Archivi tag: The Pogues

South Australia sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

Under the heading Codefish shanty we have two versions, one of Cape Cod and the other of South Australia: the titles are “Cape Cod girls” and “Rolling King” or “Bound for South Australia” (or simply “South Australia”).
Which of the two versions was born before is not certain, we can only detect a great variety of texts and also the combination with different melodies. At the beginning probably a “going-away song”, one of those songs that the sailors sang only for special occasions ie when they were on the route of the return journey.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA VERSION

“As an original worksong it was sung in a variety of trades, including being used by the wool and later the wheat traders who worked the clipper ships between Australian ports and London. In adapted form, it is now a very popular song among folk music performers that is recorded by many artists and is present in many of today’s song books.In the days of sail, South Australia was a familiar going-away song, sung as the men trudged round the capstan to heave up the heavy anchor. Some say the song originated on wool-clippers, others say it was first heard on the emigrant ships. There is no special evidence to support either belief; it was sung just as readily aboard Western Ocean ships as in those of the Australian run. Laura Smith, a remarkable Victorian Lady, obtained a 14-stanza version of South Australia from a coloured seaman in the Sailors’ Home at Newcastle-on-Tyne, in the early 1880’s. The song’s first appearance in print was in Miss Smith’s Music of the Waters. Later, it was often used as a forebitter, sung off-watch, merely for fun, with any instrumentalist joining in. It is recorded in this latter-day form. The present version was learnt from an old sailing-ship sailor, Ted Howard of Barry, in South Wales. Ted told how he and a number of shellbacks were gathered round the bed of a former shipmate. The dying man remarked: “Blimey, I think I’m slipping my cable. Strike up South Australia, lads, and let me go happy.” (A.L. Lloyd in Across the Western Plains from here)

This kind of songs were a mixture of improvised verses and a series of typical verses, but generally the refrain of the chorus was standardized and univocal (even for the obvious reason that it had to be sung by sailors coming from all the countries).
The length of the song depended on the type of work to be done and could reach several strophes. The song then took on its own life as a popular song in the folk repertoire.
The first appearance in collections on sea shanties dates back to 1881.
hulllogo

The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem 1962 the version that has been the model in the folk environment

Let’s see them in a pirate version in the TV adaptation of the “Treasure Island”

Johnny Collins, from “Shanties & Songs of the Sea” 1996

The Pogues

Gaelic Storm from Herding Cats (1999) they recall the version of the Pogues. It is interesting to compare the same group that has also tried with the arrangement of  Cape Code Girls.

In South Australia(1) I was born!
Heave away! Haul away!
South Australia round Cape Horn(2)!
We’re bound for South Australia!
Heave away, you rolling king(3),
Heave away! Haul away!
All the way you’ll hear me sing
We’re bound for South Australia!

As I walked out one morning fair,
It’s there I met Miss Nancy Blair.
I shook her up, I shook her down,
I shook her round and round the town.
There ain’t but one thing grieves my mind,
It’s to leave Miss Nancy Blair behind.
And as you wallop round Cape Horn,
You’ll wish to God you’d never been born!
I wish I was on Australia’s strand
With a bottle of whiskey in my hand

NOTES
1) Land of gentlemen and not deportees, the state is considered a “province” of Great Britain
2) the ships at the time of sailing followed the oceanic routes, that is those of winds and currents: so to go to Australia starting from America it was necessary to dub Africa, but what a trip!!

3) Another reasonable explanation  fromMudcat “The chanteyman seems to be calling the sailors rolling kings rather that refering to any piece of equipment. And given that “rolling” seems to be a common metaphor for “sailing” (cf. Rolling down to old Maui, Roll the woodpile down, Roll the old chariot along, etc.) I would guess that he is calling them “sailing kings” i.e. great sailors. There are a number of chanteys which have lines expressing the idea of “What a great crew we are.” and I think this falls into that category.” (here)
Moreover every sailor fantasized about the meaning of the word, for example Russel Slye writes ” When I was in Perth (about 1970) I met an old sailor in a bar. I found he had sailed on the Moshulu (4 masted barque moored in Philly now) during the grain trade. I asked him about Rolling Kings. His reply (abridged): “We went ashore in India and other places, and heard about a wheel-rolling-king who was a big boss of everything. Well, when the crew was working hauling, those who wasn’t pulling too hard were called rolling kings because they was acting high and mighty.” So, it is a derogatory term for slackers. (from here).
And yet without going to bother ghostly Kings (in the wake of the medieval myth of King John and the fountain of eternal youth) the word could very well be a corruption of “rollikins” an old English term for “drunk”.
Among the many hilarious hypotheses this (for mockery) of Charley Noble: it could be a reference to Elvis Prisley!

There is also a MORRIS DANCE version confirming the popularity of the song

Codefish Cape Cod Girls

LINK
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

South Australia

Read the post in English

Sotto la voce Codefish shanty si classifica una serie di canti marinareschi (sea shanty) di cui si conoscono due versioni, una di Capo Cod e l’altra dell’Australia Meridionale: i titoli sono “Cape Code girls“, e “Rolling King” o “Bound for South Australia ” (o più semplicemente “South Australia”). Quale delle due versioni sia nata prima non è certo, possiamo solo rilevare una grande varietà di testi e anche l’abbinamento con melodie diverse. All’inizio probabilmente una “going-away song” ossia una di quelle canzoni che i marinai cantavano solo per le occasioni particolari cioè quando erano in ritta per il viaggio di ritorno, è poi entrata nel circuito folk e quindi standardizzata in due distinte versioni.

VERSIONE SOUTH AUSTRALIA

“Il canto di lavoro originario fu cantato in una varietà di mestieri, incluso essere usato nel commercio della lana e in seguito nel commercio del grano sui clipper tra i porti australiani e Londra. In forma adattata, è ora una canzone molto popolare tra gli artisti di musica folk, registrata da molti artisti e presente in molti dei libri di canzoni di oggi. Nei giorni della vela, Sud Australia era una canzone consueta per il going-away , cantata mentre gli uomini arrancavano intorno all’argano per sollevare la pesante ancora. Alcuni dicono che la canzone abbia avuto origine tra i tosatori della lana, altri dicono che sia stata ascoltata per la prima volta sulle navi dell’emigrante. Non ci sono prove evidenti per supportare entrambe le supposizioni; è stato cantato altrettanto prontamente a bordo delle navi dell’Oceano Occidentale come in quelle della rotta australiana. Laura Smith, una notevole donna vittoriana, ha ottenuto una versione di 14 stanze di South Australia da un marinaio di colore nella Casa del Marinaio di Newcastle-on-Tyne, nei primi anni del 1880. La prima apparizione della canzone in stampa è stata in Music of the Waters della signorina Smith. In seguito, venne spesso usata come forebitter, cantata nelle ore di riposo semplicemente per divertimento, con qualsiasi strumento si unisse al canto. È stata registrato in questa forma degli ultimi giorni. La versione attuale è stata appresa da un marinaio delle vecchie navi a vela, Ted Howard di Barry, nel Galles del sud. Ted raccontò come lui e un certo numero di mariani si erano radunati attorno al letto di un ex compagno di viaggio. Il morente ha osservato: “Blimey, penso di stare lasciando andare la mia cima. Cantate South Australia, ragazzi, e lasciami andare felice..” (A.L. Lloyd in Across the Western Plains tratto da qui)

Così questo genere di canzoni erano un misto di versi improvvisati e una serie di versi tipici , ma in genere il ritornello del coro era standardizzato e univoco (anche per l’ovvia ragione che doveva essere cantato da marinai provenienti da tutte le parti).
La lunghezza della canzone dipendeva dal tipo di lavoro da svolgere e poteva arrivare a parecchie strofe. La canzone ha poi assunto vita propria come canzone popolare nel repertorio folk.
La sua prima comparsa in raccolte sulle sea shanties risale al 1881.
hulllogo

The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem 1962 la versione che ha fatto da modello nell’ambiente folk

Vediamoli anche in una versione piratesca nell’adattamento televisivo dell'”Isola del Tesoro”

Johnny Collins, in “Shanties & Songs of the Sea” 1996

The Pogues

Gaelic Storm in Herding Cats (1999) richiamano nell’arrangiamento la versione dei Pogues. E’ interessante confrontare lo stesso gruppo che si è cimentato anche con l’arrangiamento di Cape Code Girls.


In South Australia(1) I was born!
Heave away! Haul away!
South Australia round Cape Horn(2)!
We’re bound for South Australia!
Heave away, you rolling king(3),
Heave away! Haul away!
All the way you’ll hear me sing
We’re bound for South Australia!
As I walked out one morning fair,
It’s there I met Miss Nancy Blair.
I shook her up, I shook her down,
I shook her round and round the town.
There ain’t but one thing grieves my mind,
It’s to leave Miss Nancy Blair behind.
And as you wallop round Cape Horn,
You’ll wish to God you’d never been born!
I wish I was on Australia’s strand
With a bottle of whiskey in my hand
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sono nato in Australia Meridionale(1)
virate, alate,
Australia del Sud via Capo Horn(2)
Siamo diretti per l’Australia Meridionale
virate re dei mari(3)
virate, alate,
per tutto il tragitto si sente cantare

“Siamo diretti per l’Australia Meridionale!”
Mentre camminavo in un bel mattino
là t’incontrai la signorina Nancy Blair.
La strapazzai su
la strapazzai giù
la strapazzai in lungo e in largo per la città
e se c’e che una cosa che mi addolora
è lasciare la signorina Nancy Blair.
E mentre sei sbatacchiato a Capo Horn
vorresti per Dio non essere mai nato!
Preferirei essere su una spiaggia in Australia
con una bottiglia di whiskey in mano

NOTE
1) Terra di galantuomini e non di deportati lo stato è considerato una “provincia” della Gran Bretagna
2) le navi all’epoca dei velieri seguivano le rotte oceaniche cioè quelle dei venti e delle correnti: così per andare in Australia partendo dall’America o dall’Europa la situazione non cambiava occorreva doppiare l’Africa, ma che giro bisognava fare!!
Se prendiamo una mappa del globo notiamo subito che una rotta verso l’oriente, partendo dall’Europa, ci obbligherebbe a circumnavigare l’Africa. Lo stesso discorso vale per chi si avventura partendo dalla costa orientale dell’America del nord, a meno di volere circumnavigare l’America del sud e forzare controvento capo Horn!
A nord dell’equatore, nell’Atlantico, questi hanno un senso di rotazione orario. Quindi fin alle Canarie e Capo Verde tutto è facile. Poi, per via della forza di Coriolis, subentra la zona delle calme equatoriali con la loro quasi totale assenza di vento. Ma non basta, superate le calme nell’emisfero australe i venti dominanti hanno rotazione inversa cioè antioraria. Quindi partendo ad esempio dall’Inghilterra la rotta era la seguente : Atlantico fino a Capo Verde poi tutto ad Ovest verso i Caraibi quindi a Sud lungo il Brasile e la costa Argentina fino a riprendere i venti portanti che con rotta di nuovo verso Est portano a passare capo di Suona Speranza in Sud Africa e finalmente quella fetenzia di ostico oceano che è quello Indiano. Approssimativamente 30.000 Km quando in linea d’aria sono solo 8.000! (tratto da qui)

3) Un’altra spiegazione ragionevole sempre riportata nella discussione su Mudcat “Lo chanteyman sembra chiamare i marinai “rolling kings” piuttosto che riferirsi a una parte della nave. E dato che “rolling” sembra essere una metafora comune per “navigare” (vedi Rolling down to old Maui, Roll the woodpile down, Roll the old chariot along, ecc.) Immagino che li stia chiamando “re della vela” “cioè grandi marinai. Ci sono un certo numero di chanteys che hanno linee che esprimono l’idea di “Che grande equipaggio siamo”. e penso che questo rientri in quella categoria. “(tratto da qui)
“Quando ero a Perth (circa 1970) incontrai un vecchio marinaio in un bar e scoprii che era salpato sul Moshulu (una barca a 4 alberi ormeggiata a Philly ora) durante il commercio di cereali. Gli ho chiesto in merito a “Rolling Kings”, la sua risposta (in forma abbreviata): “Siamo andati a terra in India e in altri luoghi, e abbiamo sentito parlare di un wheel-rolling-king  che era un grande capo di tutto. Bene, quando l’equipaggio stava manovrando le vele, quelli che non stavano tirando troppo si chiamavano “rolling kings” perché si comportavano da boss. “Quindi, è un termine dispregiativo per i fannulloni.
(tratto da qui).
E tuttavia senza andare a scomodare fantomatici Re (sulla scia del mito medievale di Re Giovanni e la fontana dell’eterna giovinezza) la parola potrebbe benissimo essere una corruzione di “rollikins” un vecchio temine inglese per “ubriaco”.
Tra le tante esilaranti ipotesi anche questa (per burla) di Charley Noble: si potrebbe trattare di un riferimento ad Elvis Prisley!!

C’è anche una versione MORRIS DANCE a conferma della popolarità della canzone

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

WHISKEY YOU’RE THE DIVIL

whisky-devilWhiskey You’re The Devil” è una drinking song resa popolare negli anni 50 dai Clancy Brothers e dai Dubliners: la canzone è accreditata a Jerry Barrington che l’ha pubblicata nel 1873 a New York. Molto probabilmente si tratta di una canzone che gli immigrati irlandesi e scozzesi hanno portato in America, forse dalle origini settecentesche.
Ma furono The Pogues a trasformarla in una drinking song immancabile per i festeggiamenti di Saint Patrick!

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers (strofe I, II, III)

ASCOLTA The Pogues (strofe I, III, II)


Whiskey, you’re the devil,
you’re leadin’ me astray

Over hills and mountains (1)
and to Americae

You’re sweeter, stronger, decenter,
you’re spunkier than tae

O whiskey, you’re my darlin’
drunk or sober

I
Oh, now, brave boys,
we’re on the march
and off to Portugal and Spain
The drums are beating, banners flying , the devil a-home will come tonight (2)
Love, fare thee well, (3)
with me tithery eye
the doodelum the da
Me tithery eye the doodelum the da,
Me rikes fall tour a laddie oh
There’s whiskey in the jar. Hey!
II (3)
Said the mothe (4): “Do not wrong me, don’t take my daughter from me
For if you do I will torment you,
and after death a ghost will haunt you
Love, fare thee well,
with me …
III
The French are fighting boldly (5),
men dying hot and coldly
Give ev’ry man his flask of powder,
his firelock on his shoulder
Love, fare thee well,
with me …
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whiskey, sei il diavolo,
mi mandi alla deriva
per mari e monti
e fino in America
sei più dolce, più forte, più buono,
sei più grintoso del tè!

oh whiskey, sei il mio amore,
ubriaco o sobrio.

I
Forza valorosi,
siamo in marcia,
verso il Portogallo e la Spagna
i tamburi rullano, sventolano i vessilli, stanotte il diavolo tornerà a casa
Amore addio,
con me tithery eye
the doodelum the da
Me tithery eye the doodelum the da,
Me rikes fall tour a laddie oh
c’e’ whiskey nella boccia, hey!
II
Dice la mamma: “Non farmi torto,
non portarmi via la figlia, perchè se lo farai, ti tormenterò e da morta ti perseguiterò come un fantasma
Amore addio,
con me …
III
I francesi combattono con valore,
gli uomini muoiono a destre e a manca,
date ad ognuno la sua fiasca di polvere
e il suo moschetto a tracolla
Amore addio,
con me …

NOTE
1) letteralmente “colline e montagne”
2) nella versione di Barrington dice “colors flying, divil a home we’ll go again”
3) The Pogues dicono “with a too da loo ra loo ra doo de da
a too ra loo ra loo ra doo de da
me rikes fall too ra laddie-o
c’e’ whiskey nella boccia, hey!”
3) questa strofa sembra essere presa pari pari da una ballata scritta su broadside dal titolo “John and Moll” (Bodleian Lybrary ballads 1790-1840)
O mother dear, I will not wrong you,
Neither take your daughter from you,
If I do, you shall torment me,
After death your ghost shall haunt me
4) The Pogues dicono “old woman”
5) nella versione di Barrington dice “Now the drums are beating boldly”

LA MELODIA: Off to California

James O’Neill ha registrato un’hornpipe dal titolo “Whiskey, You’re the Devil,” (ovvero la stessa melodia di “Off to California”)
ASCOLTA la melodia con la chitarra
ASCOLTA la melodia con il violino

Una precedente versione pubblicata a Filadelfia da A. Winch (scritta e cantata da Frank Drew) nel 1865 dal titolo “Whisky, You’re a Villyan” è quasi identica a questa tranne per la strofa II chiaramente proveniente da una precedente ballata sulla guerra.

VERSIONE DI FRANK DREW
Whisky you’re a villyan, you led me astray,
Over bogs, over briers, and out of my way,
You wrestled me a fall and you threw me today,
But I’ll toss you tomorrow, when I’m sober.
I
Still whisky you’re my comfort by night and by day,
You’re stronger and sweeter and spunkier than tay,
One naggin of spirits is worth tuns of bohay,
But above a pint I never could get over.
II
Sweet whisky, you’re a coaxer, I’d best keep away,
If your lips I once taste, sure its wid you I’d stay,
So I’ll make up my mind, and my mouth too, this day,
To drink no more whisky till I’m sober..
III
So goodbye whisky jewel, it’s the last word I’ll say,
Shake hands and part friends, now I’ll stick to bohay(1),
There’s a bade on your lip! Let me kiss it away-
Acushla, you’re my darling drunk or sober.

NOTA 1) Bohay = Bohea (Chinese black tea)

In effetti il testo sembra un frullato di canzoni sull’emigrazione, di bevute e di protesta (anti-war songs)

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=105491
http://thesession.org/tunes/30
http://folksongcollector.com/whiskey.html