to thee,
My own kind dear, O:
Altho’ the night were  never so wild,
And I were never so weary O,
I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
III
The hunter loves the morning sun,
To rouse the mountain deer, my dear,
At noon the fisher takes the glen,
down the burn to steer, my dear;
Give me the hour o’ gloamin grey,
It maks my heart so cheary O
on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!

NOTES
1) the morning star
2) milking time is early in the morning
3) or “birken buds”
4) or irie
5) in the copy sent to Thomson Robert Burns wrote “wet” then corrected with wild: a summer night with severe air with lightning in the distance
6) or “I’d”

Compare with the version attributed to the poet Robert Fergusson

SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
english translation
I
Will you go the over the lea rigg,
My own kind dear, O
And cuddle there so kindly
with me, my kind deary-o!
At thorn dry-stone wall and birche tree,
we will make merry, and never be weary-o;
They’ll screen unfriendly eyes from you and me,
My own kind dear, O!
II
No herds, with sheep-dogs there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But larks whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for world’s riches, my sweetheart,
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
with you, my kind deary, O!

NOTES
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen.
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart, my dear

Scottish country dance: “My own kind deary”

The Scottish Country dance entitled “My own kind deary” with music and dance instructions appears in John Walsh’s Caledonian Country Dances (vol I 1735)


for dance explanation see

LINK
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

The Young (Baffled) knight: Down deary down

Leggi in italiano

A young knight strolls through the countryside meets a girl (sometimes he surprises her while she is intent on bathing in a river) and asks her to have sex.

THE YOUNG KNIGHT – DOWN DEARY DOWN

Child ballad #112 B

The girl of this version is a lady, testifying that it was not advisable for the honest girls of the past, to go around unaccompanied; in fact, no girl from a good family would have ventured alone in public places (and less so for woods and fields that were not in the family estate), and although Jane Austen a century later, she used to see the English countryside populated by young girls who walk, rarely they were alone.

In the most ancient version of the ballad, a young and inexperienced knight meets a girl in the fields and asks her to have sex, but the girl makes fun of his inexperience in love and tricks him into a ploy. Throughout the centuries and the oral transmission the context of the ballad becomes more prosaic and the girl is no longer playing with fire, but she is all intent on preserving her virtue from a rape.

The text, which sums up version A, is reported by Thomas D’Urfey in Pills to Purge Melancholy, V, 112, 1719, but we see that with a different melody and some cut, the version lends itself very well at a more current or at least nineteenth-century reading, set in the American Far West!
Nina Simone live at the Carnegie Hall in New York, 1963 (from the album “Folksy Nina” 1964).
Nina had a great success in the 80s (after Chanel selected one of her songs, dating back almost 30 years earlier for a television commercial). Despite being a jazz singer – blues – soul she has ventured into folk or better in American balladry. The melody written by Joseph Hathaway and Charles Kingsley, with its sore movement and the pizzicato of the strings, is perfect for a “murder ballad” so in my opinion, the music casts a sinister light on the encounter revealing it for what it is: one failed rape!

I
There was a knight (1) and he was young a-riding along the way Sir
And there he met a lady fair
among the stacks of hay (2) Sir
(Down deary down)
II
Quote he “shall you and I, Lady
among the grass lay down oh
And I will take a special care
of the rumpling of your gown(3) oh”
III
“So -she told him-
If you will go along with me
into my father’s hall Sir
You shall enjoy my maiden’s head
and my estate and all Sir”
Down deary down
IV
So he mounted her on a milk white steed himself upon another
And then they rid upon the road like sister and like brother
Down deary down 
V
And when they came to father’s home all moulded all about Sir
She stepped straight within the gate and shut the young man out Sir
Down deary down
VI
“Here is a pursue of gold -she said-
take it for your pain Sir
And I will send my father’s men
to go home with you again Sir
VII
And if you meet a lady fair
as you go by the town Sir
You must not fear the dewy grass or
The rumpling grass of her gown Sir”
Down deary down
VIII
And if you meet a lady gay
as you go by the hill Sir
Here is the moral of the story
“If you will not when you may
you shall not when you will Sir”

NOTE
1) the knight could very well be a cow-boy of the Wild West
2) the girl is configured in this setting if not just like a peasant at least as the wealthy daughter of the owner of a large ranch
3) evidently the young man does not know the saying of the previous version” When you have you owne true-love a mile or two out of the town, spare not for her gay clothing, but lay her body flat on the ground

 

ARCHIVE
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_112

SIR EGLAMORE THE HUNTER

Child ballad # 18
TITOLI: “Sir Lionell”,  “Sir Eglamore”, “Sir Egrabell”, “Bold Sir Rylas”, “The Jovial Hunter (of Bromsgrove)”, “Horn the Hunter”, “Wild Boar”, “Wild Hog in the Woods”, “Old Bangum”, “Bangum and the Boar”, The Wild Boar and Sir Eglamore, “Old Baggum”, “Crazy Sal and Her Pig”, “Isaac-a-Bell and Hugh the Graeme”, “Quilo Quay”, “Rury Bain”, “Rackabello”, “The Old Man and hisThree Sons”

San Giorgio e il Drago, Girard Master

La ballata è incentrata sul prode cavaliere errante che sfida le forze oscure rappresentate da giganti o streghe, cinghiali o draghi, come da copione nei racconti sui Cavalieri della Tavola Rotonda.
La storia del prode cavaliere che sconfigge il male è stata narrata sia nel romance dal titolo Sir Eglamour of Artois  (circa 1350) che nella ballata Sir Lionel riportata dal professor Child e conosciuta con vari titoli. (prima parte qui)

LA VERSIONE DI THOMAS D’URFEY

La ballata sul finire del Seicento è incentrata sulla lotta tra il cavaliere e il drago
ASCOLTA The City Waites  riprendono per buona parte il testo del broadside del XVII secolo (vedi) COURAGE CROWNED WITH CONQUEST, OR, A brief Relation how that valiant Knight and heroick champion, Sir Eglamore, bravely fought with, and manfully slew a terrible huge great monstrous Dragon.” (strofe I, II da V a IX e l’intercalare diventa: with his fa, la, lanctre down dilie)

In “Wit and Mirth, Or, Pills to Purge Melancholy” Thomas D’Urfey riporta testo e melodia di Sir Eglamore (III, 1719-1720)

ASCOLTA su Spotify Jean Luc Lenoir Sir Eglamore /The Dragon Jig in Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads 2013 (che segue integralmente la versione di D’Urfey)

ASCOLTA Kate Rusby (versione rifatta in polacco dai GreenWood Qui) (strofe da I a VIII)

I
Sir Eglamore was a valiant knight,
fa la lanky down dilly,
He took up (fetcht) his sword and he went to fight,/fa la lanky down dilly.
As he rode (went) o’er hill and dale,
All armed (clothed) in a coat of mail,
Fa la la m ba di n da da n da, lanky down dilly..
II
Out came (1) a dragon from her (2) den,/That killed (3)  God (the Lord) knows how many men,/When she saw Sir Eglamore,/You should have hear that dragon roar(4).
III
Then the trees began to shake,
Horse (stars) did tremble and man did quake,
The birds betook them all to peep (5),
it would have made a grown man weep(6)
IV
But all in vain it was to fear,
For now they fall to fight like bears (7),
To it they go and soundly fight,
the live-long day from more ‘till night,
V
This dragon had a plaguey hide,
That could the sharpest steel abide (8),
No sword could enter through her skin (with cuts), (9)
Which vexed the knight and made her grin (10)
VI (11)
But as in choler she did burn,
He fetched the dragon a great good turn,
As a yawning she did fall,
he thrust his sword up, hilt and all,
VII
(Then the dragon) Like a coward she did fly (began to fly),
(Un)To her den which was hard by,
There she lay all night and roared (12),
the knight was sorry (vexed) for his sword (13)
VIII
When all this was done, to the ale-house he went,
And by and by his twopence he spent,
For he was so hot with tugging with the dragon,
That nothing would quench him but a whole flaggon.
IX
Now God preserve our King and Queen
And eke in London may be seen,
As many knights – and as many more
And all so good as  Sir Eglamore
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Sir Eglamore era un prode cavaliere
fa la lanky down dilly,
prese la spada e andò a combattere
fa la lanky down dilly,
cavalcò per colli e valli
tutto bardato con la cotta di maglia
Fa la la m ba di n da da n da, lanky down dilly..
II
Un drago sbucò dalla tana,
uccisore Dio solo sa di quanti uomini,
quando vide Sir Eglamore,  avreste dovuto sentire che ruggito !
III
Gli alberi tremavano, il cavallo tremava e l’uomo tremava
gli uccelli si misero a pigolare e
un uomo adulto si sarebbe disperato
IV
Ma era inutile aver paura perchè iniziarono a combattere come orsi vanno all’assalto con forza e clangore per tutto il giorno e anche fino a notte
V
Quel drago aveva una maledetta pelle
che poteva resistere all’acciaio più affilato
nessun colpo di spada la feriva, il che preoccupava il cavaliere e faceva sogghignare il drago
VI
Ma mentre in collera sputava fuoco
riportò sul drago un gran bel tiro
appena si abbassò a prender fiato, nelle fauci
lui spinse la spada fino all’elsa
VII
Da vigliacco volò via
nella sua tana tra le rocce
là stette tutta la notte e ruggì
mentre il cavaliere era dispiaciuto per la sua spada
VIII
Quando tutto fu finito andò nella locanda
e pian piano spese i suoi due penny
perchè si era così accaldato nella lotta con il drago
che solo un intero bottiglione avrebbe potuto dargli sollievo
IX
Che Dio preservi il nostro Re e la Regina
che anche a Londra si possano vedere tanti cavalieri e anche più,
tutti bravi come Sir Eglamore

NOTE
1) D’Urfey scrive “There leap’d a Dragon out of her Den” mentre nel broadside è scritto “A huge great dragon leapt out of his den”,
2) per D’Urfey il drago è una draghessa, nel broadside invece è un maschio
3)  D’Urfey scrive “had slain”
4) il verso di drago è solitamente una via di mezzo tra il grugnito di un cinghiale e il ruggito di un leone. D’Urfey scrive “Oh that you had but heard her roar!” Il broadside dice invece: “Good lack, had you seen how this dragon did roar!”
5) Il broadside dice invece: “But had you seen how the birds lay peeping”,
6) D’Urfey scrive “Oh!T’would have made one fall a-weeping” e il broadside “‘Twould have made a man’s heart to fall a weeping. ”
7) D’Urfey scrive “For now they fall to’t, fight Dog, fight Bear”
8) nel broadside si legge “Which could both sword and spear abide”,
9)  nel broadside si legge “He could not enter with hacks and cuts”.
10) D’Urfey scrive “wich vexed teh Knight unto the Guts” e il bradside “Which vexed the knight to the very heart’s blood ”
11) Nel broadside il verso è così modificato
“But now as the knight in choler did burn,
He owed the dragon a shrewd good turn,
In at his mouth his sword he bent,
The hilt appeared at his fundament. ”
12) Il broadside dice “And there he laid him down, and roar’d”
13) D’Urfey  aggiunge: but riding away, he cries, I forsake it,he that will fetch it, let him take it

continua

FONTI
https://www.patana.ac.th/Music/Student%20Resources%20and%20recordings/sir_eglamore_and_the_dragon.htm
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5369
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50640

OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY: TOM THE PIPER

Un bellissima melodia riportata da Thomas D’Urfey nel suo “Pills to Purge Melancholy” ancora attualissima è ritornata alla popolarità con la serie tv Sharpe’s Rifles. Già all’epoca quella che era una melodia romantica per una storia d’amore, era diventata una melodia accattivante e pro arruolamento per le guerre napoleoniche. (vedi prima parte)

LA VERSIONE Jocky met with Jenny fair

La versione riportata da Thomas D’Urfey è una storia di corteggiamento un po’ tormentato; in verità tutto il canto segue un po’ il topos dell’amante tenuto sulle spine che si dispera e supplica mercede, per ottenere i favori della bella. Ma il nostro  Jock non doveva essere poi così disperato se alla fine conclude
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play

VERSIONE INGLESE O SCOZZESE?

La questione dibattuta già nel Settecento, fin dalla pubblicazione di questa song nello “Scots Musical Museum”, sulla sua attribuzione, non si è ancora risolta
There was debate at the time of this song’s publication as to whether it was an English song composed about 1700 or whether it was an earlier Scots song which was adopted in England. Unfortunately, there is still no conclusive evidence to answer this question although Burns was very specific about only including Scots songs. There is an alternative melody for these verses which is called, ‘My plaid away’, composed about 1710.” (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

ASCOLTA Connie Dover  in “Somebody la quale riprende il testo antico (senza poi modificarlo troppo) e scrive una melodia sua.


I
Jocky met with Jenny fair
Between the dawning and the day
But Jocky now is full of care
Since Jenny stole his heart away
II
Although she promised to be true
She proven has, alack, unkind
The which does make poor Jocky rue
That e’er he loved a fickle mind
III
Jocky was a bonny lad
That e’er was born in Scotland fair
But now poor lad he does run mad
Since Jenny
IV
Young Jocky was a piper’s son
He fell in love when he was young
And all the tunes that he could play
Was O’er the Hills and Far Away
Chorus
And it’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far
The wind has blown my plaid away
V
He sang when my first my Jenny’s face
I saw she seemed so full of grace
With mickle joy my heart was filled
That’s now alas with sorrow killed
VI
Oh were she but as true as fair
‘T would put an end to my despair
Instead of that she is unkind
And waivers like the winter wind
VII
Hard was my hap to fall in love
With one that does so faithless prove
Hard my fate to court a maid
Who has my constant heart betrayed
VIII
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I
Jock conobbe la bella Jenny
allo spuntar dell’alba
e ora Jock è preoccupato
da quanto Jenny gli ha rapito il cuore
II
Sebbene lei promise di essere sincera
si rivelò ahimè scortese
il che fece rimpiangere il povero Jock
di essersi innamorato di una mente volubile
III
Jock era un (il più) bel ragazzo
che mai sia nato nella Scozia bella,
ma ora povero ragazzo è impazzito
per colpa di Jenny
IV
Il giovane Jocky era figlio di un pifferaio (1)
e si innamorò quando era giovane
e l’unica melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano sulle colline”
CORO
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
il vento ha soffiato via la mia coperta (2)
V
Cantava “Quando per la prima volta il viso della mia Jenny vidi, sembrava così piena di grazia,
di molta gioia il mio cuore si colmò
ma ora ahimè dal dolore è ucciso”
VI
Oh se solo lei fosse fedele quanto è bella
potrebbe mettere fine alla mia disperazione
invece di essere scortese
e gelida (3) come il vento d’inverno
VII
Amara sorte d’innamorarmi
di una che così infedele si mostra,
amaro il mio fato di corteggiare una fanciulla
che ha tradito il mio cuore fedele
VIII
Poichè è falsa colei che adoro
non mi fiderò più di un’altra donna,
dalla loro seduzione fuggirò via
e sul mio piffero suonerò allegramente.

NOTE
1) piper si traduce sia come pifferaio (colui che suona il piffero o flauto) ma anche come zampognaro (colui che suona la cornamusa)
2) il termine è un eufemismo, la coperta copre il pudore della donna e viene soffiata o gettata via = deflorazione
3)  ho tradotto il termine a senso anche se il verbo waiver ha altro significato

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: OWER THE HILLS AND FAUR AWA’

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers in Arnish Light 2006 su Spotify.
Esilarante come al solito il commento allegato “Here’s an old poem, which has been set to this nifty little melody by the extremely talented Connie Dover. A song about a piper who can play but one tune, “ower the hills and faur awa, and probably has the cheek to wonder why the girl left him. It is amazing how many pipers are actually asked if they can play “ower the hills and faur awa’”, but it is even more amazing how many of them take it as a request for the melody and not the more obvious request for them to take a hike.
It reminds us of the old story about the regimental piper going over the top with his colleagues at the Battle of the Somme. It has for many years been the tradition that Scottish regiments are piped into battle; a tradition that is still honoured. Picture the scene, there he is blowing away furiously, right there in the thick of the battle. Bullets and shells are flashing past him and his fellow soldiers, bombs are exploding all around him, things are whizzing and whooshing all over the place. Suddenly out of the confusion of the battle the unmistakable loud voice of his sergeant major rings out. “For @#%$+* sake Angus, play something they like!” (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN GRAY: WERE I LAID ON GREENLAND’S COAST

La versione riportata da John Gay per “The Beggar’s Opera” è un duetto tra i due protagonisti (Air XVI, cantato da Macheath e Polly) con musica adattata da Johann Christoph Pepusch (1728).
ASCOLTA

Ancora l’Air XVI interpretato da Laurence Olivier e Dorothy Tutin nella versione cinematografica del lavoro di Gay, diretta da Peter Brook nel 1953.


I
Were I laid on Greenland’s Coast,
And in my Arms embrac’d my Lass;
Warm amidst eternal Frost,
Too soon the Half Year’s Night would pass.
II
Were I sold on Indian Soil,
Soon as the burning Day was clos’d,
I could mock the sultry Toil
When on my Charmer’s Breast repos’d.
III
And I would love you all the Day,
Every Night would kiss and play,
If with me you’d fondly stray
Over the Hills and far away
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I (lui)
Se fossi sulle coste delle Groenlandia
e abbracciassi la mia ragazza,
al caldo tra il ghiaccio eterno
troppo presto la notte polare passerebbe(1)
III (lei)
Se fossi sul suolo indiano (2)
appena il giorno cocente fosse finito
irriderei la fatica amara(3)
per riposare sul petto del mio innamorato
III (alternati)
Ti amerei tutto il giorno
ogni notte a baciarci e amarci
se con me appassionatamente vorresti girovagare
lontano oltre le colline

NOTE
1) letteralmente la notte del mezzo anno
2) americano
3) si riferisce al lavoro di schiavitù dei deportati

tom_10939_md

LA VERSIONE NURSERY RHYMES: Tom, Tom, the Piper’s Son

Nella versione lullaby Jock diventa Tom il figlio del piper che conosce una sola melodia “Lontano oltre le colline” ed è per l’appunto in questa versione a diventare una popolare canzone per bambini.
Ma Tom è il Matto nelle commedie dei Mummer, da qui l’idea che la storia sia una variante medievale del pifferaio magico.

Ma se proprio vogliamo chiudere il cerchio di questo susseguirsi di versioni possiamo incidentalmente notare che il protagonista della versione di George Farquard si chiamava sempre Tom e così è prorpio lui che è partito per la guerra e a suonare il suo piffero (o la sua cornamusa) nell’esercito britannico.

ASCOLTA Hilary James & Simon Mayer in: “Lullabies with Mandolins” il testo è quello di Tim Hart e presenta alcune variazioni rispetto alla filastrocca per bambini.


I
Tom, he was a piper’s son,
He learned to play when he was young,
the only tune that he could play
Was, “Over the hills and far away,”
CHORUS
Over the hills, and a long way off,
The wind shall blow my top-knot off.
II
Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they did dance when he did play
“Over the hills and far away.”
III
Now Tom did play with such a skill
That those nearby could not stand still
And all who heard him they did dance
Down through England, Spain and France
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I
Tom era il figlio del pifferaio
imparò a suonare quando era giovane
e la sola melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano oltre le colline”
CORO
Oltre le colline e lontano
il vento  scompiglierà il mio chignon  (1)
II
Ora Tom con il suo piffero faceva un tale baccano
che piaceva sia alle ragazze che ai ragazzi
e danzavano quando lui suonava
“Lontano oltre le colline”
III
Ora Tom suonava con tale abilità
che coloro che gli erano vicini non potevano stare fermi e tutti quelli che lo sentivano, danzavano
per l’Inghilterra, la Spagna e la Francia

NOTE
1) più propriamente nastro annodato a fiocco come fermaglio sulla cima dei capelli delle signore nel XVII e XVIII secolo

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/faraway.html
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-062,-pages-62-and-63-oer-the-hills,-and-far-away.aspx
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiOVRHILL4;ttOVERHILL.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=95039
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1226lyr7.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom,_Tom,_the_Piper%27s_Son
https://clamarcap.com/tag/johann-christoph-pepusch/
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1524
http://www.anonymousmorris.co.uk/dances/valiant.html
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/10900/10939/tom_10939.htm

OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY AI TEMPI DI NAPOLEONE

Un bellissima melodia probabilmente seicentesca, ancora attualissima è ritornata alla popolarità con la serie tv britannica Sharpe’s Rifles (vedi prima parte)

HARK! NOW THE DRUMS BEAT UP AGAIN

Thomas D’Urfey in “Pills to Purge Melancholy”riporta la melodia e due versioni testuali una con il titolo di “Jockey’s Lamentation” (di argomento bucolico) l’altro con il titoloThe Recruiting Officer: Or, the Merry Volunteers: Being an Excellent New Copy of Verses upon raising Recruits.

ASCOLTA

ASCOLTA Gin Lane (magnifica sovrapposizione della canzone -marcetta con le immagini e i rumori della battaglia Constantino Magno)


I
Hark now the drums beat up again
For all true soldier gentlemen,
Then let us list and march, I say,
Over the Hills and far away.
(Chorus)
Over the hills and o’er the main
To Flanders, Portugal and Spain(1),
Queen Anne(2) commands and we’ll obey,
Over the hills and far away.
II
All gentlemen that have a mind,
To serve the queen that’s good and kind,
Come list and enter into pay,
Then over the hills and far away.
III
No more from sound of drum retreat,
While Marlborough(3) and Galway(4) beat,
The French and Spaniards every day,
When over the hills and far away.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
Udite ora i tamburi rullare ancora
per tutti i veri soldati gentiluomini
così arruoliamoci e marciamo, dico io
lontano oltre le colline
CORO
Oltre le colline e oltre il mare
per le Fiandre, il Portogallo e la Spagna
la regina Anna comanda e noi obbediamo
lontano oltre le colline
II
Tutti i gentiluomini che vogliono
servire la regina che è buona e giusta
vengano ad arruolarsi e a prendere la paga
e poi lontano oltre le colline
III
Non più retrocedere al suono del tamburo
quando Marlborough e Galway sconfiggono
i Francesi e gli Spagnoli ogni giorno
lontano oltre le colline

NOTE
1) la guerra di Successione spagnola (1701-1714) in cui Inghilterra, Austria, Ducato di Savoia e i rimasugli in terra germanica del Sacro Romano Impero (ovvero i Paesi Bassi) combatterono contro la Spagna o meglio la corona di Castiglia per questioni di successione al trono: alla morte di Carlo II di Spagna il volere testamentario lasciava il trono al Duca Filippo d’Angiò nipote dell’allora re di Francia che salì al trono con il nome di Filippo V, ma i legami di sangue anche se diluiti imparentavano il defunto re con quasi la metà delle dinastie regnanti, ben intenzionate a prendersi l’eredità! La guerra di successione spagnola fu combattuta nella sua prima fase prevalentemente nelle Lowlands (terre definite anche se più impropriamente Olanda) e in Germania.
2) la regina Anna d’Inghilterra (1665 –1714).
3) il famoso condottiero e politico John Churchill, I duca di Marlborough
4) Henri de Massue, Conte di Galway

LA VERSIONE DI GEORGE FARQUARD

Già nel 1706 per la sua commedia The Recruiting Officer George Farquard aveva scritto o adattato un testo in chiave pro-arruolamento abbastanza simile


I
Our ‘prentice Tom may now refuse
To wipe his scoundrel Master’s Shoes,
For now he’s free to sing and play
Over the Hills and far away.
Over the Hills and O’er the Main,
To Flanders, Portugal and Spain,
The queen commands and we’ll obey
Over the Hills and far away.
II
We all shall lead more happy lives(1)
By getting rid of brats and wives
That scold and bawl both night and day, Over the Hills and far away.
III
Courage, boys, ‘tis one to ten,
But we return all gentlemen
All gentlemen as well as they,
Over the hills and far away.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
Il nostro praticante Tom può ora rifiutarsi
di pulire le scarpe di quella canaglia del suo Maestro
lontano oltre le colline
Oltre le colline e oltre il mare
per le Fiandre, il Portogallo e la Spagna
la regina comanda e noi obbediamo
lontano oltre le colline
II
Ci toccherà a tutti una vita più felice(1)
con lo sbarazzarci di marmocchi e mogli
che rimproverano e brontolano notte e giorno, lontano oltre le colline
III
Coraggio, ragazzi, è uno a dieci
ma ritorniamo tutti gentiluomini
tutti gentiluomini proprio come loro,
lontano oltre le colline

NOTE
1) sono gli stessi argomenti utilizzati dai sergenti reclutatori per convincere i poveracci ad arruolarsi  (vedi)

continua seconda parte

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/overthehills.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9304
http://www.nam.ac.uk/exhibitions/online-exhibitions/britains-greatest-general/duke-marlborough

OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY

Un bellissima melodia riportata da Thomas D’Urfey nel suo “Pills to Purge Melancholy” ancora attualissima è ritornata alla popolarità con la serie tv britannica Sharpe’s Rifles (tratto dal romanzo I fucilieri di Sharpe di Bernard Cornwell ). Già all’epoca quella che era una melodia romantica per una storia d’amore, era diventata una melodia accattivante e pro arruolamento per le guerre napoleoniche. Un questione dibattuta già nel Settecento è se il brano fosse d’origine inglese o scozzese. Ma c’è da procedere con ordine, cioè dalla fine !

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN TAMS PER SHARPE’S RIFLES

La versione di John Tams (1993) riprende sì la melodia antica, ma il testo richiama solo vagamente l’originale napoleonico perchè riscritto per essere adattato agli episodi della serie (che ha avuto uno strepitoso successo nelle isole britanniche)

ASCOLTA Will Martin 2008 nel cd d’esordio definito il “Crossover tenor”

ASCOLTA Treebeard 2011

Questa versione testuale è quella ridotta, rilasciata da John Tams per il Cd Over the Hills & Far Away: The Music of Sharpe, 1996


I
Here’s forty shillings on the drum
For those who’ll volunteer to come
To ‘list and fight the foe today.
Over the hills and far away. 
CHORUS
O’er the hills and o’er the main.
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain.
King George commands and we obey.
Over the hills and far away.

II
When duty calls me I must go
To stand and face another foe.
But part of me will always stray
Over the hills and far away.
III
If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades did before,
Then ask the fifes and drums to play.
Over the hills and far away.
IV
Then fall in lads behind the drum,
With colours blazing like the sun.
Along the road to come what may.
Over the hills and far away.
TRADUZIONE Cattia Salto
I
Ecco qui 40 scellini sul tamburo
per coloro che si offriranno volontari
per arruolarsi e combattere il nemico oggi, lontano oltre le colline
CORO
Oltre le colline e oltre il mare
per le Fiandre, il Portogallo e la Spagna
Re Giorgio comanda e noi obbediamo
lontano oltre le colline
II
Quando il dovere chiama dobbiamo andare, per restare in piedi e fronteggiare un altro nemico.
Ma una parte di me resterà sempre smarrita, lontano oltre le colline
III
Se dovessi cadere non mi alzerei più
come molti altri compagni prima di me,
allora chiedi ai pifferi e i tamburi di suonare, lontano oltre le colline
IV
Allora cadono i ragazzi dietro al tamburo
con i colori che brillano come il sole
lungo la strada comunque vada
lontano oltre le colline

seconda parte

FONTI
http://sharpecompendium.net/songs/
http://www.compleatseanbean.com/sharpe30.html

The Baffled knight: Down deary down

Read the post in English

Un giovane cavaliere a spasso per la campagna incontra una  fanciulla (a volte la sorprende mentre è intenta a farsi il bagno in un fiume) e le chiede di fare sesso.

VERSIONE B: THE YOUNG KNIGHT – DOWN DEARY DOWN

Child ballad #112

La fanciulla di questa versione è una lady, a testimonianza che non era consigliabile per le oneste fanciulle di un tempo, andare in giro non accompagnate; in effetti nessuna fanciulla di buona famiglia si sarebbe mai avventurata da sola in luoghi pubblici (e meno che meno per boschi e campi che non fossero nella tenuta di famiglia) , e anche se Jane Austen un secolo più tardi, ci ha abituato a vedere la campagna inglese popolata da giovani fanciulle che passeggiano, raramente esse se ne andavano sole solette.

Nella versione più antica della ballata, un giovane e inesperto cavaliere incontra una fanciulla per i campi e le chiede di fare sesso, ma la fanciulla si prende gioco della sua inesperienza amorosa e lo raggira con uno stratagemma. Attraversando i secoli e la trasmissione orale il contesto della ballata diventa più prosaico e la fanciulla non sta più giocando con il fuoco, ma è tutta intenta a preservare la propria virtù da uno stupro.

Il testo, che riprende per somme linee la versione  A (qui), è riportato da Thomas D’Urfey in Pills to Purge Melancholy, V, 112, 1719, ma vediamo che con una melodia diversa e qualche sforbiciata, la versione si presta benissimo a una lettura più attuale o quantomeno ottocentesca, ambientata nel Far West americano!
Nina Simone live al Carnegie Hall di New York , 1963 (nell’album “Folksy Nina” 1964). Nina ha conosciuto un grande successo negli anni 80 (dopo che la Chanel ha selezionato un suo brano, risalente a quasi 30 anni prima per una pubblicità televisiva). Pur essendo una cantante jazz -blues – soul si è avventurata nel folk o meglio nella balladry americana. La melodia scritta da Joseph Hathaway e Charles Kingsley, con il suo andamento dolente e il pizzicato degli archi, è perfetta per una “murder ballad” così a mio parere, la musica getta una luce sinistra sull’incontro rivelandolo per quello che è: uno stupro mancato!


There was a knight (1) and he was young a-riding along the way Sir
And there he met a lady fair
among the stacks of hay (2) Sir
(Down deary down)
Quote he “shall you and I, Lady among the grass lay down oh
And I will take a special care
of the rumpling of your gown(3) oh”
“So -she told him-
If you will go along with me
into my father’s hall Sir
You shall enjoy my maiden’s head
and my estate and all Sir”
Down deary down
So he mounted her on a milk white steed himself upon another
And then they rid upon the road like sister and like brother
Down deary down 
And when they came to father’s home all moulded all about Sir
She stepped straight within the gate and shut the young man out Sir
Down deary down
“Here is a pursue of gold -she said-take it for your pain Sir
And I will send my father’s men
to go home with you again Sir
And if you meet a lady fair
as you go by the town Sir
You must not fear the dewy grass or
The rumpling grass of her gown Sir”
Down deary down 
And if you meet a lady gay
as you go by the hill Sir
Here is the moral of the story (4)
If you will not when you may you shall not when you will Sir
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era un cavaliere (ed era giovane),
che andando a cavallo per la via,
incontrò una bella fanciulla
tra i covoni di fieno
(Down deary down)
Disse lui “Se tu ed io, fanciulla
ci gettassimo sull’erba,
farò particolare attenzione
a non stropicciarti il vestito.”
Disse lei “Allora
se verrete con me,
fino alla dimora di mio padre,  signore
potrete godere della mia verginità
e della mia tenuta signore”.
Down deary down
Lui la fece montare sullo stallone bianco
e lui ne montò un altro
e cavalcarono lungo la strada come sorella e fratello.
Down deary down
Quando giunsero alla dimora paterna
si era ormai a buon punto,
ma lei subito entrò nel cancello
e chiuse fuori il giovanotto
Down deary down
 “Qui c’è un sacchetto pieno d’oro, prendetelo per il vostro disturbo signore
e io manderò gli uomini di mio padre
per riportarvi a casa signore,
e se incontrerete una bella fanciulla
mentre andate verso la città, signore
non dovete temere per l’erba umida o
che l’erba sciupi il suo abito signore”
Down deary down
Quando incontrerete una donna gaia
andando per la brughiera, signore
ecco il morale della storia:
chi non vuole quando può, non potrà quando vorrà, signore!

NOTE
1) il cavaliere potrebbe benissimo essere un cow-boy della Frontiera per questo ho tradotto lady con fanciulla e non con dama. Conseguentemente anche tutto il linguaggio è stato resto più moderno
2) la ragazza si configura in questa ambientazione se non proprio come una contadina quantomeno come la figlia benestante del proprietario di un grosso ranch
3) evidentemente il giovane non conosce il detto della precedente versione ” When you have you owne true-love a mile or two out of the town, spare not for her gay clothing, but lay her body flat on the ground
4) che è anche un proverbio italiano

ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_112

The Lea Rig (ti incontrerò tra i campi)

ritratto di Robert Burns
ritratto di Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Read the post in English

The lea-rig (in inglese The Meadow-ridge) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese riscritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 con il titolo di “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig”.
Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche”, una tecnica colturale che prevede la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate ovvero il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale di un tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio  e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare il Mugellese che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto la dimensione opportuna. Si formavano con questo tipo di lavorazione i corn rigs e i lea rigs ossia le porche di grano e gli argini d’incolto dove cresceva l’erba.

LA MELODIA

Troviamo la bella melodia in molti manoscritti setteceneschi, conosciuta con vari nomi quali An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber in Unexpected Songs 2006

LE VERSIONI TESTUALI

rigsUn incontro “romantico” nei campi estivi declinato in molte versioni testuali con un’unica melodia (sebbene con molti diversi arrangiamenti) che ha conosciuto, come tante altre canzoni scozzesi settecentesche, una notevole fama tra i musicisti del romanticismo tedesco e nei salotti bene  d’Inghilterra, Francia e Germania.

Il testo più antico si trova nel manoscritto di Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, di autore anonimo che inizia così:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

Con il titolo “My Ain Kind Dearie O” è pubblicata successivamente nello Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (vedi qui) su invio di Robert Burns a James Johnson con la nota che si trattava della versione scritta originariamente dal poeta edimburghese Robert Fergusson (1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson morì a soli 24 anni in preda alla pazzia mentre era ricoverato nel Manicomio di Edimburgo perchè soggetto a una forte depressione esistenziale (e tuttavia c’è chi insinua si sia trattato di sifilide); fece in tempo a scrivere appena un’ottantina di poesie (pubblicate tra il 1771 e il 1773) e fu il primo poeta a usate il dialetto scozzese come lingua poetica; visse per lo più una vita da bohemien, condividendo il  fermento intellettuale di Edimburgo nel periodo conosciuto come l’Illuminismo scozzese, sempre a contatto con musicisti, attori ed editori; nel 1772 aderì alla loggia “Edinburgh Cape Club”, non proprio una loggia massonica ma un club per soli uomini per scopi conviviali (in cui si imbandivano tavolate con gustose pietanze e soprattutto grandi bevute); per Robert Burns fu ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn riscrisse la poesia nell’ottobre del 1792 per l’editore George Thomson, affinchè fosse pubblicata nel “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in quella che sarà la versione più comunemente detta The Lea Rig) pubblicata con l’arrangiamento musicale di Joseph Haydn (il quale arrangiò anche la versione tradizionale My Ain Kind Deary); e scrisse anche una versione più bawdy pubblicata nel “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“(1799) con il titolo My Ain Kind Deary (pag 98) (testo qui)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

e nella versione classica su arrangiamento di Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Quando sulla collina la stella dell’est(1)
dice che l’ora (2) di mungere le pecore è vicina, mia cara
e i buoi dal campo arato
ritornano così svogliati e stanchi;
giù al ruscello dove le betulle (3)
profumate di rugiada pendono bianche, mia cara,
ti incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
II
A mezzanotte, nella valle più tenebrosa
vagavo senza mai avere paura (4)
perchè per quella valle andavo da te
mia cara amata;
anche se la notte fosse sì tempestosa (5) e io sì tanto stanco
t’incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
III
Il cacciatore ama il sole del mattino
che risveglia il cervo della montagna, mia cara;
a mezzogiorno il pescatore cerca la valle e verso ruscello si dirige, mia cara
dammi l’ora del grigio crepuscolo
che fa diventare il mio cuore così allegro, per incontrarti tra gli argini erbosi, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) è la stella del mattino
2) bughtin-time = the time of milking the ewes; il tempo della mungitura è di prima mattina (una bella descrizione qui)
3) in altre versioni “birken buds” in effetti la frase ha più senso essendo Down by the burn, where birken buds
Wi’ dew are hangin clear = giù al ruscello dove le gemme rugiadose delle betulle pendono bianche

4) scritto anche come irie
5) nella copia mandata a Thomson Robert scrisse “wet” poi corretta con wild: una notte estiva  dall’aria grave con lampi in lontananza
6) ma anche “I’d”

Si confronti con la versione attribuita al poeta Robert Fergusson

anonimo in SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Verrai tra gli argini erbosi (1)
mia cara amata
per stare abbracciati là con tenerezza
con me, mia cara amata.
Accanto alla siepe (2) e alla betulla
saremo felici (3) e non ci stancheremo mai;
ci schermeranno (4)dagli sguardi malevoli (5) mia cara amata
II
Nessun gregge con bastone da pastore o cani lì, mai verrà a spaventarti
ma le allodole (8) che cantano nel cielo
e corteggiano come me , il loro amore.
Mentre gli altri conducono gli agnelli e le pecore
e si affaticano per le ricchezze (9) terrene mia cara (10),
nei campi cresce il mio divertimento
con te, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen. (come si dice in italiano “infrattarsi”)
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart

LA DANZA: “My own kind deary”

La Scottish Country dance dal titolo “My own kind deary”con tanto di musica e istruzioni per la danza compare in Caledonian Country Dances di John Walsh (vol I 1735)
VIDEO
Le istruzioni qui

FONTI
The Forest Minstrel, James Hogg (1810) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

JACK OF ALL TRADES

“a volte, il domani arriva impregnato di denaro e sangue,
qui abbiamo resistito alla siccità, ora resisteremo all’alluvione
so fare tutti i mestieri, ce la caveremo”
Queste sono le strofe della versione “springsteeniana” di una ballata inglese/irlandese che affonda le radici in epoca elisabettiana, ed è stata pubblicata più volte nell’ottocento come street song nei fogli volanti distribuiti per le strade delle principali cittadine della Gran Bretagna e dell’Irlanda. La versione di Bruce Springsteen risale al 2012 ed in comune con testo e melodia della versione tradizionale ha solo il titolo, ma di certo può aver preso lo spunto proprio da quella.

JACK OF ALL TRADES

Il messaggio della canzone si presta a molteplici letture e risuona in modo diverso a seconda di chi l’ascolta, della sua età o del ceto sociale, in ultima analisi del vissuto; tutti ci interroghiamo sul senso della vita, sul perchè ci troviamo nel mondo, ognuno abbraccia un credo religioso, filosofico o politico e  prende delle decisioni che influiranno sulla vita degli altri. Molti alla fine si lasciano vivere, incasellati in un ruolo, per assolvere a una funzione, a partire da quella biologica; ma quali sono le nostre scelte?
E soprattutto quanto CI COSTA fare una scelta?
In quest’epoca sono in aumento le persone che decidono drasticamente di cambiare vita, hanno chiuso il conto in banca, rinunciando al possesso del denaro e delle cose materiali superflue, per vivere fuori dalla logica del mercato capitalistico; in opposizione ad una società basata sullo spreco e lo spregio delle risorse, sul valore dell’uomo misurato dal  successo economico,  c’è chi torna alla natura con l’autoproduzione e il baratto o chi lavora fuori dagli schemi per diffondere la sharing economy e la collaborazione.   continua

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE

Eppure non si tratta solo di ingegnarsi nel “fai-da-te” il messaggio è chiaro, veicolato dall’immagine di Gesù Cristo (che tra gli americani fa ancora presa): l’amore.
Perchè l’unico vero imperativo morale dell’insegnamento di Gesù è “fate i bravi”  (A volte ritorno di John Niven, titolo originale The Second Coming 2011)
« Insomma, la Bibbia è quasi tutta una scemenza, ma non c’è altro modo per dirlo, ragazzi… voi non sapete quello che fate. Però cercate di ricordarvi questo: fate i bravi. »

Nel libro di John Niven Gesù Cristo viene rimandato sulla terra, e nei panni di un musicista manda il suo messaggio al mondo..anteprima-a-volte-ritorno-di-john-niven-L-yQYgxO

Il padreterno è incantato.
Dio è prima di tutto un creatore e la cosa che piú lo rende orgoglioso delle Sue creature è di vederle all’opera nel piú divino dei gesti: quello di dare vita a qualcosa dal niente. Questa canzone: tre-quattro accordi e una manciata di parole, un piacere sublime da una cosa tanto semplice. I suoi occhi scivolano verso lo schermo di un portatile che luccica in un angolo della scrivania, un’antologia di citazioni di sedicenti leader religiosi. A dirla tutta, un compendio di bile, invettive, odio e istigazione all’odio, ed è quest’ultimo che piú lo fa infuriare. E invece l’idea è passata. Se l’erano venduta, cazzo: milioni di esseri umani erano convinti che gli omosessuali non avrebbero mai visto il volto di Dio. O quelli che fornicavano con piú di una persona. I tossicomani. I giocatori d’azzardo. I non battezzati. I blasfemi. I non credenti.
Che fine aveva fatto il sense of humour in tutto questo fanatismo? Ogni angolo del paradiso riecheggia di risate. La gente non fa che sghignazzare. Là fuori nell’ufficio principale, dov’era sempre venerdí pomeriggio, l’ultima spassosa battuta era sempre sulle labbra di tutti. Era una delle prime cose a essere insegnata alle anime salve ma prive di spirito: il senso dell’umorismo. Quel momento fatidico in cui si levavano il prosciutto dagli occhi e il mondo esplodeva in technicolor, quando tutti quelli che di norma aggrottavano la fronte e dicevano «Non l’ho capita» finalmente la capivano. Impagabile. John Niven, A volte ritorno 

Non che la versione di Springsteen sia una canzone umoristica, piuttosto è un gospel, con quella tromba nel mezzo che sembra una marcia funebre, la citazione  è piuttosto un invito a leggere il libro di Niven (e mi piace immaginare che Bruce lo abbia fatto) (un’ottima recensione qui).

ASCOLTA
Bruce Springsteen Wrecking Ball 2012 , splendido il video di Luigi Mariano


I
I’ll mow your lawn,
clean the leaves out’ your drain
I’ll mend your roof,
to keep out the rain
I take the work
that God provides
I’m a jack of all trades,
honey we’ll be all right
II
I’ll hammer the nails,
I’ll set the stone
I’ll harvest your crops,
when they’re ripe and grown
I’ll pull that engine apart,
and patch’er up ’til she’s running right
I’m a jack of all trades,
we’ll be all right
III
The hurricane blows,
brings the hard rain
When the blue sky breaks
It feels like the world’s gonna change
And we’ll start caring for each other
Like Jesus said that we might
I’m a jack of all trades,
we’ll be all right
IV
The banker man grows fat,
working man grows thin
It’s all happened before
and it’ll happen again
It’ll happen again,
yeah they’ll bet your life
I’m a jack of all trades,
darling we’ll be all right
V
Now sometimes tomorrow
comes soaked in treasure and blood
We stood the drought,
now we’ll stand the flood
There’s a new world coming,
I can see the light
I’m a jack of all trades,
we’ll be all right
VI
So you use what you’ve got
and you learn to make do
You take the old,
you make it new
If I had me a gun,
I’d find the bastards and shoot ’em on sight(1)
I’m a jack of all trades,
we’ll be all right
Traduzione italiano di Riccardo Venturi
I
Ti falcerò il prato,
ripulirò lo scolo dalle foglie,
ti aggiusterò il tetto
perché non ci entri la pioggia
prenderò il lavoro
che Dio vorrà dare,
sono un tuttofare,
tesoro, ci andrà tutto bene
II
Pianterò i chiodi
e metterò a posto la lastra di pietra
ti mieterò i campi
quando sono maturi,
metterò da parte quella macchina
e la raccomoderò finché non andrà bene, sono un tuttofare,
ci andrà tutto bene
III
Soffia l’uragano
e porta pioggia a dirotto,
quando spunta il cielo azzurro
sembra che il mondo cambi, cominceremo a curarci l’uno dell’altro
come Gesù disse che si poteva fare,
sono un tuttofare,
ci andrà tutto bene.
IV
Il banchiere ingrassa,
il lavoratore dimagrisce,
è già successo prima
e succederà ancora
succederà ancora, sí,
si giocheranno la tua vita a scommesse, sono un tuttofare,
tesoro, ci andrà tutto bene
V
Ora, a volte, il domani
arriva impregnato di denaro e sangue, qui abbiamo resistito alla siccità,
ora resisteremo all’alluvione
c’è un mondo nuovo che viene,
vedo la luce,
sono un tuttofare,
ci andrà tutto bene
VI
E così adoperi quel che hai,
e impari a farlo bastare
prendi quel che è vecchio
e lo rendi nuovo.
Se avessi una pistola,
troverei quei bastardi e gli sparerei a vista,(1)
sono un tuttofare,
ci andrà tutto bene 

NOTE
1) apparentemente Springsteen non è un pacifista; ma nel contesto della canzone vuol dire: meglio controllare la liberalizzazione delle armi perchè il possesso di un’arma non è la soluzione! 

VIVERE-SENZA-SOLDI3

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Di tutt’altro tenore la ballata ottocentesca inglese intitolata “Jack of All Trades” che ha una versione per ogni città: Londra, Dublino, Birmingham, Nottingham. Probabilmente risale all’epoca elisabettiana e con il titolo di “Jolly Jack of All Trades” (qui) compare come broadside ballad a Londra nel 1686-8, ed è così sottotitolata
“Jolly Jack of all Trades, OR, The Cries of London City. Maids where are your hearts become, look you what here is? Betwixt my Finger and my Thumb, look ye what here is? To a pleasant new Tune, “Or a begging we will go”.

ASCOLTA sulla melodia “A-Begging We Will Go”

Anche Thomas D’Urfey in ‘Pills to Purge Melancholy‘ (1719-20) raccoglie una ballata dal titolo “The Jolly Trades-men” o “Sometimes I am a Tapster“, ma la versione che si è diffusa negli anni del folk revival è quella registrata da The Critics Group (sotto la direzione di Ewan MacColl) nel 1966 nell’album “Sweet Thames Flow Softly”.

ASCOLTA Ewan McColl  “Gypsy Jack Of All Trades”
(inizia da 19:27)

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

Popolare street ballad dublinese nei primi decenni del Novecento la cui versione testuale riprende le pubblicazioni nelle broadside ballads degli anni 1860. Una mappa di Dublino vista attraverso le opportunità di lavoro che ogni zona poteva offrire, ma anche un modo gergale per indicare attività illegali e/o dalla dubbia moralità che si praticavano nei quartieri più degradati.

ASCOLTA The Dubliners

The Chieftains in Water from the well 2000 (strofe I, II)


I
I am a roving sporting blade,
they call me Jack of all trades
I always found my chief delight(1)
in courting pretty fair maids
For when in Dublin I arrived
to try for a situation
I always heard them say
“it was the pride of all the nation(2)”
On George’s Quay I first began,
I there became a porter
Me and my master soon fell out
which cut my aquaintance shorter
In Sackville Street a pastry cook,
in James’ Street a baker
In Cook Street I did coffins make,
in Eustace Street a preacher
CHORUS
I’m a roving Jack of many a trade
Of every trade, of all trades
And if you wish to know my name
They call me Jack of all trades
II
In Baggot Street I drove a cab
and there was well required
In Francis Street had lodging beds
to entertain all strangers
For Dublin is of high renown,
or I am much mistaken
In Kevin Street I do declare
sold butter eggs and bacon
In Golden Lane I sold old shoes,
in Meath Street was a grinder
In Barrack Street I lost my wife,
and I’m glad I ne’er could find her
In Mary’s Lane I’ve dyed old clothes
of which I’ve often boasted
In that noted place Exchequer Street sold mutton ready roasted
III
In Temple Bar(3) I dressed old hats,
in Thomas Street a sawyer
In Pill Lane I sold the plate,
in Green Street an honest lawyer
In Plunkett Street I sold cast clothes,
in Bride’s Alley a broker
In Charles Street I had a shop,
sold shovel, tongs and poker(4)
In College Green a banker was,
and in Smithfield, a drover
In Britain Street, a waiter
and in George’s Street, a glover
On Ormond Quay I sold old books;
in King Street, a nailer
In Townsend Street, a carpenter;
and in Ringsend, a sailor.
IV
In Cole’s Lane, a jobbing butcher;
in Dane Street, a tailor
In Moore Street a chandler
and on the Coombe, a weaver.
In Church Street, I sold old ropes-
on Redmond’s Hill a draper
In Mary Street, sold ‘bacco pipes-
in Bishop street a quaker.
In Peter Street, I was a quack:
In Greek street, a grainer
On the Harbour, I did carry sacks;
In Werburgh Street, a glazier.
In Mud Island, was a dairy boy,
where I became a scooper
In Capel Street, a barber’s clerk;
In Abbey Street, a cooper.
V
In Liffey street had furniture
with fleas and bugs I sold it
And at the Bank a big placard
I often stood to hold it(5)
In New Street I sold hay and straw, and in Spitalfields made bacon
In Fishamble Street was at the grand
old trade of basketmaking(6).
In Summerhill a coachmaker;
in Denzille Street a gilder
In Cork Street was a tanner,
in Brunswick Street, a builder,
In High Street, I sold hosiery;
In Patrick Street sold all blades
So if you wish to know my name,
they call me Jack of all Trades.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un giramondo, lama gaudente,
e mi chiamano Jack Tuttofare.
Ho sempre provato sommo piacere (1)
a corteggiare le giovani fanciulle;
così quando arrivai a Dublino
per cercare una sistemazione
li ho sempre sentiti dire
“Era l’orgoglio di ogni nazione (2)”.
Incominciai a George’s Quay
dove divenni un facchino,
io e il mio capo presto litigammo,
il che rese la mia permanenza più breve, in Sackville Street (ero) un pasticcere e in James’ Street un panettiere, in Cook Street facevo bare e in Eustace Street predicavo
CORO
Sono il giramondo Jack dai molti mestieri, di ogni mestiere,
di tutti i mestieri, e se vuoi sapere come mi chiamo, sono Jack il tutto fare
II
In Baggot Street guidavo carrozze
ed ero ben richiesto,
in Francis Street affittavo posti-letto per tutti i forestieri,
perchè Dublino è molto rinomata
o (sono) io che mi sbaglio.
In Kevin Street devo dire che
vendevo burro uova e pancetta
In Golden Lane scarpe vecchie,
in Meath Street ero un arrotino
In Barrack Street ho perso mia moglie, e sono contento di non averla mai ritrovata, In Mary’s Lane ho tinto i vecchi vestiti di cui andavo fiero,
nel noto posto di Exchequer Street vendevo montone arrosto
III
In Temple Bar(3) indossavo vecchi cappelli, in Thomas Street ero un falegname, in Pill Lane vendevo piatti, in Green Street ero un avvocato onesto, In Plunkett Street vendevo abiti usati,
in Bride’s Alley ero un allibratore
In Charles Street avevo un negozio,
vendevo paletta, pinze e scopino(4)
In College Green ero un banchiere
e in Smithfield ero un mandriano,
In Britain Street ero un cameriere
e a George’s Street, un guantaio
in Ormond Quay vendevo vecchi libri, in King Street ero un pianta-chiodi, In Townsend Street un carpentiere e in Ringsend un marinaio
IV
In Cole’s Lane un macellaio occasionale; in Dane Street un sarto,
in Moore Street un venditore di candele e nel Coombe un tessitore, in Church Street un robivecchi e in Redmond’s Hill un commerciante di stoffe
In Mary Street vendevo tabacco per pipa, in Bishop street ero un quacchero, In Peter Street ero un ciarlatano, e in Greek street uno che immagazzinava il grano,
al Porto portavo sacchi
in Werburgh ero vetraio
In Mud Island ero il casaro
dove divenni un dosatore
In Capel Street il garzone del barbiere,
In Abbey Street un bottaio.
V
In Liffey street avevo mobili
e li vendevo con cimici e pulci
e al Bank spesso tenevo un grosso cartello(5)
In New Street vendevo berretti e pagliette
e in Spitalfields facevo la pancetta,
In Fishamble Street ero nel grande vecchio mercato dei cestai(6)
In Summerhill facevo l’allenatore,
in Denzille Street l’indoratore
In Cork Street ero un conciatore,
in Brunswick Street un costruttore
In High Street vendevo calze
In Patrick Street spade,
così se volete sapere il mio nome,
sono Jack tutto fare

NOTE
1) oppure I always take a great delight
2) leggera variazione della strofa
“So when in Dublin I arrive, to look for a situation,
you can always hear them all say “He’s the pride of all the nation”
così nella prima versione quell’it è riferito alla città, nella seconda a Jack
3) Temple Bar è oggi il quartiere degli artisti di strada centro della vita notturna dublinese (per turisti), l’originario nucleo medievale di Dublino sede di corporazioni e artigiani, famigerato per i suoi bordelli e le sue bettole
4) sono gli accessori per i caminetti o le stufe a legna
5) uomo sandwich
6) con il termine “old trade of basketmaking” si allude ai tenutari di bordelli o equivale a prostituirsi o di darci dentro con il sesso- Il significato è più propriamente settecentesco; mentre nell’ottocento diventa l’equivalente di fare il borseggiatore o rubare. Così secondo il codice dell’epoca Jack si dava al furto con destrezza mentre si trovava in Fishamble Street (luogo di mercato del pesce nel Medioevo)

THE STREETS OF LONDON (Jack Of All Trades)

Questa versione testuale risale al 1955 ed è stata scritta da John Hasted (1921-2002) il fisico atomico ‎e musicista con la passione per le folksong: è evidentemente un arrangiamento della versione irlandese “Dublin Jack Of All Trades”

ASCOLTA Roy Bailey (Leon Rosselson e Martin Carthy chitarre) in  ‘That’s Not The Way It’s Got To Be’ 1975


I
I’m a roving blade of many a trade.
I’ve every trade and all trades.
And if you want to know my name,
then call me Jack of all trades.
I’d often heard of London town,
the pride of every nation.
At twenty-one it’s here
I’ve come to try for a situation.
II
In Covent Garden(1) I began
and there I was a porter.
My boss and I we soon fell out
which made acquaintance shorter.
Then I drove a number 46
from Waterloo to Wembley,
Where I became an engineer
on aeroplane assembly. ‎
III
In Charlotte Street I was a chef,
in Stepney Green a tailor,
But very soon they laid us off,
so I became a sailor.
In Rotherhithe a stevedore,
in Gray’s Inn Road a grinder.
On Hampstead Heath I lost my wife,
it’s sad but I could never find her. ‎
IV
In Downing Street I was a lord.
In Denmark Street I made songs.
In every street and all streets
with my banjo I played songs(2).
In Harley Street I was a quack,
in Turnham Green a teacher,
On Highbury Hill(3) a half-back,
and on Primrose Hill a preacher.
‎V
In Gower Street I’d furniture.
With fleas and bugs I sold it.(4)
In Leicester Square a big white card
I often stood to hold it.
By London Bridge I’d lodging beds
for all who made their way there,
For London is of high renown
and Scotsmen often stay there.
VI
I’m a roving blade of many a trade.
I’ve every trade and all trades.
And if you want to know my name,
then call me Jack of all trades.
I’ve tried my hand at everything
from herringbones to hat pegs,
But I can raise my head
and say I’ve never been a blackleg(5).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un giramondo dai molti mestieri,
ed ha imparato ogni mestiere,
e se volete sapere il ‎mio nome,
mi chiamano Jack Tuttofare.
Ho sentito parlare spesso della città di Londra, l’orgoglio di ogni nazione,
a 21 anni ci sono andato per cercare una sistemazione.
II
Incominciai a Covent Garden(1)
dove divenni facchino,
io e il mio capo presto litigammo, il che rese la mia permanenza più breve,
poi guidai il bus numero 46
da Waterloo a Wembley,
dove divenni un assemblatore
di pezzi di aeroplano
III
In Charlotte Street ero un cuoco,
in Stepney Green un sarto,
ma molto presto mi licenziarono
così divenni un marinaio.
In Rotherhithe ero uno scaricatore
in Gray’s Inn Road un arrotino
In Hampstead Heath persi mia moglie, è triste ma non l’ho più ritrovata
IV
In Downing Street ero un signore,
in Denmark Street facevo canzoni,
in ogni strada e per tutte le strade suonavo canzoni con il mio banjo(2)
In Harley Street ero un ciarlatano,
in Turnham Green un insegnante,
su Highbury Hill(3) un mediano
e in Primrose Hil un predicatore.
V
In Gower Street vendevo mobili
li vendevo con pulci e cimici(4),
In Leicester Square facevo l’uomo sandwich
per London Bridge affittavo letti
a tutti coloro che ci capitavano,
perchè Londra è molto rinomata
e gli scozzesi spesso ci stanno.
VI
Sono un giramondo dai molti mestieri,
ed ha imparato ogni mestiere.
E se volete sapere il ‎mio nome,
mi chiamano Jack Tuttofare.
E so fare davvero di tutto,
dal tessuto a spina di pesce agli attaccapanni,
ma sono fiero di dire
che non sono mai stato un crumiro(5)

NOTE
1) la piazza al centro di Covent Garden è stata la sede di un grosso mercato ortofrutticolo
2) è un riferimento autobiografico dell’autore suonatore di banjo e chitarra oltre che cantante
3) ad Highbury c’era l’Arsenal Stadium lo stadio della squadra di calcio Arsenal
4) si trattava evidentemente di mobilia usata (mercatino delle pulci)
5) John Hasted era un marxista iscritto al partito comunista: il crumiraggio era per lui il peggiore dei mali, in quanto infrangeva la solidarietà di classe, premessa per la conquista di condizioni di vita migliori

FONTI
http://www.einaudi.it/speciali/John-Niven-A-volte-ritorno
http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu/ballad/21924/transcription http://ebba.english.ucsb.edu/ballad/21924/xml http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33404/33404-h/music/music091.pdf http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/Jack%20of%20all%20trades
http://auspace.athabascau.ca/bitstream/2149/1660/ 1/transatlantic_troubadours.pdf
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=71305 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16801 http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=41623
http://babelstone.blogspot.it/2006/06/ grand-old-trade-of-basket-making.html

RIDDLES WISELY EXPOUNDED

5413113294_KNIGHT20AND20MAIDEN_xlargeIl “contrasto” tra innamorati, basato sui “compiti o enigmi impossibili” ha come modello la ballata “The Elfin Knight” (la ballata alla base della famosissima Scarborough Fair): collezionata dal professor Francis James Child (1825-1896) nella sua raccolta  “The English And Scottish Popular Ballads”.

Questi “enigmi” o “indovinelli” fanno parte di una consuetudine delle canzoni popolari nel rapportarsi con il soprannaturale, sia esso un essere magico o diabolico, e più in generale rappresentano un’arma di difesa per scongiurare un pericolo o ottenere un beneficio, così nelle fiabe giovanetti e giovanette di umili origini ottengono matrimoni vantaggiosi o regni per aver saputo risolvere degli enigmi o aver adempiuto a dei compiti impossibili. Un bel salto mentale per noi moderni che abbiamo ridotto gli indovinelli a barzellette!

RIDDLES WISELY EXPOUNDED CHILD # 1

Ovvero tradotto in italiano “Gli indovinelli ben risposti“, con il titolo di “Inter Diabolus Et Virgo” la ballata è riportata in un manoscritto del 1445, conservato adesso presso la Bodleian Library di Oxford (Rawlinson MS., 328, fo. 174v). Ma questa è già una versione più tarda “cristianizzata” della storia. Nelle versioni più antiche si narra di una iniziazione sessuale in cui una vergine per sposare il cavaliere deve rispondere saggiamente a degli indovinelli.
Occorre tuttavia riflettere sul ruolo che i giochi di parole e le metafore hanno assunto nella cultura antica più in generale e in quella celtica in particolare: le gare di indovinelli rappresentavano un tempo la forma suprema di saggezza, erano prove iniziatiche dei momenti di “passaggio” ovvero di transizione tra uno stato dell’essere ad un altro, o più semplicemente di crescita in cui si elaborano nuove verità e conoscenze. L’enigma parla con metafore e compiere il salto tra il senso letterale e quello metafisico è la sfida.

L’ineffabile non è esprimibile con le semplici parole ma solo con la magia delle parole, ovvero il linguaggio poetico, così il sovrannaturale può parlare alla nostra anima; non per niente queste sfide hanno come esito la morte o il rapimento dei demoni, oppure possono salvare la vita.

VERSIONE A

Tre sorelle accolgono con sollecitudine uno “straniero” e la più giovane passa la notte con lui. Al mattino il cavaliere esorta la più giovane a rispondere ai suoi indovinelli e superata la prova la prende in sposa.

Come accade per questo tipo di struttura del canto il ritornello è ridotto a due versi che si alternano alle strofe ed è quanto mai vario

Melodia: Lay the bend to the bonny broom in Pills to Purge Melancholy, Thomas D’Urfey

ASCOLTA Anaïs Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer


There were three sisters in the north
Lay the bend to the bonny broom
And they lived in their mother’s house
And you’ll beguile a lady soon
There came a man one evening late
And he came knocking at the gate
The eldest sister let him in
And locked the door with a silver pin
The second sister made his bed
And laid soft pillows ‘neath his head
The youngest sister, fair and bright
She lay beside him all through the nigh

And in the morning, come the day
She said, “Young man, will you marry me?”
And he said, “Yes, I’ll marry thee
If you can answer this to me”
“What is greener than the grass?
And what is smoother than the glass?”
“What is louder than a horn?
And what is sharper than a thorn?”
“What is deeper than the sea?
And what is longer than the way?”

“Envy’s greener than the grass
Flattery’s smoother than the glass”
“Rumor’s louder than a horn
Slander’s sharper than a thorn”
“Regret is deeper than the sea
But love is longer than the way”

The eldest sister rang the bell
She rang it from the highest hill
The second sister made the gown
She sewed it of the silk so fine
The youngest sister, true and wise
They’ve made of her a lovely bride
And now fair maids, I bid adieu
These parting words I’ll leave with you
May you always constant prove
Unto the one that you do love
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre sorelle nel Nord (1)
poni il giunco con la bella ginestra (2)
che vivevano nella casa della madre
tra poco ingannerai una fanciulla (3)
Venne un uomo una sera tardi
a bussare ai cancelli,
e la sorella maggiore lo fece entrare
e bloccò la porta con uno spillo d’argento, (4)/la seconda sorella  gli fece il letto/e mise soffici cuscini per la testa,/la sorella minore, bella e gentile
giacque con lui per tutta la notte.

E al mattino allo spuntar del giorno
lei disse “Giovanotto, mi vuoi
sposare?”
e lui rispose “Si, ti  sposerò
se risponderai a queste domande
Cos’è più verde dell’erba?
e cos’è più levigato del vetro?
Cosa fa più rumore del corno?
e cos’è più pungente della spina?
Cos’è più profondo del mare
e cos’è più ampio della distanza? (5)

“L’edera è più verde del bosco,
la lusinga più levigata del vetro
il tuono fa più rumore del corno,
la calunnia è più pungente della spina,
il rimpianto è più profondo del mare
ma l’amore è più ampio della distanza”

La sorella maggiore (6) suonò la campana, la suonò dalla collina più alta,
la seconda sorella confezionò l’abito,
lo cucì con la seta più fine,
della sorella minore, sincera e saggia
fecero una bella sposa.
E ora giovani fanciulle, vi porgo i saluti, con queste parole di congedo
vi lascio: che possiate sempre mantenervi fedeli a colui che amate (7)

NOTE
1) nel codice delle ballate britanniche il Nord è inteso dagli ascoltatori come negativo e quindi nel richiamarlo li prepara a qualcosa di terribile.
2) il refrain è presente anche in alcune versioni della ballata “The Cruel Sister” (vedi): al di là di ogni possibile traduzione delle parole la frase indica chiaramente il fare sesso. Alcuno traducono “bent” nel senso di “ricurvo” e quindi come un modo di descrivere l’horn cioè il corno (richiamando il corno o la tromba dell’elfo nella ballata “The Elfin Knight”) altri invece riconducono il termine all’Inglese antico (derivato dal sassone) nel senso di pianta o cespuglio della brughiera ossia l’erica o più in genera il giunco. Il significato dell’intercalare Lay the bairn tae the bonnie broom è stato a lungo dibattuto, la traduzione proposta da Dall’Armellina –poni il giunco con la bella ginestra- è una sorta di codice che introduce una storia di corteggiamento (l’uomo è il bairn o il bent che si avvinghia alla – o entra nella- bella ginestra, la donna)
3) in molte altre versioni il verso diventa solo un” Fa la la la la la la la la la”
4) nell’antichità i gioielli erano un tramite tra l’uomo e la divinità e servivano a invocarne le grazie per allontanare le forze negative; nella tradizione scozzese è ancora consuetudine da parte dell’uomo regalare alla futura sposa una spilla d’argento, che in Scozia prende il nome di “luckenbooth“: è in argento e con incisi due cuori intrecciati, variamente lavorata anche con pietre incastonate; è un regalo di fidanzamento che viene indossato durante il matrimonio e che passerà al primogenito, la spilla stessa è un amuleto che protegge la nuova coppia dall’invidia delle fate o più in generale dal male, favorendo la nascita di un bambino. Vedi
5) Le gare di indovinelli sono sfide serie e sacre, ma soprattutto con due  regole ben precise che impediscono ai concorrenti di barare: la risposta dell’indovinello deve essere ricavabile dal testo dell’enigma e condivisa dai partecipanti. Così per rispondere a queste domande bisogna pensare considerando l’aggettivo in termini metaforici.
6) in questa ballata non c’è rivalità tra le tre sorelle eppure secondo le consuetudini spetterebbe alla maggiore ricevere le attenzioni del corteggiatore
7) Un corteggiamento un po’ inusuale per i nostri parametri, in cui la donna deve dimostrare di essere all’altezza del suo ruolo di moglie, soprattutto sul piano della fedeltà indiscussa.

continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/captain-wedderburn.html
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=1076&all=1#agg258069