Archivi tag: The Merry Muses of Caledonia

I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig by Robert Burns

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – by Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Leggi in italiano

The lea-rig (The Meadow-ridge) is a traditional Scottish song rewritten by Robert Burns in 1792 under the title “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig“.
The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows. These bumps could reach up to the knee and hand sowing was greatly facilitated: the grass grew in the lea rigs.

THE TUNE

We find the beautiful melody in many eighteenth-century manuscripts, known by various names such as An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber

THE LYRICS

rigsA “romantic” meeting in the summer camps declined in many text versions with a single melody (albeit with many different arrangements) that has known, like so many other Scottish eighteenth-century songs, a notable fame among the musicians of German romanticism and in good living rooms over England, France and Germany.

The oldest text can be found in the manuscript of Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, by anonymous author who starts like this:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

With the title “My Ain Kind Dearie O” it is published later in the Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (see here) on Robert Burns’ dispatch to James Johnson with the note that it was the version originally written by the edinburgh poet Robert Fergusson ( 1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson died only 24 years old in the grip of madness while he was hospitalized in the Edinburgh Asylum because subject to a strong existential depression (and yet there are those who insinuate it was syphilis); he had just enough time to write about eighty poems (published between 1771 and 1773) and was the first poet to use the Scottish dialect as a poetic language; he lived for the most part a bohemian life, sharing the intellectual ferment of Edinburgh in the period known as the Scottish Enlightenment, always in contact with musicians, actors and editors; in 1772 it joined the “Edinburgh Cape Club”, not a Masonic lodge but a club for men only for convivial purposes (in which tables were laid out with tasty dishes and above all large drinks); for Robert Burns he was ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn rewrote the poem in October 1792 for the publisher George Thomson, to be published in the “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in what will be the most commonly known version of The Lea Rig) published with the musical arrangement of Joseph Haydn (who also arranged the traditional My Ain Kind Deary version); and he also wrote a more bawdy version published in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” (1799) under the title My Ain Kind Deary (page 98) (text here)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

and in the classic version on arrangement by Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
english translation
I
When over the hill the eastern star
Tells the time of milking the ewes is near, my dear,
And oxes from the furrowed field
Return so lethargic and weary O:
Down by the burn where scented birch trees
With dew are hanging clear, my dear, I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
II
At midnight hour, in darkest glen,
I’d rove and never be frightened O, If thro’ that glen I go to thee,
My own kind dear, O:
Altho’ the night were  never so wild,
And I were never so weary O,
I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
III
The hunter loves the morning sun,
To rouse the mountain deer, my dear,
At noon the fisher takes the glen,
down the burn to steer, my dear;
Give me the hour o’ gloamin grey,
It maks my heart so cheary O
on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!

NOTES
1) the morning star
2) milking time is early in the morning
3) or “birken buds”
4) or irie
5) in the copy sent to Thomson Robert Burns wrote “wet” then corrected with wild: a summer night with severe air with lightning in the distance
6) or “I’d”

Compare with the version attributed to the poet Robert Fergusson

SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
english translation
I
Will you go the over the lea rigg,
My own kind dear, O
And cuddle there so kindly
with me, my kind deary-o!
At thorn dry-stone wall and birche tree,
we will make merry, and never be weary-o;
They’ll screen unfriendly eyes from you and me,
My own kind dear, O!
II
No herds, with sheep-dogs there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But larks whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for world’s riches, my sweetheart,
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
with you, my kind deary, O!

NOTES
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen.
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart, my dear

Scottish country dance: “My own kind deary”

The Scottish Country dance entitled “My own kind deary” with music and dance instructions appears in John Walsh’s Caledonian Country Dances (vol I 1735)


for dance explanation see

LINK
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

HEY, CA’ THRO’ BY ROBERT BURNS

Un’antica canzone dei pescatori del Fifeshire trascritta da Robert Burns probabilmente durante il suo viaggio nelle Highland alla ricerca di documentazione sui canti tradizionali ancora tramandati oralmente (1787).
Nel 1792 la canzone è stata pubblicata in “The Scots Musical Museum” vol 4 con il nome di The Carls o Dysart [in italiano: I vecchi lavoratori di Dysart].
La contea di Fife si trova sulla costa sud-est della Scozia e ha la conformazione di una penisola, la parte Est è caratterizzata da piccoli villaggi costruiti intorno a porti protetti, in cui oramai l’attività della pesca è marginale rispetto al turismo. Immancabili i castelli, gli edifici storici, le chiese e le antiche abbazie, le aree protette e i campi di golf…

Il porticciolo di Dysart
Il porticciolo di Dysart

Un canto del mare ma anche drinking song per il suo allegro carpe diem!

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers in Capernaum – 1994, titolo Carls o’Dysart (su Spotify)

ASCOLTA Isla St Clair cantante scozzese, che interpreta il brano con la sola voce, facendolo seguire da “Tail toddle” un canto sempre della zona di Fife trascritto da Robert Burnes nel suo “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” (vedi )


I
Up wi’ the carls(1) o’ Dysart,
And the lads o’ Buckhaven,
And the kimmers(2) o’ Largo,
And the lasses o’ Leven.
Chorus.
Hey, ca’ thro’, ca’ thro'(3),
For we hae muckle a do.
Hey, ca’ thro’, ca’ thro’,
For we hae muckle a do;
II
We hae tales to tell,
An’ we hae sangs to sing;
We hae pennies tae spend,
An’ we hae pints to bring.
III
We’ll live a’ our days,
And them that comes behin’,
Let them do the like,
An’ spend the gear they win.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
In piedi vecchi lavoratori di Dysart,
e ragazzi di Buckhaven,
e comari di Largo,
e ragazze di Leven
(Ritornello)
“Lavoriamo, continuiamo a lavorare”
perchè abbiamo tanto da fare.
“Lavoriamo, continuiamo a lavorare”
perchè abbiamo tanto da fare.
II
Abbiamo racconti da raccontare
e canzoni da cantare;
soldi da spendere
e pinte da bere.
III
Vivremo tutti i nostri giorni
e quelli che ci vengono davanti,
come ci piace,
a spendere i soldi guadagnati

TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
NOTE
1) carls= carles: men, common folk
2) kimmers: women, especially older women or gossips
3) il caratteristico grido “Ca ‘thro” preannunciava l’avvicinarsi di una barca da pesca ad una spiaggia affollata

IN VIAGGIO

MERAVIGLIE DELLA SCOZIA: Il tratto tra Edimburgo e St. Andrews è ricco di stupendi villaggi di pescatori, con alcune delle spiagge più rinomate e pulite della Scozia. Ottime le specialità di mare nei ristoranti locali continua
VISIT SCOZIA: Tradizionali villaggi di pescatori con tratti incontaminati di spiagge sabbiose. Visitate Pittenweem per l’arte, Crail per l’artigianato o Anstruther per un’escursione all’Isola di May e per assaggiare il miglior fish and chips della Gran Bretagna continua

FONTI http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/hey_ca_thro.htm
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1146lyr7.htm

The Lea Rig (ti incontrerò tra i campi)

ritratto di Robert Burns
ritratto di Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Read the post in English

The lea-rig (in inglese The Meadow-ridge) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese riscritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 con il titolo di “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig”.
Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche”, una tecnica colturale che prevede la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate ovvero il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale di un tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio  e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare il Mugellese che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto la dimensione opportuna. Si formavano con questo tipo di lavorazione i corn rigs e i lea rigs ossia le porche di grano e gli argini d’incolto dove cresceva l’erba.

LA MELODIA

Troviamo la bella melodia in molti manoscritti setteceneschi, conosciuta con vari nomi quali An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber in Unexpected Songs 2006

LE VERSIONI TESTUALI

rigsUn incontro “romantico” nei campi estivi declinato in molte versioni testuali con un’unica melodia (sebbene con molti diversi arrangiamenti) che ha conosciuto, come tante altre canzoni scozzesi settecentesche, una notevole fama tra i musicisti del romanticismo tedesco e nei salotti bene  d’Inghilterra, Francia e Germania.

Il testo più antico si trova nel manoscritto di Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, di autore anonimo che inizia così:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

Con il titolo “My Ain Kind Dearie O” è pubblicata successivamente nello Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (vedi qui) su invio di Robert Burns a James Johnson con la nota che si trattava della versione scritta originariamente dal poeta edimburghese Robert Fergusson (1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson morì a soli 24 anni in preda alla pazzia mentre era ricoverato nel Manicomio di Edimburgo perchè soggetto a una forte depressione esistenziale (e tuttavia c’è chi insinua si sia trattato di sifilide); fece in tempo a scrivere appena un’ottantina di poesie (pubblicate tra il 1771 e il 1773) e fu il primo poeta a usate il dialetto scozzese come lingua poetica; visse per lo più una vita da bohemien, condividendo il  fermento intellettuale di Edimburgo nel periodo conosciuto come l’Illuminismo scozzese, sempre a contatto con musicisti, attori ed editori; nel 1772 aderì alla loggia “Edinburgh Cape Club”, non proprio una loggia massonica ma un club per soli uomini per scopi conviviali (in cui si imbandivano tavolate con gustose pietanze e soprattutto grandi bevute); per Robert Burns fu ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn riscrisse la poesia nell’ottobre del 1792 per l’editore George Thomson, affinchè fosse pubblicata nel “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in quella che sarà la versione più comunemente detta The Lea Rig) pubblicata con l’arrangiamento musicale di Joseph Haydn (il quale arrangiò anche la versione tradizionale My Ain Kind Deary); e scrisse anche una versione più bawdy pubblicata nel “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“(1799) con il titolo My Ain Kind Deary (pag 98) (testo qui)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

e nella versione classica su arrangiamento di Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Quando sulla collina la stella dell’est(1)
dice che l’ora (2) di mungere le pecore è vicina, mia cara
e i buoi dal campo arato
ritornano così svogliati e stanchi;
giù al ruscello dove le betulle (3)
profumate di rugiada pendono bianche, mia cara,
ti incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
II
A mezzanotte, nella valle più tenebrosa
vagavo senza mai avere paura (4)
perchè per quella valle andavo da te
mia cara amata;
anche se la notte fosse sì tempestosa (5) e io sì tanto stanco
t’incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
III
Il cacciatore ama il sole del mattino
che risveglia il cervo della montagna, mia cara;
a mezzogiorno il pescatore cerca la valle e verso ruscello si dirige, mia cara
dammi l’ora del grigio crepuscolo
che fa diventare il mio cuore così allegro, per incontrarti tra gli argini erbosi, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) è la stella del mattino
2) bughtin-time = the time of milking the ewes; il tempo della mungitura è di prima mattina (una bella descrizione qui)
3) in altre versioni “birken buds” in effetti la frase ha più senso essendo Down by the burn, where birken buds
Wi’ dew are hangin clear = giù al ruscello dove le gemme rugiadose delle betulle pendono bianche

4) scritto anche come irie
5) nella copia mandata a Thomson Robert scrisse “wet” poi corretta con wild: una notte estiva  dall’aria grave con lampi in lontananza
6) ma anche “I’d”

Si confronti con la versione attribuita al poeta Robert Fergusson

anonimo in SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Verrai tra gli argini erbosi (1)
mia cara amata
per stare abbracciati là con tenerezza
con me, mia cara amata.
Accanto alla siepe (2) e alla betulla
saremo felici (3) e non ci stancheremo mai;
ci schermeranno (4)dagli sguardi malevoli (5) mia cara amata
II
Nessun gregge con bastone da pastore o cani lì, mai verrà a spaventarti
ma le allodole (8) che cantano nel cielo
e corteggiano come me , il loro amore.
Mentre gli altri conducono gli agnelli e le pecore
e si affaticano per le ricchezze (9) terrene mia cara (10),
nei campi cresce il mio divertimento
con te, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen. (come si dice in italiano “infrattarsi”)
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart

LA DANZA: “My own kind deary”

La Scottish Country dance dal titolo “My own kind deary”con tanto di musica e istruzioni per la danza compare in Caledonian Country Dances di John Walsh (vol I 1735)
VIDEO
Le istruzioni qui

FONTI
The Forest Minstrel, James Hogg (1810) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

DAINTY DAVY

Controversa la sua origine (se inglese o scozzese), di certo sappiamo che una delle melodie risale al XVII secolo essendo pubblicata nel “The English Dancing Master” di John Playford (per la precisione nella sua decima edizione risalente al 1698). la versione testuale più diffusa è quella di Robert Burns .

Della canzone si conoscono diverse versioni testuali e almeno due diverse melodie (vedi ), ma la melodia più accreditata dagli interpreti attuali è “The Gardener’s March“, la stessa utilizzata anche per “Rantin ‘Rovin’ Robin”, data alle stampe daJames Aird in ‘Selection of Scotch, English, Irish, and Foreign Airs’ (1782).

WILLIAMSON DavidCollezionata (o scritta) anche da Robert Burns (e pubblicata postuma in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“) questa versione testuale è accompagnata da un aneddoto storico o pseudostorico avvenuto alla fine del 1600 (1692).

Il reverendo presbiteriano David Williamson ovvero il nostro Davie “dalla delicata bellezza”, stava soggiornando nella tenuta dei Kerrs, Cherrytrees vicino a Yetholm (Scottish Border), quando sopraggiunse un drappello di dragoni mandati sulle sue tracce per catturarlo.
Il giovane, dalla delicate fattezze, venne nascosto da Lady Kerrs camuffato da donna, nel letto della figlia diciottenne. Però mentre la madre distraeva i soldati offrendo whisky nel salotto, Davie si dava da fare nel letto con la figlia! Per nascondere lo scandalo, e per amore della causa, la donna acconsentì poi al matrimonio riparatore tra i due.
Un’altra versione della storia (riportata da Burns) narra che il bel giovane inseguito nottetempo dai soldati a cavallo, si rifugiò in casa dei Kerrs di Cherrytrees entrando nella camera della figlia, passando per la finestra.

Carlo II quando venne a conoscenza dell’episodio sembra abbia esclamato “Trovatemi quell’uomo che lo farò vescovo!” Il reverendo David Williamson (1630-1706) fu un amante infaticabile, morì all’età di circa 70 anni dopo aver sposato ben sette mogli (Jane Kerrs fu solo la terza della serie)

VERSIONE BAWDY

Dopo l’epoca dei fatti circolarono dalla parte scozzese molte versioni “piccanti” e ironiche della vicenda.

ASCOLTA Ian Campbell
tratta da Scots Songs di David Herd   -1776: questa versione è la più infarcita di vecchi termini scozzesi (bawdy ballads)


I
Being pursued by the dragoons,
Within my bed he was laid down,
And weel I wat he was worth his room,
My ain dear dainty Davie.
Chorus
O leeze me on(3) his curly pow(4),
Bonie Davie, dainty Davie;
Leeze me on his curly pow,
He was my dainty Davie.
II
My minnie laid him at my back,
I trow he lay na lang at that,
But turn’d, and in a verra crack
Produc’d a dainty Davie(7).
III
Then in the field amang the pease,
Behin’ the house o’ Cherrytrees,
Again he wan atweesh my thies(8),
my dear dainty Davie(9).
IV
But had I goud(10), or had I land,
I should be a’ at his command;
I’ll ne’er forget what he pat i’ my hand,
It was sic a dainty Davie.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANA DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Essendo inseguito dai cavalleggeri,
nel mio letto lui si coricò,
credevo fosse un degno compagno di stanza,
proprio il mio caro bel Davie.
Coro
Così cara per me la testa riccia del
bello e tenero Davie,
Così cara per me la testa riccia
lui era il mio tenero Davie.
II
Mia madre ci fece stendere schiena contro schiena,
credevo non rimanesse a lungo in quella posizione,
ma si girò, e di colpo,
produsse un “grazioso Davie”.
III
Allora nei campi tra i piselli,
dietro alla casa di Cherrytrees,
di nuovo si insinuò tra le mie cosce,
il mio caro e delicato Davie
IV
Se avessi oro o terreni,
sarebbero tutti a sua disposizione;
non dimenticherò mai quello che mi mise in mano,
è stato un così tenero Davie

 

VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS: The Merry Muses

VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS tratta da The Merry Muses of Caledonia   – 1799, una versione testuale piuttosto casta  rispetto al tono più bawdy degli   altri canti

La versione dei Dubliners ha fatto scuola per le interpretazioni successive
ASCOLTA The Dubliners


VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS 1799
I
It was in and through the window broads(1)
And a’ the tirliewirlies(2) o’d
The sweetest kiss that e’er I got
Was from my Dainty Davie.
Chorus:
Oh, leeze me(3) on your curly pow(4)
Dainty Davie, Dainty Davie
Leeze me on your curly pow
You are my own dear Dainty Davie.
II
It was doon(5) amang my Daddy’s pease
And underneath the cherrytrees(6)
Oh, there he kissed me as he pleased
For he was my own dear Davie.
III
When he was chased by a dragoon
Into my bed he was laid doon
I thought him worthy o’ his room
For he’s my Dainty Davie.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Aprì le persiane ed entrò
e tutti i soprammobili scavalcò,
il bacio più dolce che mi hanno dato
fu del mio bel Davie.
Coro:
Benedetta le testolina riccia
del bel Davie,
Benedetta le testolina riccia
del mio caro bel Davie.
II
Fu giù tra i piselli di mio padre
e nella tenuta dei Cherrytrees
oh là lui mi baciò come voleva
perchè lui era proprio il mio caro Davie.
III
Quando era inseguito dai cavalleggeri
nel mio letto si distese
credevo fosse un degno compagno di stanza,
perchè lui è il mio bel Davie.

NOTE
1) broads= boads
2) tirliewirlies= Knick-knacks
3) leeze me on = termine arcaico e contrazione di mio caro, nel significato   di grande piacere o amore per una persona o cosa.
4) pow= head nel senso di capelli ricci ma anche nel doppio senso di tutto   ciò che di peloso può esserci in un corpo maschile! Fiumi d’inchiostro sono   stati scritti per interpretare il senso della frase!
5) doon= down
6) Cherrytrees è la tenuta dei Kerrs vicino a Yetholm quindi la frase si può   tradurre come “nella tenuta dei Cherrytrees” oppure “sotto gli alberi di ciliegio”
7) doppio senso
8) thies = thighs   o knees
9) nelle versioni più   licenziose la frase diventa “And creesh’d them weel wi’ gravy” oppure   anche “And, splash! gaed out his gravy” nel senso del sopraggiunto   godimento maschile e in effetti la frase da un senso compiuto al verso   contenuto nella strofa successiva (I’ll never forget what he put in my hand)
10) gould= gold

VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS: da SMM

loversQuesta versione è molto bucolica e romantica, scritta da Robert Burns nel 1793 e contenuta in “The Scots musical museum” (editore James Johnson).

In effetti la poesia è stata composta nel 1789 da Burns con il titolo di “The Gardener wi’ his paidle” dall’ultima frase di ogni strofa. (vedi)
Paidle è un termine scozzese per pagaia, ma qui ha più senso come pala (il giardiniere con la sua pala)

ASCOLTA The Gardener wi’ his paidle come doveva essere eseguita all’epoca
ASCOLTA Karine Polwart

Con il titolo di “Dainty Davie” Burns apporta lievi modifiche a “The Gardener wi’ his paidle” aggiungendo inoltre il coro: anche in questa versione i due si rotolano nottetempo nel prato! La melodia è indicata chiaramente come quella di “The Gardener’s March”.

ASCOLTA Eddi Reader


I
Now rosy May comes on wi’ flowers
to deck her gay green spreading bowers
now comes in the happy hours
wandering wi’ my Davie
CHORUS
o leeze me (meet me) on the Warlock   knowe(1)
dainty Davie, dainty Davie
there I’ll spend the day wi’ you
my ain(2) dear dainty Davie
II
the crystal waters round us flow
and merry birds are lovers a’
the scented breezes round us blaw(3)
wandering wi’ my Davie
III
when purple morning starts the hare
to steal upon his earthly fare
then through the dews I will repair
to meet my ain dear Davie
IV
when day expirin’ in the west
the curtain draws o’er nature’s rest
I’ll flee to arms I love the best
that’s my ain dear Davie

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Ora il roseo Maggio arriva con i fiori
e decora i pergolati con profusione di foglie vivaci
ora arriva l’ora felice
di passeggiare con il mio Davy
CHORUS
Incontriamoci sul tumulo di Warlock
leggiadro Davie
là passerò il giorno con te
mio caro bel Davie
II
Le acque cristalline intorno a noi scorrono
e tutti gli uccelli felici si amano,
la brezza profumata intorno a noi soffia
per passeggiare con il mio Davy
III
Quando sorge l’alba la lepre si muove furtivamente per il suo cibo terreno,  allora nella rugiada mi sistemerò per incontrare il mio caro bel Davie
IV
Quando il giorno svanisce a ovest
il sipario cala sul riposo della natura
fuggirò nelle braccia di colui che amo
che è proprio il mio caro Davie

NOTE
1) knowe= mound
2) ain = own
3) blaw= blow

FONTI
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/meetmeon.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9055
http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erDD.htm

JOHN ANDERSON, MY JO

John Anderson era un falegname amico di Robert Burns (1759-1796) e suo coetaneo. Del brano si conoscono due varianti: una versione erotica contenuta in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” e una più intimista di due sole strofe che parla dell’amore (o dell’amicizia) tra due persone giunte alla tarda età.

JOHN ANDERSON, MY JO : VERSIONE SMM

"John Anderson my jo" - John Faed (1819-1902)
“John Anderson my jo” – John Faed (1819-1902)

La versione scritta da Burns è stata pubblicata in “The Scots Musical Museum” nel 1790. La melodia abbinata è “Town Piper of Kelso” trascritta nel 1578 nel Queen Elizabeth’s Virginal Book. E’ stata letta come l’omaggio del poeta all’amore nella vecchiaia, anche se Burns non è mai diventato vecchio, eppure ha saputo farsi interprete anche del sentimento di amicizia e condivisione degli affetti tra due persone alla fine di un lungo cammino percorso assieme, che serenamente attendono di compiere l’ultimo passo verso il riposo eterno. Burns aveva 30 anni quando scrisse questa poesia, dedicandola all’amico della gioventù (che visse fino in tarda età) ed ha il tono di un addio (la famosa Auld Lang Syne è del 1788).

ASCOLTA Eddi Reader

VERSIONE R. BURNS 1789
I
John Anderson, my jo(1), John,
When we were first acquent(2);
Your locks were like the raven,
Your bonnie brow was brent(3);
But now your brow is beld(4), John,
Your locks are like the snaw;
But blessings on your frosty pow,
John Anderson, my jo.
II
John Anderson, my jo, John,
We clamb(5) the hill thegither;
And mony a cantie(8) day, John,
We’ve had wi’ ane anither:
Now we maun totter down, John,
And hand in hand we’ll go,
And sleep thegither at the foot (9),
John Anderson, my jo
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
John Anderson, mio caro, John,
quando d’apprima c’incontrammo,
i tuoi riccioli erano neri,
la tua bella fronte era liscia;
ma ora sei stempiato, John,
e i riccioli tuoi son come neve;
eppure benedico la tua testa bianca,
John Anderson, mio caro.
II
John Anderson, mio caro, John,
scalammo la collina insieme;
e molti lieti giorni, John,
abbiamo passato insieme:
ora, barcollando, dobbiamo
scendere, John, ma mano nella mano
e nella terra dormiremo insieme,
John Anderson, mio caro.

NOTE
1) Jo è una vecchia parola scozzese per innamorato
2) acquent=acquainted
3) brent=smooth
4) beld=bald, si riferisce a una testa calva, ma qui si sta parlando di fronte, immagino si voglia riferire alla scriminatura alta tipica di chi perde i capelli per la vecchiaia
6) clamb=climbed
7) cantie=jolly
9) letteralmente “dormiremo insieme ai piedi della collina”

JOHN ANDERSON, MY JO : VERSIONE MUSES OF CALEDONIA

William Hogarth (1697-1764) – Before the Seduction and After
William Hogarth (1697-1764) – Before the Seduction and After

La seconda versione è quella erotica della tradizione popolare (le bawdy ballads) ed è stata collezionata  da Burns nel “The Merry Muses of Caledonia”.
I Fancibles erano una specie di armata di volontari per la difesa della patria dai ranghi pseudomilitari, ma in particolare il Fencibles Crochallan era un club per soli uomini ubicato in un vicoletto medievale di Edimburgo (Anchor close), assiduamente frequentato da Burns durante il suo   soggiorno edimburghese, una delle tipiche associazioni conviviali “very   british” in cui i soci maschi si ritrovavano per stare in compagnia e in libertà, lontano dalle mogli e le altre donne, per mangiare bene, bere parecchio, fumare in santa pace e “discutere” di cose da uomini.”Le Muse allegre della Scozia” è una collezione di canti scozzesi preferiti, antichi e moderni, selezionati da Robert Burns per il “Crochallan Fencibles” di Edimburgo: i canti sono per lo più tradizionali con solo alcuni testi scritti interamente da Robbie, e il loro contenuto è decisamente erotico. La prima pubblicazione della raccolta comparve postuma nel 1799.
La ballata di cui si hanno diverse strofe già prima della seconda metà del Settecento, è scritta dal punto di vista femminile: la moglie rimprovera John per la sua impotenza sessuale, gli ricorda i suoi   passati ardori e lo minaccia di mettergli le corna se non si darà da fare!

ASCOLTA Sileas


I
John Anderson, my jo, John
I wonder what you mean
To lie sae lang in the morning
And sit sae late at e’en
Ye’ll bleer a’ your een, John
And why should you do so?
Come sooner tae your bed at nicht
John Anderson, my jo
II
John Anderson, my jo, John
When that ye first began
Ye had as good a tail-tree
As any ither man
But now its waxen wan, John
And wrinkles to and fro
I’ve twa gae-ups for ae gae-doon
John Anderson, my jo
III
When ye begin to come, John
See that ye come your best
And when ye start to haud me
See that ye haud me fast
See that ye haud me fast, John
Until that I cry oh
Your back shall crack ere I do that
John Anderson, my jo
IV
John Anderson, my jo, John
Ye’re welcome when you please
It’s either in the warm bed
Or in aboon the claes
Or ye shall bear the horns, John
Upon your head to grow
And that’s the cuckold’s mallison
John Anderson, my jo
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
John Anderson, mio caro, John
mi chiedo che intenzioni hai
per riposarti così a lungo al mattino
e stare seduto fino a sera tardi
anche se ti si socchiudono gli occhi, John, perché fai così?
Di notte vieni a letto prima
John Anderson, mio caro
II
John Anderson, mio caro, John
quando eri giovane
avevi un buon “palo”
come ogni altro uomo
ma ora è molliccio, John
e si piega avanti e indietro
io ho due su, per uno giù
John Anderson, mio caro
III
Quando inizi a venire, John
vedi di fare del tuo meglio
e quando inizi a prendermi
vedi di prendermi veloce
vedi di prendermi veloce, John
finchè non grido oh la tua schiena deve rompersi prima che io lo faccia,
John Anderson, mio caro
IV
John Anderson, mio caro, John
sei il benvenuto quando vuoi
sia nel letto al caldo
oppure in piedi con i vestiti addosso
o tu porterai le corna, John
che cresceranno sulla tua testa
e che sono la maledizione del cornuto
John Anderson, mio caro

FONTI
The World Burns Club
http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erJAMJ1.htm
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/songtexts/JohnAndersonMyJo.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/sileas/john.htm
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/expert/merry_muses/john_anderson_my_jo_john.htm

TAIL TODDLE BY ROBERT BURNS

ATTENZIONE : IL CONTENUTO POTREBBE RISULTARE OFFENSIVO

ritratto di Robert Burns
ritratto di Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

“The Merry Muses of Caledonia ” [in italiano, Le Muse Allegre della Scozia] è una collezione di canti scozzesi preferiti, antichi e moderni, selezionati da Robert Burns per il ” Crochallan Fencibles “:  i canti sono per lo più tradizionali, con solo alcuni testi scritti interamente da Robbie, e il loro contenuto è decisamente erotico.
La prima pubblicazione della raccolta comparve postuma nel 1799.

I Fancibles erano una specie di armata di volontari per la difesa della patria dai ranghi pseudo-militari, ma in particolare il Crochallan Fencibles  era un club edimburghese per soli uomini ubicato in un vicoletto medievale  (Anchor close), assiduamente frequentato da Burns quando viveva in città, una delle tipiche associazioni conviviali “very british” in cui i soci si ritrovavano per stare in compagnia e in libertà, lontano dalle mogli e le altre donne, per mangiare bene, bere parecchio, fumare in santa pace e “discutere” di cose da uomini.

Say, Puritan, can it be wrong,
To dress plain truth in witty song?
What honest Nature says, we should do;
What every lady does… or would do.
[traduzione italiano: Dimmi, Puritano, è sbagliato vestire la verità con un canto di spirito? Quello che la Natura onestamente dice, noi dovremmo fare; quello che tutte le donne fanno .. o dovrebbero fare]

TAIL TODDLE

lovers-observed-dettaglioCantato in molte occasioni conviviali, il testo è di difficile comprensione essendo pieno di parole scozzesi obsolete e di doppi sensi: una servetta si diverte con un giovanotto di nome Tommy mentre la padrona di casa è andata al mercato; quando arriva il tempo del suo matrimonio, la ragazza ormai esperta, fa un confronto poco lusinghiero verso l’attributo del marito.

LA MELODIA: MOUTH MUSIC

La melodia è un reel (danza con tempo in 4/4) “The Chevalier’s Muster Roll” (ASCOLTA) e il testo è spesso eseguito come un tipico Puirt à Beul (letteralmente vuol dire melodia per la bocca) ossia una forma tradizionale di canto proprio della Scozia, Irlanda e dell’Isola di Cape Breton (Nuova Scozia). In inglese si dice (Gaelic) Mouth music ed è un canto eseguito da una sola voce, a tema umoristico, con doppi sensi o decisamente osceno, spesso infarcito di frasi non-sense: in effetti il ritmo e il suono hanno più importanza del significato delle parole.
Non si conosce con esattezza l’origine di questa forma di canto, poiché il ritmo delle parole è una replica del ritmo musicale alcuni studiosi ipotizzano si tratti di versi composti per aiutare violinisti e zampognari ad imparare la melodia oppure cantati quando non era disponibile (o vietato) l’uso di certi strumenti, oppure utilizzati dai cantanti per potenziare il loro respiro.

ASCOLTA The Chad Mitchell Trio

ASCOLTA Tony Cuffe, Tony canta le strofe in una sequenza diversa e le ripete più volte


Chorus
Tail toddle, tail toddle(1),
Tammy gars(2) ma tail toddle
But and ben(3) wi diddle doddle(4)
Tammy gars ma tail toddle!
I
Oor guidwife held ow’r tae Fife
Fur tae buy a coal riddle
Lang ere she cam back again
Tammy gart(2) ma tail toddle

II
Jessie Rack she gied a plack(5)
Helen Wallace gied a boddle (6)
Quo’ the bride(7), ” It’s ower kittle
For to mend a broken doddl(8).”
III
When ah’m deid ah’m oot o date,
When ah’m seek ah’m fu o trouble,
When ah’m weel ah stap aboot an
Tammy gars ma tail toddle
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Coro
Zum-zum, zum-zum (1)
Tommy mi fa zum-zum
dentro e fuori, mi sbatte per bene (2)
Tommy mi fa zum-zum.
I
La nostra padrona andò fino a Fife
per comprare un setaccio per il carbone molto tempo dopo è ritornata,
Tommy mi faceva zum-zum
II
Jessy Rack diede una monetina (5)
Helen Wallace diede una moneta (6)
disse la sposa (7)”E’ troppo piccolo
per rattoppare un buco rotto (8)”
III
Quando sono stanca sono fuori uso,
quando sono malata sono piena di dolori, quando sto bene vado a passeggio e Tommy mi fa zum-zum

NOTA
1) tail toddle =  camminare con passo incerto, allusivo al su e giù dell’accoppiamento sessuale. In italiano potrebbe equivalere all’espressione colloquiale: zum-zum. Nell’edizione di “The Merry Muses of Caledonia ” del 1966 nelle note è riportato come possibile traduzione: “made my behind go to and fro.” [in italiano letteralmente =fa andare avanti e indietro il mio didietro]
2) gars, gart = to make
3) But and ben = dentro e fuori
4) diddle doddle: (doddle = sesso maschile) agitare da una parte all’altra con grande energia (anche = sverginare). Il movimento dell’atto sessuale è ripetutamente espresso  e ribadito
5) plack = moneta scozzese dal valore di un dodicesimo di penny
6) boddle = moneta di rame del valore di un sesto di penny
7) La strofa menziona plack e boddle ossia monete del conio scozzese con le quali si potevano comprare delle plack- pie cioè torte da una monetina e delle bottiglie di vino/birra, quindi potrebbe riferirsi al Penny wedding: una vecchia tradizione scozzese prevedeva che il cibo e le bevande fossero pagate dagli ospiti, un versione non del tutta estinta ancora ai nostri giorni, vuole che siano gli ospiti a portare il proprio cibo e le bevande per la festa, una sorta di condivisione della collettività introno alla tavola.
8) evidentemente la sposa non era più vergine e poteva fare paragoni: l’attrezzo del marito era kittle = molto piccolo

Ulteriori strofe qui
FONTI
Le allegre Muse della Caledonia continua
Puirt-à-Beul vedi
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=117836
http://sangstories.webs.com/tailtoddle.htm

https://thesession.org/tunes/1484