Archivi tag: Susan Craig Winsberg

Belle Dame sans Merci, by John Keats in music and film

Leggi in italiano

John Melhuish Strudwick

In 1819 the English poet John Keats reworked the figure of the “Queen of Faerie” of Scottish ballads (starting with Tam Lin and True Thomas) in turn writes the ballad “La Belle Dame sans Merci”, giving rise to a theme that has become very popular among the Pre-Raphaelite painters, that of the vamp woman who has however already a consideration in the beliefs of folklore: the
Lennan or leman shee – Shide Leannan (literally fairy child) that is the fairy who seeks love between humans. The fairy, who is both a male and a female being, after having seduced a mortal abandons him to return to his world. The lover is tormented by the love lost until death.
Fairy lovers have a short but intense life. The fairy who takes a human as lover is also the muse of the artist who offers talent in exchange for a devout love, bringing the lover to madness or premature death.
The title was paraphrased from a fifteenth-century poem written by Alain Chartier (in the form of a dialogue between a rejected lover and the disdainful lady) and became the figure of a seductive woman, a dark lady incapable of feelings towards the man the which falls prey to its spell. We are in reverse of the much older theme of “Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight

John William Waterhouse – La Belle Dame sans Merci (1893)

THE SEASONS OF THE HEART

In the ballad there are two seasons, spring and winter: in spring among the meadows in bloom, the knight meets a beautiful lady, a forest creature, daughter of a fairy, who enchants him with a sweet lullaby; the knight, already hopelessly in love, puts her on the saddle of his own horse and lets himself be led docilely in the Cave of the Elves; here he is cradled by the dame, who sighs sadly, and he dreams of princes and diaphanous kings who cry out their slavery to the beautiful lady.
On awakening we are in late autumn or in winter and the knight finds himself prostrate near the shore of a lake, pale and sick, certainly dying or with no other thought than the song of the fairy.
The keys to reading the ballad are many and each perspective increases the disturbing charm of the verses

There are two pictorial images that evoke the two seasons of the heart and ballad, the first – perhaps the most famous painting – is by Sir Frank Dicksee, (dated 1902): spring takes the colors of the English countryside with the inevitable roses in the first plan; the lady has just been hoisted on the fiery steed of the knight and with her right hand firmly holding the reins, with the other hand she leans against the saddle to be able to lean towards the beautiful face of the knight and whisper a spell; the knight, in precarious balance, is totally concentrated on the face of the lady and kidnapped.

caitiffknight
Sir Frank Dicksee La Belle Dame sans merci

The second is by Henry Meynell Rheam (painted in 1901) all in the tones of autumn, which recreates a desolate landscape wrapped in the mist, as if it were a barrier that holds the knight prostrate on the ground; while he dreams of pale and evanescent warriors (blue is a typical color to evoke the images of dreams) that warn him, the lady leaves the cave perhaps in search of other lovers.

Curiously, the armors of the two knights are very similar, but both are not really medieval and more suitable for being shown off in tournaments that on the battlefields. Elaborate and finely decorated models date back to the end of the fifteenth century.

Henry Meynell Rheam La Belle Dame sans merci

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: a “live action short” by Hidetoshi Oneda

The ballad could not fail to inspire even today’s artists, here is a cinematic story a “live action short” directed by the Japanese Hidetoshi Oneda. The short begins with giving body to the imaginary interlocutor who asks the knight “O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms …” so we find ourselves in 1819 on an island after the shipwreck of a ship and we witness the meeting between the castaway and an old decrepit kept alive by regret ..

THE PLOT (from here) 1819. The Navigator and the Doctor survive a shipwreck only to find themselves lost in a strange forest. The Navigator is challenged by the gravely ill Doctor into pursuing his true passion – art. While he protests, the ailing Doctor dies. Later, the Navigator is beside a lake, where he finds an Old Knight who tells him his story: once, he encountered a mysterious Lady, and fell in love with her. But horrified by her true form – an immortal spirit and the ghosts of her mortal lovers – the Young Knight begged for release. Awoken and alone, he realized his failure. Thus he has waited, kept alive for centuries by his regret. The Navigator considers his own crossroads. What will he be when he returns to the world?

La Belle Dame Sans Merci by Hidetoshi Oneda – 2005

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI IN MUSIC

The first to play the ballad was Charlse Villiers Stanford in the nineteenth century with a very dramatic arrangement for piano but a bit dated today, although popular in his day.
The ballad was put into music by different artists in the 21st century.

Susan Craig Winsberg from La Belle Dame 2008

Jesse Ferguson

Giordano Dall’Armellina from “Old Time Ballads From The British Isles” 2007

Penda’s Fen (Richard Dwyer)

Loreena McKennitt from “Lost Souls” 2018

POETIC READING
 Ben Whishaw

I
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge is wither’d from the lake(1),
And no birds sing.
II
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrel’s granary is full,
And the harvest ‘s done.
III
I see a lily(2) on thy brow thy
With anguish moist and fever dew;
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.’
IV
I met a lady in the meads,
Full beautiful — a faery’s child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild(3).
V
I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She look’d at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan.
VI
I set her on my pacing steed
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sideways would she lean, and sing
A faery’s song(4).
VII
She found me roots of relish sweet
And honey wild and manna(5) dew,
And sure in language strange she said,
“I love thee true (6)
VIII
She took me to her elfin grot(7),
And there she wept and sigh’d fill sore(8);
And there I shut her wild, wild eyes
With kisses four.
IX
And there she lullèd me asleep,
And there I dream’d — Ah! woe betide!
The latest dream I ever dream’d
On the cold hill’s side.
X
I saw pale kings and princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried – “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”
Hath thee in thrall!”
XI
I saw their starved lips in the gloam
With horrid warning gapèd wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
On the cold hill’s side.
XII
And this is why I sojourn here
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is wither’d from the lake,
And no birds sing.’

NOTES
1) not by chance the landscape is lacustrine, the waters of the lake are beautiful but treacherous, but it is a desolate landscape and more like the swamp
2) the lily is a symbol of death. The knight’s brow of a deadly pallor is bathed in the sweat of fever and the color of his face is as dull as a dried rose. The symptoms are those of the consumption: the always mild fever does not show signs of diminution, turns on two “roses” on the cheeks of the sick. It is also said that Keats was a toxic addict to the use of nightshade that in the analysis of Giampaolo Sasso (The secret of Keats: The ghost of the “Belle Dame sans Merci”) is represented in the Lady Without Mercy
3) the whole description of the danger of the lady is concentrated in the eyes, they are as wild but also crazy. The rider ignores the repeated signs of danger: not only the eyes but also the strange language and the food (honey wild)
4) the elven song leads the knight to slavery
5) the manna is a white and sweet substance. It is well known that those who eat the food of fairies are condemned to remain in the Other World
6) the fairy is expressed in a language incomprehensible to the knight and then in reality could have said anything but “I love you”; yet the language of the body is unequivocal, at least as far as sexual desire is concerned
7) the elf cave is the Celtic otherworldly (see more)
8) why the fairy is sorry? Would not want to annihilate the knight but can not do otherwise? Does she know that a man’s love is not eternal and that sooner or later his knight will leave her with a breaking heart? Is love inevitably destructive?

LA BELLA DAMA SENZA PIETA’

To the disquieting fascination of the ballad could not escape Angelo Branduardi the Italian Bard, the final part of the melody of each stanza takes the traditional English song “Once I had a sweetheart.”

Angelo Branduardi from La Pulce d’acqua 1977


Guarda com’è pallido
il volto che hai,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
Vedo nei tuoi occhi
profondo terrore,
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…
Guarda come stan ferme
le acque del lago
nemmeno un uccello che osi cantare…
“è stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai
e come se mi amasse lei mi guardò”.
Guarda come l’angoscia
ti arde le labbra,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
“E`stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai…”
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…

“Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò
io l’anima le diedi ed il tempo scordai.
Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò…”.
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Al limite del monte
mi addormentai
fu l’ultimo mio sogno
che io allora sognai;
erano in mille e mille di più…”
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Erano in mille
e mille di più,
con pallide labbra dicevano a me:
– Quella che anche a te
la vita rubò, è lei,
la bella dama senza pietà”.

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: GERMAN VERSION

Faun from “Buch Der Balladen” 2009.


“Was ist dein Schmerz, du armer Mann,
so bleich zu sein und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt?”
“Ich traf ein’ edle Frau am Rhein,
die war so so schön – ein feenhaft Bild,
ihr Haar war lang, ihr Gang war leicht,
und ihr Blick wild.Ich hob sie auf mein weißes Ross
und was ich sah, das war nur sie,
die mir zur Seit’ sich lehnt und sang
ein Feenlied.Sie führt mich in ihr Grottenhaus,
dort weinte sie und klagte sehr;
drum schloss ich ihr wild-wildes Auf’
mit Küssen vier.
Da hat sie mich in Schlaf gewiegt,
da träumte ich – die Nacht voll Leid!-,
und Schatten folgen mir seitdem
zu jeder Zeit.Sah König bleich und Königskind
todbleiche Ritter, Mann an Mann;
die schrien: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci
hält dich in Bann!”Drum muss ich hier sein und allein
und wandeln bleich und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt.”
English translation (from here)
“What ails you, my poor man,
that makes you pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard (1)?”
“I met a noble lady on the Rhine,
so very fair was she – a fairy vision,
her hair was long, her gait was light,
and wild her stare.I lifted her on my white steed
and nothing but her could I see,
as she leant by my side and sang
a song of the fairies.She led me to her cave house
where she cried and wailed much;
so I closed her wild deer eyes (2)
with four kisses of mine.
She lulled me to sleep then,
and I dreamt a nightlong song!
and shadows follow me since
be it day or night (3).I saw a pale king and his son
knights pale as death, face to face;
who cried out: “The fair lady without mercy
has you in her spell!”Thus shall I remain here alone
to wander, pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard”


NOTES
1) lit “(where) no bird sings”
2) I assume it’s “Aug(en)” instead of “Auf'”
3) the original says “all the time” but I opted for (hopefully) more colorful English

LINK
http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/belle.html http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/k/keats/john/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/
http://noirinrosa.wordpress.com/tag/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/ http://zerkalomitomania.blogspot.it/search/label/Belle%20Dame%20sans%20Merci
http://www.celophaine.com/lbdsm/lbdsm_top.html
http://www.craigrecords.com/recordings/la-belle-dame/

SEA LONGING (AN IONNDRAINN MHARA)

Una melodia tradizionale dalle Isole Ebridi della collezione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser. Il titolo si traduce in italiano come “Desiderio del mare”: si tratta di una particolare nostalgia del mare, un inappagabile struggimento, tipica delle creature fatate provenienti dal mare. Questo sentimento è un topico della letteratura fantasy richiamata anche dal “padre” del genere: “It is said by the Eldar that in water there lives yet the echo of the Music of the Ainur more than in any substance else that is in this Earth; and many of the Children of Iluvatar hearken still unsated to the voices of the Sea, and yet know not for what they listen. “(The Silmarillion, Tolkien) Nell’oceano risuona ancora la voce primigenia che ha creato il mondo, la quale attira le creature fatate e in particolare gli Elfi molto sensibili verso la musica, essendo ottimi musicisti. Oltre il Mare ci sono le Terre Imperiture, il Reame Beato (ovvero l’altromondo celtico.)
Nel cuore di tutti gli (elfi) Esuli la nostalgia del Mare era un inguaribile tormento; nell’animo dei Grigi Elfi un’inquietudine latente, che una volta destata non poteva essere più placata.” (Appendice F, A proposito degli Elfi) Così scrive Tolkien descrivendo lo stato d’animo degli Elfi lontani dalla loro Terra Madre; questo “richiamo del mare” è ben presente nella musica celtica delle Isole dalla Scozia.

Il brano non è molto conosciuto, in pratica l’unica versione che si trova in rete è quella raccolta da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser ma molto rielaborata. Possiamo presumere si tratti del canto di una selkie,  costretta a vivere in forma umana. Secondo la leggenda bastava rubare e nascondere la pelle della foca mentre era mutata in fanciulla danzante sugli scogli, la creatura del mare si sarebbe trasformata in una docile e servizievole moglie…

selkie_by_annie_stegg600_450

Una bella versione strumentale quella di Susan Craig Winsberg nel Cd La Belle Dame (1999)
ASCOLTA Susan Craig Winsberg

E per chi piace la musica classica la rielaborazione sinfonica di Sir Granville Bantock

ASCOLTA Lisa Milne (soprano), Sioned Williams (arpa) in Land of Heart’s Desire. Nelle note si legge: “The air was collected by Mrs Kennedy-Fraser and her daughter Patuffa from Anne Monk of Benbecula but the accompaniment is by Sir Granville Bantock. The words are described as ‘an old fragment’ adapted and translated by Kenneth Macleod”

ASCOLTA Kenneth McKellar su Spotify


Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Sore sea-longing in my heart
Glides the sun, but ah! how slowly,
Far away to luring seas!
Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Hear’st, O Sun, the roll of waters,
Breaking, calling by yon Isle?
Sore sea-longing in my heart,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Sore sea-longing in my heart.
Sun on high, ere falls the gloamin’,
Heart to heart, thou’lt greet yon waves.
Mary Mother(1), how I yearn,
Blue deep Barra waves are calling,
Mary Mother, how I yearn.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Nostalgia del mare nel cuore
le onde oltremare di Barra chiamano,
Nostalgia del mare nel cuore
sfugge il sole ma oh si piano,
per adescare il mare!
Nostalgia del mare nel cuore
le onde oltremare di Barra chiamano,
Nostalgia del mare nel cuore,
Senti oh Sole le onde del mare, che si frangono e chiamano dalla lontana Isle?
Nostalgia del mare nel cuore
le onde oltremare di Barra chiamano,
Nostalgia del mare nel cuore.
Sole supremo ecco scende il crepuscolo,
cuore contro cuore, andrai a salutare quelle onde,
madre Maria(1), che struggimento,
le onde oltremare di Barra chiamano,
madre Maria, che struggimento!

NOTE
1) probabilmente Bride la dea che veniva chiamata Maria in una sorta di sincretizzazione con la religione cristiana

Viccy Wanliss  composizione strumentale

APPROFONDIMENTO DEL MITO: SCHEDA continua

FONTI
http://www.craigrecords.com/recordings/la-belle-dame/
http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/sea-longing-0
http://inkpot.com/classical/bantocksyms.html

La Belle Dame sans Merci

Read the post in English

John Melhuish Strudwick

Nel 1819 il poeta inglese John Keats rielaborando la figura della “Queen of Faerie” delle ballate scozzesi (a partire da Tam Lin e True Thomas) scrive a sua volta la ballata “La Belle Dame sans Merci”, (la bella dama senza pietà) dando origine a un tema diventato molto popolare tra i pittori Pre-Raffaelliti, quello della donna vamp (la femme fatale) che ha però già un corrispettivo nelle credenze del folklore la
Lennan o leman shee – Shide Leannan (letteralmente fata bambino) cioè la fata che cerca l’amore tra gli umani. La fata, che è un essere sia di genere maschile che femminile, dopo aver sedotto un mortale lo abbandona per ritornare nel suo mondo. L’amante si tormenta per l’amore perduto fino alla morte.
Gli amanti delle fate hanno una vita breve, ma intensa. La fata che prende come amante un umano è anche la musa ispiratrice dell’artista che offre il talento in cambio di un amore devoto, portando l’amante alla follia o a una morte prematura.
Il titolo è stato parafrasato da un poemetto del XV secolo scritto da Alain Chartier (in forma di dialogo tra un amante respinto e la dama sdegnosa) ed è diventato la cifra di una donna seduttrice, una dark lady incapace di sentimenti verso l’uomo il quale cade preda del suo incantesimo. Siamo all’inverso del tema ben più antico di “Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight” (vedi)

John William Waterhouse – La Belle Dame sans Merci (1893)

LE STAGIONI DEL CUORE

Nella ballata ci sono due stagioni la primavera e l’inverno: in primavera tra i prati in fiore, il cavaliere incontra una dama bellissima, creatura del bosco, figlia di una fata, che lo incanta con una dolce nenia; il cavaliere, già perdutamente innamorato, la mette in sella al proprio destriero e si lascia condurre docilmente nella Grotta degli elfi; qui viene cullato dalla fanciulla, che sospira tristemente, e sogna di principi e re diafani i quali gridano la loro schiavitù verso la bella dama.
Al risveglio siamo nel tardo autunno o nell’inverno e il cavaliere si ritrova prostrato presso la riva di un lago, pallido e malato, certamente morente o senza altro pensiero che il canto della fata.
Le chiavi di lettura della ballata sono moltissime e ogni prospettiva accresce il fascino inquietante dei versi.

Due sono le immagini pittoriche che evocano le due stagioni del cuore e della ballata, la prima – forse il dipinto più famoso- è di Sir Frank Dicksee, (datato 1902): la primavera prende i colori della campagna inglese con le immancabili rose in primo piano; la dama è stata appena issata sul focoso destriero del cavaliere e con la mano destra tiene saldamente le redini, con l’altra mano si appoggia alla sella per potersi chinare verso il bel viso del cavaliere e sussurrare un incantesimo; il cavaliere, in precario equilibrio, è totalmente concentrato sul volto della dama e come rapito.

caitiffknight
Sir Frank Dicksee

Il secondo è di Henry Meynell Rheam (dipinto nel 1901) tutto nei toni dell’autunno, il quale ricrea un paesaggio desolato avvolto nella bruma, come se fosse una barriera che tiene prigioniero il cavaliere prostrato a terra; mentre egli sogna di pallidi e evanescenti guerrieri (l’azzurro è un colore tipico per evocare le immagini dei sogni) che lo mettono in guardia, la dama lascia la grotta forse in cerca di altri amanti.

Curiosamente le armature dei due cavalieri sono molto simili, ma entrambe non propriamente medievali e più adatte ad essere sfoggiate nei tornei che non indossate nei campi di battaglia. Modelli elaborati e finemente decorati risalgono alla fine del XV secolo.

Henry Meynell Rheam

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: IL FILMATO

La ballata non poteva non ispirare anche gli artisti di oggi, ecco un racconto cinematografico un “live action short” diretto dal giapponese Hidetoshi Oneda. Lo short inizia con il dare corpo all’interlocutore immaginario che domanda al cavaliere ” O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms..” cosi ci troviamo nel 1819 su un isola dopo il naufragio di una nave e assistiamo all’incontro tra il naufrago e un vecchio decrepito tenuto in vita dal rimpianto..

LA STORIA (tratto da qui) 1819. The Navigator and the Doctor survive a shipwreck only to find themselves lost in a strange forest. The Navigator is challenged by the gravely ill Doctor into pursuing his true passion – art. While he protests, the ailing Doctor dies. Later, the Navigator is beside a lake, where he finds an Old Knight who tells him his story: once, he encountered a mysterious Lady, and fell in love with her. But horrified by her true form – an immortal spirit and the ghosts of her mortal lovers – the Young Knight begged for release. Awoken and alone, he realized his failure. Thus he has waited, kept alive for centuries by his regret. The Navigator considers his own crossroads. What will he be when he returns to the world?

La Belle Dame Sans Merci di Hidetoshi Oneda – 2005

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI IN MUSICA

Il primo a musicare la ballata fu Charlse Villiers Stanford nell’Ottocento con un arrangiamento per piano molto drammatico ma un po’ datato oggi, anche se popolare ai suoi tempi.
La ballata è stata messa in musica da diversi artisti nel XXI secolo.

Susan Craig Winsberg in La Belle Dame 2008

Jesse Ferguson

Giordano Dall’Armellina in “Old Time Ballads From The British Isles” 2007

Penda’s Fen (Richard Dwyer)

Loreena McKennitt in “Lost Souls” 2018

LA LETTURA POETICA
dalla voce di Ben Whishaw

versi in italiano


I
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge is wither’d from the lake(1),
And no birds sing.
II
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrel’s granary is full,
And the harvest ‘s done.
III
I see a lily(2) on thy brow thy
With anguish moist and fever dew;
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.’
IV
I met a lady in the meads,
Full beautiful — a faery’s child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild(3).
V
I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She look’d at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan.
VI
I set her on my pacing steed
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sideways would she lean, and sing
A faery’s song(4).
VII
She found me roots of relish sweet
And honey wild and manna(5) dew,
And sure in language strange she said,
“I love thee true (6)
VIII
She took me to her elfin grot(7),
And there she wept and sigh’d fill sore(8);
And there I shut her wild, wild eyes
With kisses four.
IX
And there she lullèd me asleep,
And there I dream’d — Ah! woe betide!
The latest dream I ever dream’d
On the cold hill’s side.
X
I saw pale kings and princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried – “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”
Hath thee in thrall!”
XI
I saw their starved lips in the gloam
With horrid warning gapèd wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
On the cold hill’s side.
XII
And this is why I sojourn here
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is wither’d from the lake,
And no birds sing.’
traduzione italiano M Roffi
I
Che mai ti cruccia, o cavaliere armato,
solo e pallido errante?
Giace prostrato il giunco in riva al lago(1),
né uccello canta.
II
Che mai ti cruccia, o cavaliere armato,
così smunto e abbattuto?
Lo scoiattolo ha colmo il suo granaio,
e fu colto ogni frutto.
III
Un giglio(2) hai sulla fronte
rugiadosa di febbre e di tormento,
e sulla guancia una rosa appassita
rapidamente muore.
IV
Una dama incontrai
bella nei prati, figlia delle fate;
lunghi i capelli e il passo suo leggero,
e gli occhi folli.(3)
V
Composi una ghirlanda pel suo capo,
e braccialetti e un cinto
fragrante, mi guardava innamorata,
con un dolce lamento.
VI
Sul mio corsiero al passo la posai,
né altro vidi quel giorno,
ché reclina da un lato ella cantava
canzoni d’incantesimo.(4)
VII
Cercò per me dolci radici e miele
e rugiada di manna(5);
nel suo ignoto linguaggio ella mi disse:
«Amo te solo»(6)
VIII
Nella magica grotta(7) mi condusse,
là pianse disperata e sospirò(8)
là io le chiusi i folli folli occhi
con quattro baci.
IX
Mi cullò fino al sonno,
là misero sognai l’ultimo sogno
da me sognato mai lungo il pendio
della fredda collina.
X
Vidi pallidi re, guerrieri e principi
dal mortale pallore che gridavano:
«La belle Dame sans merci
ti ha preso nella rete».
XI
Nel crepuscolo vidi le arse labbra
in orrida minaccia spalancate,
e quivi mi svegliai lungo il pendio
della fredda collina.
XII
Per questo io qui soggiorno
solo e pallido errante,
benché il giunco è prostrato in riva al lago,
né uccello canta.

NOTE
1) non a caso il paesaggio è lacustre, le acque del lago sono belle ma infide, si tratta però di un paesaggio desolato e più simile alla palude
2) il giglio è un simbolo di mort. La fronte del cavaliere di un pallore mortale è bagnata dal sudore della febbre e il colorito del viso è smorto come una rosa appassita. I sintomi sono quelli della tisi: la febbre sempre lieve, ma che non accenna a diminuire, accende due “rose” sulle guance dei malati. Si dice anche che Keats fosse un tossico dedito all’uso della Belladonna che nell’analisi di Giampaolo Sasso (Il segreto di Keats: Il fantasma della “Belle Dame sans Merci”) è rappresentata nella Dama Senza pietà

3) tutta la descrizione della pericolosità della dama è concentrata negli occhi, definiti selvaggi ma anche folli. Il cavaliere ignora i ripetuti segnali di pericolo : non solo gli occhi ma anche la lingua strana (Language strange), il cibo (honey wild)
4) il canto elfico conduce il cavaliere alla schiavitù
5) la manna è una sostanza bianca e dolce. E’ risaputo che coloro che mangiano il cibo delle fate sono condannati a restare nell’Altro Mondo
6) la fata si esprime in un linguaggio incomprensibile al cavaliere e quindi in realtà avrebbe potuto dirgli tutt’altro che “ti amo”; eppure il linguaggio del corpo è inequivocabile, almeno per quanto riguarda il desiderio sessuale
7) la grotta dell’elfo è l’altromondo celtico (vedi)
8) perchè la fata è dispiaciuta? Non vorrebbe annientare il cavaliere ma non può fare altrimenti? Sa che l’amore di un uomo non è eterno e che prima o poi il suo cavaliere la lascerà spezzandole il cuore? E’ l’amore inevitabilmente distruttivo?

Un’altra bella traduzione in italiano ( tratta da qui)
Qual è la tua pena, o Cavaliere in armi,
Che qui – pallido – indugi in solitudine?
Sfiorita è la carice del lago,
Tacciono gli uccelli.

Qual è la tua pena, o Cavaliere in armi,
Che appari affranto e desolato?
Ricolmo è il granaio dello scoiattolo,
Mietuto ormai il raccolto.

Un giglio sulla tua fronte
Ròrida d’angoscia e febbre,
Rose morenti sulle guance
Anch’esse troppo presto sfiorite.

Una Dama incontrai sui prati,
Bella oltre ogni dire – Figlia di Fate,
Lunghi i capelli, leggero il piede,
Selvaggi gli occhi.

Una ghirlanda per la sua fronte intrecciai,
E braccialetti, e una fragrante cintura.
Mi guardò come Amore guarda,
Dolce emise un gemito.

La issai sul mio destriero al passo,
E altro se non lei per tutto il giorno vidi.
Verso me protesa,
Cantava una melodia delle Fate.

Per me cercò radici dolci al gusto,
E miele selvatico e stille di manna.
E – certo – in una lingua ignota, ripeteva,
“Il mio amore è sincero”.

Alla sua grotta fatata mi condusse,
E là sospirò e pianse con grande tristezza,
E là quei suoi occhi selvaggi chiusi,
Baciandoli quattro volte.

E là mi addormentò cantando,
E là – oh, sventurato!- sognai l’ultimo sogno
Che avrei mai sognato
Sul gelido pendìo del colle.

Pallidi Re e pallidi prìncipi vidi;
E pallidi guerrieri – oh, di quale pallore mortale!
La Belle Dame sans Merci – gridavano –
Ti ha ormai in suo potere.

Vidi le loro labbra livide nell’oscurità
Orribilmente spalancate nel grido.
Mi svegliai, e mi ritrovai qui,
Sul gelido pendìo del colle.

Ed ecco perché ivi mi trattengo,
Pallido – indugiando in solitudine,
Benchè avvizzita sia la carice del lago,
E tacciano gli uccelli.

VERSIONE IN ITALIANO: LA BELLA DAMA SENZA PIETA’

Al fascino inquietante della ballata non poteva sfuggire il nostrano Bardo che si avvale delle sonorità lamentose del sitar per esaltarne il fascino soprannaturale. La parte finale della melodia di ogni strofa riprende il brano tradizionale inglese Once I had a sweetheart.

Angelo Branduardi in La Pulce d’acqua 1977


Guarda com’è pallido
il volto che hai,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
Vedo nei tuoi occhi
profondo terrore,
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…
Guarda come stan ferme
le acque del lago
nemmeno un uccello che osi cantare…
“è stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai
e come se mi amasse lei mi guardò”.
Guarda come l’angoscia
ti arde le labbra,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
“E`stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai…”
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…

“Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò
io l’anima le diedi ed il tempo scordai.
Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò…”.
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Al limite del monte
mi addormentai
fu l’ultimo mio sogno
che io allora sognai;
erano in mille e mille di più…”
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Erano in mille
e mille di più,
con pallide labbra dicevano a me:
– Quella che anche a te
la vita rubò, è lei,
la bella dama senza pietà”.

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: VERSIONE IN TEDESCO

Interessante anche questa versione di un gruppo tedesco medieval-folk che ho avuto modo di ascoltare dal vivo nel 2005 alla Festa celtica di Beltane organizzata dall’Associazione Antica Quercia a Masserano (Biella – Piemonte): intrigante mix di strumenti tradizionali ed elettronici.

Faun in “Buch Der Balladen” 2009.


“Was ist dein Schmerz, du armer Mann,
so bleich zu sein und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt?”
“Ich traf ein’ edle Frau am Rhein,
die war so so schön – ein feenhaft Bild,
ihr Haar war lang, ihr Gang war leicht,
und ihr Blick wild.Ich hob sie auf mein weißes Ross
und was ich sah, das war nur sie,
die mir zur Seit’ sich lehnt und sang
ein Feenlied.Sie führt mich in ihr Grottenhaus,
dort weinte sie und klagte sehr;
drum schloss ich ihr wild-wildes Auf’
mit Küssen vier.
Da hat sie mich in Schlaf gewiegt,
da träumte ich – die Nacht voll Leid!-,
und Schatten folgen mir seitdem
zu jeder Zeit.Sah König bleich und Königskind
todbleiche Ritter, Mann an Mann;
die schrien: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci
hält dich in Bann!”Drum muss ich hier sein und allein
und wandeln bleich und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt.”
traduzione inglese (tratto da qui)
“What ails you, my poor man,
that makes you pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard (1)?”
“I met a noble lady on the Rhine,
so very fair was she – a fairy vision,
her hair was long, her gait was light,
and wild her stare.I lifted her on my white steed
and nothing but her could I see,
as she leant by my side and sang
a song of the fairies.She led me to her cave house
where she cried and wailed much;
so I closed her wild deer eyes (2)
with four kisses of mine.
She lulled me to sleep then,
and I dreamt a nightlong song!
and shadows follow me since
be it day or night (3).I saw a pale king and his son
knights pale as death, face to face;
who cried out: “The fair lady without mercy
has you in her spell!”Thus shall I remain here alone
to wander, pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard”

NOTE
1) lit “(where) no bird sings”
2) I assume it’s “Aug(en)” instead of “Auf'”
3) the original says “all the time” but I opted for (hopefully) more colorful English

FONTI
http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/belle.html http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/k/keats/john/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/
http://noirinrosa.wordpress.com/tag/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/ http://zerkalomitomania.blogspot.it/search/label/Belle%20Dame%20sans%20Merci
http://www.celophaine.com/lbdsm/lbdsm_top.html
http://www.craigrecords.com/recordings/la-belle-dame/