Loreena McKennitt: Fear no more the heat o’ th’ sun

La canzone “Fear no more the heat o’ th’ sun” scritta da William Shakespeare per il Cimbellino viene musicata da Loreena McKennitt come brano di chiusura del suo album “The Visit” (1991) con il titolo di Cymbeline. E’ il lament inserito nell’atto IV scena II in forma di canto funebre cantata da due personaggi della commedia Guiderio e Arvirago a Imogene (l’eroina della storia) creduta morta – Imogene in realtà non è morta, ma più tardi si risveglia dalla catalessi dovuta all’ingestione di un medicamento.
The song “Fear no more the heat or ‘th’ sun” written by William Shakespeare for the Cymbeline is composed by Loreena McKennitt as a closing track of her album “The Visit” titled “Cymbeline”. It is the dirge included in Act IV scene II (lines 258-281) sung by two characters of the comedy, Guiderius and Arviragus, to Imogene (the heroine of the story) believed dead.
Quale sia l’intricata storia della commedia non è rilevante alla comprensione del testo essendo il canto semplicemente un memento mori: alle passioni e all’infuriare della vita segue la serenità della morte, da cui l’ammonimento a condurre la vita secondo valori spirituali che permettano di conseguire la pace eterna.
Whatever Shakespeare’s comedy, it is not relevant to the understanding of the text, being the song simply a memento mori: to the passions and to enrage of life follows the serenity of death, from which the admonition to lead our life according to spiritual values for achieving the eternal peace.

Così scrive Loreena nelle note: Ecco i pensieri di William Shakespeare su questa visita terrena. Questa canzone si svolge verso la fine della sua commedia Cimbellino, scritta verso la fine della vita dell’autore. E’ ambientato nell’antica Britannia quando i Romani stavano invadendo l’ultimo avamposto rimasto del vecchio ordine celtico.
” Here are William Shakespeare’s thoughts on this earthly visit. This song occurs toward the end of his romance Cymbeline, which was written near the end of the author’s life. The play is set in ancient Britain when the Romans were invading the last remaining outpost of the old Celtic order” (LMK).

Loreena McKennitt in The Visit 1991
Live In Paris And Toronto


I
Fear no more the heat o’ th’ sun
Nor the furious winters’ rages;
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta’en thy wages (1).
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust(2).
riff
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this and come to dust.
II
Fear no more the frown o’ th’ great;
Thou art past the tyrant’s stroke (3).
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak.
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this and come to dust.
riff
All lovers young, all lovers must
Consign to thee and come to dust.
Traduzione italiano*
I (Guiderio)
Più non temere del sol la calura,
non la tempesta dell’inverno furiosa.
Hai assolto nel mondo ogni tua cura,
a casa sei andato, paga hai generosa.
Ragazzi e fanciulle che paiono d’oro,
come chi spazza i camini per loro,
in polvere deve ciascuno tornare.
inciso
Re, medico, dotto ti devon seguire;
in polvere deve ciascuno tornare.
II (Arvirago)
L’ira dei grandi più non temere,
non può dei tiranni toccarti condanna.
Più non curar di vestire e mangiare,
come una quercia è per te ogni canna.
Re, medico, dotto ti devon seguire;
in polvere deve ciascuno tornare.
inciso
Gli amanti giovani, gli amanti tutti,
in polvere deve ciascuno tornare.

NOTE
tratta da qui
le frasi dell’inciso sono state estrapolate da Loreena dalla canzone “Fear no more the heat o’ the sun”  scritta da William Shakespeare per il Cimbellino
the sentences of the riff were extrapolated from Loreena by the song “Fear no more the heat or ‘the sun” written by William Shakespeare for the Cymbeline
1) sei ritornato a casa e sei stato ricompensato
you returned home and you have been rewarded
2) polvere-morte sono il binomio dei vari riti funebri
dust-death are the binomial of the various funeral rites
3) richiamo alla persecuzione attuata da Cimbellino, re dei Britanni  nei confronti della figlia Imogene
reference to the persecution carried out by Cymbeline, king of the Britons against his daughter Imogene

Lady Greensleeves

Leggi in italiano

Greensleeves is a song coming from the English Renaissance (with undeniable Italian musical influences) that tells us about the courtship of a very rich gentleman and a Lady who rejects him, despite the generous gifts.

It was the year 1580 when Richard Jones and Edward White competed for prints of a fashion song, Jones with “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” and White with “A ballad, being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his frende “, then after a few days, White again with another version:” Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves “and a few months later Jones with the publication of” A merry newe “Northern Songe of Greene Sleeves” ; this time the reply came from William Elderton, who wrote the “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” in February 1581.
Finally, the revised and expanded version by Richard Jones with the title “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” included in the collection ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites‘ of 1584, was the one that became the final version, still performed today (at least as regards the melody and for most of the text with 17 stanzas).

The Melody

The melody is born for lute, the instrument par excellence of Renaissance (and baroque) music that has seen in England a fine flowering with the likes of John Jonson and John Dowland. As evidenced in the in-depth study of Ian Pittaway the ancestor of Greensleeves is the old Passamezzo.
By the late 15th century, plucked instruments such as the lute were just beginning to develop a new technique to add to their repertoire of playing styles, chordal playing, leading the way for grounds to be chordal rather than the single notes of the mediaeval period. One of the chordal grounds that developed was the passamezzo antico, meaning old passamezzo (there was also the passamezzo moderno), which began in Italy in the early 16th century before it spread through Europe. It’s a little like the blues today in that you have a basic, unchanging chord sequence and, on top of that, a melody is added. (from here)
The chorus of Greensleeves however follows the melodic trend of a  Romanesca which in turn is a variant of the passamezzo.

lute melody in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” written by Adriaen Smout for the Netherlands in 1595

Baltimore Consort  instrumental version in Renaissance style for dancing

We find a choreography of the dance  only in later times, in the “English Dancing Master” by John Playford (both in the edition of 1686 and then published several times in the eighteenth century) as an English country dance

The Legend

anne-boleyn-roseIn 1526 Henry VIII wrote “Greensleeves” for Anna Bolena, right at the beginning of their relationship.
A suggestive hypothesis because both the melody that the text well suited to the character, that of his own he wrote several piece still today in the repertoire of many artists of ancient music; however the poem was not transcribed in any manuscript of the time and therefore we can not be certain of this attribution.
The misunderstanding was generated by William Chappell who in his “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (London: Chappell & Co, 1859) attributes the melody to the king, misinterpreting a quote by Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th ‘Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.” (In Skialethia, or Shadow of Truth, 1598: the ballad “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” dates back to time of Henry VIII (King Harries) and, according to Chappell has always been sung on the melody Greensleeves.

The Tudor serie + The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Gregorian“,  ( I, III, VIII, IX)

Irish origins!?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1905) was the first to assume (without giving evidence) the irish origins. “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.
Since then the idea of Irish paternity has become more and more vigorous so much so that this song is present in the compilations of Celtic music labeled as irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

A courting song or a dirty trick?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-S
Roberto Venturi observes in his essay
Already at the time of Geoffrey Chaucer and the Tales of Canterbury (remember that Chaucer lived from 1343 to 1400) the green dress was considered typical of a “light woman”, that is a prostitute. She would therefore be a young woman of promiscuous customs; Nevill Coghill, the famous and heroic modern English translator of the Canterbury Tales, explains – referring to an interpretation of a Chaucerian step – that, at the time, the green color had precise sexual connotations, particularly in the phrase A green gown. It was the dress of a woman with some grass spots, who practiced (or suffered) a sexual intercourse in a meadow. If a woman was said to have “the green skirt”, in practice it was a whore.
The song would then be the lamentation of a betrayed and abandoned lover, or of a rejected customer; in short, you know, something far from regal (although in every age the kings were generally the first whoremongers of the Kingdom). Another possible interpretation is that the lover betrayed, or rejected, has wanted to revenge on the poor woman by devoting to her a delicious little song in which he calls her a whore through the metaphor of the “green sleeves” (translated from here)

Many interpreters, with versions both in ancient than modern style (also Yngwie Malmsteen plays it with his guitar and Leonard Cohen proposes a rewrite in 1974)
Today the text is rarely performed and only for two or four stanzas, but it is a song loved by choral groups that sing it more extensively.

In ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, from the collection of Israel G. Young (about twenty strophe see) all the gifts that the nobleman makes to his Lady to court her:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” with “sleeves of satin”, but also “men clothed all in green” and “dainties”!

So many versions (see) and a difficult choice, but here is:

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The Visit 1991 (I, III) interpreted “as if she were singing Tom Waits

Jethro Tull  in Christmas Album 2003 (instrumental version)

David Nevue amazing piano version!


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
NOTE
1) the first two sentences are sometimes reversed and start in the opposite direction
2) In the Middle Ages the green color was the symbol of regeneration and therefore of youth and physical vigor, meant “fertility” but also “hope” and with gold indicating pleasure. It was the color of medicine for its revitalizing powers. Color of love in the nascent stage, in the Renaissance it was the color used by the young especially in May; in women it was also the color of chastity.
But the other more promiscuous meaning is of “light woman always ready to roll in the grass”. And the charm of the ballad lies in its ambiguity!
Green is also the color that in fairy tales / ballads connotes a fairy creature.
The Gaelic words “Grian Sliabh” (literally translated as “sun mountain” or a “mountain exposed to the south, sunny”) are pronounced Green Sleeve (the song is also very popular in Ireland especially as slow air). Grian is also the name of a river that flows from Sliabh Aughty (County Clare and Galway)
3) the expressions are proper to the courtly lyric
4) sendal= light silk material

in the extended version the gifts of the suitor are many and expensive and it is all a complaint about “oh how much you costs me my dear!”

“Extended version
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

SOURCE
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm

Bonny Portmore: the ornament tree

Leggi in italiano

When the great oak of Portmore was break down in 1760, someone wrote a song known as “The Highlander’s Farewell to Bonny Portmore“; in 1796 Edward Bunting picked it up from Daniel Black, an old harpist from Glenoak (Antrim, Northern Ireland), and published it in “Ancient Music of Ireland” – 1840.
The age-old oak was located on the estate of Portmore’s Castle on the banks of Lugh Bege and it was knocked down by a great wind; the tree was already famous for its posture and was nicknamed “the ornament tree“. The oak was cut and the wood sold, from the measurements made we know that the trunk was 13 meters wide.

LOUGH PORTMORE

1032910_tcm9-205039Loch un Phoirt Mhóir (lake with a large landing place) is an almost circular lake in the South-West of Antrim County, Northern Ireland, today a nature reserve for bird protection.
The property formerly belonged to the O’Neill clan of Ballinderry, while the castle was built in 1661 or 1664 by Lord Conway (on the foundations of an ancient fortress) between Lough Beg and Lough Neagh; the estate was rich in centenarian trees and beautiful woods; however, the count fell into ruin and lost the property when he decided to drain Lake Ber to cultivate the land (the drainage system called “Tunny cut” is still existing); the ambitious project failed and the land passed into the hands of English nobles.
In other versions more simply the Count’s dynasty became extinct and the new owners left the estate in a state of neglect, since they did not intend to reside in Ireland. Almost all the trees were cut down and sold as timber for shipbuilding and the castle fell into disrepair.

Bonny Portmore could be understood symbolically as the decline of the Irish Gaelic lords: pain and nostalgia mixed in a lament of a twilight beauty; the dutiful tribute goes to Loreena McKennitt who brought this traditional iris  song to the international attention.
Loreena McKennitt in The Visit 1991
Nights from the Alhambra: live

CHORUS
O bonny Portmore,
you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.
I
O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many’s the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.
II
All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, “Where will we shelter or where will we sleep?”
For the Oak and the Ash (1), they are all cutten down
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.
NOTE
1) coded phrase to indicate the decline of the Gaelic lineage clans

Laura Marling live
Laura Creamer

Lucinda Williams in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006


Dan Gibson & Michael Maxwell in Emerald Forest instrumental version
And here I open a small parenthesis recalling a personal episode of a long time ago in which I met an ancient tree: at the time I lived in Florence and I had the opportunity to turn a bit for Tuscany, now I can not remember the location, but I know that I was in the Colli Senesi and it was summer; someone advised us to go and see an old holm oak, explaining roughly to the road; in the distance it seemed we were approaching a grove, in reality it was a single tree whose foliage was so leafy and vast, the old branches so bent, that to get closer to the trunk we had to bow. I still remember after many years the feeling of a presence, a deep and vital breath, and the discomfort that I tried to disturb the place. I do not exaggerate speaking of fear at all, and I think that feeling was the same feeling experienced by the ancient man, who felt in the centenarian trees the presence of a spirit.
SOURCE
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/immie/bonny.html
http://www.sentryjournal.com/2010/10/11/the-fate-of-bonny-portmore/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15567
http://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves/guide/p/portmorelough/about.aspx

Loreena McKennitt: The Old Ways

The Old Ways (in italiano Le vecchie usanze) nasce da una festa di capodanno passata in Irlanda nella parte occidentale dell’Isola dove più forti sono le tradizioni legate alla cultura celtica.
Così scrive Loreena McKennitt nelle note del booklet dell’album The Visit: ho trascorso il più spettrale capodanno a Doolin nella contea di Clare, Irlanda alcuni anni fa, e mi sono commossa per l’antichità di alcune celebrazioni. Fui sopraggiunta da profondi ricordi che potrebbero essere i resti del vecchio mondo che incontra il “nuovo”.
The Old Ways comes from a New Year’s Eve party in Ireland on the western side of the island where traditions linked to Celtic culture are stronger.
So Loreena McKennitt writes in the notes of the booklet of the album The Visit: I spent a most haunting New Year’s Eve in Doolin, County Clare, Ireland some years ago, and was moved by the antiquity of some of the celebrations. I was met by deep reminders that they may be the remnants of the old world meeting the “new”.

Una lunga introduzione strumentale (che richiama il tema di Huron ‘Beltane’ Fire Dance dell’album precedente) affidata dapprima all’arpa a cui si aggiungono in un crescendo violino, cornamusa, batteria e chitarra elettrica: quando entra il canto l’andamento epico si stempera e prevale un ritmo lento e meditativo.
A long instrumental introduction (which recalls the theme of Huron ‘Beltane’ Fire Dance from the previous album) starts with just harp, then adds on successive parts by violin, Uilleann pipes, drums, and electric guitar: when the song enters the epic performance  is dissolved and a slow and meditative rhythm prevails.

Così lo spirito dei tempi passati presenzia la festa di Capodanno e Loreena lo vede come se fosse una persona in carne ed ossa.
So the spirit of past times attends the New Year party and Loreena sees it as if it were a person in flesh and blood.

Loreena McKennitt in The Visit


intro
The thundering waves are calling me home, home to you
The pounding sea is calling me home, home to you
I
On a dark new year’s night on the west coast of Claire
I heard your voice singing
Your eyes danced the song,
your hands played the tune
‘Twas a vision (1) before me
II
We left the music behind as the dance carried on
As we stole away to the seashore
And smelt the brine,
felt the wind in our hair
With sadness you paused
III
Suddenly I knew that you’d have to go
Your world was not mine,
your eyes told me so
Yet it was there I felt the crossroads of time
And I wondered why
IV
As we cast our gaze on the tumbling sea
A vision came o’er me
Of thundering hooves and beating wings
In the clouds above (2)
V
Turning to go, heard you call out my name
Like a bird in a cage spreading its wings to fly
“The old ways are lost,”
you sang as you flew
And I wondered why
Traduzione in italiano Cattia Salto
intro
Le onde roboanti mi chiamano a casa, a casa da te
il mormorio del mare mi chiama a casa, a casa da te
I
In una notte buia di fine anno sulla costa ovest del Claire
sentivo la tua voce cantare
i tuoi occhi seguivano la canzone
le tue mani suonavano la melodia
c’era una visione davanti a me
II
Ci lasciammo la musica alle spalle mentre la danza proseguiva,
e fuggimmo sulla spiaggia
ad annusare la salsedine
e sentire il vento tra i capelli
ma con tristezza ti fermasti
III
Di colpo sapevo che tu dovevi andare via
il tuo mondo non era il mio
i tuoi occhi così mi dicevano,
tuttavia fu là che sentii  il bivio del tempo
e mi domandai perchè
IV
Appena posammo lo sguardo sul mare tumultuoso
una visione venne verso di me
di zoccoli tonanti e ali sbattute
nelle nuvole in cielo
V
In procinto di andare, ti sentii chiamare il mio nome,
come un uccello nella gabbia dispiega le sue ali per volare
“le vecchie usanze sono andate perdute”
cantavi mentre volavi via
e mi chiedevo perchè

NOTE
1) è un revenant,  dalle note di commento di Loreena lo possiamo inquadrare come lo spirito del passato, l’antenato. Come nella migliore tradizione di Samain vivo e morto s’incontrano.
2) una tribù a cavallo con stendardi e insegne del clan

Courtyard Lullaby & Unicorn by Loreena McKennitt

la location di Courtyard lullaby Quinta das Torres

Loreena McKennitt nel suo album “The visit” compone una breve ma intensa canzone dal titolo  “Courtyard Lullaby“.
Il contesto in cui nasce il brano è  una location del Portogallo a Quinta das Torres in un palazzo del XVI secolo con il tipico cortile interno adornato da aranci, così scrive Loreena nel booklet: “l’atmosfera del posto mi ha ricordato gli arazzi dell’Unicorno appesi ai Cloisters di New York. Gli arazzi e il palazzo sono entrambi ricchi  di un’iconografia mondana pre-cristiana che rappresenta il misterioso ciclo di vita e morte delle stagioni. Fu nel cortile di Quinta das Torres che questo brano è stato concepito”
Loreena McKennitt in her album “The Visit” composes a short but intense song entitled “Courtyard Lullaby”.
The context in which the piece is born is a location of Portugal in Quinta das Torres, a 16th century palace with a typical courtyard decorated with orange trees, Loreena writes in the booklet “the feel of the place reminded me of the Unicorn tapestries which hang in The Cloisters in New York City. The tapestries and the lodge are both rich with earthy, pre-Christian iconography depicting the mysterious life and death cycle of the seasons. It was in the courtyard of Quinta das Torres that this piece was conceived.

L’UNICORNO
The unicorn

Se all’origine delle leggende sull’unicorno (liocorno) con tutta probabilità si nasconde un rinoceronte, nel Medioevo europeo dei bestiari viene raffigurato con fattezze di capra, tuttavia la figura che prende il sopravvento nell’immaginario collettivo (e nell’araldica) è quella di un piccolo cavallo bianco (per sottolinearne la purezza, allegoria della castità) con un singolo corno a spirale in mezzo alla fronte. Secondo le leggende è una creatura magica che si mostra solo ai puri di cuore e per poterlo catturare occorre la mano di una vergine.
If at the origin of the legends on the unicorn (unicorn) most probably hides a rhinoceros, in the European Middle Ages bestiaries the unicorn is depicted with features of goat, but the figure that takes over in the collective imagination (and in the heraldic crest) is that of a small white horse (to underline purity, allegory of chastity) with a single spiral horn in the middle of the forehead. According to the legends unicorn is a magical creature that shows itself only to the pure of heart and to be able to capture it takes the hand of a virgin.

Angela Betta Casale

Scrive il professor Franco Cardini nel suo saggio “Fra XII e XIII secolo, l’unicorno raggiunge il suo aspetto “classico”: è ormai – sia pure con parecchie varianti possibili – un candido cavallo dal mento barbato e dagli zoccoli bifidi (due attributi caprini), e reca sulla fronte un corno di narvalo. Si sottolinea il suo carattere di guaritore, sia perché il suo corno purifica le acque e allontana i veleni, sia perché – come si vede nell’unicorno donato da Candace, regina di Etiopia ad Alessandro nell’Alexanderlied, oppure nel Parsival di Wolfram von Eschenbach incastonata nella sua fronte c’è una pietra preziosa, il carbonchio, dal magico potere. Il corno, il candore, l’elemento acqua avvicinano d’altronde l’unicorno al regime femmineo del simbolo, e di esso si fa talora non solo il simbolo del Cristo, ma anche della vergine stessa. D’altronde, il simbolo è per sua natura ambivalente: e così, al pari di altri animali nobili quanto lui, anche all’unicorno spettò di rappresentare talora il Cristo, ma tal altra anche il suo avversario. La sua ferocia poteva essere interpretata come simbolo di malvagità..” (tratto da qui)

E’ proprio il corno, immagine fallica per eccellenza ad alludere alla sua carica erotica e feconda: il corno teso verso l’alto è spada (forza, sovranità, ma anche spada di Dio) e nello stesso tempo corno vuoto, cornucopia simbolo femminile di fecondità e abbondanza.
It is precisely the horn, a phallic image par excellence to allude to its erotic and fruitful charge: the horn stretched upwards is sword (strength, sovereignty, but also sword of God) and at the same time empty horn, cornucopia female symbol of fruitfulness and abundance.

La sua raffigurazione più rinomata è negli arazzi fiamminghi della Dama e l’Unicorno, ma anche nei sette arazzi della Caccia all’Unicorno conservati ai Cloisters di New York. Nel ciclo che riproduce una battuta di caccia come la tradizionale caccia al cervo assistiamo ad un prodigio: l’animale catturato e ucciso rinasce e in ultimo è raffigurato in un recinto sotto ad un albero di melograno, così si riassume il mistero della vita, la fertilità della terra e del cosmo con l’eterno ciclo di morte e rinascita delle stagioni.
Its most famous depiction is in the Flemish tapestries of the Lady and the Unicorn, but also in the seven tapestries of the Unicorn Hunting preserved at the Cloisters of New York; in the cycle that reproduces a hunting trip like the traditional deer hunting we witness a prodigy: the animal, captured and killed, is reborned and is ultimately depicted in an enclosure under a pomegranate tree, thus summarizing the mystery of life, the fertility of the earth and the cosmos with the eternal cycle of death and rebirth of the seasons

In questa chiave di lettura si decodifica il testo e il sogno notturno.
In this interpretation, the text and the nocturnal dream are decoded

Loreena McKennitt in The Visit (1991)


I
Wherein the deep night sky
The stars lie in its embrace
The courtyard still in its sleep
And peace comes over your face
II
“Come to me,” it sings (1)
“Hear the pulse of the land
The ocean’s rhythms pull
To hold your heart in its hand (2).”
III
And when the wind draws strong
Across the cypress trees
The nightbirds cease their songs
So gathers memories
IV
Last night you spoke of a dream
Where forests stretched to the east
And each bird sang its song
A unicorn (3) joined in a feast
V
And in a corner stood
A pomegranate tree (4)
With wild flowers there
No mortal eye could see
VI
Yet still some mystery befalls
Sure as the cock crows at dawn
The world in stillness keeps (5)
The secret of babes to be born
VII
Come to me, my love
Hear the pulse of the land
The ocean’s rhythms pull
To hold your heart in its hand
VIII
I heard an old voice say
“Don’t go far from the land
The seasons have their way
No mortal can understand.”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Nel cielo scuro della notte
dove le stelle stanno abbracciate,
il cortile ancora dorme
e la pace ti sovrasta.
II
“Vieni da me- canta-ascolta il pulsare della terra e il richiamo dei battiti dell’oceano, per possedere in mano il tuo cuore”
III
E quando il vento soffia forte
tra i cipressi
gli usignoli smettono di cantare,
così si radunano i ricordi
IV
Ieri notte mi raccontavi di un sogno,
dove le foreste  si estendevano ad est
e ogni uccello intonava il suo canto
e un unicorno si unì alla gioia
V
E in un angolo stava
un melograno
con fiori selvatici, che nessun occhio mortale poteva vedere.
VI
Tuttavia ancora un mistero accade,
appena il gallo canta all’alba,
il mondo immobile custodisce
il segreto dei bimbi nascituri
VII
Vieni da me, amore mio
ascolta il pulsare della terra e il richiamo dei battiti dell’oceano, per possedere in mano il tuo cuore
VIII
Sentivo una vecchia voce dire
“Non allontanarti dalla terra,
le stagioni hanno i loro percorsi
che nessun mortale può capire”

NOTE
1) come ogni cortile che si rispetti, sia della tradizione medievale europea che di quella araba, al centro è costruita una fontana (o un pozzo come nei chiostri dei monasteri), immagino sia la fontana con il suo sommesso zampillo a porgere l’invito a coloro che dormono nel palazzo di scendere nel cortile
like any self-respecting courtyard, both in the European and Arab medieval tradition, in the center a fountain (or a well as in the cloisters of the monasteries) is built, I imagine that the fountain with its quiet gush sends the invitation to those who sleep in the palace to go down into the courtyard
2) è il cortile a tenere in palmo di mano il cuore di chi sogna
it is the courtyard that holds the heart of the dreamer in its hand
3) l’irruzione del sacro nel sogno
the irruption of the sacred in the dream
4) il melograno è un albero dal duplice significato fertilità e morte, frutto sacro,  alla Dea Madre e simbolo di rinascita e rigenerazione
the pomegranate is a tree with a double meaning fertility and death, sacred fruit, to the Mother Goddess and symbol of rebirth and regeneration
5) richiamo alla nascita di Gesù
a recall to the birth of Jesus

LINK
https://aispes.net/biblioteca/il-giardino-dei-magi/lunicorno/
http://mariateresalupo.it/analisi-dei-miti-2/la-dama-e-lunicorno/
https://www.mondimedievali.net/Immaginario/unicorno.htm
http://www.lanuovabq.it/it/il-mistero-degli-arazzi-dellunicorno
http://www.claudiazedda.it/la-melagrana-il-cibo-dei-morti/

Loreena McKennitt: All Souls Night

Con la notte di Samain ha inizio l’inverno, una notte di passaggio in cui i defunti ritornano sulla terra, una notte in cui i morti danzano con i vivi tra le ombre dei falò sulle alture.
“All Soul night” è stato composto e registrato in uno dei primi album dell’artista canadese Loreena McKennitt  (“The Visit” 1991) ma riproposto spesso nei suoi concerti live, nella canzone si evoca la festa delle “mummie”, cioè le maschere. Mummers erano uomini travestiti che indossavano maschere e andavano a visitare i loro vicini di casa in casa, cantando e ballando, un’usanza solstiziale che richiama certe tradizioni celtiche di Samain. Il mumming implica anche una “sacra rappresentazione“,  incentrata sul rito di morte-rinascita proprio di molte tradizioni solstiziali e di Capodanno.
With the night of Samain it begins the winter, a night of passage in which the dead return to earth, a night when the dead dance with the living in the shadows of the bonfires on the hills.
“All Soul Night” was composed and recorded in one of the first albums by the Canadian artist Loreena McKennitt (“The Visit” 1991) but often repeated in her live concerts, in the song she evokes a scene from the festival of “mummies” “, that is, the masks. Mummers were disguised men who wore masks and went to visit their neighbors at home, singing and dancing, a solstice custom that recalls certain Celtic traditions of Samain. The mumming also implies a sort of “sacred representation”, focused on the rite of death-rebirth of many solstice traditions and New Year’s Eve.

“The Visit” (1991)

live in “Nights from the Alhambra”


I
Bonfires dot the rolling hillsides.
Figures dance around and around
to drums that pulse out echoes of darkness;
moving to the pagan sound.
II
Somewhere in a hidden memory
images float before my eyes
of fragrant nights of straw and of bonfires,
dancing till the next sunrise.
CHORUS
I can see the lights in the distance
trembling in the dark cloak of night.
Candles and lanterns are dancing, dancing
a waltz on all souls night (1).
III
Figures of cornstalks bend in the shadows
held up tall as the flames leap high.
The Green Knight holds the holly bush (2)
to mark where the old year passes by.
I
Bonfires dot the rolling hillsides.
Figures dance around and around
to drums that pulse out echoes of darkness;
moving to the pagan sound.
IV
Standing on the bridge that crosses
the river (3) that goes out to the sea.
The wind is full of a thousand voices;
they pass by the bridge and me.
Traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto (*)
I
I falò illuminano i fianchi sinuosi delle colline, sagome danzano in cerchio
al battito dei tamburi che fanno risuonare nella notte
un trascinante ritmo pagano
II
Da qualche parte, da una memoria segreta, immagini mi fluttuano davanti agli occhi, notti profumate di fieno e di falò
e danze fino all’alba del giorno seguente
CORO
vedo le luci lontane
tremule sul manto nero della notte
candele e lanterne danzano,
danzano

un valzer nella notte dei defunti (1)
III
Fantocci di granturco si flettono nell’ombra, stanno in piedi mentre le fiamme divampano
il Cavaliere Verde tiene un ramo di agrifoglio (2) per indicare dove è passato il vecchio anno
I
I falò illuminano i fianchi sinuosi delle colline sagome danzano in cerchio
al battito dei tamburi che fanno risuonare nella notte
un trascinante ritmo pagano
IV
In piedi sul ponte che attraversa
il fiume (3) che finisce nel mare
il vento è carico di mille voci,
attraversano il ponte e mi superano.

NOTE
* Non ho resistito a rifare una traduzione anche se ce ne sono già altre (ben fatte)
1) Samain o Samahin, Samhain letteralmente “la fine dell’Estate” era la festa celtica che celebrava l’inizio della Stagione Invernale e l’inizio del nuovo anno. Era una festività dedicata agli Antenati e ai sacrifici rituali continua
Samain or Samahin, Samhain literally “the end of Summer” was the Celtic festival that celebrated the beginning of the Winter Season and the beginning of the new year. It was a festival dedicated to the Ancestors and to the ritual sacrifices continues
2) Sir James George Frazer, nel suo libro “Il Ramo d’Oro” e Robert Graves, in “La Dea Bianca” e “I Miti Greci”, hanno descritto una cerimonia rituale che veniva, secondo loro, praticata nell’antica Roma e in altre culture europee più antiche: la lotta rituale tra il Re Agrifoglio e il Re Quercia, lotta che garantiva l’alternarsi delle stagioni invernale e estiva. L’Uomo Verde o Cavaliere Verde è una figura archetipa connessa con il ciclo della natura, è la forza verde immanente della Natura. continua
La scena descrive i Mummers, gruppi di questuanti che travestiti e mascherati andavano di casa in casa per le festività rituali dell’anno, oggi il Mumming natalizio si è trasformato in una parata carnevalesca per le strade, ma le vecchie tradizioni sono ancora molto vive in Irlanda
Sir James George Frazer, in his book “The Golden Bough” and Robert Graves, in “The White Goddess” and “The Greek Myths”, described a ritual ceremony that was, according to them, practiced in ancient Rome and in other more ancient European cultures: the ritual fight between King Holly and King Oak, a struggle that guaranteed the alternation of winter and summer seasons. The Green Man or Green Knight is an archetypal figure connected with the cycle of nature, it is the immanent green force of Nature. 
The scene describes the Mummers, groups of beggars who disguised went from house to house for the ritual festivities of the year; today the Christmas Mumming has turned into a carnival parade through the streets, but the old traditions are still very much alive in Ireland
3) i ponti sono luoghi di soglia a mezzo tra terra e acqua, luogo privilegiato di passaggio delle schiere fatate, ma qui Loreena inserisce un rituale orientale quello delle lanterne abbandonate alla corrente del fiume, una sorta di ricordo ancestrale dei popoli orientali che migrarono in Europa, le terre dell’Ovest.
Questo pezzo è stato ispirato dall’immaginario di una tradizione giapponese che celebra le anime dei defunti inviando lanterne illuminate dalle candele su vie navigabili che conducono all’oceano, a volte in piccole imbarcazioni; insieme con l’immaginario delle celebrazioni celtiche di Samain, durante le quali si accendevano enormi falò non solo per celebrare il nuovo anno, ma anche per riscaldare le anime dei defunti” LMK(tradotto da qui)
Bridges are threshold places between land and water, a privileged place for passing the fairy ranks, but here Loreena inserts an oriental ritual that of the lanterns abandoned to the current of the river, a sort of ancestral memory of the oriental peoples who migrated to Europe, the lands of the West.
This piece was inspired by the imagery of a Japanese tradition which celebrates the souls of the departed by sending candle-lit lanterns on out waterways leading to the ocean, sometimes in little boats; along with the imagery of the Celtic All Souls Night celebrations, at which time huge bonfires were lit not only to mark the new year, but to warm the souls of the departed. LMK (from here)

Il tema del Mumming è ripreso da Loreena anche con la Mummer’s Dance (in The Book of Secrets) questa volta riferito alla questua primaverile. Musicalmente i due brani si compendiano.
The theme of Mumming is taken up by Loreena also with the Mummer’s Dance (in The Book of Secrets)about the spring quest (“going a-Maying“). Musically the two pieces are summarized.

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/ritual-chants/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/samain.htm

THE MUMMERS ARE PLANKIN’ HER DOWN

Bonny Portmore: la grande quercia di Portmore

Read the post in English

Quando fu abbattuta la grande quercia di Portmore nel 1760 qualcuno scrisse una canzone conosciuta con il nome di “The Highlander’s Farewell to Bonny Portmore“; nel 1796 Edward Bunting la raccolse dalla voce di Daniel Black un vecchio arpista di Glenoak (Antrim, Irlanda del Nord) e la pubblicò in “Ancient Music of Ireland” – 1840. La quercia secolare si trovava sulla proprietà del castello di Portmore sulle rive di Lugh Bege e fu abbattuta da un grande vento, l’albero era già famoso per il suo portamento ed era soprannominato “the ornament tree“. La quercia venne tagliata e il legno venduto, dalle misurazioni fatte sappiamo che il tronco era largo 13 metri.

LOUGH PORTMORE

Bonny Portmore
Loch Portmore

Loch un Phoirt Mhóir (lago dal grande approdo) ovvero  Lough Portmore è un laghetto quasi circolare nel Sud-Ovest della contea di Antrim, Irlanda del Nord, oggi riserva naturale per la protezione degli uccelli.
La proprietà anticamente apparteneva al clan O’Neill di Ballinderry, mentre il castello fu costruito nel 1661 o 1664 da Lord Conway (sulle fondamenta di una antica fortezza) tra Lough Beg e Lough Neagh; la tenuta era ricca di alberi centenari e di bellissimi boschi; il conte però cadde in rovina e perse la proprietà quando decise di prosciugare il lago Ber per mettere la terra a seminativo (il sistema di drenaggio detto “Tunny cut” è tutt’ora esistente); l’ambizioso progetto fallì e la terra passò in mano a dei nobili Inglesi.
In altre versioni più semplicemente la dinastia del Conte si estinse e i nuovi proprietari lasciarono la tenuta in stato di abbandono, non essendo intenzionati a risiedere in Irlanda. Quasi tutti gli alberi vennero abbattuti e venduti come legname per la costruzione navale e il castello cadde in rovina.

Il canto potrebbe essere inteso simbolicamente per indicare il declino dei signori gaelici irlandesi, dolore e nostalgia mescolati in un lamento di una bellezza crepuscolare; l’omaggio doveroso va a Loreena McKennitt che ha portato il brano alla ribalta internazionale.
Loreena McKennitt in The Visit 1991
Nights from the Alhambra: una versione live


CHORUS
O bonny Portmore,
you shine where you stand
And the more I think on you the more I think long
If I had you now as I had once before
All the lords in Old England would not purchase Portmore.
I
O bonny Portmore, I am sorry to see
Such a woeful destruction of your ornament tree
For it stood on your shore for many’s the long day
Till the long boats from Antrim came to float it away.
II
All the birds in the forest they bitterly weep
Saying, “Where will we shelter or where will we sleep?”
For the Oak and the Ash, they are all cutten down
And the walls of bonny Portmore are all down to the ground.
traduzione in italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
O bella Portmore,
la risplendente
e più penso a te,
più ti penso intensamente.

Se tu fossi mia come lo fosti un tempo
nemmeno tutti i Lord nella vecchia Inghilterra potrebbero acquistare Portmore.
I
O bella Portmore, che pena vedere
la tua quercia secolare distrutta malamente
rimanere sulla spiaggia per molto tempo in quel lungo giorno
finché la barcaccia da Antrim venne per trasportarla lontano.
II
Tutti gli uccelli nella foresta amaramente piangono
cantando “Dove ci ripareremo
o dove dormiremo?”
Poichè la Quercia e il Frassino, sono stati tutti abbattuti
e le mura della bella Portmore sono crollate a terra.

Laura Marling live

Laura Creamer

Lucinda Williams in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006


Dan Gibson & Michael Maxwell in Emerald Forest in versione strumentale con il canto degli uccelli

LO SPIRITO DELL’ALBERO
E qui apro una piccola parentesi ricordando un episodio personale di molto tempo fa in cui ho incontrato un albero secolare: all’epoca vivevo a Firenze e ho avuto l’occasione di girare un po’ per la Toscana, ora non ricordo più la località, ma so che mi trovavo nelle colline del senese ed era estate; qualcuno ci consigliò di andare a vedere un vecchio leccio spiegandoci grosso modo  la strada, arrivati in zona ovviamente ci siamo persi, ma un contadino ci fece la cortesia di accompagnarci nei paraggi; in lontananza sembrava ci stessimo avvicinando ad un boschetto, in realtà si trattava di un solo albero le cui chiome erano così frondose e vaste, i vecchi rami così piegati, che per avvicinarci al tronco ci siamo dovuti chinare. Radici poderose rendevano ondulato il terreno e subito fatti pochi passi ci siamo trovati in un’ombra via via più fitta. Adesso non ricordo se si sentiva freddo o se faceva sempre caldo come pochi attimi prima sotto il sole estivo, ma ricordo ancora dopo tanti anni la sensazione di una presenza, di un respiro profondo e vitale, e il disagio che provavo a disturbare il luogo. Non esagero affatto parlando di timore, e credo che quel sentimento fosse lo stesso provato dall’uomo antico, che sentiva negli alberi centenari la presenza di uno spirito.

FONTI
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/immie/bonny.html
http://www.sentryjournal.com/2010/10/11/the-fate-of-bonny-portmore/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15567
http://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves/guide/p/portmorelough/about.aspx

Lady Greensleeves

Read the post in English

Il brano Greensleeves giunge dal rinascimento inglese (con innegabili influenze musicali italiane) e ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo molto ricco e di una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i  generosi regali.

Era l’anno 1580 che vide un susseguirsi di pubblicazioni  di un canto d’amore di un gentiluomo alla sua Lady Greensleeves,  [in italiano la Signora dalle Maniche Verdi]; Richard Jones e Edward White si contendevano  le stampe di una canzone di gran moda, nel mese di settembre, lo stesso giorno Jones con  “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” e White con “A ballad,  being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his   frende“, poi dopo pochi giorni, ancora White con  un’altra versione: “Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves” e  qualche mese dopo Jones  con la pubblicazione di “A merry newe Northern   Songe of Greene Sleeves“; questa volta la replica venne da William Elderton,  che, nel febbraio del 1581, scrisse la “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” .
In ultimo la versione riveduta e ampliata da Richard Jones  con il titolo “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” inclusa nella collezione ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites’  del 1584, fu quella che diventò la versione finale, ancora oggi eseguita  (almeno per quanto riguarda la melodia e per buona parte del testo con ben 17  strofe).

LA MELODIA

La melodia nasce per liuto, lo strumento per eccellenza della musica  rinascimentale (e barocca) che ha visto in Inghilterra una pregevole fioritura con autori del calibro di John Jonson e di John Dowland (consiglio l’ascolto del Cd di Sting Labirinth). Come evidenziato nello studio approfondito di Ian Pittaway l’antenato di Greensleeves è il Passamezzo antico.
Verso la fine del XV secolo, gli strumenti a pizzico come il liuto stavano appena iniziando a sviluppare una nuova tecnica da aggiungere al loro repertorio espressivo, suonando corde per accordi piuttosto che suonando le note del periodo medievale. Uno degli accordi che si sviluppò fu il passamezzo antico (c’era anche il passamezzo moderno), che nacque in Italia all’inizio del XVI secolo prima di diffondersi in tutta Europa. Oggi è un po’ come il blues, ci sono una prefissara sequenza di accordi di base sulla quale viene aggiunta una melodia. (tradotto da qui)
Il coro però di Greensleeves segue l’andamento melodico di una Romanesca che a sua volta è stata una variante del passamezzo.

Melodia per liuto in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” scritto da Adriaen Smout per i Paesi Bassi  nel 1595

Baltimore Consort nella versione strumentale in stile  rinascimentale con andamento a ballo

Una coreografia della danza la ritroviamo solo  in epoca più tarda, nell'”English Dancing Master” di John Playford (sia nell’edizione del 1686 e poi pubblicata a più riprese nel Settecento) come english country dance

LA LEGGENDA

anne-boleyn-roseLa leggenda  vuole che sia stato Enrico VIII, nel 1526, a  scrivere “Greensleeves”  per Anna Bolena, proprio  all’inizio della loro relazione, quando lei lo faceva sospirare (e gli anni  furono sette prima che i due si sposassero).
Un’ipotesi suggestiva in quanto sia la melodia che il testo ben si adattano al personaggio, che di suo ha scritto svariati brani ancora oggi nel repertorio  di molti artisti di musica antica; tuttavia la  poesia non è stata trascritta in nessun manoscritto dell’epoca e quindi non possiamo essere certi dell’attribuzione.
L’equivoco è stato generato da William Chappell che nel suo “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (Londra: Chappell & Co, 1859) attribuisce la melodia al re, mal interpretando una citazione di Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th’ Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.”(in Skialethia, or a Shadow of Truth, 1598: la ballata “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” risale al tempo di Enrico VIII (King Harries) e, secondo Chappell è sempre stata cantata sulla melodia Greensleeves.

Così nella Serie Tv “The Tudors” si segue la leggenda e noi possiamo ammirare Jonathan Rhys Meyers tutto assorto mentre “trova” la melodia sul liuto…
The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Per restare in tema il gruppo tedesco  “Gregorian“, con le immagini del film “The Tudors” (strofe I, III, VIII, IX)

L’ORIGINE IRLANDESE?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublino: Browne e Nolan, 1905) è stato il primo a presumere (senza addurre prove) l’irlandesità della melodia.  “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music however), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.”
Da allora l’idea della paternità irlandese ha preso sempre più vigore tant’è che il brano è presente nelle compilations di musica celtica  etichettato come irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

Lirica cortese o uno scherzo pesante?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-SIl testo ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo verso una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i suoi generosi e principeschi regali; più ironicamente, si può interpretare come il lamento di un gentiluomo verso la moglie o l’amante bisbetica!
Roberto Venturi propende per un contesto un po’ più piccante
Già ai tempi di Geoffrey Chaucer e dei Racconti di Canterbury (ricordiamo che Chaucer visse dal 1343 al 1400) l’abito verde era considerato tipico di una “donna leggera”, leggasi di una prostituta. Si tratterebbe quindi di una giovane donna di promiscui costumi; Nevill Coghill, il celebre ed eroico traduttore in inglese moderno dei Canterbury Tales, spiega -in riferimento ad un’interpretazione di un passo chauceriano- che, all’epoca, il colore verde aveva precise connotazioni sessuali, particolarmente nella frase A green gown, una gonna verde. Si trattava, in estrema pratica, delle macchie d’erba sul vestito di una donna che praticava (o subiva) un rapporto sessuale all’esterno, in un prato, “in camporella” come si direbbe oggigiorno. Se di una donna si diceva che aveva “la gonna verde”, in pratica era un pesante ammiccamento e le si dava di leggera se non tout court della puttana.
La canzone sarebbe quindi la lamentazione di un amante tradito e abbandonato, o di un cliente respinto; insomma, come dire, qualcosa di tutt’altro che regale (sebbene in ogni epoca i re siano stati generalmente i primi puttanieri del Regno). Un’altra possibile interpretazione è che l’amante tradito, o respinto, si sia voluto come vendicare sulla poveretta indirizzandole una deliziosa canzoncina in cui le dà della puttana mediante la metafora delle “maniche verdi”.” (Riccardo Venturi da qui)

Moltissimi gli interpreti, con versioni in stile antico e moderno (anche Yngwie Malmsteen la suona con la sua chitarra e Leonard Cohen ne propone una riscrittura nel 1974 ) di una melodia antica che non ha mai perso il suo fascino e popolarità.
Oggi il testo viene raramente eseguito e  solo per due o quattro strofe, ma è un brano amato dai gruppi corali che lo cantano più estesamente.

Nella versione in ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, dalla raccolta di Israel G. Young (una ventina di strofe vedi testo qui) ci si dilunga sui regali che il nobiluomo fa alla sua bella per vezzeggiarla:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” con “sleeves of satin”, che la fanno essere “our harvest queen”, “garters” decorate d’oro e d’argento, “gelding”, e servitori “men clothed all in green”, e non ultimo tante leccornie ( “dainties”).

Le proposte per l’ascolto sono veramente tante e fare una cernita è ardua impresa (vedi qui), così mi limiterò a un paio di suggerimenti (il primo di parte!)

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The   Visit 1991 (strofe I, III)
Jethro Tull in Christmas Album 2003 versione strumentale

David Nevue un arrangiamento per pianoforte stupefacente!

Da non perdere la traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (sommo poeta e traduttore) (qui) del Nouo Sonetto Cortese su la Signora da le Verdi Maniche. Su la noua Melodia di Verdi Maniche.
Verdi Maniche era ogni mia Gioja,
Verdi Maniche, la mia Delizia.
Verdi Maniche, lo mio Cor d’Oro;
Chi altra, se non la Signora da le Verdi Maniche?


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
Traduzione italiano
coro(1)
Greensleeves era la gioia mia
Greensleeves era la mia delizia,
Greensleeves era il mio cuore d’oro,
chi se non la mia Signora dalle Maniche Verdi?(2)
I
Ahimè amore mio, non mi rendete giustizia, a respingermi con scortesia
vi ho amata per tanto tempo
deliziandomi della vostra compagnia.
II
I vostri voti avete spezzato,
come il mio cuore.
Oh perché così mi  avete rapito?
Ora resto in un mondo a parte
e il mio cuore resta in prigione
III
Ero pronto al vostro fianco, a concedervi ciò che bramavate e avevo impegnato vita e terre, per restare nelle vostre buone grazie.
IV
La gonna di zendalo bianco(4)
con sfarzosi ricami d’oro,
la gonna di seta bianca
vi ho comprato con gioia.
V
Se così intendete disprezzarmi,
ancor più m’incantate
e anche così, continuo a rimanere
un amante in prigionia
VI
I miei uomini erano tutti di verde vestiti , ed erano al vostro servizio
tutto ciò era galante da vedersi
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VII
Voi non potreste desiderare cosa terrena senza che l’abbiate prontamente, la vostra musica sempre suonerò e canterò
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VIII
Pregherò Iddio lassù
che voi possiate accorgervi della mia costanza e che una volta prima
che io  muoia voi possiate infine amarmi
IX
Ed ora Greensleeves  vi saluto, addio
Pregherò Iddio che voi prosperiate
sono ancora il vostro fedele amante
venite ancora da me ed amatemi

NOTE
1) l’ordine in cui sono cantate le prime due frasi del coro a volte sono  invertite e iniziano in senso contrario
2) Nel medioevo il colore verde era il simbolo  della rigenerazione e quindi della giovinezza e del vigore fisico, significava “fertilità” ma anche “speranza” e accostato  all’oro indicava il piacere. Era il colore della medicina per i suoi poteri  rivitalizzanti. Colore dell’amore allo stadio nascente, nel  Rinascimento era il colore usato dai giovani specialmente a Maggio; nelle donne  era anche il colore della castità. E tale attribuzione mal si accosta all’altro significato più promiscuo  di “donnina sempre pronta a rotolarsi nell’erba”. E il fascino della ballata sta proprio nella sua ambiguità!
Il verde è anche il colore che nelle fiabe/ballate connota una creatura fatata.
Le parole gaeliche “Grian Sliabh” (letteralmente tradotte come “sole montagna” ovvero una “montagna esposta a sud, soleggiata”)  si pronunciano Green Sleeve (il brano è peraltro molto popolare in Irlanda soprattutto come slow air). Grian è anche il nome di un fiume che scorre dalle Sliabh Aughty (contea Clare e Galway)
3) le espressioni sono proprie della lirica cortese
4) lo zendalo è un velo di seta

Nella versione estesa i regali dello spasimante sono molti e costosi assai ed è tutto un lagnarsi di “oh quanto mi costi bella mia!”
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm