Godred Cròvan’s Galley

Leggi in italiano

Godred Cròvan (in irish gaelic “Gofraid mac meic Arailt“) was a Norse-Gael ruler of Dublin, and King of Mann and the Isles in the second half of the 11th century.
Godred may well be identical to the celebrated King Orry of Manx legend, Godred and King Orry are associated with numerous historic and prehistoric sites on Mann and Islay.  As the ruler of Dublin and the Isles, Godred dominated the routes through the Irish Sea region.

MANX VERSION: Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan

In the XX century George Broderick, Douglas Fargher and Brian Stowell wrote the text in manx gaelic  from an Hebridean tune. It tells of the King Orry galley’s landing on the Isle of Man.
Cairistiona Dougherty & Paul Rogers live (or sound track here)
Scran

 Manx gaelic
O vans ny hovan O,
Hirree O sy hovan;
O vans ny hovan O,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Kiart ayns lhing ny Loghlynee
Haink nyn Ree gys Mannin
Tessyn mooiryn freayney roie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
II
Datt ny tonnyn, heid yn gheay
Ghow yn skimmee aggle;
Agh va fer as daanys ayn,
Hie yn Ree dy stiurey.
III
Daag ad Eeley er nyn gooyl
Shiaull’ my yiass gy Mannin;
Eeanlee marrey, raunyn roie,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
IV
Hrog ad seose yn shiaull mooar mean,
Hum ny maidjyn tappee –
Gour e vullee er y cheayn,
Cosney’n Kione ny hAarey.
V
Stiagh gy Balley Rhumsaa hie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan;
Ooilley dooiney er y traie
Haink dy oltagh’ Gorree.
VI
Jeeagh er Raad Mooar Ghorree heose
Cryss smoo gial ‘sy tuinney,
Cowrey da ny Manninee
Reiltys Ghorree Chrovan.
English translation*
O vans ny hovan o,
Hirree o ‘sy hovan,
O vans ny hovan o,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Right in the era of the Norsemen,
Their king came to Mannin,
Running across surging seas,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
II
The waves swoll up and the wind blew,
The crew were frightened,
But there was one brave man,
The King went to steer.
III
They left Islay behind them,
Sailing southward to Mannin,
Sea birds and seals running,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
IV
They raised the main-sail,
The oars dipped quickly,
Onwards on the sea,
Reaching the Point of Ayre.
V
Into Ramsey went,
Gorree Crovan’s longship,
Every man on the beach,
Come to salute Gorree.
VI (1)
Look at the Milkey-Way above,
Brightest band in the heavens,
A sign to the Manx,
Of the Gorree Crovan’s government.

1) Ramsey is a coastal town in the north of the Isle of Man: landing point of the Viking warrior Godred Crovan around 1079, came to subjugate the island and make it his kingdom. The fact told is obviously after the conquest because the first time the islanders tried to defend themselves from the Vikings, and near the landing of the galley there was a violent battle and not a festive crowd !!

SCOTTISH VERSION: Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain

And here is the Hebridean tune, the song composed by the bard and songwriter Duncan Johnston of Islay (Donnchadh MacIain 1881-1947) and published in his book “Cronan nan Tonn” (The Croon of the Sea) in 1938! The journey, however, is told to the contrary, the Viking galley leaves the Isle of Man to go to Islay.
Scottish gaelic lyrics

English lyrics
The Corries
The Barge O’ Gorrie Crovan, a more warlike version

The Sound of Mull, a trio from Tobermory, Isle of Mull : Janet Tandy, Joanie MacKenzie and David Williamson. (verses I, II, IV)
Robin Hall & Jimmy Macgregor  (verses I, IV)

Scottish gaelic
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
Air Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain (1)
I
Fichead sonn air cùl nan ràmh,
Fichead buille lùghmhor,
Siùbhlaidh ì mar eun a’ snàmh,
Is sìoban thonn ‘ga sgiùrsadh.
II
Suas i sheòid air bàrr nan tonn !
Sìos gu ìochdar sùigh i !
Suas an ceòl is togaibh fonn,
Tha Mac an Righ ‘ga stiuireadh !
III
A’bhìrlinn rìoghail ‘s i a th’ann
Siubhal-sìth ‘na gluasad
Sròl is sìoda àrd ri crann
‘S i bratach Olaibh Ruaidhe (2)
IV
Dh’ fhàg sinn Manainn (3) mòr nan tòrr,
Eireann a’ tighinn dlùth dhuinn,
Air Ile-an-Fheòir tha sinn an tòir
Ged dh’ èireas tonnan dùbh-ghorm
V
Siod e ‘nis-an t-eilean crom!(4)
Tìr nan sonn nach diùltadh,
Stòp na dìbhe ‘thoirt air lom
‘S bìdh fleadh air bonn ‘san Dùn (5) duinn!
English
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
The barge of Gorrie Crovan
I
Behind the oars, a score so brave,
A lusty score to row her,
She sails away like bird on wave,
While foaming seas lash o’er her.
II
Up she goes on ocean wave !
Down the surge she wails O,
Sing away; the chorus, raise,
A royal prince; he sails her !
III
The royal galley onward skims,
With magic speed, she sails O,
Aloft her silken bunting swims,
Red Olav‘s Banner waving.
IV
The towers of Man we leave away,
Old Erin’s hills we hail O,
On Islay’s shore her course we lay
Though billows roar and rave O.
V
See the island bent like bow,
Where kindly souls await us;
The Castle hall, I see it now,
The feast’s for us prepared O

NOTES
Gaelic and English texts by Duncan Johnston (Donnachadh Mac Iain), published in his book Cronan nan Tonn (The Croon of the Sea) 1938/9 and reprinted in 1997 by Dun Eisden of Inverness. These are his comments on the song:
1)  Godred, or Gorry Crovan was, according to the ancient sagas, the son of Harald the Black of Isla.  Tradition has it that his mother was a lady of the subdued House of Angus Beag, son of Erc, who occupied Isla in 498.  This explains his remarkable popularity with both the Norse and Celtic elements in the west.  His grand-daughter, Regnaldis (Raonaild), daughter of Olave the Red, afterwards married Somerled, who displaced Red Olave as King of the Isles.  Somerled founded the Dynasty of the Lords of the Isles, with its headquarters on an island on Loch Finlagan in Isla.  Godred was a celebrated warrior of the eleventh century.  He acted as Adjutant to the King of Norway at the battle of Stamford Bridge, 1066.  Escaping from that stricken field, he made his way to the Isle of Man, and thence to Isla, where he raised his standard.  The Norsemen and the Gaels alike flocked to his standard.  With a large force, he crossed over into the North of Ireland (Ulster), and carried everything before him up to the gates of Dublin, which City surrendered to him.  For a time, he waged a successful war against the King of Scotland.  In Isla he was spoken of with saintly reverence because of his prowess and dauntless gallantry in ridding the island of a huge saurian that had his lair near the present village of Bridgend.  Many of our Clans and their Septs of the west can claim descent from Godred.  The MacDougalls, MacDonalds, MacAllisters, MacRuaries, MacRanalds, MacIains, etc.  He died in Isla in 1095, and his grave is marked with a huge white boulder, known locally as “An Carragh Ban.”  He founded the Dynasty of the Kingdom of the Isles, of Dublin and of Man.  He was succeded by his son King Lagman, who reigned at the time of the “Sack of Isla” by Magnus Barefoot .  Lagman was taken prisoner.  He latterly, after a short reign of seven years, embraced Christianity, abdicated in favour of his brother, Olave the Red, and went to Palestine to fight for the Holy Sepulchre.  He is buried at Jerusalem.
2) Olave the Red, third son of Godred Crovan, and father of the princess Regnaldis.
3)  The Isle of Man
4)  Isla, so called in Fingalian Poetry. Approaching the island at dusk from the south, the skyline presents the appearance of a bent bow – “Tha e crom mar bhogha air ghleus.”
5) Dunyveg or Dùn Naomhaig Castle, more properly, Dùn Aonghais Bhig, abbreviated “aobhaig.” This was the House of Aengus, or Aonghas Beag, son of Erc, 498.”

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31829
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mackenziefiona/birlinn.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/12851
https://wiki1.sch.im/wiki/pages/i063V5H9/Birlinn_Ghorree_Crovan_.html
https://soundcloud.com/cairistiona-dougherty/birlinn-ghorree-chrovan

http://www.iomguide.com/kingorrysgrave.php
http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/hist1900/ch13.htm

La Galea di Godred Cròvan

Read the post in English

Godred Cròvan (in irlandese antico”Gofraid mac meic Arailt“) fu un capo norreno che regnò su Dublino, re dell’Isola di Man e delle Isole nella seconda metà del XI secolo.
Godred nelle leggende mannesi è diventato Re Orry,  Godred e Re Orry sono associati a numerosi siti archeologicisu Man e Islay.  Come governante di Dublino e delle Isole, Godred dominò incontrastato sul Mare d’Irlanda.

VERSIONE MANNESE: Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan

George Broderick, Douglas Fargher e Brian Stowell (studiosi ed editori nonchè compilatori del Dizionario Inglese-gaelico mannese) hanno scritto il testo in mannese adattandolo a una melodia delle isole Ebridi. Si racconta dello sbarco della galea di King Orry sull’isola di Man.
Cairistiona Dougherty & Paul Rogers live (oppure here)
Scran

 Gaelico mannese
O vans ny hovan O,
Hirree O sy hovan;
O vans ny hovan O,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Kiart ayns lhing ny Loghlynee
Haink nyn Ree gys Mannin
Tessyn mooiryn freayney roie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
II
Datt ny tonnyn, heid yn gheay
Ghow yn skimmee aggle;
Agh va fer as daanys ayn,
Hie yn Ree dy stiurey.
III
Daag ad Eeley er nyn gooyl
Shiaull’ my yiass gy Mannin;
Eeanlee marrey, raunyn roie,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
IV
Hrog ad seose yn shiaull mooar mean,
Hum ny maidjyn tappee –
Gour e vullee er y cheayn,
Cosney’n Kione ny hAarey.
V
Stiagh gy Balley Rhumsaa hie
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan;
Ooilley dooiney er y traie
Haink dy oltagh’ Gorree.
VI
Jeeagh er Raad Mooar Ghorree heose
Cryss smoo gial ‘sy tuinney,
Cowrey da ny Manninee
Reiltys Ghorree Chrovan.

O vans ny hovan o,
Hirree o ‘sy hovan,
O vans ny hovan o,
Birlinn Ghorree Chrovan.
I
Right in the era of the Norsemen,
Their king came to Mannin,
Running across surging seas,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
II
The waves swoll up and the wind blew,
The crew were frightened,
But there was one brave man,
The King went to steer.
III
They left Islay behind them,
Sailing southward to Mannin,
Sea birds and seals running,
Gorree Crovan’s longship.
IV
They raised the main-sail,
The oars dipped quickly,
Onwards on the sea,
Reaching the Point of Ayre.
V
Into Ramsey went,
Gorree Crovan’s longship,
Every man on the beach,
Come to salute Gorree.
VI
Look at the Milkey-Way above,
Brightest band in the heavens,
A sign to the Manx,
Of the Gorree Crovan’s government.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
O vans ny hovan o,
Hirree o ‘sy hovan,
O vans ny hovan o,
la galea di Godred Grovan (1)
I
Proprio nell’era degli Uomini del Nord
il loro re venne a Man
attraversa il mare mosso
la galea di Godred Grovan
II
Le onde si agitano e soffia il vento
l’equipaggio era spaventato
ma c’era un uomo coraggioso,
il Re che andò al timone
III
Lasciarono Islay alle spalle
e navigarono verso sud fino a Man,
con gli uccelli marini  e le foche correva
la galea di Godred Grovan
IV
Alzarono la vela maestra
e calarono i remi
avanzando sul mare
per raggiungere Point of Ayre (2)
V
A Ramsey (3) andò
la galea di Godred Grovan
ogni uomo sulla spiaggia
venne e salutare (4) Godred
VI
Guarda la via lattea
la striscia più luminosa nei cieli,
un segno per i Mannesi
del governo di Godred Grovan

NOTE
1) nell’originale il nome  è declinato con la pronuncia mannese Ghorree Chrovan
2) la punta più a Nord dell’Isola di Man
3) Ramsey città costiera nel nord dell’isola di Man: punto di approdo del guerriero vichingo Godred Crovan intorno al 1079 venuto a soggiogare l’isola e renderla il suo regno
4) il fatto raccontato è ovviamente successivo alla conquista perchè la prima volta gli isolani cercarono di difendersi dai Vichinghi, e nei pressi dello sbarco della galea ci fu una violenta battaglia e non una folla festante!!

VERSIONE SCOZZESE: Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain

La canzone fu composta da  Duncan Johnston di Islay (Donnchadh MacIain 1881-1947) e pubblicata nel suo libro “Cronan nan Tonn” (The Croon of the Sea in italiano Il canto del mare) 1938/9. Il viaggio però è raccontato al contrario, la galea  lascia l’isola di Man per andare a Islay e al comando non c’è il re  ma il figlio Olaf.

The Sound of Mull, trio di Tobermory, Isle of Mull : Janet Tandy, Joanie MacKenzie e David Williamson. (strofe I, II, IV)

Robin Hall & Jimmy Macgregor  (strofe I, IV)

Testo in gaelico scozzese
di Duncan Johnston

Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
Air Birlinn Ghoraidh Chrobhain
I
Fichead sonn air cùl nan ràmh,
Fichead buille lùghmhor,
Siùbhlaidh ì mar eun a’ snàmh,
Is sìoban thonn ‘ga sgiùrsadh.
II
Suas i sheòid air bàrr nan tonn !
Sìos gu ìochdar sùigh i !
Suas an ceòl is togaibh fonn,
Tha Mac an Righ ‘ga stiuireadh !
III
A’bhìrlinn rìoghail ‘s i a th’ann
Siubhal-sìth ‘na gluasad
Sròl is sìoda àrd ri crann
‘S i bratach Olaibh Ruaidhe
IV
Dh’ fhàg sinn Manainn mòr nan tòrr,
Eireann a’ tighinn dlùth dhuinn,
Air Ile-an-Fheòir tha sinn an tòir
Ged dh’ èireas tonnan dùbh-ghorm
V
Siod e ‘nis-an t-eilean crom!
Tìr nan sonn nach diùltadh,
Stòp na dìbhe ‘thoirt air lom
‘S bìdh fleadh air bonn ‘san Dùn duinn!

The Corries The Barge O’ Gorrie Crovan, una versione più guerresca

THE BARGE OF GORRIE CROVAN
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
The barge of Gorrie Crovan
I
Behind the oars, a score so brave,
A lusty score to row her,
She sails away like bird on wave,
While foaming seas lash o’er her.
II
Up she goes on ocean wave !
Down the surge she wails O,
Sing away; the chorus, raise,
A royal prince; he sails her !
III
The royal galley onward skims,
With magic speed, she sails O,
Aloft her silken bunting swims,
Red Olav’s Banner waving.
IV
The towers of Man we leave away,
Old Erin’s hills we hail O,
On Islay’s shore her course we lay
Though billows roar and rave O.
V
See the island bent like bow,
Where kindly souls await us;
The Castle hall, I see it now,
The feast’s for us prepared O
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
hi horó na hùbhan,
Hóbhan na hóbhan hó,
la galea di Godred Grovan  (1)
I
Dietro ai remi una ventina di prodi
una vigorosa ventina voga,
si allontana come uccello sull’onda
la galea di Godred Grovan
II
Va sull’onda del mare
e sotto l’onda geme
canta e il coro s’alza
un principe di stirpe reale la naviga
III
La galea regale scivola in avanti,
sospinta magicamente
innalza il vessillo di seta, è l’insegna di Olaf il Rosso (2) che sventola
IV
Le torri di Man (3)  lasciamo  e salutiamo le colline della vecchia Irlanda, sulla riva di Islay dirigiamo la rotta, anche se i flutti ruggiscono e ribollono
V
Vedi l’isola (4) dalla forma arcuata
dove animi gentili ci attendono
la sala del Castello (5), ora vedo
il festino è per noi preparato

NOTE
1) nelle note alla canzone l’autore commenta: “Godred, o Gorry Crovan era, secondo le antiche saghe, il figlio di Harald il Nero di Isla. La tradizione vuole che sua madre fosse una donna della sconfitta Casa di Angus Beag, figlio di Erc, che occupò Isla nel 498. Questo spiega la sua notevole popolarità sia con la parte norrena che celtica nelle terre d’occidente. Sua nipote, Regnaldis (Raonaild), figlia di Olave il Rosso, in seguito sposò Somerled, che sostituì Olave come Re delle Isole. Somerled fondò la Dinastia del Re delle Isole  (Lords of the Isles), con sede sull’isola di Loch Finlagan a Isla.
Godred era un celebre guerriero dell’XI secolo. Agì come alfiere del re di Norvegia nella battaglia di Stamford Bridge, nel 1066. Scappando da quell’orrore, si diresse verso l’Isola di Man, e da lì a Isla, dove innalzò il suo stendardo. Sia Vichinghi che Celti si riunirono sotto le sue insegne. Con un grande contingente, attraversò il nord dell’Irlanda (Ulster) e conquistò tutto quello che  si trovava di fronte fino alle porte di Dublino, che si arrese. Per un certo periodo, ha combattuto con successo contro il re di Scozia. A Isla era considerato protetto da dio  per la sua cavalleresca  impresa  nel liberare l’isola da un enorme sauro che aveva la tana vicino all’attuale villaggio di Bridgend. Molti dei nostri clan e i clan dell’ovest possono rivendicare di discendere da Godred. MacDougalls, MacDonalds, MacAllisters, MacRuaries, MacRanalds, MacIains, ecc.
Morì a Isla nel 1095 e la sua tomba è contrassegnata da un enorme masso bianco, conosciuto localmente come “An Carragh Ban“. Ha fondato la Dinastia del Regno delle Isole, di Dublino e di Man. Gli successe suo figlio Re Lagman, che regnò ai tempi del “Sacco di Isla” di Magnus Barefoot. Lagman fu fatto prigioniero. In seguito, dopo un breve regno di sette anni, abbracciò il cristianesimo, abdicò in favore di suo fratello, Olave il Rosso, e andò in Palestina a combattere per il Santo Sepolcro. È sepolto a Gerusalemme.”
2) Olaf (Olave) il rosso  era il terzo figlio di Re Godfrey Grovan
3) l’Isola di Man
4) l’isola di Islay,  la “regina delle Ebridi” avvicinandosi da sub sembra abbracciare la nave
5)  Dunyveg o Dùn Naomhaig Castle

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31829
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mackenziefiona/birlinn.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/12851
https://wiki1.sch.im/wiki/pages/i063V5H9/Birlinn_Ghorree_Crovan_.html
https://soundcloud.com/cairistiona-dougherty/birlinn-ghorree-chrovan

http://www.iomguide.com/kingorrysgrave.php
http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/hist1900/ch13.htm

ROBERT BURNS: RANTIN’, ROVIN’ ROBIN

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

 Leggi in italiano

“Rantin ‘, rovin’, Robin” is an autobiographical song written by Robert Burns as a celebration of his 28th birthday (25 January 1787), also known under the title “There was a lad“.
Burns describes in joking terms his own birth in the presence of a midwife who predicts his destiny. A sort of fairy-tale in which the old woman next to the cradle is a kind of fairy-godmother who dispenses the gift of Poetry to the future Bard.
The cottage that saw his birth is located in Alloway in the district of Kyle, Ayr county and was built by his father William Burness (the name of the family at the origins), a cottage of straw and clay for a family of small sharecroppers (now Robert Burns Birthplace Museum)

Burns' s Cottage - Samuel Bough 1876
Burns’ s Cottage – Samuel Bough 1876

Shortly after his death (aged only 37), a group of friends dined together to commemorate him. It was 1802 and the dinners have become part of the Scottish tradition, and the song is among the favorites in the Burns’ Supper.

Jim Malcolm


The Corries
Sylvia Barnes & The Battlefield Band con immagini dell’ambiente quotidiano di Robbie
Andy M. Stewart

RANTIN’, ROVIN’, ROBIN *
I
There was a lad was born in Kyle (1),
But whatna day o’ whatna style,
I doubt it’s hardly worth the while
To be sae nice wi’ Robin.
Chorus.
Robin was a rovin’ boy,
Rantin’, rovin’, rantin’, rovin’,
Robin was a rovin’ boy,
Rantin’, rovin’, Robin!
II
Our monarch’s hindmost year but ane(2)
Was five-and-twenty days begun,
‘Twas then a blast o’ Janwar’ win’
Blew hansel(3) in on Robin.
III
The gossip keekit(4) in his loof(5),
Quo’ scho(6), “Wha lives will see the proof,
This waly(7) boy will be nae coof(8):
I think we’ll ca’ him Robin.
IV
He’ll hae misfortunes great an’ sma’,
But aye(9) a heart aboon(10) them a’,
He’ll be a credit till us a’-
We’ll a’ be proud o’ Robin.”
V
“But sure as three times three mak nine,
I see by ilka(11) score and line,
This chap will dearly like our kin’,
So leeze(12) me on thee! Robin.”
VI
“Guid(13) faith,” quo’, scho, “I doubt you gar(14)
The bonie lasses lie aspar(15);
But twenty fauts (16) ye may hae waur(17)
So blessins on thee! Robin.” 
NOTES

* english translation 
1) The cottage is in the village of Alloway in Ayrshire, now Robert Burns Birthplace Museum Burns’ start in life was a humble one. He was born the son of poor tenant farmers and was the eldest of seven children
2) hindmost year but one=January 25, 1759.The strong wind that blew in those days destroyed part of the house, so his mother with the little one in her arms preferred to challenge the storm to take refuge from the neighbor.
3) hansel=birth-gift
4) keekit=peered – glanced. Allan Connochie  notes “The “gossip” was the midwife, family friend or godparent telling the baby’s future”
5) loof=the palm, the hand outspread and upturned
6) said she: It is said that his father met the woman while he was crossing the river at the ford, but the river was in flood and the woman was in trouble, so Robert’s father helped her and took her home; the woman in exchange made a prophecy about the child.
7) waly=sturdy
8) coof=fool – dolt
9) aye= always
10) aboon=above
11) ilka=every
12) leeze=commend; blessings on thee; I am fond of you
13) guid= good
14) gar= make
15) asprar= wide apart
16) fauts=faults
17) waur=worse

FONTI
http://sangstories.webs.com/therewasalad.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/6927
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/ThereWasALad.html

The Bonny Moorhen

Ennesima jacobite song made in Scozia, scritta in codice e in cui l’uccello invocato non è un “moorhen” ma il Bel Carletto.
La melodia è quantomeno seicentesca (in Henry Atkinson MS, 1694, dal titolo “Take tent to the rippells good Man”).
C’è anche una versione goliardica di Robert Burns riportata nelle “Merry Muses of Caledonia” uscito postumo dal titolo “The Bonie Moo-hen” a hunting song”: nella versione di Robert Burns si tratta di una battuta di caccia alla gallinella d’acqua (vedi). Il poemetto è un linguaggio cifrato tra lui e la bella Nancy McLehose con cui il bardo intratteneva una relazione adulterina, ennesima prova di una loro relazione molto più carnale di quanto sia stato lecito supporre nei salotti edimburghesi del tempo.

Bear McCreary ne ha fatto un personale arrangiamento strumentale per la serie Outlander (stagione 1) con il titolo “Tracking Jamie” in Outlander: Season 1, Vol. 2 (Original Television Soundtrack)  ascolta su Spotify (qui)

LA VERSIONE TRADIZIONALE

La bella gallinella d’acqua (Gallinula chloropus) –  il maschio e la femmina hanno una livrea identica con colorazione prevalentemente marrone scuro-grigio e nera – porta i colori del vecchio tartan Stuart: becco rosso acceso, zampe verdi, piumaggio nero e grigio con una spruzzata di bianco, e molto probabilmente proprio per questo è stata presa come avatar del  “giovane” e ultimo pretendente Stuart al trono di Scozia, tuttavia alcuni ritengono offensivo paragonare il bel principe a una gallinella (moor-hen) e preferiscono considerare il termine come un ulteriore allusione al moor-cock!
Già in “The mountain streams where the moorcocks crow” mi sono soffermata sul Moorcock, perchè ben due uccelli si condendono il nome: il gallo cedrone ma anche la pernice di Scozia, entrambi della famiglia dei fagiani. (continua)

La versione testuale proviene da “The Jacobite Relics of Scotland, being the Songs, Airs and Legends of the Adherents to the House of Stuart”( James Hogg, 1818)
ASCOLTA The Corries


I
My bonnie moorhen,
my bonnie moorhen,
Up in the grey hills,
and doon in the glen,
It’s when ye gang butt the hoose,
when ye gang ben
I’ll drink a health tae
my bonnie moorhen.
II
My bonnie moorhen’s gane
o’er the main,
And it will be summer
till she comes again,
But when she comes back again
some folk will ken,
Oh, joy be with you
my bonnie moorhen.
III
My bonnie moorhen
has feathers anew,
And she’s a’ fine colours,
but nane o’ them blue,
She’s red an’ she’s white,
an’ she’s green an’ she’s grey
My bonnie moorhen come hither way.
IV
Come up by Glen Duich,
and doon by Glen Shee
An’ roun’ past Kinclaven
and hither by me,
For Ranald and Donald
lie low in the fen,
Tae brak the wing o’
my bonnie moorhen.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
La mia bella gallinella d’acqua,
la mia bella gallinella
su per le grige colline
e giù nelle valli
è quando uscirai di casa
per venire qui [1]
berrò alla salute della mia bella gallinella d’acqua
II
La mia bella gallinella d’acqua
è andata oltre il mare
ma quando sarà estate
ritornerà di nuovo
e quando ritornerà,
e lo sapete bene
che la gioia sia con te [2]
mia bella gallinella
III
La mia bella gallinella
ha un nuovo piumaggio,
ha tanti bei colori,
ma tra di essi non c’è l’azzurro.[3]
Rosso e bianco
e verde e grigio[4]
la mia bella gallinella verrà quaggiù
IV
Vieni su per Glenduich
e giù per Glendee
e superato Kinclaven[5]
e poi da me
perchè Ranald e Donald[6]
sono acquattati nel fango
per spezzare le ali
alla mia bella gallinella

NOTE
1) “when ye gang but the house, when ye gang ben…” =when you go out of the house and when you come in. Il Bonny Prince si trova esule in Francia
2) frase tipica di un brindisi benaugurale
3) blu significa anche triste
4) sono i colori del tartan stuart
5) a detta di James Hogg un itinerario non corretto
6) i soldati inglesi, anche se Ranald e Donald sono nomi tipicamente scozzesi, si vuole forse alludere ai traditori

LA VERSIONE DELLA FAMIGLIA CARTHY

E’ una versione testuale completamente diversa anche se cantata sulla stessa melodia (vedi)

FONTI
http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/linnut/moorhen
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/bonnymoorhen.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=10726
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/moorhen.htm
http://www.robertburns.org/works/157.shtml
https://nslmblog.wordpress.com/2015/01/16/the-bonie-moorhen-1788/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=50450&lang=en

Johnny the Brine

Una ‘Border Ballad’ trascritta dal professor Child al numero 114 in ben 13 versioni:  Johnny the Brine, Johnnie Cock, Johnnie (Jock)  o’ Breadislee, Jock O’Braidosly, Johnnie o’ Graidie sono i vari nomi con cui è identificato questo bracconiere/bandito del Border scozzese.

LA GUERRA AL BRACCONAGGIO

“La foresta ha occupato un posto importantissimo nella vita inglese fino dai tempi antichi; ancora durante il regno della regina Elisabetta, fitte boscaglie ricoprivano le aree di intere contee, ed il mondo della foresta aveva guardie, leggi e tribunali propri ai quali neanche i nobili ed il clero potevano sottrarsi completamente. Dall’invasione normanna fino a Giorgio III è stata una continua lotta, per lungo tempo assai sanguinosa, tra il popolo da una parte e, dall’altra, le inique leggi che trattavano l’uccisione d’un cervo alla stregua di un assassinio e sottoponevano i cacciatori di frodo, quando non alla morte, all’abbacinamento o alla mutilazione degli arti. La foresta veniva “monopolizzata” dalla nobiltà per l’esclusivo “sport” della caccia, mentre per la gente essa rappresentava uno dei pochi mezzi di sostentamento. Il bracconaggio era dunque un’attività rischiosissima e poteva davvero costare la vita, anche perché i guardacaccia avevano la facoltà di abbattere sul posto chiunque fosse stato scoperto a cacciare di frodo. Da qui la denominazione di “guerra del bracconaggio“, che rende esattamente l’idea di che cosa davvero si trattasse (anche perché le foreste, ideale rifugio di banditi e Outlaws, venivano spesso soggette a vere e proprie spedizioni militari.” (Riccardo Venturi tratto da qui)

Nell’Alto Medioevo i bracconieri  erano considerati alla stregua di fuorilegge e uccisi sul posto dai guardacaccia. Successivamente le pene si mitigarono prevedendo l’incarcerazione e/o l’amputazione della mano (o l’abbacinamento) fino alla pena capitale quando gli animali erano della riserva di caccia del Re. In Inghilterra con la Magna Charta libertatum (1215) vennero abolite le pene per la caccia di frodo, ma nella prassi quotidiana i giudici della contea (ovvero gli stessi nobili “derubati”) raramente erano ben disposti verso i bracconieri. Le condanne  nei secoli successivi furono progressivamente più miti e nel settecento il bracconiere rischiava solo la detenzione in carcere per qualche mese e/o le frustate. Era inoltre possibile pagare una multa (anche se salata) per riavere la libertà.

La ballata è ancora popolare in Scozia (dal Fife all’Aberdeenshire fino al Border) e le sue prime versioni in stampa risalgono alla fine del Settecento: si narra di un giovane che va a caccia di cervi, ma in sprezzo del pericolo, dopo il buon esito della caccia, se ne resta nel bosco appisolandosi dopo un lauto banchetto. Sorpreso da un servitore della zona viene denunciato ai guardacaccia del Re i quali gli tendono un’imboscata per ucciderlo: sono sette contro uno ma Johnny riesce a ucciderne sei. Il finale varia a seconda delle versioni: il settimo guardacaccia riesce a mettersi in salvo fuggendo sul cavallo, o viene lasciato in vita per poter riferire l’accaduto; in altre è un uccellino che viene inviato a casa con la richiesta di soccorso, ma la fine è sempre tragica e il bracconiere muore a causa delle ferite.

Johnny of Braidislee-Samuel Edmund Waller

LA VERSIONE ESTESA: Jock O’Braidosly

ASCOLTA The Corries, live

ASCOLTA Top Floor Taivers live in un arrangiamento molto personale


I
Johnny got up on a May mornin’
Called for water to wash his hands
Says “Gie loose tae me my twa grey dugs
That lie in iron bands – bands
That lie in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s mother she heard o’ this
Her hands for dool she wrang
Sayin’ “Johnny for your venison
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang – gang
Tae the greenwood dinnae gang”
III
But Johnny has ta’en his guid bend bow
His arrows one by one
And he’s awa’ tae the greenwood gane
Tae ding the dun deer doon – doon
Tae ding the dun deer doon
IV
Noo Johnny shot and the dun deer leapt
And he wounded her in the side
And there between the water and the woods
The grey hounds laid her pride – her pride/The grey hounds laid her pride
V
They ate so much o’ the venison
They drank so much o’ the blood
That Johnny and his twa grey dugs
Fell asleep as though were deid – were deid
Fell asleep as though were deid
VI
Then by there cam’ a silly auld man
An ill death may he dee
For he’s awa’ tae Esslemont (1)
The seven foresters for tae see – tae see
The foresters for tae see
VII
“As I cam’ in by Monymusk (2)
Doon among yon scruggs
Well there I spied the bonniest youth
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs – twa dugs
Lyin’ sleepin’ atween twa dugs”
VIII (3)
The buttons that were upon his sleeve
Were o’ the gowd sae guid
And the twa grey hounds that he lay between
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood – wi’ blood
Their mouths were dyed wi’ blood
IX
Then up and jumps the first forester
He was captain o’ them a’
Sayin “If that be Jock o’ Braidislee
Unto him we’ll draw – we’ll draw
Unto him we’ll draw”
X
The first shot that the foresters fired
It hit Johnny on the knee
And the second shot that the foresters fired
His heart’s blood blint his e’e – his e’e
His heart’s blood blint his e’e
XI (4)
Then up jumps Johnny fae oot o’ his sleep
And an angry man was he
Sayin “Ye micht have woken me fae my sleep
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e – my e’e
Ere my heart’s blood blint my e’e”
XII
But he’s rested his back against an oak
His fit upon a stane
And he has fired at the seven o’ them
He’s killed them a’ but ane – but ane
He’s killed them a’ but ane
XIII
He’s broken four o’ that one’s ribs
His airm and his collar bane (5)
And he has set him upon his horse
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame – hame
Wi’ the tidings sent him hame
XIV
But Johnny’s guid bend bow is broke
His twa grey dugs are slain
And his body lies in Monymusk
His huntin’ days are dane – are dane
His huntin’ days are dane
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani
“Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri
sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La madre di Johnny che seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
” Johnny per la tua caccia
al bosco non andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo, le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù – per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna spiccò un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda,
la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Molto mangiarono della carne
e bevvero tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono di colpo –
di colpo
si addormentarono di colpo
VI
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio,
che peste lo colga,
che andava a Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia, –
vedere
per vedere i sette guardacaccia.
VII
“Mentre venivo qui da Monymusk
per quella boscaglia
vidi il ragazzo più bello
che giaceva addormentato tra due cani- due cani
giaceva addormentato tra due cani
VIII
I bottoni che portava alla maniche
erano d’oro zecchino
e i due levrieri tra cui era
disteso
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue- di sangue
avevano le bocche sporche di sangue
IX
Saltò su il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Se quello è il giovane Jock o’ Braidislee andremo da lui –
andremo da lui”
X
Il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, colpì Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio- occhio il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
XI
Saltò su Johnny risvegliandosi dal sonno
ed era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Mi avete risvegliato dal sonno
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio
il sangue del mio cuore mi è schizzato nell’occhio”
XII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno – uno
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
XIII
Aveva quattro delle costole rotte
il braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa
XIV
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti – sono finiti, i giorni della caccia sono finiti

NOTE
1) nell’Aberdeenshire si trovano ancora i resti del Castello di Esslemont
2) Monymusk è un ameno paesello, oggi la tenuta Monymusk gestisce una vasta area boschiava lungo le rive del fiume Don (vedi)
3) un classico espediente dei narratori che aggiungevano dettagli sfarzosi alla storia per destare meraviglia tra il pubblico
4) è una strofa riempitiva secondo lo schema della ripetizione tipico delle ballate popolari (vedi)
5) un passaggio un po’ brusco inerente il settimo guardacaccia lasciato in vita, anche se malconcio issato sul cavallo e liberato perchè fosse un testimone di quanto accaduto

SECONDA VERSIONE: Johnny the Brine

La versione è quella della traveller Jeannie Robertson un po’ più rielaborata nelle strofe finali.
ASCOLTA Sam Lee

ed ecco l’intervista filmanta dallo stesso Sam Lee in merito alla trasmissione orale della ballata all’interno della famiglia Robertson


I
Johnny arose one May morning
Called water to wash his hands
“so bring to me my twa greyhounds
They are bound in iron bands, bands
They are bound in iron bands”
II
Johnny’s wife she wrang her hands –
“To the greenwoods dinnae gang
for the sake o’ the venison
To the greenwoods dinnae gang, gang
To the greenwoods dinnae gang”
III
Johnny’s gane up through Monymusk
And doon some scroggs
And there he spied a young deer leap
She was lying in a field of scrub, scrub
She was lying in a field of scrub
IV
The first arrow he fired
It wounded her on the side
And between the water and the wood
His greyhounds laid her pride, pride
His greyhounds laid her pride
V
Johnny and his two greyhounds
Drank so much blood
That Johnny an his two greyhounds
They fell sleeping in the wood, wood
They fell sleeping in the wood
VI
By them came a fool old man
And an ill death may he dee
he went up and telt the forester
And he telt what he did lie, lie
And he telt what he did lie
VII
“If that be young Johnny of the Brine
then let him sleep on (1)”
but the seventh forester denied (2)
he was Johnny’s sister’s son, son
“To the greenwood we will gang”
VIII
The first arrow that they fired
wounded him upon the thigh,
And the second arrow that they fired
his heart’s blood blinded his eye, eye
his heart’s blood blinded his eye
IX
Johnny rose up wi’ a angry growl
For an angry man was he –
“I‘ll kill a’ you six foresters
And brak the seventh one’s back in three, three, three
And brak the seventh one’s back in three”
X
He put his foot all against a stane
And his back against a tree
An he’s kilt a’ the six foresters
And broke the seventh one’s back in three,
and he broke his collar-bone
An he put him on his grey mare’s back
For to carry the tidings home, home
For to carry the tidings home
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e domandò dell’acqua per lavarsi le mani “Allora portatemi i miei due levrieri, sono legati con catene di ferro
sono legati con catene di ferro”
II
La moglie di Johnny si torse le mani
“Al bosco non andare
per amor della caggiagione
al bosco non andare, andare
al bosco non andare”
III
Johnny è andato per il Monymusk,
in mezzo alla boscaglia
e lì vide una giovane cerva
distesa nella macchia, macchia
distesa nella macchia
IV
La prima freccia scoccata
la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i suoi levrieri presero la preda, la preda
i suoi levrieri presero la preda
V
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
bevvero così tanto sangue
Johnny e i suoi due levrieri
si addormentarono nel bosco, bosco
si addormentarono nel bosco
VI
Presso di loro venne un vecchio pazzo,
che peste lo colga,
e andò a chiamare i guardacaccia
per dire dove (John) dormiva, dormiva
per dire dove lui dormiva.
VII
“Se quello è il giovane Johnny of the Brine allora che riposi in pace” eccetto il settimo dei guardacaccia  che li rimproverò, era il figlio della sorella di Johnny, il figlio “e al bosco andremo”
VIII
La prima freccia che tirarono
lo ferì alla coscia, e la seconda freccia che tirarono, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio, il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
IX
Johnny si alzò con un urlo straziante
perchè era un uomo pieno di rabbia
“Ucciderò tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre, tre, tre
e spezzerò la schiena del settimo in tre”
X
Mise un piede contro la pietra
e la schiena contro l’albero
e uccise tutti i sei guardacaccia
e spezzò la schiena del settimo in tre,
e gli ruppe la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso della sua cavalla grigia
per portare la notizia a casa, casa
per portare la notizia a casa

NOTE
1) l’intendo dei guardiaboschi è di cogliere Johnny nel sonno perchè non si risvegli mai più
2) sono tutti daccordo a tendere l’imboscata mentre il bracconiere dorme indifeso, tranne il settimo guardacaccia, il quale li rimprovera, in alcune versioni si dice che nemmeno un lupo avrebbe attaccato un uomo inerme 

TERZA VERSIONE: Johnny O’Breadislee

ASCOLTA Hamish Imlach
ASCOLTA Old Blind Dogs in “Five” 1997


I
Johnny arose on a May mornin’
Gone for water tae wash his hands
He hae loused tae me his twa gray dogs
That lie bound in iron bands
II
When Johnny’s mother, she heard o’ this
Her hands for dule she wrang
Cryin’, “Johnny, for yer venison
Tae the green woods dinna ye gang”
III
Aye, but Johnny hae taen his good benbow
His arrows one by one
Aye, and he’s awa tae green wood gaen
Tae dae the dun deer doon
IV
Oh Johnny, he shot, and the dun deer lapp’t
He wounded her in the side
Aye, between the water and the wood
The gray dogs laid their pride
V
It’s by there cam’ a silly auld man
Wi’ an ill that John he might dee
And he’s awa’ doon tae Esslemont
Well, the King’s seven foresters tae see
VI
It’s up and spake the first forester
He was heid ane amang them a’
“Can this be Johnny O’ Braidislee?
Untae him we will draw”
VII
An’ the first shot that the foresters, they fired
They wounded John in the knee
An’ the second shot that the foresters, they fired
Well, his hairt’s blood blint his e’e
VIII
But he’s leaned his back against an oak
An’ his foot against a stane
Oh and he hae fired on the seven foresters
An’ he’s killed them a’ but ane
IX
Aye, he hae broke fower o’ this man’s ribs
His airm and his collar bain
Oh and he has sent him on a horse
For tae carry the tidings hame
X
Johnny’s good benbow, it lies broke
His twa gray dogs, they lie deid
And his body, it lies doon in Monymusk
And his huntin’ days are daen
His huntin’ days are daen
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Johnny si alzò un mattin di maggio
e andò al fiume per lavarsi le mani
aveva liberato per me i suoi due levrieri  legati con catene di ferro.
II
Quando la madre di Johnny seppe di ciò
si torse le mani dal dispiacere
gridando “Johnny per la tua cacciagione al bosco non andare”
III
Ma Johnny ha preso il suo buon arco ricurvo,
le sue frecce una ad una
ed è andato nel folto del bosco
per catturare una cerva bruna laggiù
IV
Johnny tirò e la cerva bruna diede un balzo
e la ferì al fianco
e tra il fiume e il bosco
i levrieri presero la preda
V
Nei pressi venne un povero vecchio
in animo che John dovesse morire,
ed è uscito da Esslemont
per vedere i sette guardacaccia
del Re
VI
Saltò su a parlare il primo guardacaccia
era il capitano di tutti loro
“Potrebbe essere Johnny O’ Braidislee? Andremo da lui!”
VII
E il primo colpo che i guardacaccia tirarono
colpirono Johnny al ginocchio
e al secondo che i guardacaccia tirarono il sangue del suo cuore gli schizzò nell’occhio
VIII
Appoggiò la schiena contro una quercia e un piede contro
la pietra
e tirò a tutti e sette i guardacaccia
uccidendoli tutti tranne uno
IX
Aveva rotto quattro delle costole di quell’uomo
il suo braccio e la clavicola
e lo mise sul dorso del cavallo
per portare la notizia a casa
X
Il buon arco di Johnny è rotto
i suoi due levreieri sono morti
e il suo corpo giace nel Monymusk
i giorni della caccia sono finiti
i giorni della caccia sono finiti


FONTI
http://www.mostly-medieval.com/explore/johnie.htm
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch114.htm
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=9398
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/johnnyobredislee.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/johnny.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/johnobre.html
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2014/11/23/johnnie-o-breadisley/

Galway city vs Ettrick Highway

Adrien Henri Tanoux (1865-1923) Spanish Lady

“Spanish lady” è il titolo di una canzone popolare diffusa in Irlanda, Inghilterra, e Scozia riconducibile sicuramente al 1700.
La canzone è estremamente popolare a Dublino e per il suo tono scanzonato e allegro è una tipica canzone da pub anche se non si parla affatto di alcool!
Tuttavia la Bella Spagnola cambia indirizzo a seconda della città da cui proviene la canzone, abbiamo così versioni da Galway, ma anche da Belfast, Chester e dalla Scozia

GALWAY CITY

Questa versione si configura più propriamente come un “contrasto amoroso” con botta e risposta anche allusivi. Il modello è “Madam, I am come to court you“. Per la verità la bella in questione non è mai espressamente appellata come “Dama Spagnola”, ma la melodia è la stessa della “Spanish Lady” popolare a Dublino 
(prima parte)

 

The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem in “Isn’t It Grand Boys” 1966


I
As I walked out through Galway City
at the hour of 12 at night,
Whom should I spy but a handsome lassie, combing her hair by candlelight?
(He:)”Lassie, I have come a-courting,
your kind favors for to win,
And if you’d but smile upon me,
next Sunday night I’ll call again.”
Chorus: A raddy up a toorum, toorum, toorum, raddy up a toorum dey (bis)
II
(She:) “So to me you came a-courting,
my kind favors for to win,
But ‘twould give me the greatest pleasure
if you never did call again.
What would I do, when I go walking,
walking out in the morning dew?
What would I do when I go walking,
walking out with a lad like you?”
III
(He:) Lassie, I have gold and silver.
Lassie, I have houses and land.
Lassie, I have ships on the ocean.
They’ll be all at your command.”
(She:) What do I want with your gold and silver?
What do I want with your houses and land?
What do I want with your ships on the ocean? All I want is a handsome man.”
IV
(He:) “Did you ever see the grass in the morning, all bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie,
diamonds sparkling in her hair?”
(She:) “Did you ever see a copper kettle, mended with an old tin can (2)?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie
married off to an ugly man?
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
 Mentre camminavo per Galway
a mezzanotte,
chi vidi mai, se non una bella fanciulla
che si pettinava i capelli a lume di candela?
(lui)”Fanciulla sono venuto per corteggiarvi
e ottenere la vostra amabile grazia
e se invece vorrete deridermi,
la prossima Domenica sera riproverò di nuovo.”
Coro: A raddy up a toorum, toorum, toorum, raddy up a toorum dey
II
(lei) “Così siete venuto per corteggiarmi
e ottenere i miei favori,
ma non mi rendereste una grande grazia 
se non mi chiamerete di nuovo.
Cosa dovrei fare, mentre vado a passeggiare, a passeggiare nella rugiada del mattino?
Cosa dovrei fare, mentre vado a passeggiare, a passeggiare con un giovanotto come voi?”
III
(lui) “Fanciulla ho oro e argento,
ho case e terra, fanciulla
ho navi in mare,
sarà tutto a vostro comando”
(lei) “Cosa m’importa dell’oro e dell’argento? (1) Cosa m’importa delle vostre case e terre?
Cosa m’importa delle vostre navi in mare?
Ciò che voglio è un bell’uomo”
IV
(lui) “Avete mai visto l’erba al mattino,
tutta adornata da gemme rare?
Avete mai visto una bella fanciulla
con i diamanti che scintillano tra i capelli? “
(lei) “Avete mai visto un paiolo di rame,
riparato con un vecchio barattolo di latta? (2) Avete mai visto una bella fanciulla
sposarsi con un uomo sgradevole?”

NOTE
1) versi tipici delle gypsy ballads
2) il paragone non è privo di allusioni sessuali

ETTRICK LADY

La versione è una riscrittura di Galway City

The Corries


I
As I gang doon the Et(t)rick (1) Highway
at the hour o’ 12 at night;
What should I spy but a handsome lassie, combin’ her hair by candlelight.
First she combed it, then she brushed it;
Tied it up wi’ a velvet band;
Ne’er hae I seen such a handsome lassie
all up an’ doon ov’r all Scotland!
Chorus:
Fallah-tallah rhu-dhumma, rhu-dhum, rhu-u-dhum;
Fallah-tallah rhu-dhumma, rhu-dhum-day!
II
He:) Lassie, I hae come a-courting,
your kind favors for to win;
And if you’d but smile upon me,
next Sunday night I’ll call again.
(She:) So to me you came a-courting,
my kind favors for to win;
But ‘twould give me the greatest pleasure
if you never would call again!
What would I do, when I go walking,
walking out in the Ettrick view;
What would I do when I go walking,
walkin’ oot wi’ a laddie like you?
III
(He:) Lassie, I hae gold and silver,
lassie I hae houses and land
Lassie, I hae ships on the ocean,
they’ll a’ be at you’r command.
(She:) What do I care for your gold and silver,
what do I care for your houses and land?
What do I care for your ships on the ocean?;
When all I want is a handsome man!
IV
(He:) Did you ever see the grass in the morning,
all bedecked with jewels rare?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie,
diamonds sparkling in her hair?
(She:) Did you ever see a copper kettle,
mended up wi’ an old tin can?
Did you ever see a handsome lassie
married up tae an ugly man?
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
 Mentre camminavo per la strada di Ettrick 
a mezzanotte,
chi vidi mai, se non una bella fanciulla
che si pettinava i capelli a lume di candela?
Prima li pettinava e poi li spazzolava
e poi li legava con un nastro di velluto
non ho mai visto una ragazza così bella
in tutta la Scozia!
Coro:
Fallah-tallah rhu-dhumma, rhu-dhum, rhu-u-dhum;
Fallah-tallah rhu-dhumma, rhu-dhum-day!

II
(lui)”Fanciulla sono venuto per corteggiarvi e ottenere la vostra amabile grazia;
e se invece vorrete deridermi,
la prossima Domenica sera riproverò di nuovo.”
(lei) “Così siete venuto per corteggiarmi
e ottenere i miei favori,
ma non mi rendereste una grande grazia 
se non mi chiamerete di nuovo.
Cosa dovrei fare, mentre vado a passeggiare, a passeggiare nell’Ettrick ?
Cosa dovrei fare, mentre vado a passeggiare, a passeggiare con un giovanotto come voi?”
III
(lui) “Fanciulla ho oro e argento,
ho case e terra, fanciulla
ho navi in mare,
sarà tutto a vostro comando”
(lei) “Cosa m’importa dell’oro e dell’argento?
Cosa m’importa delle vostre case e terre?
Cosa m’importa delle vostre navi in mare?
Ciò che voglio è un bell’uomo”
IV
(lui) “Avete mai visto l’erba al mattino,
tutta adornata da gemme rare?
Avete mai visto una bella fanciulla
con i diamanti che scintillano tra i capelli? “
(lei) “Avete mai visto un paiolo di rame,
riparato con un vecchio barattolo di latta?
Avete mai visto una bella fanciulla
sposarsi con un uomo sgradevole?”

NOTE
1) La zona intorno al fiume Ettrick (Scozia) è ricca di riferimenti letterari a cominciare dal poeta James Hogg (1770-1835) noto con il nome di “Ettrick Shepherd”; nelle Ettrick forest sono ambientate molte delle ballate più antiche e magiche della Scozia

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44796

The winter it is past by Robert Burns

The ballad “The winter it is past” is spread throughout Ireland and more generally also in the British Isles, although with several titles: The Lamenting Maid, Winter’s Gone And Past, The Irish Lovers, The love-sick maid. The story told is no longer easily reconstructed through the various textual references, we can broadly say that it is the lament of a young woman, for having been abandoned by her lover. The printed textual versions date back to 1765 (The love-sick maid) and the 20’s of 1800, the Scottish one reported by Robert Burns is dated 1788.
La ballata “The winter it is past” (L’inverno è trascorso”) è diffusa in tutta Irlanda e più in generale anche nelle Isole Britanniche, seppure identificata con diversi titoli: The Lamenting Maid, Winter’s Gone And Past, The Irish Lovers, The love-sick maid.
La vicenda narrata non è più ben ricostruibile attraverso i vari riferimenti testuali, possiamo a grandi linee dire che si tratta del lamento di una giovane donna, per essere stata abbandonata dal suo innamorato.

Le versioni testuali stampate risalgono al 1765 (The love-sick maid ) e agli anni 20 del 1800, quella scozzese riportata da Robert Burns è datata 1788.

The Princess Out of School di Edward Robert Hughes
The Princess Out of School, Edward Robert Hughes

The Air

Robert Louis Stevenson

ROBERT BURNS VERSION

ritratto di Robert BurnsRobert Burns’s version published in the “Scots Musical Museum” is an adaptation of the ballad printed in a broadside of 1765 titled “The love-sick maid” in which Burns eliminates the reference to Kildare’s Curragh . Scholars believe that the 2nd stanza was written entirely by the poet, while the I and III strophes are already reported in the aforementioned ballad.
La versione riportata da Robert Burns e pubblicata nello “Scots Musical Museum” (vedi) è un adattamento della ballata stampata in un broadside del 1765 “The love-sick maid” in cui Burns elimina il riferimento al Curragh di Kildare.
Gli studiosi ritengono che la II strofa sia stata scritta interamente dal poeta, mentre la I e la III strofa sono già riportate nella ballata citata.

The Corries

Eddi Reader in”Eddi Reader Sings The Songs Of Robert Burns Deluxe Edition”. 2003

Billy Ross

Robert Burns 1788
I
The winter it is past,
and the summer’s come at last,
And the small birds sing on ev’ry tree;
The hearts of these are glad,
but mine is very sad,
For my Lover has parted from me.
II
The rose upon the briar,
by the waters running clear,
May have charms for the linnet or the bee;
Their little loves are blest
and their little hearts at rest,
But my Lover is parted from me.
III
My love is like the sun,
in the firmament does run,
For ever constant and true;
But his is like the moon
that wanders up and down,
And every month it is new.
IV
All you that are in love
and cannot it remove,
I pity the pains you endure:
For experience makes me know
that your hearts are full of woe,
A woe that no mortal can cure.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ora l’inverno è trascorso
e l’estate è finalmente arrivata
e gli uccellini cantano su ogni albero,
i loro cuori sono allegri
mentre il mio è molto triste
perchè il mio amante mi ha lasciato.
II
Le rose tra i rovi
presso le acque che scorrono limpide,
portano gioia al fanello e all’ape:
i loro piccoli amori sono benedetti
e i loro piccoli cuori sono lieti
mentre il mio amante mi ha lasciato.
III
Il mio amore è come il sole
che nel firmamento fa la gara
per dimostrare sempre costanza e fedeltà;
ma il suo (amore) è come la luna,
che vaga su e giù
e ad ogni mese è nuova.
IV
Tutti voi che siete innamorati
e non potete farne a meno,
compatisco il dolore che sopportate,
l’esperienza mi ha insegnato
che i vostri cuori sono pieni di dolore,
un dolore che nessun mortale può curare.

LINK
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-200,-page-208-the-winter-it-is-past.aspx
http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erWIIP.htm
http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erCK.htm

Sweet Tibbie Dunbar

TEXT: Robert Burns
It is not known whether the verse was written by the bard or whether it is a song collected from popular sources. He sent it to Johnson in 1789 for publication in the SMM. Jim McLean on Mudcat states that in 1966 he added an additional stanza for the Dubliners registration. Further verses also in Allan Cunningham in The Songs of Scotland, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 2, (London: John Taylor, 1825).
TUNE: “Johnny McGill”
Better known for being used also in “Come under my plaidie“. If the melody is of Irish or Scottish origint is still discussing; on the Scottish side it is attributed to John McGill, a Girvan violinist
TESTO: Robert Burns
non è dato sapere se il verso sia stato scritto dal bardo o si tratti di una canzone collezionata da fonti popolari. La inviò nel 1789 a Johnson per la pubblicazione nello SMM.  Jim McLean su Mudcat precisa di aver aggiunto nel 1966 un’ulteriore strofa per la registrazione dei Dubliners. Ulteriori versi anche in Allan Cunningham in The Songs of Scotland, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 2, (Londra: John Taylor, 1825).

MELODIA: “Johnny McGill”,
meglio conosciuta per essere utilizzata anche in “Come under my plaidie“. E’ ancora aperta la discussione se la melodia sia di origini irlandesi o scozzesi; sul versante scozzese viene attribuita a John McGill, violinista di Girvan

A jolly beggar song

A young wander asks a beautiful (and rich) girl to leave her family to marry him and follow him in his life wandering, promising her true love in return. In Scottish folk ballads the proposal is a test and the beggar is actually a Lord who wants to know the true feelings of the girl see more
Un giovane vagabondo chiede ad una bella (e ricca) fanciulla di lasciare la sua famiglia per sposarlo e seguirlo nella sua vita raminga, promettendole in cambio il vero amore. Nelle ballate popolari scozzesi la proposta è un test e il mendicante è in realtà un Lord che vuole conoscere i veri sentimenti della fanciulla.. vedi

The Corries

Ewan MaColl in Songs of Robert Burns

Alastair McDonald in Robert Burns: Scotland’s First Superstar, Vol. 1

The Dubliners

Bob n Along & Mick O’connor

Caprice, Girdenwodan part 1, 2012 (Chorus, I)


chorus
O wilt thou go wi’ me, sweet Tibbie Dunbar
O wilt thou go wi’ me, sweet Tibbie Dunbar
Wilt thou ride on a horse, or be drawn in a cart
Or walk by my side, sweet Tibbie Dunbar
I
I care na thy daddie,
his land or his money
I care na thy kin,
sae high and sae lordly
But say that thou’lt hae me
for better or waur
And come in your coatie(1),
sweet Tibbie Dunbar
II (additional verses by Jim McLean)
I offer you naethin’ in siller or land
What man could determine
the price o’ your hand
But gie me your consent
we’d be richer by far
O wilt thou go wi’ me (2),
sweet Tibbie Dunbar
III
O wilt thou be known (3)
as a poor beggar’s lady
And sleep in the heather well
wrapt in my plaidie (4)
The sky for a roof
and your candle a star
My love for a fire, (5)
sweet Tibbie Dunbar 
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Verrai con me bella Tibbie Dunbar?
Verrai con me bella Tibbie Dunbar?
Verrai a cavallo o portata in carrozza,
o camminerai al mio fianco bella Tibbie Dunbar?
I
Non mi importa di tuo padre,
della sua terra e dei suoi soldi,
non mi importa dei tuoi parenti
così altolocati,
ma dimmi che mi prenderai,
nel bene e nel male
e verrai così come sei,
bella Tibbie Dunbar.
II
Non ti offro argento o terre
quale uomo può determinare
il prezzo della tua mano?
Ma dammi il tuo assenso
e saremo di gran lunga i più ricchi.
Verrai con me
bella Tibbie Dunbar?
III
Vuoi diventare
la sposa di un povero vagabondo
e dormire all’aria aperta
avvolta nel mio mantello,
il cielo come tetto
e le stelle come candele,
il mio amore per un fuoco,
bella Tibbie Dunbar?

NOTE
english translation here
1) “come in your coat”=come as you are. The theme of a disapproving father, with, ‘his lands and his money’, features in several Burns poems. Robbie married Jean Armor in the spring of 1788, regularizing their union started in 1784; he had made the girl pregnant in 1786 but had not married her, arguing with her father who considered him a penniless poet: his parents were poor tenants and even Rabbie’s affairs never went well.
“come in your coat”=letteralmente: “vieni nella tua giacca” cioè l’uomo la esorta “prendi la tua giacchetta e andiamo” da intendersi “vieni così come sei”. Il tema di un padre contrario, con “le sue terre e il suo denaro”, è presente in diverse poesie di Burns: Robbie sposa Jean Armour nella primavera del 1788 regolarizzando la loro unione iniziata nel 1784, aveva messo incinta la ragazza nel 1786 ma non l’aveva sposata, litigando con il padre di lei che lo considerava un poeta spiantato: i suoi genitori erano dei poveri fittavoli e anche gli affari di Rabbie non andarono mai bene.
2) or “Oh walk by me side”
3) or “Oh wilt thou become”
4) or “rolled up in my plaidie” it is the Scottish plaid that is worn as a skirt-cloak by day and becomes a warm blanket for the night in the moor
[il plaid scozzese che era indossato come gonna-mantello di giorno e diventava una calda coperta per il bivacco notturno]
5) or “our love for your fire”

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/bonie-jeane.htm
http://museu.ms/collection/object/55894?pUnitId=1134&pDashed=volume-iii-song-207-page-216-tibbie-dunbar-scanned-from-the-1853-edition-of-the-scots-musical-museum
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/t/tibbiedu.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27566

The Battle of Sherramoor [la battaglia di Sheriffmuir]

From “Drums of Autumn” of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon chapter 4.
In the future Roger sings many popular airs at the Celtic Festival in New England (Outlander Season 4, episode 3)
“”…a bodhran,” Roger was saying. The drum was no more than a wooden hoop, a few inches wide, with a skin head stretched over it, some eighteen inches across. He held the drum balanced on the fingers of one hand, a small double-headed stick in the other. “One of the oldest known instruments, this is the drum with which the Celtic tribes scared the bejesus out of Julius Caesar’s troops in 52 BC.” The audience tittered, and he touched the wide drumhead with the stick, back and forth in a soft, quick rhythm like a heartbeat. 
“And here’s ‘The Sheriffmuir Fight,’ from the first Jacobite Rising, in 1715.”
..”…then on they rushed, and blood out-gushed, and many a puke did fall, man… They hacked and hashed, while broadswords clashed…” ” 
[In “Tamburi d’Autunno” della saga “La Straniera” di Diana Gabaldon, capitolo 4.
Nel futuro Roger canta molti brani popolari al Festival Celtico nel New England (Outlander stagione 4, terzo episodio)
un bodhran” stava dicendo Roger. Il tamburo non era più che un anello di legno di pochi centimetri su cui era tesa una pelle larga due spanne. Lui lo teneva bilanciato sulle dita di una mano, con un bastoncino dalla doppia estremità nell’altra. “Questo è uno dei più antichi strumenti conosciuti: il tamburo con cui le tribù celtiche fecero prendere una strizza tremenda alle truppe di Giulio Cesare nel 52 avanti Cristo” Il pubblico ridacchiò, e lui sfiorò il tamburo con la mazza, avanti e indietro, in un ritmo rapido e sommesso, come un battito cardiaco. “Ed ecco a voi “The Sheriffmuir Fight, dalla prima sommossa giacobita, nel 1715

Several ballads have been written about the battle of Sheriffmuir, but there are two main versions: Robert Burns version and Robert Tannahill pro-Jacobite version.
Sono state scritte diverse ballate sulla battaglia di Sheriffmuir, ma due sono le versioni principali:  quella di Robert Burns e quella pro-giacobita di Robert Tannahill

180px-John-Erskine-11th
John-Erskine Lord Mar

The claims to the throne of “the Old Pretender” (James Francis Edward Stuart) broke at the Battle of Sheriffmuir of November 13, 1715, which ended essentially with a stalemate (apart from so many deaths)- with jacobites forces commanded by Lord Mar.
Le rivendicazioni al trono di Giacomo Stuart “Il vecchio Pretendente” si infransero nella Battaglia di Sheriffmuir il 13 novembre 1715, che si concluse in sostanza con un nulla di fatto (a parte tanti morti) – con l’esercito giacobita comandato da Lord Mar.
The Old Pretender” arrived on board a French ship in December, founding his cause desperate, he fled to France: Mar’s army dispersed and the revolt ended. In 1717 a general pardon was granted under the “Act of Grace” to all the Highlanders who participated in the insurrection. 
Il Vecchio Pretendente arrivò a bordo di una nave francese in dicembre, trovò la sua causa disperata e fuggì in Francia: l’esercito di Mar si disperse e la rivolta finì. Nel 1717 venne concesso, con l’”Act of Grace” un generale perdono a tutti gli Highlanders che parteciparono all’insurrezione.

Sherramuir Fight : O, cam ye here the fight to shun

Robert Burns wrote his version of the Battle on the melody “The Cameronian Rant” (aka “The Camerons’ March” or ” The Cameronian Kant,”) when he toured the Highlands in 1787 and first published in The Scots Musical Museum, 1790: two shepherds meet on a hill and discuss who won the battle of Sherra-moor (Sheriffmuir).
Robert Burns scrive la sua versione della Battaglia sulla melodia “The Cameronian Rant”, quando visitò le Highlands nel 1787 che fu pubblicata la prima volta nello Scots Musical Museum del 1790: due pastori si incontrano su una collina e discutono su chi abbia vinto la battaglia di Sherra-moor (Sheriffmuir).

The Highland clans had flocked in large numbers but the battles were not always won with brute force and abundance of men: while there were those who had men between both sides, there were also those who remained to watch without taking part in the battle; the Scots do not want to admit it, but the battle was a defeat (in the series when a commander knows no terrain, tactics and enemy).
I clan delle Highlands erano accorsi in grande numero ma non sempre le battaglie vengono vinte con la forza bruta e l’abbondanza di uomini: mentre c’erano quelli che avevano uomini tra entrambi gli schieramenti, c’erano anche quelli che restarono a guardare senza prendere parte alla battaglia; gli Scozzesi non vogliono ammetterlo, ma la battaglia fu una sconfitta (della serie quando un comandante non conosce terreno, tattiche e nemico).

At the fall of darkness both armies returned to their respective camps, and the following day the Highlanders retreated to Perth and the government forces commanded by the Duke of Argyle, returned to Stirling.
Al cadere dell’oscurità entrambi gli eserciti tornarono ai rispettivi accampamenti, e il giorno seguente gli Highlanders si ritirarono verso Perth e i governativi, comandati dal Duca di Argyle, tornarono a Stirling. 


Jacobite Rising 1715 : Sheriffmuir, Perthshire

Clanadonia

The Corries live

Jean Redpath in Songs of Robert Burns Vols 1&2

Jamie McMenemy


I.
‘O, cam ye here the fight to shun,
Or herd the sheep wi’ me, man?
Or were ye at the Sherra-moor,
Or did the battle see, man?’
‘I saw the battle, sair and teugh,
And reekin-red ran monie a sheugh;
My heart for fear gae sough for sough,
To hear the thuds, and see the cluds
O’ clans frae woods in tartan duds,
Wha glaum’d at kingdoms three (1), man.”
CHORUS
Huh! Hey dum dirrum hey dum dan
Huh! Hey dum dirrum dey dan.
Huh! Hey dum dirrum hey dum dandy
Hey dum dirrum dey dan.
II.
‘The red-coat lads wi’ black cockauds (2)
To meet them were na slaw, man:
They rush’d and push’d and bluid outgush’d,
And monie a bouk did fa’, man!
The great Argyle (3) led on his files,
I wat they glanc’d for twenty miles;
They hough’d the clans like nine-pin kyles,
They hack’d and hash’d, while braid-swords clash’d,
And thro’ they dash’d, and hew’d and smash’d,
Till fey men died awa, man.
III.
‘But had ye seen the philibegs
And skyrin tartan trews, man,
When in the teeth they daur’d our Whigs (4)
And Covenant (5)  trueblues, man!
In lines extended lang and large,
When baig’nets o’erpower’d the targe,
And thousands hasten’d to the charge (6),
Wi’ Highland wrath they frae the sheath
Drew blades o’ death, till out o’ breath
They fled like frighted dows, man!’
IV.
‘They’ve lost some gallant gentlemen,
Amang the Highland clans, man!
I fear my Lord Panmure (7) is slain,
Or in his en’mies’ hands, man.
Now wad ye sing this double fight
Some fell for wrang, and some for right,
But monie bade the world guid-night:
Say, pell and mell, wi’ muskets’ knell
How Tories fell, and Whigs to Hell
Flew off in frighted bands, man!’
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto*
I
“Sei venuto qui per sfuggire alla battaglia
o per accudire le pecore con me, amico?
Oppure eri a Sheriffmuir
e hai visto la battaglia, amico?”
“Ho visto la battaglia, amara e dura
e il puzzo del sangue spargersi nei fossi;
il mio cuore tremava di paura
nell’ascoltare i colpi e nel vedere l’annuvolarsi
tra i boschi dei clan in tartan
a sfidare i Tre Regni, amico “
Coro
Huh! Hey dum dirrum hey dum dan
Huh! Hey dum dirrum dey dan.
Huh! Hey dum dirrum hey dum dandy
Hey dum dirrum dey dan.
II
“Le giubbe rosse con coccarde nere
ad incontrarli non erano restii, amico:
essi si precipitavano e spingevano e il sangue scorreva copioso/ e molti corpi caddero, amico!
Il grande Argyle conduceva le sue file
(avranno attraversato più di venti miglia)
essi colpirono i clan come birilli,
li fecero a pezzi e li sbudellarono mentre le grandi spade si scontravano,/ si dibattevano, tagliavano e fracassavano/ finchè gli uomini predestinati morirono, amico.”
III
“Ma avevi visto i kilt/ e i pantaloni in tartan dagli sgargianti colori, amico,
quando mostrarono i denti ai Whigs 
ai Covenanti e ai Lealisti, amico!
Allineati su un ampio fronte
quando le baionette e gli scudi abbandonarono
e a migliaia si affrettarono alla carica 
con l’ira degli Highlands, che dal fodero
sguainarono le lame mortali, a perdifiato/ gli altri scapparono come piccioni timorosi, amico”
IV
“Hanno perduto dei galantuomini valorosi
tra i clan delle Highlands.
Temo che il mio Lord Panmure sia morto
o in mano ai suoi nemici.
E’ tempo di cantare questo duplice scontro,
alcuni caddero a torto e altri a ragione,
ma molti diedero la buonanotte al mondo:
alla rinfusa, con le fiammate dei moschetti
dicci come i Conservatori caddero e i Whigs volarono dritti all’inferno in bande spaventate”

NOTE
english translation 
french translation
*La versione originaria ha due ulteriori strofe prima del finale, che però non essendo più cantate al giorno d’oggi, non mi sono data la pena di tradurre.
1) the crown of England, Scotland and Ireland [la corona d’Inghilterra, Scozia e Irlanda]
2) The cockade pinned to the hat is an eighteenth-century fashion and was worn as a symbol of loyalty to a certain ideology, or even as an indication of social status (and more often part of a servant’s uniform). In Britain the white cockade indicated the Jacobites, while the government ones wore the black or blue cockade.
[La coccarda appuntata sul cappello è una moda del Settecento ed era indossata come simbolo della fedeltà a una certa ideologia, o anche come indicazione di status sociale (e più spesso parte della divisa di un servitore). In Gran Bretagna la coccarda bianca indicava i giacobiti mentre i governativi indossavano la coccarda nera o blu.]
3)  John Campbell, Duke of Argyll (British Government) [John Campbell, II duca di Argyll, comandante in campo delle forze governative]
4) Tories and Whigs are the two opposing parties in the English parliament,  Whigs, it is a word of probable Scottish origin, perhaps with the meaning of marauder, or perhaps it comes from “whig”, sour milk, it was certainly an insult that in 1600 addressed this political current but remained stuck as a label in the following centuries. It does not seem to me the case to go to distinguish between the subtle or more substantial divergences between the two parties, but to underline that it was the Whigs who unconditionally supported the new dynasty inaugurated with the election of King George I of Hannover. [Tories e Whigs sono i due partiti opposti nel parlamento inglese (Conservatori e Liberali)
 Whigs, è una parola di probabile origine scozzese, forse col significato di predone, o forse viene da “whig”, latte acido, di certo era un insulto che nel 1600 si rivolgeva a questa corrente politica ma rimase appiccicato come un etichetta nei secoli successivi. Non mi sembra il caso di andare a distinguere tra le sottili o più sostanziali divergenze tra i due partiti, quanto sottolineare che furono i Whigs ad appoggiare incondizionatamente la nuova dinastia inaugurata con l’elezione di Re Giorgio I di Hannover.]
5) The Covenanters were a Scottish Presbyterian movement during the 17th century. They derived their name from the word covenant meaning a band, legal document or agreement, with particular reference to the Covenant between God and the Israelites in the Old Testament [Covenante era il nome dato agli scozzesi presbiteriani che si ricollegavano direttamente al patto di alleanza biblico (tra Dio e il popolo d’Israele). Le riunioni in aperta campagna vennero denominate “conventicles” e considerate illegali passibili di pena capitale.]
6) see Highland charge The use of the scottish charge greatly resembled older Celtic fighting styles of battle in which one side would rush at the other in an attempt to break the line of battle [gli scozzesi andavano così in battaglia: la famosa carica degli highlanders consisteva nel correre verso la schiera dei nemici, sparare il colpo di moschetto alla distanza di tiro del nemico, creando una cortina di fumo, liberarsi di moschetto, cinturone e plaid, e procedere nella carica urlando come ossessi e brandendo minacciosamente la grande spada (con i lembi della camicia che svolazzano sul culo nudo). Il kilt un tempo era infatti più che altro una lunga coperta drappeggiata introno ai fianchi e trattenuta da una cintura anzichè da una fibbia. vedi
7) James Maule, 4th Earl of Panmure (1658 -1723) had been a Privy councillor to James II/VII whom he continued to support when the latter was in exile. He was an early supporter of the Jacobite cause. James Maule encouraged rebellion and the return of the King by signing a letter suggesting the country would rise to support him (1707). From the Mercat Cross at Brechin, he proclaimed James Francis Edward Stuart, the ‘Old Pretender’ as King James VIII (1715) and went on to fight at the battle of Sherrifmuir in November of the same year. He was captured but escaped, with his younger brother Henry, via Arbroath to the Continent the following year. This resulted in the forfeiture of the Panmure title and estates; indeed it is said that the gates of Panmure House have not been opened since. Maule was honoured by the Old Pretender and followed him to Avignon (1716) and then Rome (1717).
He died of pleurisy in Paris, still in exile having twice refused the opportunity of reconciliation with the British government. Source: Wikipedia
[James Maule, quarto conte di Panmure (1658 -1723) era stato consigliere privato di Giacomo II / VII, che continuò a sostenere quando quest’ultimo era in esilio. Fu un primo sostenitore della causa giacobita. James Maule incoraggiò la ribellione e il ritorno del Re firmando una lettera che suggeriva che il paese si sarebbe ribellato per sostenerlo (1707). Dalla Mercat Cross a Brechin, ha proclamato James Francis Edward Stuart, il “Vecchio Pretendente” come Re Giacomo VIII (1715) e ha continuato a combattere nella battaglia di Sherrifmuir nel novembre dello stesso anno. Fu catturato ma riuscì a fuggire, con il fratello minore Henry, attraverso Arbroath fino al continente l’anno seguente. Ciò ha comportato la confisca del titolo e delle proprietà di Panmure; in effetti si dice che le porte di Panmure House non siano state aperte da allora. Maule fu tenuto in grande rispetto dal Vecchio Pretendente e lo seguì ad Avignone (1716) e poi a Roma (1717). Morì di pleurite a Parigi, ancora in esilio avendo rifiutato due volte l’opportunità di riconciliazione con il governo britannico]

Sheriffmuir : They Ran and We Ran 

The song, as arranged by The McCalmas, consists of two parts, the first part is titled “We ran and they ran” and it is attributed by Burns to Rev. Murdoch M’Lellan; the tune of “We ran and they ran” is said by Hogg to have been anciently called “She’s yours, she’s yours, she nae mair ours,” or more recently “John Paterson’s mare”.
The second part takes some stanzas (the first two and the last) from the “Dialogue between Will Lickladle and Tam Cleancogue” (a broadside by John Barclay-1734, 1798), as reported by J. Ritson’s in “Scotish Songs”, volume II, p.67 (class III, N ° 17), 1794 and by James Hogg in “Jacobite Relics” Volume II N ° 2 page 6, 1821 (which was the starting material for the Burns version)
La canzone così come arrangiata dai McCalmas si compone di due parti, la prima parte s’intitola “We ran and they ran” ed è attribuita da Burns al Rev. Murdoch M’Lellan; la melodia secondo Hogg era anticamente intitolata “She’s yours, she’s yours, she nae mair ours,” ovvero la più recente “John Paterson’s mare”.
La seconda parte invece riprende alcune strofe (le prime due e l’ultima) del “Dialogue between Will Lickladle and Tam Cleancogue” (un foglio volante di John Barclay), così come riportato da J. Ritson’s in “Scotish Songs”, volume II, p.67 (class III, N°17), 1794 e da James Hogg in “Jacobite Relics” Volume II N°2 page 6, 1821 (che costituì il materiale di partenza per la versione scritta da Burns)

The McCalmans in ‘Side By Side By Side’ 1977


[First Part: We ran and they ran]
I.
There’s some say that we wan
and some say that they wan
And some say that nane wan at a’ man
But one thing is sure that at Sheriff Muir
A battle was fought on that day, man
Chorus
And we ran and they ran
and they ran and we ran

And we ran and they ran
awa’ man

II.
Now Trumpet McLean whose breeks
were not clean (1)
By misfortune did happen tae fa’ man
By saving his neck his trumpet did break
He came off without music at a’ man
And we ran and they ran …
III.
Whether we wan or they wan
or they wan or we wan
Or if there was winnin’ at a’ man
There’s nae man can tell save our brave general
Wha first began runnin’ awa’ man
And we ran and they ran…
[Second part]
IV. (Will)
Pray come ye here the fight tae shun
or keep the sheep wi’ me man
Or was you at the Sheriffmuir
and did the battle see man
Pray tell which o’ the parties won,
for weel I know I saw them run
Both south and north when they began
Tae pell (2) and mell and kill and fell
wi’ muskets snell and pistols knell
And some tae hell did flee man
V. (Tam)
But my dear Will I kenna still
which o’ the twa did lose man
For weel I know they had good skill
tae set upon their foes man.
The Redcoats they are trained you see
the Highland clans disdain tae flee
Wha then shall gain the victory?
But the Highland race, all in a brace,
with a swift pace, to the Whigs’ disgrace,
Did put to chase their foes, man
VI. (Will)
But Scotland has not much to say
for such a fight as this is
For baith did fight baith ran away;
the devil take the misses,
For every soldier was not slain
that ran that day and was nae ta’en
Either flying from or to Dunblane (3):
For fear of foes that they should lose the bowls of brose all crying woes
Yonder them goes d’ye see man
There’s no one knows who’s wan man (4)
And we ran and they ran 
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Prima Parte
I
Alcuni dicono che vincemmo
e altri dicono che essi vinsero
e altri ancora che nessuno vinse del tutto, amico/ Ma una cosa è certa, che a SheriffMuir
una battaglia fu combattuta quel giorno, amico
Coro
E noi correvamo e loro correvano
e loro correvano e noi correvamo
E noi correvamo e loro ..
scappavano, amico!
II
McLean il trombettiere i cui pantaloni 
non erano puliti
ebbe la sfortuna di cadere, amico
e per salvarsi il collo, ruppe la sua trombetta,
ne venne fuori senza musica del tutto, amico
E noi correvamo e loro correvano
III
Che noi vincemmo o loro vinsero,
o essi vinsero o noi vincemmo
se ci fosse stato un vincitore, amico
nessuno può dirlo, tranne il nostro bravo generale, che per primo iniziò a scappare, amico/ E noi correvamo e loro correvano
[seconda parte] 
IV -Will
“Ti prego dimmi sei venuto qui per sfuggire alla la battaglia o per accudire le pecore con me, amico?/ Oppure eri a Sheriffmuir
e hai visto la battaglia, amico?
Ti prego dimmi quali delle due parti ha vinto, perchè so bene di averli visti correre sia a Sud che a Nord quando iniziarono, alla rinfusa, a uccidere e a cadere con la fiammata dei moschetti e il rintocco delle pistole
e alcuni volarono dritti all’inferno, amico
V -Tom
Ma mio caro Will, non riesco ancora a capire chi dei due abbia perso, amico
Per quanto mi riguarda, so che erano bravi
ad attaccare i loro nemici, amico
le Giubbe Rosse sono addestrate 
e i clan delle Highland sdegnano la fuga.
Chi allora otterrà la vittoria?
Ma la carica degli Highlands in coppia a passo veloce e disonore ai Whigs,
che i misero a inseguire i loro nemici, amico
VI -Will
Ma la Scozia non ha molto da dire
per un combattimento del genere
perchè entrambi combatterono e  entrambi fuggirono e il diavolo si prese i dispersi,
per ogni soldato non ucciso
che corse quel giorno e non fu catturato  volando da o verso Dunblane
per paura dei nemici che dovranno perdere
le ciotole del porridge tutti piangendo guai
laggiù vanno, hai visto, amico?
Nessuno sa chi vinse, amico
E noi correvamo e loro correvano

NOTE
french translation
1) breeks= trousers si insinua che “l’abbia fatta nei pantaloni”
2) to pell= To beat or strike violently, to thump
3) Sheriff-muir is situated in the parish of Dunblane, Perthshire, near the Ochil hills
4) i versi del broadside sono diversi:
When Whig and Tory, in their fury
Strove for glory, to our sorrow,
This sad story hush is. 

LINK
http://digital.nls.uk/1715-rising/songs/will-ye-go-tae-sheriffmuir/index.html
http://www.contemplator.com/scotland/sheriffmur.html

https://burnsscotland.wordpress.com/2012/05/18/friday-gem-the-battle-of-sherra-moor-2/
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=7898

http://data.historic-scotland.gov.uk/pls/htmldb/f?p=2500:15:0::::BATTLEFIELD:17
https://thesession.org/tunes/284
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/sheramui.htm
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/s/sheriffm.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/s/sherramu.html
http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/29309/

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Book_of_Scottish_Song/Battle_of_Sheriff-Muir_1

Bonny Lass of Fyvie

soldierThree titles for a ballad: Bonny Lass of Fyvie in Scotland, Pretty Peggy of Derby in England and Pretty Peggy-o in America. Francis James Child considers all the “Peggy ballads” (and its variants “Fen (n) ario”) as part of the Trooper and Maid theme: a genre that dates back at least to the 1600s about the meeting of a night between a soldier and a girl before he leaves for war; usually it is the girl who takes the initiative, while the handsome soldier is evasive on the later, and especially after the word marriage; in this context instead, a young captain of dragons falls madly in love with a local beauty, who rejects him because her mother does not consider him a good match.
Tre titoli per una ballata: Bonny Lass of Fyvie in Scozia, Pretty Peggy of Derby in Inghilterra e Pretty Peggy-o in America.  Francis James Child ritiene tutte le “ballate di Peggy” (e le sue varianti “Fen(n)ario”) come facenti parte del ramo di Trooper and Maid: un genere che risale quantomeno al 1600 e ha come tema l’incontro di una notte tra un soldato e una fanciulla prima che lui parta per la guerra; di solito è la ragazza a prendere l’iniziativa, mentre è il bel soldatino a essere evasivo sul dopo, e specialmente davanti alla parola matrimonio; in questo contesto invece, un giovane capitano dei dragoni si innamora perdutamente di una bellezza locale, la quale lo respinge perchè la madre non lo ritiene un buon partito.

THE MAID OF FIFE or FYVIE?

In the Scottish version of the ballad the captain is a dragon of the Irish Royal Guard, a cavalry regiment established in the British Army in 1685. The story comes from the Aberdeenshire, with precise references to locations near Inverurie. In other versions the girl is from Fife, a county that is located further down the coast in the Tay and Forth fjord.
The first printed version of the ballad dates back to 1794 and the girl rejects the suitor because he is only a young cadet without land and inheritance; in other versions she instead becomes a “soldier maid” (or “a sodger lass” in scottish) and follows him with the rearguard.
Nella versione scozzese della ballata il capitano è un dragone della Guardia Reale Irlandese, un reggimento di cavalleria istituito nella British Army nel 1685. La collocazione della vicenda è riconducibile all’Aberdeenshire (la punta del naso della sagoma a testa di cane con la quale per semplicità si identifica il territorio della Scozia), con precisi riferimenti a località nei pressi di Inverurie. In altre versioni la ragazza è del Fife una contea che si trova invece più sotto lungo la costa nel fiordo di Tay e di Forth.
La prima versione in stampa della ballata risale al 1794 e la ragazza respinge il corteggiatore perchè è solo un giovane cadetto senza terra e eredità; in altre versioni lei diventa invece una “soldier maid” (o per dirla alla scozzese una sodger lass) e lo segue con la retroguardia.

March version (la versione marcetta con cornamuse e tamburi)

Curiously it was the Irish arrangements of Clancy Brother and Dubliners to become a standard and to popularize the song at the folk music circuits.
Curiosamente sono stati gli arrangiamenti irlandesi  dei Clancy Brother e dei Dubliners a diventare uno standard e a divulgare la canzone presso i circuiti della musica folk.

The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem (I, VII, II, VIA, VIII,  XI, XII, VII)

The Dubliners (I, II, VIA, VIII, XI, XII)

To the listening of the most exquisitely “Scottish” pronunciation, here is a series of Scottish groups!
Per passare però all’ascolto della pronuncia più squisitamente “scottish” ecco una serie di gruppi scozzesi

The Corries

Gaberlunzie (I, VII, II, VII, VIA, VII, VIII, VII, XI, XII, VII)

Amurnaidh (Glasgow duo: Jim Graham & Kevin Robertson) (I,  II, VIA, VIII, X, XI)

Here is a different ending in which the girl decides to follow the handsome captain
Old Blind Dogs in New Tricks 1992 (stanzas I, II, VIB, VIII, XI, VII, XII) the first formation with the voice and guitar of Ian F. Benzie, Jonny Hardie (violin), Buzzby McMillan (cittern and bass) (the three original founders of the group) Carmen Higgins (violin) and the percussions of Dave Francis and Davy Cattanach
per finire con un finale diverso in cui  la ragazza decide di seguire il bel capitano
Old Blind Dogs  in New Tricks 1992 (strofe I, II, VIB, VIII, XI, VII, XII) la prima formazione con la voce e chitarra di Ian F. Benzie , Jonny Hardie (violino), Buzzby McMillan (cittern e basso) (i tre originari fondatori del gruppo) a cui si unirono Carmen Higgins (violino) e le percussioni di Dave Francis e Davy Cattanach

The many stanzas of the ballad are mostly reduced to seven in the standard versions.
Le molte strofe della ballata sono per lo più ridotte a sette nelle versioni standard.


I
There once was a  troop
of Irish dragoons
Come mairchin’ doon
through Fyvie(1) O
The captain’s fa’en in love
wi’ a very bonnie quine(2)
Her name that she had
was pretty Peggy O
II
“Ah come runnin’ doon the stairs, pretty Peggy, my dear (x2)
Come runnin’ doon the stairs
an’ tie back yer yellow hair
Tak’ a last fareweel tae yer daddie O (3)
III
For it’s I’ll buy ye ribbons (love)
an’ I’ll buy ye rings
I’ll buy ye necklaces o’ lammer (4) O
I’ll buy ye silken goon(5)
for tae clead  ye up an’ doon (6)
If ye’d just come doon
intae ma chamber O (6 bis)”
IV
What would your mother think
if she heard the guineas clink
And saw the haut-boys
marching all before you o

O little would she think gin she heard the guineas clink
If I followed a soldier laddie-o
V
“Well, I’ll hae nane o’ yer ribbons,
I’ll hae nane o’ yer rings
An’ nane o’ yer necklaces o’ lammerO
An’ as for silken goon,
I will never put it on
An’ I never will enter yer chamber O”
VIA
I never did intend a soldier’s wife for to be,
I never will marry a soldier-O,
I never did intend to go to a foreign land.
A soldier will never enjoy me, O
VIB
Well, it’s braw, it’s braw
a captain’s lady for tae be
It’s braw tae be a captain’s lady O
Braw tae rine and rant (7),
aye tae follow wi’ the camp
Oh an’ march when yer captain, he is ready O
VII (8)
There’s mony a bonnie lass
in the howe (9) o’ Auchterless (10)
An’ mony a bonnie lassie
in the Gearie(11) O
There’s mony a bonnie Jean
in the toon o’ Aberdeen
But the flo’er o’ them a’
bides in Fyvie O
VIII
Well, the colonel, he cries,
“Mount, boys, mount, boys, mount”

And the captain, he cries, “Tarry O
Tarry for a while,
just anither day or twa
For tae see if the bonnie lass
will marry O”
IX
“I’ll drink nae mair
o’ yer guid claret wine
I’ll drink nae mair
o’ yer glasses O
For the morn is the day
that I maun  ride away
Wi’ adieu tae ye, Fyvie lassies O”
X
Twas in the early morning,
when we marched awa
And O but the captain he was sorry-o
The drums they did beat
a merry brasselgeicht (12)
And the band played
the bonnie lass of Fyvie, O
XI
An’ it’s syne e’er we got (cam’ up)
tae Old Meldrum toon (13)

Oor captain we had for tae carry O
An’ syne e’er we got (cam’ up)
intae bonnie Aberdeen (14)

Oor captain we had for tae bury O
XII
It’s green grow the birks
on Bonnie Ythan side (15)
And low lie the Lowlands o’ Fyvie O
Oor captain’s name was Ned,
an’ he’s died for a maid
He’s died for the sodger lass(16) o’ Fyvie O
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era una volta una truppa
di Dragoni Irlandesi
che marciava
verso Fyvie o.
Il capitano si innamorò
di una ragazza molto graziosa
che si chiamava
la bella Peggy -o.
II
“Scendi di corsa le scale
bella Peggy mia cara
scendi di corsa le scale
e tirati indietro i capelli biondi
e dai l’ultimo addio a tuo padre o (3).
III
Perchè ti comprerò nastri
e ti comprerò anelli
e ti comprerò  collane d’ambra o,
ti comprerò abiti d’argento
per andare a spasso
se tu solo verrai
nella mia camera”
IV
“Che potrebbe pensare tua madre
se sentisse tintinnare le ghinee
e vedesse tutti i soldati
marciare dietro di te”
“Non troverebbe da ridire se sentisse
tintinnare le ghinee
e io seguissi un soldato o”
V
“Non voglio i tuoi nastri,
e non voglio i tuoi anelli,
e nemmeno le collane d’ambra,
e per quanto riguarda il vestito d’argento
non lo metterò mai,
e mai entrerò nella tua camera”
VIA
Non ci penso proprio ad essere la moglie di un soldato, non sposerò mai un soldato o
Non ci penso proprio di andare in una terra straniera, un soldato non mi piacerà mai o
VIB
E’ bello oh si è proprio bello
essere la signora del capitano,
E’ bello essere la signora del capitano o
bello urlare e strepitare,
al seguito delle salmerie
oh e marciare quando il capitano è pronto o .
VII
Ci sono molte belle ragazze
nella valle di Auchterless
e più di una bella ragazza
nel Garioch o
ci sono molte belle Jean
nella città di Aberdeen
ma il fiore di tutte loro
cresce a Fyvie o.
VIII
Il colonnello grida
“In sella ragazzi, in sella”
e il capitano grida ” Rimandate
rimandate per un momento
solo un altro giorno o due,
per vedere se sposerò
la bella ragazza”
IX
“Non berrò più
del tuo vino rosso,
non berrò più
dai tuoi bicchieri o
perchè domani è il giorno
che devo andare via,
e dirti addio, ragazza del Fyvie. o”
X
Era mattino  presto
quando marciammo via
e oh il capitano era triste o
i tamburi suonavano
un allegro motivetto
e la banda suonava
the bonnie lass of Fyvie, O
XI
E quando arrivammo
alla vecchia città di Meldrum
il nostro capitano dovemmo trasportare
e quando arrivammo
nella bella Aberdeen
il nostro capitano dovemmo seppellire,
XII
Rigogliose crescevano le betulle
sulle rive del bel Ythan
vicino alle Lowlands del Fyvie O.
Il nostro capitano si chiamava Ned
ed è morto per una fanciulla
è morto per la ragazza-soldato del Fyvie O

NOTE
1) Fyvie is a town in Aberdeenshire and was a mandatory stop on the military road from Aberdeen to Fort George on the Moray Firth.
Fyvie è un paese nell’Aberdeenshire ed era una tappa obbligatoria sulla strada militare da Aberdeen a Fort George sul Moray Firth.
2) or lass; quine = quean is a Scottish term for a young unmarried girl, a girl. As an old term it assumes a derogatory character to refer to a shrew or a disreputable woman
oppure lass; quine=quean è un termine scozzese per una giovane fanciulla non sposata, una ragazza. Come termine arcaio nella lingua inglese assume un carattere dispregiativo per riferirsi a una bisbetica o una donna poco raccomandabile
3) or”Bid a long farewell to your Mammy-O”
4) amber
5) or petticoat; gown
6) or “with flounces to the knee”
6 bis) or ” If you’ll convey me doon to your chamber-o”
7) or ”  to ride around”;  rant and rave= tipica espressione scozzese
8) the verse often becomes a refrain la strofa diventa spesso un ritornello
9) or glen; howe = Scottish for a basin or a valley (from hole = hole)
 howe= termine scozzese che indica un bacino o una valle (da buco= hole)
10) Auchterless is a village in Aberdeenshire Auchterless è un villaggio nell’ Aberdeenshire
11) also written as “Garioch” (Gearie) is the land west of Inverurie between Benachie and Oldmeldrum
scritto anche come “Garioch” (Gearie) è la terra a ovest di Inverurie tra Benachie e Oldmeldrum
12) someone translates brasselgeicht = noisy road; the verse also appears written with much more sense: “The drums they did beat o’er the bonnie braes or ‘Gight”
qualcuno traduce brasselgeicht=noisy road; il verso compare anche scritto con molto più senso: “The drums they did beat o’er the bonnie braes o’ Gight”
13) Oldmeldrum is a village in the Formartine not far from Inverurie; in the teatuale version of the Old Blind Dogs the country becomes Bethelnie; or the sentence becomes “Long time we came to the glen of Auchterlass”
Oldmeldrum è un villaggio nel Formartine non lontano da Inverurie; nella versione teatuale dei Old Blind Dogs il paese diventa Bethelnie; oppure la frase diventa “Long ere we came to the glen of Auchterlass”
14) or And long ere we won into the streets of Aberdeen
15)  Ethanside
16) sodger lass = girl-soldier: the Malinky left the title even if the girl didn’t follow the handsome captain. In other versions it is a “chamber maid” or “the bonny lass”
sodger lass= ragazza-soldato: i Malinky hanno lasciato l’appellativo anche se la ragazza non ha seguito il bel capitano. In altre versioni è una “chamber maid” oppure “the bonny lass”

LINK
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/308.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/handsomepolly.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/malinky/bonnie.htm http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/oldblinddogs/bonnielass.htm http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_fyvie.htm

American versions: Peggy O, Fennario