Archivi tag: Solas

(Mer)Maid on the Shore

Leggi in italiano

A fertile vein of the European balladry tradition that has its roots in the Middle Ages, is the so-called “girl on the beach”; Riccardo Venturi summarizes the commonplace “solitary girl who walks on the shores of the sea – coming ship – commander or sailor who calls her on board – girl who embarks on her own will – rethinking and remorse – thoughts at the maternal / conjugal house – drama that takes place (in various ways)
In the “warning ballads” the good girls are warned not to fantasise, to stay in their place (next to the fireplace to crank out delicious treats and children) and not to venture into “male roles”, otherwise they will end dishonored or raped or killed. Better then the more or less golden cage that is already known, rather than free flight.
Every now and then, however, the girl manages to triumph with cunning, over the male cravings, so in the “(Fair) Maid on the Shore” she turns herself into a predator!

Mermaid
Rebecca Guay: Mermaid

MAIDEN IN THE SHORE

It is a mermaid, which the captain sees on a moonlit night, who is walking along the beach (it is well known that selkies and sirens can walk with human feet on full moon nights). Immediately he falls in love and sends a boat to carry her on his ship (by hook or by crook), but as soon as she sings, she casts a spell on the whole crew.
And here the fantastic and magical theme ends: the girl takes all gold and silver and returns to her beach, far from being a fragile and helpless creature, so also her looting the treasures recalls the topos of the siren that collects the glistening things from ships (after having caused shipwreck and death) to “furnish” his cave!
(mer)maid on the shoreBertrand Bronson in his “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifies “Fair Maid on the Shore” as a variant of Broomfield Hill (Child # 43), the ballad was found more rarely in Ireland (where it is assumed to be original) and more widely in America (and in particular in Canada). Thus reports Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3) “More commonly found in the North-eastern United States, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland is a curious marine adaptation of the story in which the knight of the Broomfield Hill is transformed into an amorous sea-captain. The young woman on whom he has designs succeeds in preserving her chastity by singing her would-be lover to sleep.”

A.L. Lloyd sang The Maid on the Shore in his album The Foggy Dew and Other Traditional English Love Songs (1956) and commented in the notes “As the song comes to us, it is the bouncing ballad of a girl too smart for a lecherous sea captain. But a scrap of the ballad as sung in Ireland hints at something sinister behind the gay recital. For there, the girl is a mermaid or siren.

I
It’s of a sea captain that sailed the salt sea
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o (1)
And a beautiful damsel he changed for to spy
walking alone on the shore, shore
walking alone on the shore
II
What I’ll give to you me sailors boys
and …  costly ware-o (2).
if you’ll fleach me that girl aboard of my ship
who walks all alone on the shore, shore
walks all alone on the shore
III
So the sailors they got them a very long boat
And off for the shore they did steer-o,
Saying, “Ma’am if you please will you enter on board
To view a fine cargo of ware (3), ware
To view a fine cargo of ware.”
IV
With much persuasion they got her on board
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
she sat herself down in the stern of the boat
off for the ship they did steer, steer
off for the ship they did steer.
V
And when they’ve arrived alongside of the ship
the captain he order his chew-o,
Saying, “First you should lie in my arms all this night
and may be I’ll marry you dear, dear
may be I’ll marry you dear(4)
VI (5)
She sat herself down in the stern of the ship
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
She sang so neat, so sweet and complete,
She sang sailors and captain to sleep, sleep
sang sailors and captain to sleep.
VII
She’s robbed them of silver, she’s robbed them of gold,
she’s robbed their costly ware-o.
And the captain’s bright sword she’s took for an oar
And she’s paddled away for the shore, shore/ paddled away for the shore.
VIII
And when he awaken he find she was gone
he would like a man in despair-o
… she deluded both captain and crew
“I’m a maid once more on the shore, shore
I’m a maid once more on the shore”

NOTES
having transcribed the text directly from listening, there are some words that escape me (and that for a mother-tongue are very clear!) Any additions are welcome !
1)  the verse is used as a refrain on the call and response scheme typical of the sea shanty
2) the captain promises a substantial reward to his sailors
3) in other more explicit versions the cabin boy is sent to show rings and other precious jewels, asking her to get on board to admiring ones more beautiful
4) in a more cruel version the captain threatens to give the girl to his crew, if she will not be nice to him
First you will lie in my arms all this night
And then I’ll give you to me jolly young crew,
5) It is missing
“Oh thank you, oh thank you,” this young girl she cried,
“It’s just what I’ve been waiting for-o:
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead
As I walked all alone on the shore.”

In the Scandinavian versions of the story the girl is first enticed with flattery on board the ship and then kidnapped, in the French version L ‘Epee Liberatrice she is a princess who gets on the ship because she wants to learn the song sung by the young cabin boy: she falls asleep and when she wakes up she discovers to be on the high seas, she asks a sailor for a sword and kills herself, the Italian version (Il corsaro -Costantino Nigra) follows a similar story, but it is only the Irish version that dwells on the magic song of the siren.

The ballad has many interpreters mostly in the folk or folk-rock field.

Stan Rogers from Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
John Renbourn group from The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)

Eliza Carthy from Rough Music, 2005

The Once from The Once 2009

I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu (5) to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (6)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (7)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (8)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore

NOTES
The textual version of the John Renbourn group differs slightly from Stan’s version
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) or Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) in the version of Renbourn the sentence is clearer, it is the pains of love that the captain tries to alleviate by rape the girl!
6) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
7) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
8) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

 Solas from “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997)

I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind (1)
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair (2)/”I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care (3).
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth (4)
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VII
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”

NOTES
1) the sentence would make more sense if it were instead “to calm his restless mind”
2) the reference to the good weather is not accidental, in fact the sighting of a siren was synonymous with the approach of a storm
3) that is having a good time with a presumably virgin
4) the woman is not just a thief but a fairy creature that steals the health of the sailors

LINK
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung24.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35649
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp

Fare ye well, lovely Nancy

Leggi in italiano

000brgcfLover’s separation is a theme widespread in the english balladry and that of a sailor and a young maid it’s probably originated in the eighteenth century, as we find it in the illustrations of the time: some ballads dwell on the figure of Nancy in tears who die of heartbreak because she believes that the sailor has abandoned her.

THE SAILOR’S FAREWELL

A further version of the sailor’s farewell ballad comes from”Oxford Book of Sea Song” 1986 “that version was originally noted by Dr George Gardiner (text) and (probably) Charles Gamblin (tune) from George Lovett (born 1841) at Winchester, Hampshire. In January 1909, Ralph Vaughan Williams re-noted the melody because there was some doubt about the notation; it appears that he visited Mr Lovett and recorded his singing for later checking”.

A sailor bidding farewell from his weeping sweetheart 1790s

TEARS ON THE SHORE

Polly / Nancy is on the beach  to complain for having been abandoned by her sailor (who evidently left for the sea without marrying her).

There are many variations of the text, in this one we go back to the eighteenth century music
Baltimore Consort

FARE YE WELL, LOVELY NANCY
I
Fare ye well, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you.
I am bound for th’ East Indies
my course for to steer.
I know very well my long absence
will grieve you,
But, true love, I’ll be back
in the spring of the year(1).”
II
“Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me,
my dearest Johnny,
Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me
here all alone;
For it is your good company
that I do desire
I will sigh till l die
if l ne’er see you more.
III
In sailor’s apparel I’ll dress
and go with you,
ln the midst of all danger
your friend I will be;
And that is, my dear,
when the stormy wind’s blowing,
True love, I`ll be ready to reef your topsails.”
IV
“Your neat little fingers
strong cables can’t handle,
Your neat little feet
to the topmast can’t go;
Your delicate body
strong winds can’t endure.
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
to the seas do not go.”
V
Now Johnny is sailing
and Nancy bewailing;
The tears down her eyes
like torrents do flow.
Her gay golden hair
she’s continually tearing,
Saying, “I’ll sigh till I die
if l ne’er see you more”.
VI
Now all you young maidens
by me take a warning,
Never trust a sailor
or believe what they say.
First they will court you,
and then they will slight you;
They will leave you behind,
love, in grief and in pain.

NOTES
1) as sea ballad  Lovely on the Water the sailor’s farewell is framed in an opening stanza that describes the coming of spring

SAILOR’S LETTER

Johnny is about to send a letter to his sweetheart to swear his true love and renew the promise of marriage (but everyone knows what happened to sailor vow)

Solas from Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers, 1997

ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
I
“Adieu, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you
To the far-off West Indies
I’m bound for to steer
But let my long journey
be of no trouble to you
For my love, I’ll return
in the course of a year”
II
“Talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Jimmy
Talk not of leaving me
here on the shore
You know very well
your long absence will grieve me
As you sail the wild ocean
where the wild billows roar
III
I’ll cut off my ringlets
all curly and yellow
I’ll dress in the coats
of a young cabin boy
And when we are out
on that dark, rolling ocean
I will always be near you,
my pride and my joy”
IV
“Your lily-white hands,
they could not handle the cables
Your lily-white feet
to the top mast could not go
And the cold winter storms, well,
you could not endure them
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
where the wild winds won’t blow”
V
As Jimmy set a-sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears from her eyes
in great torrents did a-flow
As she stood on the beach,
oh her hands she was wringing
Crying, “Oh and alas,
will I e’er see you more?”
VI
As Jimmy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
they filled him with pride
He said, “Nancy, lovely Nancy,
if I had you here, love
How happy I’d be for
to make you my bride”
VII
So Jimmy wrote a letter
to his own lovely Nancy
Saying, “If you have proved constant, well, I will prove true”
Oh but Nancy was dying,
for her poor heart was broken
Oh the day that he left her,
forever he’d rue
VIII
Come all of you young maidens,
I pray, take a warning
And don’t trust a sailor boy
or any of his kind
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their love, it is tempestuous
as the wavering wind

HEART BREAKING

A melodramatic ending with sailor’s letter coming too late to the bedside of a dying Nancy.
Jarlath Henderson from Hearts Broken, Heads Turned, 2016  
Samplers, piano and an expressive voice for this young musician who won the BBC Young Folk Award in 2003.

FARE YE WELL, LOVELY NANCY
I
Fare thee well, lovely Nancy,
It’s now I must leave you,
To cross the main ocean
where the stormy winds blow,
let not my long journey
be of no trouble to you,
for you know I’ll be back
in the course of a year”
II
“Let’s talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Billy
Let’s talk not of leaving me
here all alone
for you know your long journey
at early will grieve me
stay at home lovely Billy
to the sea do not roar”
V-VI
As Billy went to sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears down her eyes
like fountains did flow
As Billy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
still run throu his eyes
VII
So Billy wrote a letter
to his own true love Nancy
Saying, “If you prove constant,
then I will prove true”
Lovely Nancy on death bed
could not recover
when the news was brough to her
but his true love was death
VIII
So come on ye pretty fair maids,
and a warning take by me
care for a sailor or of his kind men
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their minds are imperfectual like the westerly wind

000brgcf

Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
english version: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
english version: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
american/irish version: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

LINK
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.8notes.com/scores/4582.asp?ftype=gif

This love will carry by Dougie MacLean

Firmata Dougie MacLean nel 1983 This love will carry, è tra le sue canzoni più popolari che ama cantare nei suoi live. Semplici rime che parlano d’amore, della paura di amare. Una delle canzoni fatta propria da vari artisti della scena celtica e folk-rok.
ASCOLTA Dougie MacLean & Kathy Mattea live per Transatlantic Sessions

ASCOLTA Piedmont Brothers Band (non facciamoci ingannare dal nome sono italo-americani di Eden, North Carolina) una bella versione acustica con arpa, flauto e violino
ASCOLTA Solas in ANother Day 2005 (su Spotify)
ASCOLTA Frances Black


I
It’s a thin line that leads us
and keeps a man from shame
And dark clouds quickly gather
along the way he came
There’s fear out on the mountain
and death out on the plain
There’s heartbreak and heart-ache in the shadow of the flame
But this love will carry,
this love will carry me
I know this love will carry me
This love will carry,
this love will carry me
I know this love will carry me
II
The strongest web will tangle,
the sweetest bloom will fall
And somewhere in the distance
we try and catch it all
Success lasts for a moment
and failure’s always near
And you look down at your blistered hands as turns another year
III
These days are golden,
they must not waste away
Our time is like that flower
and soon it will decay
And though by storms we’re weakened, uncertainty is sure
And like the coming of the dawn
it’s ours for evermore
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
E’ stretta la via da seguire
che preserva l’uomo dal disonore
e nuvole oscure si radunano
rapide sul suo cammino
c’è la paura fuori sulla vetta
e la morte fuori in basso
c’è il crepacuore e il mal di cuore nell’ombra della fiamma
Ma quest’amore andrà avanti,
questo amore mi sosterrà

lo so che quest’amore andrà avanti, quest’amore andrà avanti,
questo amore mi sosterrà
lo so che quest’amore andrà avanti,

II
La rete più forte s’annoderà
e la fioritura più bella finirà a terra
e da qualche parte in lontananza
proveremo a catturarlo,
il successo dura un attimo
e il fallimento è sempre nei paraggi
e guardi verso le mani piene di vesciche, quando arriva un nuovo anno
III
Questi giorni sono fatti d’oro,
non si devono sprecare;
il nostro tempo è come quel fiore
e presto sfiorirà,
e per le tempeste ci siamo indeboliti,
il dubbio è certo
e come il sorgere dell’alba
è nostro per l’eternità

FONTI
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44414

THE GALLANT HUSSAR

Alla parola Ussaro il pensiero corre verso il soldato a cavallo, dalla divisa impeccabile e romantica -alla “Viennese”- infatti, indipendentemente dall’esercito di appartenenza, le uniformi degli ussari erano tutte simili: una blusa corta e attillata, piena zeppa di passamaneria, e con un numero sproporzionato di alamari, bordata di pelliccia d’inverno, un buffo cappello dalla forma di cilindro allungato e rivestito da pelo di gatto centrifugato, (oppure senza pelo, ma con un altrettanto vistoso pennacchio), pantaloni aderenti infilati in stivali tirati a lucido e alti quasi al ginocchio.
Se ci aggiungi la giovane età, il fisico agile ed allenato dello sportivo, il portamento marziale e i modi da gentiluomo, l’effetto doveva essere devastante sul cuore e le menti delle giovani fanciulle! Ah si e non dimentichiamoci i baffetti a manubrio, che ai tempi erano considerati molto “virili”.

Gli ussari erano infatti una cavalleria d’élite nelle guerre napoleonicheussar-jane-austen: lasciata l’armatura e la lunga lancia che lo aveva caratterizzato nel XV secolo il nostro ussaro è rimasto con la sciabola e il cavallo, oltre non mi addentro in merito alle differenze tra ussaro, dragone, e armamentari vari..

Per aiutarmi nella traduzione della ballata “The Gallant Ussar” ho preso un soldato a caso … Mr Wickham di Orgoglio & Pregiudizio di Jane Austen -ovviamente dalla versione del film di Joe Wright- (credo che tra i due personaggi ci sia molto più di una semplice uniforme in comune!)

MEGLIO SPOSARSI CHE ANDARE IN GUERRA

La ballata è nota con il titolo di “Young Edward, the Gallant Hussar” diffusa a metà Ottocento in una serie di broadside, il tema è quello solito della separazione tra i due innamorati, lui giovane soldato di belle speranze, ma con poche sostanze, e lei giovane fanciulla che aspira al matrimonio. In questa ballata la ragazza riesce a coronare il suo sogno grazie a una piccola rendita lasciatale in eredità  dallo zio. Qui la guerra è uno sfondo lontano, l’ussaro è pronto a combattere, non appena la tromba squillerà per l’adunata, ma nello stesso tempo (valutate le sostanze della fanciulla) pronto a sposarsi e a dimenticare la “guerra crudele”.  Non so se la ballata avesse intenti umoristici ma in effetti la parola “gallant” è un po’ ambivalente.

La ballata è stata registrata recentemente da Eliza Carthy in un’ottima versione. Così scrive Eliza nelle note “This version of the song comes from Still Growing, English Traditional Songs & Singers from the Cecil Sharp Collection, a book of songs collected by Cecil Sharp with fascinating pictures and stories of the people he learned from, published by the EFDSS…”

ASCOLTA Eliza Carthy in Rough Music 2005

Bella anche la versione dei Solas che al momento è ascoltabile su Spotify ASCOLTA in For Love and Laughter 2008

I
A damsel possessed of great beauty,
She stood by her own father’s gate,
The gallant hussars were on duty,
To view them this maiden did wait;
Their horses were capering and prancing,
Their accoutrements shone like a star,
From the plain they were nearest advancing,
She espied her young gallant hussar.
II
Their pellisses were slung on their shoulders,
So careless they seemed for to ride,
So warlike appeared these young soldiers,
With glittering swords by each side.
To the barracks next morning so early,
This damsel she went in her car,
Because she loved him sincerely-
Young Edward, the gallant Hussar.
III
It was there she conversed with her soldier,
These words he was heard for to say,
Said Jane, I’ve heard none more bolder,
To follow my laddie away.
O fie! said young Edward, be steady,
And think of the dangers of war,
When the trumpet sounds I must be ready,
So wed not your gallant Hussar.
IV
For twelve months on bread and cold water,
My parents confined me for you,
O hard-hearted friends to their daughter,
Whose heart it is loyal and true;
Unless they confine me for ever,
Or banish me from you afar,
I will follow my soldier so clever,
To wed with my gallant Hussar.
V
Said Edward, Your friends you must mind them,
Or else you are for ever undone,
They will leave you no portion behind them,
So pray do my company shun.
She said, If you will be true-hearted,
I have gold of my uncle in store,
From this time no more we’ll be parted,
I will wed with my gallant Hussar.
VI
As he gazed on each elegant feature,
The tears they did fall from each eye,
I will wed with this beautiful creature,
And forsake cruel war, he did cry.
So they were united together,
Friends think of them now they’re afar,
Crying: Heaven bless them now and for ever,
Young Jane and her gallant Hussar.
Traduzione Cattia Salto
I
Una donzella di gran beltà
stava ai cancelli di casa
gli ussari galanti erano in marcia
e per vederli questa fanciulla attendeva;
i loro cavalli erano impetuosi e imponenti,
il loro equipaggiamento scintillava come una stella,
dalla pianura si avvicinavano dappresso
e lei scrutava il suo giovane ussaro galante.
II
Le loro giubbe (1) pendevano dalle spalle, così noncuranti in sella,
così amanti della guerra apparivano questi giovani soldati
con sciabole lucenti al fianco.
Alla caserma di buon mattino
questa donzella andò con la sua carrozza,
perché amava sinceramente
il giovane Edward, l’ussaro galante.
III
Mentre conversava con il suo soldato
queste parole sentì dire
da Jane “Non ho sentito di altri più audaci,
e seguirò il mio ragazzo”.
“Ovvia- disse il giovane Edward- resta qui
e pensa ai pericoli della guerra
quando le trombe suonano, devo essere pronto,
così non sposare il tuo ussaro galante.”
IV
“A 12 mesi di pane e acqua fredda
i miei genitori mi hanno confinata a causa tua.
O amici duri di cuore verso la loro figlia
dal cuore leale e sincero;
a meno che non mi confinino per sempre,
o mi bandiscano da te lontano,
seguirò il mio soldato così dotato,
e mi sposerò con il mio ussaro galante.”
V
Disse Edward “Ai tuoi amici devi dare retta,
oppure non avrai più scampo, loro ti leveranno la terra da sotto ai piedi,
così ti prego di evitare la mia compagnia”
Lei disse “ Se tu sarai un cuor sincero
ho dell’oro di mio zio da parte,
da ora non ci separeremo più
e mi sposerò con il mio ussaro galante”.
VI
Mentre lui guardava fattezze tanto eleganti (2)
le lacrime gli caddero dagli occhi
“Mi voglio sposar con questa bellissima creatura,
e dimenticare la guerra crudele” lui gridò.
Così furono maritati,
gli amici che pensano a loro, ora che sono lontani
gridano: “il Cielo li benedica ora e per sempre,
la giovane Jane e il suo ussaro galante”.

NOTE
1) l’ussar pelisse è la giubba che si portava con nonchalance di traverso su una spalla. In effetti quello che contraddistingue gli ussari è lo shakò, (il cappello) di foggia e colori differenti per ciascun reggimento.
2) chissà perchè alla parola “oro di mio zio” il giovane ussaro si è commosso…

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/hussar.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82384
https://mainlynorfolk.info/guvnor/songs/thegallanthussar.html

Sailor’s farewell: dalla parte della bella Nancy/Polly

000brgcfRead the post in English  

Il tema della separazione tra i due innamorati è molto diffuso nelle ballate popolari e quella tra marinaio e giovane fidanzatina risale sicuramente al 1700: alcune ballate si soffermano sulla figura di Nancy in lacrime che muore di crepacuore perchè crede che il marinaio l’abbia abbandonata.

FARE YE WELL, LOVELY NANCY

Un’ulteriore versione dell’addio del marinaio (sailor’s farewell)  viene dall'”Oxford Book of Sea Song” 1986 “questa versione fu scritta dal Dr George Gardiner (testo) e (probabilmente) Charles Gamblin (melodia)  da George Lovett (nato nel 1841) a Winchester, Hampshire. Nel gennaio 1909, Ralph Vaughan Williams annotò nuovamente la melodia perché aveva qualche dubbio sulla precedente annotazione; sembra che abbia visitato il signor Lovett e registrato il suo canto per un successivo controllo”. (Malcom Douglas tradotto da qui)

Il marinaio saluta la fidanzatina in lacrime circa 1790

LE LACRIME SUL LITORALE

Oltre al momento della separazione questa seconda versione presenta ulteriori sviluppi: in uno si descrive Polly/Nancy rimasta sulla spiaggia che si lamenta e piange per essere stata abbandonata dal suo marinaio (che evidentemente se n’è andato per mare senza sposarla).

Ci sono molti varianti del testo, vediamo quella che ci riporta al Settecento anche come arrangiamento musicale.
Baltimore Consort


I
Fare ye well, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you.
I am bound for th’ East Indies
my course for to steer.
I know very well my long absence
will grieve you,
But, true love, I’ll be back
in the spring of the year(1).”
II
“Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me,
my dearest Johnny,
Oh, ‘tis not talk of leaving me
here all alone;
For it is your good company
that I do desire
I will sigh till l die
if l ne’er see you more.
III
In sailor’s apparel I’ll dress
and go with you,
ln the midst of all danger
your friend I will be;
And that is, my dear,
when the stormy wind’s blowing,
True love, I`ll be ready to reef your topsails.”
IV
“Your neat little fingers
strong cables can’t handle,
Your neat little feet
to the topmast can’t go;
Your delicate body
strong winds can’t endure.
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
to the seas do not go.”
V
Now Johnny is sailing
and Nancy bewailing;
The tears down her eyes
like torrents do flow.
Her gay golden hair
she’s continually tearing,
Saying, “I’ll sigh till I die
if l ne’er see you more”.
VI
Now all you young maidens
by me take a warning,
Never trust a sailor
or believe what they say.
First they will court you,
and then they will slight you;
They will leave you behind,
love, in grief and in pain.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio bella Nancy
perchè ti devo lasciare
sono in partenza per le Indie orientali
per seguire la mia rotta.
So bene che la mia lunga assenza
ti addolorerà,
ma amore, io ritornerò
nella primavera dell’anno”
II LEI
“Oh non parlare di lasciarmi
caro il mio Johnny,
oh non parlare di lasciarmi
qui tutta sola;
perchè è la tua cara compagnia
che io desidero,
piangerò fino a morire
se non ti vedrò mai più!
III
Come un marinaio mi vestirò
e verrò con te,
in mezzo ai grandi pericoli
ti sarò compagna;
e così mio caro, quando soffierà
il  freddo vento di tempesta,
amore, sarò pronta a ridurre le vele di gabbia”
IV LUI
“Ma le tue piccole manine non possono maneggiare le nostre grosse cime
e nemmeno i tuoi piedini delicati
posso salire sull’albero maestro;
il tuo corpo delicato
non può sopportare le raffiche di vento, resta a casa, Nancy cara
non andare per mare”.
V
Ora Johnny è per mare
e Nancy si lamenta,
le lacrime dai suoi occhi cadono
come torrenti in piena,
i capelli biondi
in continuazione si strappa
dicendo “Piangerò fino a morire
se non ti vedrò mai più”
VI
Allora tutte voi giovani fanciulle
ascoltate il mio avvertimento
non fidatevi di un marinaio
e non credete a quello che dicono,
prima vi corteggiano
e poi vi faranno piangere;
vi lasceranno a casa
care, a tormentarvi

NOTE
1) il verso riprende la sea ballad  Lovely on the Water  
in cui l’addio del marinaio è inquadrato in una strofa d’apertura che descrive l’arrivo della primavera

LA LETTERA

In un’altra versione l’aggiunta di ulteriori strofe descrivono Johnny in procinto di mandare una lettera alla fidanzata per giurarle amore eterno e rinnovarle la promessa di matrimonio (ma tutti sanno che fine fanno le promesse da marinaio)..

Solas in Sunny Spells and Scattered Showers, 1997


I
“Adieu, lovely Nancy,
for now I must leave you
To the far-off West Indies
I’m bound for to steer
But let my long journey
be of no trouble to you
For my love, I’ll return
in the course of a year”
II
“Talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Jimmy
Talk not of leaving me
here on the shore
You know very well
your long absence will grieve me
As you sail the wild ocean
where the wild billows roar
III
I’ll cut off my ringlets
all curly and yellow
I’ll dress in the coats
of a young cabin boy
And when we are out
on that dark, rolling ocean
I will always be near you,
my pride and my joy”
IV
“Your lily-white hands,
they could not handle the cables
Your lily-white feet
to the top mast could not go
And the cold winter storms, well,
you could not endure them
Stay at home, lovely Nancy,
where the wild winds won’t blow”
V
As Jimmy set a-sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears from her eyes
in great torrents did a-flow
As she stood on the beach,
oh her hands she was wringing
Crying, “Oh and alas,
will I e’er see you more?”
VI
As Jimmy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
they filled him with pride
He said, “Nancy, lovely Nancy,
if I had you here, love
How happy I’d be for
to make you my bride”
VII
So Jimmy wrote a letter
to his own lovely Nancy
Saying, “If you have proved constant, well, I will prove true”
Oh but Nancy was dying,
for her poor heart was broken
Oh the day that he left her,
forever he’d rue
VIII
Come all of you young maidens,
I pray, take a warning
And don’t trust a sailor boy
or any of his kind
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their love, it is tempestuous
as the wavering wind
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio bella Nancy
che ora ti devo lasciare,
per le Indie Occidentali
sto per salpare,
che la mia lunga assenza
non ti crei affanno,
perche amore mio
io ritornerò entro l’anno”
II LEI
“Non dire che mi lasci qui,
Jimmy amore mio,
non dire che mi lasci
qui sulla spiaggia,
lo sai bene che
la tua lunga assenza mi addolorerà, perchè tu navighi nel vasto oceano
dove ruggiscono gli immensi flutti.
III
Mi taglierò i boccoli
biondi e ricci,
mi metterò i panni
di un mozzo,
e quando saremo fuori
nell’oscuro, beccheggiante oceano, starò sempre accanto a te,
mio orgoglio e gioia”
IV LUI
“Le tue mani bianche come giglio
non riuscirebbero a maneggiare le cime
e nemmeno i tuoi piedini delicati
riuscirebbero a salire sull’albero maestro e le fredde tempeste invernali
non saresti in grado di sopportare.
Resta a casa amata Nancy,
dove non soffia forte il vento.”
V
Appena Jimmy fu a bordo
la bella Nancy si lamentò,
le lacrime dagli occhi
scorrevano come torrenti
mentre stava sulla spiaggia
si torceva le mani
gridando “Ahimè
ti vedrò ancora?”
VI
Mentre Jimmy stava camminando
per il molo di Filadelfia
i pensieri del suo vero amore
lo riempivano d’orgoglio
diceva: “Nancy, amata Nancy
se ti avessi qui, amore,
quanto sarei felice
di farti la mia sposa!”
VII
Così Jimmy scrisse una lettera
alla sua amata Nancy
dicendo “Se mi sei restata fedele
allora ti mostrerò fedeltà”
Ma Nancy stava morendo, perchè il suo povero cuore si era spezzato il giorno in cui lui l’aveva lasciata e per sempre lui se ne sarebbe pentito.
VIII
Venite tutte voi giovani fanciulle, accettate il mio consiglio
e non fidatevi di un marinaio
o di altri della sua specie,
perchè prima vi corteggeranno
e poi vi inganneranno
perchè il loro amore è tempestoso come il vento incostante.

LA MORTE DI CREPACUORE

In questa versione sono tagliate le strofe centrali in cui Nancy vuole travestirsi da marinaio per seguire il suo bel marinaio, ma c’è il finale melodrammatico della lettera che giunge troppo tardi al capezzale della morta.

Jarlath Henderson in Hearts Broken, Heads Turned, 2016  
Campionatori,  pianoforte e una voce espressiva per questo giovane  musicista  che ha vinto il BBC Young Folk Award nel 2003.


I
Fare thee well, lovely Nancy,
It’s now I must leave you,
To cross the main ocean
where the stormy winds blow,
let not my long journey
be of no trouble to you,
for you know I’ll be back
in the course of a year”
II
“Let’s talk not of leaving me here,
lovely Billy
Let’s talk not of leaving me
here all alone
for you know your long journey
at early will grieve me
stay at home lovely Billy
to the sea do not roar”
V-VI
As Billy went to sailing,
lovely Nancy stood a-wailing
The tears down her eyes
like fountains did flow
As Billy was a-walking
on the quays of Philadelphia
The thoughts of his true love,
still run throu his eyes
VII
So Billy wrote a letter
to his own true love Nancy
Saying, “If you prove constant,
then I will prove true”
Lovely Nancy on death bed
could not recover
when the news was brough to her
but his true love was death
VIII
So come on ye pretty fair maids,
and a warning take by me
care for a sailor or of his kind men
For first they will court you
and then they’ll deceive you
For their minds are imperfectual like the westerly wind
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio bella Nancy
ora ti devo lasciare,
per attraversare l’oceano
dove soffiano i venti di tempesta,
che la mia lunga assenza
non ti crei affanno,
perchè io ritornerò
entro l’anno”
II LEI
“Non dire che mi lasci qui,
caro Billy
non dire che mi lasci
qui tutta sola,
lo sai bene che il tuo lungo viaggio
alla lunga mi addolorerà,
resta a casa caro Billy
non andare per mare”
V-VI
Appena Billy fu a bordo
la bella Nancy si lamentò,
le lacrime dagli occhi
zampillavano come fontane.
Mentre Billy stava camminando
per il molo di Filadelfia
i pensieri del suo vero amore
gli scorrevano innanzi agli occhi
VII
Così Billy scrisse una lettera
alla sua amata Nancy
“Se mi sei restata fedele
allora ti mostrerò che sono sincero”
La cara Nancy sul letto di morte
non si riprendeva
quando le fu portata la lettera
era già morta
VIII
Venite tutte voi giovani fanciulle,
accettate il mio consiglio
e non fidatevi di un marinaio o di altri della sua specie,
perchè prima vi corteggeranno
e poi vi inganneranno
perchè il loro amore è scostante
come il vento dell’ovest.
000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
versione sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.8notes.com/scores/4582.asp?ftype=gif

BRUACH NA CARRAIGE BAINE

“Bruach na Carraige Báine ” (The edge -brink ma anche shore- of the white rock)  è una canzone d’amore originaria dalle isole Blasket, una manciata di isolette al largo della penisola di Dingle, nel sud-ovest del Kerry, Irlanda.
“This beautiful love song originates from the Blasket Islands, a group of six islands which lie off the coast of Corca Dhuibhne in southwest Kerry. A great deal of music has come to us from these islands during this century, much of it is believed to be rooted in much older traditions. The Blaskets had a wonderful tradition of music as an integral part of the culture and traditions of this close knit community. The Blaskets were brought to the attention of the world by three books which gave a first hand account of island life. They include An tOileanach, the Islandman by Tomás Ó Croimthain, 1929; Fiche Blian ag Gás (Twenty years a Growing) Muiris Ó Suilleabhain Dublin 1933, and most especially Peig by Peig Sayers (Dublin 1936). )
Weddings in these small communities, whose population never exceeded 200, were a huge source of joy – in a place where nature was ruler, these people saw a wedding as the constant hope for the future and the possibility for new life to the island. It represented the most profound symbol of continuance of the island way of life.” (tratto da qui)

La selvaggia bellezza dell’arcipelago è incomparabile e così si spiega come i suoi abitanti siano rimasti tenacemente a vivere lì sospesi fuori dal tempo..

Il costante fascino esercitato dalle Blasket può essere in parte spiegato dalla genialità dei loro narratori. Durante le lunghe e buie notti invernali, un “seanchaí” (un bravo narratore di racconti) come Peig Sayers incantava i vicini raccontando storie che spesso venivano tramandate di generazione in generazione.
All’inizio del XX secolo, tuttavia, gli isolani sapevano che il loro stile di vita stava per terminare. Alcuni, come Sayers e Tomás O’Crohan, decisero di scrivere i loro ricordi per preservarli. E la straordinaria collezione di libri proveniente da questo luogo remoto e isolato, scritta nella pura forma d’irlandese unica delle Blasket, racconta le gioie e i dolori della vita sull’isola. Vennero scritti, secondo O’Crohan, “perché qui non tornerà più nessuno come noi”. (tratto da qui)

foto di Kevin Coleman l’ultimo abitante a lasciare l’isola

Gli ultimi abitanti decisero di evacuare nel 1953 (o furono evacuati dal governo)  lasciando le rocce alle colonie di uccelli marini e alle foche, i prati a pecore, lepri e cervi.. e ai turisti.

LA MELODIA

Bruac Na Carraige Baine (Brink of the White Rocks) è una melodia fuori dal tempo  la cui origine si perde nel lontano passato.
O’Sullivan (1983) remarks there are a number of versions of this tune, including five printed in Petrie’s 1855 volume, pgs. 137-143 (one appears under the title “Ar Thaoibh na Carraige Baine”), while Ó Canainn (1978) reports the music can be found in John O’Daly’s Poets and Poetry of Munster (1849). O’Daly has a story that the song was written for a wedding gift for the Blacker family of Portadown about the year 1666. The air retains some currency among traditional musicians today. This, the Munster version, is quite different from northern versions. Source for notated version: Source for notated version: The Irish collector Edward Bunting noted the melody for his 1840 collection from a blind man at Westport in 1802. O’Neill (1850), 1903/1979; No. 84, pg. 15. O’Sullivan/Bunting, 1983; No. 26, pgs. 42-43. (tratto da qui)

La melodia è romantica, una bella versione per piano è quella dei Clannad (in Fuaim 1982 qui)
ASCOLTA Clanú versione strumentale
ASCOLTA J.J. Sheridan al pianoforte nell’arrangiamento di Edward Bunting, 1840 

WEDDING SONG

irish-loversLa canzone è una sorta di dichiarazione d’amore ma anche una proposta di matrimonio, in cui l’uomo prima si dice perdutamente innamorato, poi chiede di scambiarsi le promesse d’amore: la fanciulla se acconsentirà a sposarlo vivrà come una regina, con tanto d’oro e carrozza. Quest’ultima strofa è certamente un’esagerazione, soprattutto se si confronta la vita lussuosa descritta, con la vita di sussistenza che si svolgeva sulle isole Blasket.

ASCOLTA Seamus Begley & Mary Black

VERSIONE MARY BLACK
I
Is thiar cois abhainn gan bhréag gan dabht
Tá an ainnir chiúin tais mhánla
Is gur ghile a com ná an eala ar an dtonn
Ó bhaitheas go bonn a bróige
‘Sí an stáidbhean í a chráigh mo chroí
Is d’fhág sí i m’intinn brónach
Is leigheas le fáil níl agam go brách
Ó dhiúltaigh mo ghrá gheal domsa
II
Ó b’fhearr liom fhéin ná Éire mhóir
Ná saibhres Rí na Spáinne
Go mbéinnse ‘gus tusa i lúb na finne
I gcoilltibh i bhfad ón ár gcáirde
Ó mise ‘gus tusa bheith pósta a ghrá
Le haontoil athar is máthair
A mhaighdean óig is milse póg
‘S tú grian na Carraige Báine
III
‘S a stuaire an chinn cailce, más dual dom go mbeir agam
Beidh cóir ort a thaithneodh led’ cháirde
Idir shíoda ‘gus hata ó bhonn go bathas
‘S gach ní insa chathair dá bhfeabhas
Beidh do bhólacht á gcasadh gach neoin chun baile
‘S ceol binn ag beacha do bhánta
Beidh ór(7) ar do ghlacadh is cóiste id’ tharraingt
Go bruach na Carraige Báine
TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
To the west by a river, with no lie, with no doubt(1)
Is the quiet tender gentle girl
And her skin(2) is fairer than the swan on the wave
From the top of her head to the soles of her shoes.
She is the stately woman that broke my heart
And she left my mind sorrowful
And a cure can never be found by me
Since my fair love refused me.
II
I deem it better than great Ireland,
Than the the king of Spain’s riches
That you and I should be in a beautiful place(3)
In woods far away from our friends
Oh you and I to be wed(4), love,
With the blessing of father and mother
Oh young maiden with the sweetest kiss
You’re the sun of the White Rock(5)
III
Oh fair-haired (6) handsome woman,
if my fate is that you be mine
You will wear gear that would please your friends
between silk and hats,
from head to toe(7),
And the best of everything in the city
Your cattle will be driven home every evening
And the bees of your green fields will hum sweetly,
You will have gold(8) and a coach to bring you
To the edge of the White Rock.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
A ovest accanto al fiume, vi dico il vero(1)
vive la bella, mite e gentile fanciulla
e il suo incarnato(2) è più pallido del cigno tra le onde;
dalla cima della testa alla punta delle scarpe.
Lei è la nobile donna che mi ha spezzato il cuore
e mi ha lasciato in affanno,
e nessuna cura potrà porvi rimedio,
poichè l’amore mio mi ha respinto.
II
Vorrei, più di tutta l’Irlanda
o delle ricchezze del re di Spagna
che tu ed io fossimo in un bel posto (3)
tra i boschi molto lontano dai nostri amici
per sposarci tu ed io(4), amore
con la benedizione di mamma e papà
oh giovane fanciulla dal dolcissimo bacio
tu sei il sole di White Rock(5)
III
Oh bellezza dai capelli d’argento (6),
se il destino ti farà essere mia,
indosserai abiti che piaceranno ai tuoi amici
con seta e cappellini,
da capo a piedi (7)
e avrai il meglio di tutto in città,
il tuo bestiame sarà guidato a casa ogni sera
e le api dei tuoi verdi campi canticchieranno per te soavemente,
avrai oro(8) e una carrozza che ti porterà
sul ciglio di White Rock

NOTE
1) letteralmente: senza dubbio o menzogna
2) letteralmente:”her cover”. In questa strofa viene descritta una bellezza tipicamente medievale, come quelle cantate dagli antichi bardi, dal bianco incarnato e di nobile stirpe
3) “amid fairness” -“caught up in whiteness” = “in a quiet place”
4) il matrimonio tra i boschi è un topico delle canzoni d’amore popolari, si trattava di uno scambio di promesse suggellato con la wedlock’s band, ma senza la presenza di testimoni. In genere in queste unioni mancava il consenso dei genitori, e il matrimonio nel bosco aveva le caratteristiche di una fuitina ovvero di un “matrimonio d’amore” in cui la coppia consumava il rapporto mettendo i famigliari davanti al fatto compiuto. (continua)
5) l’arcipelago delle Blasket island è formato da sette isole e da un centinaio di scogli (ognuno con il suo nome). La più grande delle isole è Blascaodaí, il Grande Blasket (Great Blasket in lingua inglese), che era abitata un tempo da circa 200 abitanti. C’è da presumere che la Roccia bianca sia un nome locale di qualche scoglio o scogliera, anche se in alcune traduzioni invece di essere sul ciglio di un punto panoramico o ai piedi di una scogliera, ci si trova piuttosto sulle rive di un fiume.
6) “of the chalky head”
7) from foot to crown of head
8) anche scritto come ól che però significa fill of drink

Una bella traduzione in inglese The Brink of the White Rock (Bruach na Carraige Ban) (tratta da qui)
I
Beside the river there dwells a maid
Of maidens she is the fairest
Her white neck throws the swans in the shade
Her form and her face are the rarest
Oh she is the maid who my love betrayed
And left my soul all shaken
For there’s no cure while life endures
My love has me forsaken
II
I would rather far than Eireann’s shore
Or the Spaniard’s golden treasure
Were you and I in the greenwoods nigh
To walk there at our leisure
Or were we wed, dear love instead
Your parents both consenting
Sweet maid your kiss would make my bliss
If you to me were relenting
III
Oh and if you would freely come with me
In fashions brave I’ll dress thee
In satins fine your form would shine
And finest silks caress thee
Your kin would come each evening home
Your bees hum in the clover
Your coach in golden style shall roll
When we ride to the white rock over

Del testo si trovano alcune varianti che tuttavia non alterano la trama della canzone, gli Altan (in Blackwater 1996 qui) riproducono il testo in inglese mantenendo solo una strofa in gaelico, mentre la versione dei Solas (in The Hour before dawn 2000 qui) riprende il testo di Mary Black.

ASCOLTA Aine Minogue (con il testo)

FONTI
http://www.independent.ie/regionals/kerryman/news/evacuation-marks-end-of-an-era-as-last-families-leave-the-blaskets-27370752.html
https://www.marinetours.ie/blasket-islands.html
http://www.ireland.com/it-it/destinazioni/republic-of-ireland/kerry/articoli/vista-blasket-waw/
http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/2059207/data_sounds_T507_4.html
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/231/
https://thesession.org/tunes/1165
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32097
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/bruach.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/compilations/bruach.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/domhnaill/bruach.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/altan/arbhruach.htm
http://lyricstranslate.com/it/mary-black-bruach-na-carraige-b%C3%A1ine-lyrics.html

CHÌ MI NA MÒRBHEANNA

“Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh” è una canzone in gaelico scozzese scritta da John Cameron di Ballachulish (Iain Camshroin) nel 1856.
Il titolo iniziale della canzone era” Duil ri Baile Chaolais Fhaicinn” (Hoping to see Ballachulish), la sua pubblicazione nella raccolta “The Gaelic Songster” (An t-Oranaiche) di Archibald Sinclair, -Glasgow 1879 (il formato digitale qui) ci permette di cogliere le differenze testuali con la versione “O, chì, chì mi na mòrbheanna” diventata poi standard. Ballachulish (Highlands Scozia nord-occidentale) è un paesino alla foce del Loch Leven con le montagne che offrono delle viste spettacolari.

Vista da Sgorr na Ciche verso Loch Leven

DUIL RI BAILE CHAOLAIS FHAICINN
Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh ;
Chi, chi mi na cor-bheannaibh ;
Chi, chi mi na coireachan(5) 

Chi mi na sgoraibh fo cheò.
I*
Chi mi gun dàil an t-àit’ ‘s d’ rugadh mi,
Cuirear orm fàilt’ ‘s a’ chainnt a thuigeas mi ;
Gheibh mi ann aoidh a’s gràdh ‘n uair ruigeam
Nach reicinn air tunnachan òir.
II
Chi mi a’ ghrian an liath nam flaitheanas,
Chi mi ‘s an iar a ciar ‘n uair luidheas i ;
Cha ‘n ionnan ‘s mar tha i ghnàth ‘s a’ bhaile so
N deatach a’ falach a glòir.
III
Gheibh mi ann ceòl bho eòin na Duthaige,
Ged a tha ‘n t-àm thar àm na cuthaige,
Tha smeoraichean ann is annsa guth leam
Na plob, no fiodhal mar cheòL
IV
Gheibh mi le lìontan iasgach sgadain ann,
Gheibh mi le iarraidh bric a’s bradain ann ;
Na’m faighinn mo mhiann ‘s ann ann a stadainn.
S ann ann is fhaid’ bhithinn beò.
V*
Chi mi ann coilltean, rhi ini ann doireachan,
Clii nii ann màghan bàn’ is torraiche.
Chi mi na fèidh air làr nan coireachan,
Falaicht’ an trusgan do cheò.

NOTE
* coro e strofe presenti nella versione standard

TRADUZIONE INGLESE J. Mark Sugars 1998
I
I shall see without delay the place where I was born,
I shall receive a welcome in the language that I understand;
I shall get there a smile and love when I arrive
That I would not trade for tons of gold(1).
II
I shall see the sun grow pale in the sky
I shall see the dusk in the west when it sets;
It won’t be like it always is in this town(2),
The smoke hiding its glory.
III
There I shall get music from the birds of my Homeland,
Although the time is after the time of the cuckoo,(3)
Mavises are there and their sound is dearer to me
Than pipe or fiddle for music.
IV
I shall get herring with fishing-nets there,
I shall get trout and salmon by asking there;
If I were to get my desire it’s there I would stay,
And it’s there I would live the longest.
V
There I shall see woods, there I shall see oak groves(4),
There I shall see fair and fertile fields,
I shall see the deer on the floor of the corries,
Veiled by a shroud of mist.
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Vedrò presto il luogo in cui sono nato
e sarò accolto nella lingua che capisco
riceverò al mio arrivo cortesie e affetto
che non cambierei per quintali d’oro(1)
II
Vedrò il sole diventare pallido nel cielo
e vedrò il tramonto ad ovest quando cala
non sarà sempre come in questa città(2)
con l’inquinamento che nasconde il suo splendore
III
Là sentirò la musica degli uccelli della mia terra
anche se è passata la stagione del cuculo(3)
ci sono i tordi e il loro canto mi è più caro
del suono del flauto o del violino
IV
Pescherò le aringhe con le reti là
prenderò trote e salmoni a volontà là
se dipendesse da me e là dove vorrei stare
e dove vorrei vivere a lungo
V
Vedrò i boschi, i boschi di querce(4)
vedrò la più fertile e bella terra
vedrò il cervo ai piedi delle conche
nascoste da una coltre di nebbia

NOTE
1) l’espressione idiomatica in italiano preferisce “quintali d’oro” anche se letteralmente in inglese si dice “una tonnellata”
2) Glasgow
3) la poesia è stata scritta agli inizi dell’autunno (del 1856), quando il cuculo è già emigrato verso le terre più calde
4) i boschetti di querce sono il greennwood, ovvero il  nemeton, il bosco sacro; doireachan è tradotto altrove come thickets
5) corrie (coire) è un anfiteatro morenico nel dizionario inglese si legge “is a circular dip or bowl-shaped geographical feature in a Scottish or Irish highland mountain or hillside formed by glaciation.” Le montagne vengono descritte non genericamente ma con preciso riferimento alla morfologia del territorio intorno a Ballachulish

Glen-coe Taken near Ballachulish null William Daniell 1769-1837 Presented by Tate Gallery Publications 1979 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02823
Glen-coe vista da Ballachulish (Tate Gallery Publications 1979)

Nel settimanale  della contea di Argyll “The Oban Times”  (8 Aprile 1882) vennero pubblicate anche le altre strofe della canzone intitolata questa volta “Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh” 

VERSIONE IN GAELICO SCOZZESE

Il testo è stato scritto in gaelico scozzese ed è incentrato sulla nostalgia per le amate montagne, la melodia è lenta con l’andamento di una ninna-nanna.

ASCOLTA The Rankin Family 1989

ASCOLTA Solas

ASCOLTA Quadriga Consort live

CHÌ MI NA MÒRBHEANNA (versione standard)
O, chì, chì mi na mòrbheanna;
O, chì, chì mi na còrrbheanna;
O, chì, chì mi na coireachan,
Chì mi na sgoran fo cheò.
I
Chì mi gun dàil an t-àite ‘san d’ rugadh mi;
Cuirear orm fàilte ‘sa chànan a thuigeas mi;
Gheibh mi ann aoidh agus gràdh nuair ruigeam,
Nach reicinn air thunnachan òir.
II
Chì mi ann coilltean; chi mi ann doireachan;
Chì mi ann màghan bàna is toraiche;
Chì mi na fèidh air làr nan coireachan,
Falaicht’ an trusgan de cheò.
III
Beanntaichean àrda is àillidh leacainnean
Sluagh ann an còmhnuidh is còire cleachdainnean
‘S aotrom mo cheum a’ leum g’am faicinn
Is fanaidh mi tacan le deòin
IV
Fàilt’ air na gorm-mheallaibh, tholmach, thulachnach;
Fàilt air na còrr-bheannaibh mòra, mulanach;
Fàilt’ air na coilltean, is fàilt’ air na h-uile –
O! ‘s sona bhith fuireach ‘nan còir.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
O, I will see, I will see the great mountains,
O, I will see, I will see the lofty mountains,
O, I will see, I will see the corries(5),
I’ll see the mist covered peaks.
I
I will soon see the place of my birth.
They’ll welcome me in a language I’ll understand.
I’ll receive attention and love when I get there,
which I wouldn’t sell for tons of gold(1).
II
There I’ll see forests, there I’ll see groves.
There I’ll see fair, fruitful meadows.
I’ll see deer at the foot of the corries,
hidden in the mantles of mist.
III
High mountains and beautiful ledges,
folk there always kind by custom,
light is my step as I go bounding to see them,
and I’ll willingly stay a long while.
IV
Hail to the blue-green, grassy, hilly,
hail to the hummocky, high-peaked mountains.
Hail to the forests, hail to all there;
o, contentedly would I live there forever.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Vedrò le grandi montagne
Oh vedrò le alte montagne
vedrò le conche (5)
vedrò le cime coperte dalla nebbia
I
Vedrò presto il luogo in cui sono nato
e sarò accolto nella lingua che capisco
riceverò al mio arrivo cortesie e affetto
che non cambierei per quintali d’oro(1)
II
Vedrò le foreste, vedrò il bosco antico (4)
vedrò la più fertile e bella terra
vedrò il cervo ai piedi delle conche
nascoste da una coltre di nebbia.
III
Alte montagne e splendidi pendii
genti che sono sempre di modi gentili
leggero il passo quando vado a trovarli
e volentieri resterei là per molto tempo.
IV
Salve alle colline d’erba verde scuro
salve ai monti corrugati in alti picchi
salve alle foreste, salve a tutto,
contento vorrei vivere là per sempre.

VERSIONE IN INGLESE:The Mist Covered Mountains

Il testo è stato adattato anche in inglese da Malcolm MacFarlane (secondo il gusto romantico di fine ottocento) e pubblicato in “The ministrelsy of the scottish highlands ” di Alfred Moffat, 1907 (vedi). Così è con questo titolo che il brano viene chiamato anche solo nella sua versione strumentale. Molti gli artisti di fama che lo hanno riprodotto.

ASCOLTA Ryan’s fancy 1979


CHORUS
Oh ho soon shall I see them,
Oh he ho see them, oh see them;
Oh ho ro soon shall I see them,
The mist covered mountains of home.
I
There I shall visit the place of my birth,
And they’ll give me a welcome
to the warmest on earth;
All so loving and kind, full of music and mirth,
In the sweet sounding language of home.
II
There I shall gaze on the mountains again,
On the fields and the woods
and the burns and the glens;
And away ‘mong the corries beyond human ken,
In the haunts of the deer I shall roam.
III
Hail to the mountains with summits of blue,
To the glens with their meadows
of sunshine and dew;
To the women and men ever constant and true,
Ever ready to welcome one home.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Oh presto le rivedrò
le rivedrò, le rivedrò
Oh presto le rivedrò
le montagne natie coperte dalla nebbia
I
Là visiterò i posti in cui sono nato
che mi daranno il benvenuto
il più caloroso della terra,
tutto è così amorevole e gentile, pieno di musica e allegria
nel dolce suono della lingua di casa.
II
Là guarderò di nuovo i monti
i campi e i boschi
i ruscelli e le valli
e lontano tra le conche al di sopra delle case degli uomini, dove si trovano i cervi andrò
III
Salve alle montagne dalle cime blu
alle valli con i loro prati
di sole e rugiada
alle donne e agli uomini sempre fedeli e sinceri
sempre pronti ad accogliere uno in casa.

LA MELODIA

Per gli scozzesi SAW YE JOHNNY COMIN, per gli inglesi JOHNNY BYDES LANG AT THE FAIR
La filastrocca “What Can the Matter Be?”(anche “Johnny’s So Long at the Fair.”) che a sua volta deriva dalla ballata Johnny bydes lang at the fair.. (qui)  nel The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes  viene datata tra il 1770 e il 1780.
In America ne venne fatta una parodia con il titolo  “Seven Old Ladies Locked in the Lavatory”,
“The Society for Creative Anachronism doesn’t feel it’s a valid Medieval song because the rendition we all know today comes from a collection of sheet music in the 1770’s or so. But truth is it dates farther back from that, coming from a really old ditty entitled “Saw Ye Johnny Comin’”. It’s English in origin, although there is at least one recorded Anglo-Scot rendition.” (tratto da qui)

In Mudcat Malcom Douglas scrive ” The tunes are fundamentally the same, though they have grown apart with the years.  According to  The Fiddler’s Companion, Oh Dear What Can the Matter Be (a.k.a. Johnny’s So Long at the Fair) was first published in the British Lyre for 1792, and “was sung as a famous duet between Samuel Harrison and his wife, the soprano Miss Cantelo, at Harrison’s Concerts, periodic events which he began in 1776”.  It became, as a consequence, widely-known, and turns up in England, Scotland and Ireland in various forms, and, as was mentioned above, the Scottish variant under discussion was used by Junior Crehan as the basis for his jig Misty Mountain.”(qui)

ASCOLTA Fuzzy Felt Folk 2006 la versione come poteva essere cantata all’epoca

Nell’adattamento di John Cameron diventa una melodia dolce ma malinconica a metà tra il lament e una slow march, e da allora che viene eseguita spesso nelle commemorazioni funebri.

ASCOLTA John Renbourn in The Black Ballon, 1979 con il titolo di The Mist Covered Mountains of Home (seguono The Orphan, Tarboulton)

ASCOLTA con le cornamuse

Qui suonata quasi come un walzer lento

e qui suonata come jig
ASCOLTA De Dannan 1980

FONTI
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02823
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/pageturner.cfm?id=76643345&mode=transcription
http://ingeb.org/songs/mistcovd.html
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_mist.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mouthmusic/chi.htm
http://apocalypsewriters.com/blog/tag/saw-ye-him-coming/
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/chimi.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/3411
https://thesession.org/tunes/470
https://thesession.org/tunes/256
http://ericdentinger.com/themistcoveredmountains_en.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/ohdearwhatcanthematterbe.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1393

JOHNNY HAS GONE FOR A SOLDIER

The Spinning Wheel, c.1855 (oil on panel)“Siuil a Ruin” scritto con la grafia inglese come “Shule Aroon“, o come “Suil a Gra” (Shule agrah), è il richiamo lanciato da una donna irlandese al suo amore andato in Francia a combattere come “Wild Geese“, perchè ritorni da lei.
Una canzone tradizionale XVIII secolo (forse risalente alla fine del 1600, quando con il trattato di Limerick, venne permesso agli irlandesi che avevano combattuto al fianco dello sconfitto Giacomo II, di espatriare in Francia). La canzone emigrò in America e divenne un canto tradizionale della Rivoluzione americana del 1776, per ritornare in auge nel secolo successivo tra i soldati che combattevano nella Guerra civile; è considerata un classico della tradizione americana, perciò interpretata da molti tra i più grandi artisti popolari.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA

In America cambia il titolo in  “Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier” (Buttermilk Hill) o anche come “Gone the Rainbow”. Il testo della canzone si contraddistingue rispetto alla versione irlandese (vedere qui) dall’aggiunta nella I strofa di una Buttermilk Hill e, in alcune versioni, dalla morte in battaglia di Johnny. E tuttavia le versioni americane perdono spesso l’accorato richiamo della donna che invoca il ritorno del suo amore; piuttosto ella è rassegnata al suo ruolo di donna piangente, in attesa che lui compia il suo dovere di soldato.

ASCOLTA John Tams nella miniserie TV Sharpe’s Battle diretta da Tom Clegg, episodio n 7 (1995)

In questa breve clip la canzone non ha ritornello


I
Here I sit on Butternut Hill(1)
Who would blame me cry my fill
Every tear would turn a mill
Johnny is gone for a soldier
II
I’ll sell my ruck(2), I’ll sell me reel(3)
I’ll even sell my spinning wheel
Buy my love a coat of steel(4)
Johnny’s gone for a soldier

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Seduta qui sulla Buttermilk Hill,
chi biasimerebbe tutte le mie lacrime,
ogni lacrima da far girare un mulino,
Johnny è andato militare
II
Venderò l’aspo e la conocchia
e anche il mio filatoio a ruota
per comperare al mio amore una corazza d’acciaio, Johnny è andato militare

NOTE
1) Nella contea di Jackson, nello Stato dell’Illinois, c’è una località chiamata Buttermilk Hill.
2) e 3)  trovato scritto anche come rock, rack sono parti del filatoio a ruota (spinning wheel) (vedi dettaglio) In alcune versioni diventa clock
4) a mio avviso la donna sarebbe disposta a vendere tutto ciò che ha di prezioso per comprare una buona spada o un’armatura (un temine un po’ anacronistico per l’armamentario di un soldato del 700-800!), non perchè voglia sostenere la sua decisione di andare a combattere, bensì perchè egli possa avere qualche chance in più di restare vivo e ritornare da lei sano e salvo

La versione più estesa della canzone

 

Here I sit on Butternut Hill
Who would blame me cry my fill
Every tear would turn a mill
Johnny is gone for a soldier

Chorus:
Shule shule, shule agrah(5)
His nets and creel are laid away
Till he comes back I’ll rue the day
Johnny is gone for a soldier

With fife’s and drums he marched away
War dost came he couldn’t stay
Till he comes back I’ll rue the day
Johnny’s gone for a soldier

I’ll sell my ruck, I’ll sell me reel
I’ll even sell my spinning wheel
Buy my love a coat of steel
Johnny’s gone for a soldier

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Seduta qui sulla Butternut Hill,
chi biasimerebbe tutte le mie lacrime,
ogni lacrima da far girare un mulino,
Johnny è andato militareCoro
Vieni, vieni, vieni, amore mio,
le sue reti e le nasse sono messe da parte
io maledico il giorno fino a quando non farà ritorno, Johnny è andato militare.Con pifferi e tamburi a passo di marcia è andato via, la guerra è venuta e lui non poteva restare, io maledico il giorno fino a quando non farà ritorno, Johnny è andato militareVenderò l’aspo e la conocchia
e anche il mio filatoio a ruota
per comperare al mio amore una corazza d’acciaio, Johnny è andato militare

NOTE
1) Come, come, come O love,

ASCOLTA James Taylor & Mark O’Connor

 

I
There she sits on Buttermilk Hill
Oh, who could blame her cryin’ her fill
Every tear would turn a mill
Jonny has gone for a soldier
CHORUS
Me-oh-my she loved him so
It broke her heart just to see him go
Only time will heal her woe
Johnny has gone for a soldier
II
She sold her rock and she sold her reel
She sold her only spinning wheel
To buy her love a sword of steel
Johnny has gone for a soldier
III
She’ll dye her dress, she’ll dye it red
And in the streets go begging for bread
The one she loves from her has fled
Johnny has gone for a soldier

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Seduta la sulla Buttermilk Hill,
chi biasimerebbe tutte le sue lacrime,
ogni lacrima da far girare un mulino,
Johnny è andato militare
Coro
Lei lo amava così tanto
e le si spezzò il cuore quando lo vide partire
solo il tempo guarirà le sue pene
Johnny è andato militare
II
Vendette l’aspo e la conocchia
e anche il suo unico filatoio a ruota
per comperare al suo amore una spada d’acciaio, Johnny è andato militare
III
Si tingerà le gonne, le tingerà di rosso
e andrà per le strade a mendicare il pane
colui che amava da lei è fuggito
Johnny è andato militare

 

ASCOLTA Solas il gruppo riprende il testo irlandese modificando però il refrain con la frase “Johnny has gone for a soldier”


Oh I wish I were on yonder hill
It’s there I’d sit and cry my fill
‘Til every tear would turn a mill
My Johnny’s gone for a soldier
Well, Johnny, my love, he went away
He would not heed what I did say
He won’t be back for many’s a day
My Johnny’s gone for a soldier
Chorus:
Shule, shule, shule a gra
Oh shule, oh shule and he loves me
When he comes back, he will marry me
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldierI
‘ll sell my rack,
I’ll sell my reel
I’ll sell my only spinning wheel
And buy my love a sword of steel
My Johnny’s gone for a soldier
I’ll dye my petticoat, I’ll dye it red
Around the world I’ll bake my bread
‘Til I find my love alive or dead
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
(Chorus)
But now my love, he has gone to France
To try his fortune to advance
If he returns, it is but a chance
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
(Chorus)
I wish, I wish, I wish in vain
I wish I had my heart again
‘Tis gladly I would not complain
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
(Chorus 2x)
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
Vorrei essere su quella collina lassù
dove mi siederei a piangere a dirotto
ed ogni lacrima girerebbe un mulino,
il mio Johnny è andato militare
Johnny, il mio amore, è partito
Non ha prestato attenzione a quello che gli dicevo
non farà ritorno per un lungo tempo
il mio Johnny è andato militare
RITORNELLO
Vieni, vieni, vieni, amore mio,
presto, vieni da me, lui mi ama
quando ritornerà mi sposerà
il mio Johnny è andato militare
Venderò l’aspo
e la conocchia,
venderò l’unico filatoio a ruota
per comprare una spada d’acciaio al mio amore
il mio Johnny è andato militare
Mi tingerò le gonne, le tingerò di rosso
e me ne andrò per il mondo a mendicare il pane
finché non troverò il mio amore vivo o morto
il mio Johnny è andato militare
(Ritornello)
Ma ora il mio amore è andato in Francia
per tentare di migliorare la sua sorte
ma c’è solo  da sperare che ritorni
il mio Johnny è andato militare
(Ritornello)
Vorrei, vorrei, vorrei ma invano,
vorrei riavere qui il mio amore,
e senz’altro non mi lamenterei
il mio Johnny è andato militare

 

Ma che dire di questa versione strumentale? Lascia senza parole (o senza fiato)..

ASCOLTA Goldmund con il titolo di “Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier”

Non male anche quest’arrangiamento per chitarra
ASCOLTA Mark Ferguson

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sailing-lowlands.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/ye-jacobites.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6969
http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48603
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=336&lang=it
http://stec-173395.blogspot.it/2011/05/fuso-e-telaio.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30259
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/johnnys.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/shulegra.htm

WHEN MY LOVE AND I PARTED

Emigrants_leave_IrelandUna canzone  estremamente popolare nell’Ottocento, dal titolo “When my love and I parted”, dalle incerte origini settecentesche (forse irlandese forse inglese) sulla separazione di due innamorati.

Così su Mudcat è riportata una testimonianza (qui) “I recently came across a reference to this song in the memoirs of a fella by the name of William Grattan who served as an Anglo-Irish officer in Spain over troops from the West of Ireland (The Connaught Rangers). The year was 1812. I was moved by the following account of the mood of the Irish as they were preparing to rush into a brutal breech in the walls of a city called Badajoz near the borders of Portugal. Here’s Grattan’s words: “The band of my corps, the 88th, all Irish, played several airs which exclusively belong to their country, and it is impossible to describe the effect it had upon us all; such an air as “Savourneen Deelish” is sufficient, at any time, to inspire a feeling of melancholy, but on an occasion like the present it acted powerfully on the feelings of the men: they thought of their distant homes, of their friends, and of bygone days. It was Easter Sunday, and the contrast which their present position presented to what to what it would have been in their native land afforded ample food for the occupation of their minds…”

Ma in origine la canzone era il canto d’addio di un soldato irlandese alla fidanzata, ovvero un povero diavolo irlandese costretto dalla necessità a una lunga ferma presso “the British Army”, che una volta ritornato a casa “Peace was proclaim’d,—escaped from the slaughter” scopre che la fidanzata era morta..

Rita Gallagher scrive su Mudcat (qui): “I learned this little song from a recording made by Charlie Herron, Glenfinn, County Donegal, Ireland, an avid collector of songs, made many years ago, at some singing session or other, and I included it in a cassette “Easter Snow” which I made in 1997; cassette kindly promoted and distributed by John Moulden, Ulster Singers, at that time, song has been recorded since then by “Solas” and perhaps others.”

Nella versione ritrovata attraverso la tradizione orale del Donegal non è più il soldato a lamentarsi, ma la fidanzata rimasta in Irlanda, non sappiamo nemmeno il motivo della separazione ma è più probabilmente un lamento per la partenza del fidanzato per l’America!

ASCOLTA Rita Gallagher in The May Morning Dew 2010 originariamente registrata nel 1997 (versione integrale su Spotify)

ASCOLTA Solas & Deirdre Scanlan in “The Hour before Dawn” 2009

When my love and I parted, the wind blew cold
When my love and I parted, our love untold
Though my heart was crying, “Love, come with me”(1)
I turned my face from him and sought the sea
When my love and I parted, we shed no tears
For we knew that between us lay weary years
A bird was singing on a tree
And a gleam of sunlight lay on the sea
Parting is bitter and weeping, vain
But all true lovers will meet again
For no fate can sever my love from me
For his heart is a river and mine, the sea

NOTE
1) è l’uomo che chiede alla donna di seguirlo, ma la domanda è chiaramente senza risposta perchè era già stato difficile trovare i soldi per poter comprare un solo biglietto.. così partiva il più giovane e determinato della famiglia e gli altri ne aspettavano il ritorno o che mandasse i soldi per potersi pagare a loro volta il viaggio..

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Quando il mio amore ed io ci separammo il vento era gelido e il nostro amore era immenso, anche se il mio cuore stava gridando “Amore vieni con me” ho voltato il viso e guardato il mare. Quando il mio amore ed io ci separammo non abbiamo pianto perchè sapevamo che tra di noi ci sarebbero stati anni difficili, un uccello cantò sul ramo e un raggio di sole si posò sul mare. Lasciarci inutilmente è doloroso e straziante, ma tutti i veri innamorati si incontreranno ancora, perchè nessun destino può separarmi dal mio amore che il suo cuore è un fiume e il mio il mare…

LA STORIA DIETRO LA CANZONE

Un primo testo è stato scritto nel 1791 dal commediografo inglese George Coleman il giovane (1762-1834) direttore del  Drury Lane ( Theatre Royal Drury Lane di Londra) per la commedia “The Surrender of Calais“. La melodia è invece tratta dalla commedia “The Poor Soldier” (1783) di William Shield and John O’Keefe con il titolo “Farewell Ye Groves”: “Savournah Delish,” a tune credited to Samuel Arnold (1740-1802) that was used in John O’Keefe and William Shield’s Poor Soldier (1783) for another “farewell song” beginning “Farewell ye Groves” (Wells 502-4; Wolfe, Secular Music #272-76).
Ho trovato lo spartito di Savourna Delish, con la dicitura “attribuito a Samuel Arnold pubblicato a Dublino 1790 circa” e come sottotitolo “a suched amired song in “The Surrender of Calais”.
Lo stesso titolo lo troviamo scritto come “Savourneen Deelish, Eileen Oge”

ASCOLTA John McCormack 1907 in una versione d’epoca
SAVOURNEEN DEELISH, EILEEN OGE(1)
Oh! the moment was sad when my love and I parted;
Savourna deligh shighan ogh!
As I kiss’d off her tears, I was nigh broken hearted;
Savourna deligh shighan ogh;
Wan was her cheek, which hung on my shoulder;
Damp was her hand, no marble was colder;
I felt that I never again should behold her.
Savourna deligh shighan ogh!
Long I fought for my country, far, far from my true love;
Savourna deligh shighan ogh!
All my pay and my booty I hoarded for you, love;
Savourna deligh shighan ogh!
Peace was proclaim’d,—escaped from the slaughter,
Landed at home—my sweet girl I sought her;
But sorrow, alas! to the cold grave had brought her.
Savourna deligh shighan ogh!

NOTE
1) in inglese “Young Eileen, the faithful sweetheart” per celia George Coleman dice di aver avuto il versetto da un suo amico irlandese e che lo scrive così come l’ha sentito storpiando il gaelico ”s a mhuirnin dilis’ ( in inglese “and my own true love” ovvero amore caro)

I due George Coleman e Samuel Arnold collaborarono per la scrittura dell’opera teatrale, ma sebbene la melodia in questione sia stata attribuita a Arnold in realtà già proveniva da un’altra comic opera “The Poor Soldier” (1783) di William Shield, (1754-1829), pure egli inglese. Resta il dubbio se la melodia fosse stata scritta da Shield “in the fashionable “Stage Irish” style of the day” o se fosse una melodia tradizionale irlandese (e il sospetto ha una sua fondatezza essendo John O’Keefe, commediografo e librettista, di origini irlandesi).
Ritroviamo il testo nella raccolta “American Memory” della Biblioteca del Congresso con un’ulteriore strofa finale
She is gone now, alas! and thus left me forlorn,
Savourneen deelish Eileen oge!
I’ll take to the desart, forever I’ll mourn,
Savourneen deelish Eileen oge!
Not the warbling throng, with the notes so charming,
Never shall soothe my grief or mourning,
But in silent solitude, sighing for my Darling.

FONTI
http://www.brendanmcauleymusic.com/#!reviews/c1kam http://www.monartcollection.com/category/the-music-collection/18th-century-music/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=83225 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=12700 http://www.contemplator.com/ireland/deelish.html http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/Moyl173.html http://www.kalliope.org/en/digt.pl?longdid=moore2000082969 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/when.htm

THE MAID ON THE SHORE IS IT A MERMAID?

Read the post in English

Un filone fecondo della tradizione ballatistica europea che affonda le sue radici nel medioevo, è quello cosiddetto della “fanciulla sulla spiaggia”;  Riccardo Venturi riassume il commonplace in modo puntuale  “fanciulla solitaria che passeggia sulle rive del mare – nave che arriva – comandante o marinaio che la richiama a bordo – fanciulla che s’imbarca di spontanea volontà – ripensamento e rimorso – pensieri alla casa materna / coniugale – dramma che si compie (in vari modi)
Nelle “warning ballads” si ammoniscono le brave fanciulle a non mettersi grilli per il capo,  a stare al loro posto (accanto al focolare a sfornare manicaretti e bambini) e a non avventurarsi in “ruoli maschili”, altrimenti finiranno disonorate o stuprate o uccise. Meglio quindi la gabbia più o meno dorata che già si conosce piuttosto che il volo libero.
Ogni tanto però la fanciulla riesce a trionfare con l’astuzia, sulle prepotenti voglie maschili, cosi nella “(Fair) Maid on the Shore” si trasforma lei stessa in predatrice!

Mermaid
Rebecca Guay: Mermaid

LA SIRENA SULLA SPIAGGIA

E’ una sirena, che il capitano vede in una notte di luna, camminare lungo la spiaggia (è risaputo che selkie e sirene possono camminare con piedi umani nelle notti di luna piena). Subito s’invaghisce e manda una scialuppa per portare la fanciulla sulla sua nave (con le buone o con le cattive), ma appena lei canta, getta un incantesimo su tutto l’equipaggio.
E qui finisce il tema fantastico e magico: la fanciulla si prende tutti gli oggetti di valore e l’oro e l’argento e ritorna alla sua spiaggia, ben lungi dall’essere una creatura fragile e indifesa, così anche il suo depredare i tesori richiama il topos della sirena che raccoglie le cose luccicose dalle navi (dopo averne causato naufragio e  morte) per “arredare” la sua grotta!(mer)maid on the shoreBertrand Bronson nel suo “Tunes of the Child Ballads” classifica “Fair Maid on the Shore” come una variante di Broomfield Hill (Child #43), la ballata è stata trovata più raramente in Irlanda (dove si presume sia originaria) e più diffusamente in America (e in particolare in Canada). Così riporta Ewan MacCall (The Long Harvest, Volume 3): “Più comunemente trovato negli Stati Uniti nord-orientali, Nuova Scozia e Terranova è un curioso adattamento marino della storia in cui il cavaliere di Broomfield Hill viene trasformato in un galante capitano di mare. La giovane donna su cui si è fatto un pensierino, riesce a preservare la sua castità cantando al suo aspirante amante e addormentandolo”

A.L. Lloyd canta The Maid on the Shore nell’album The Foggy Dew and Other Traditional English Love Songs (1956) e commenta “Così come la canzone arriva a noi, è la ballata  di una ragazza troppo intelligente per un capitano di mare vizioso. Ma una versione della ballata come cantata in Irlanda suggerisce qualcosa di sinistro dietro al racconto scanzonato. Perchè la ragazza è una Sirena o una donna del Mare.”


I
It’s of a sea captain that sailed the salt sea
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o (1)
And a beautiful damsel he changed for to spy
walking alone on the shore, shore
walking alone on the shore
II
What I’ll give to you me sailors boys
and …  costly ware-o (2).
if you’ll fleach me that girl aboard of my ship
who walks all alone on the shore, shore
walks all alone on the shore
III
So the sailors they got them a very long boat
And off for the shore they did steer-o,
Saying, “Ma’am if you please will you enter on board
To view a fine cargo of ware (3), ware
To view a fine cargo of ware.”
IV
With much persuasion they got her on board
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
she sat herself down in the stern of the boat
off for the ship they did steer, steer
off for the ship they did steer.
V
And when they’ve arrived alongside of the ship
the captain he order his chew-o,
Saying, “First you should lie in my arms all this night
and may be I’ll marry you dear, dear
may be I’ll marry you dear(4)
VI (5)
She sat herself down in the stern of the ship
the seas they were fine, calm and clear-o,
She sang so neat, so sweet and complete,
She sang sailors and captain to sleep, sleep
sang sailors and captain to sleep.
VII
She’s robbed them of silver, she’s robbed them of gold,
she’s robbed their costly ware-o.
And the captain’s bright sword she’s took for an oar
And she’s paddled away for the shore, shore/ paddled away for the shore.
VIII
And when he awaken he find she was gone
he would like a man in despair-o
… she deluded both captain and crew
“I’m a maid once more on the shore, shore
I’m a maid once more on the shore”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Si narra di un capitano che navigava in alto mare
e i mari erano sereni, calmi e chiari-o
e una bellissima fanciulla gli capitò di vedere
mentre camminava sola sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
mentre camminava sola sulla spiaggia
II
Quello che vi darò miei marinai
..
se mi porterete quella ragazza a bordo della nave
che cammina tutta sola sulla spiaggia, cammina tutta sola sulla spiaggia.
III
Così i marinai presero la loro
scialuppa
e verso riva manovrarono-o
dicono “Madama, vi preghiamo di salire a bordo per ammirare un carico di bella merce,
ammirare un carico di bella merce
IV
Con molte chiacchiere la presero a bordo,
i mari erano sereni, calmi e
chiari-o
lei si sedette a  poppa della scialuppa
e indietro verso la nave loro manovrarono,
indietro verso la nave manovrarono.
V
E quando arrivarono al fianco della nave
il capitano ordina il suo tabacco da masticare e dice “Per prima cosa dormirai con me tutta la notte
e forse ti sposerò, cara
forse ti sposerò”
VI
Lei si sedette a  poppa della
nave
i mari erano sereni, calmi e chiari-o
lei cantò in modo puro, dolce e perfetto;
cantò per far addormentare  i marinai e il capitano
cantò per far addormentare  i marinai e il capitano.
VII
Li derubò dell’argento, li derubò dell’oro,
li derubò della loro preziosa mercanzia
e la luccicante spada del capitano prese come remo
e remò via verso la terra,
remò via verso la terra.
VIII
E quando si svegliò e scoprì che lei se n’era andata
sembrava un uomo disperato
..
“Sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
avendo trascritto il testo direttamente dall’ascolto, ci sono alcune parole che mi sfuggono (e che per un madre-lingua sono invece chiarissime! sono benvenute le integrazioni)
1) il verso è utilizzato come un ritornello sullo schema botta e risposta tipico delle sea shanty
2) il capitano promette una sostanziosa ricompensa ai marinai, ma non capisco la pronuncia
3) in altre versioni più esplicite si manda il giovane mozzo a mostrare alla ragazza anelli e altri gioielli preziosi, chiedendole di salire a bordo per poter ammirarne di ancora più belli
4) in una versione più crudele il capitano minaccia di dare la ragazza in pasto alla sua ciurma, se non sarà carina con lui
First you will lie in my arms all this night
And then I’ll give you to me jolly young crew,
5) Manca la strofa in cui la fanciulla tira fuori la sua spavalderia
“Oh thank you, oh thank you,” this young girl she cried,
“It’s just what I’ve been waiting for-o:
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead
As I walked all alone on the shore.”

Nelle versioni scandinave della storia la fanciulla viene prima allettata con lusinghe a bordo della nave e quindi rapita, nella versione francese L’ Epee Liberatrice è una principessa che sale sulla nave perchè vuole imparare la canzone cantata dal giovane mozzo: si addormenta e quando si sveglia scopre di essere in alto mare, chiede a un marinaio una spada e si uccide, la versione italiana (Il corsaro -Costantino Nigra) segue una storia simile, ma è la versione irlandese che si sofferma sul canto magico della sirena.

La ballata  ha molti interpreti per lo più di ambito folk o folk-rock

Stan Rogers in Fogarty’s Cove (1976)
John Renbourn group in The Enchanted Garden, 1980 (strofe I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VIII)

Eliza Carthy in Rough Music, 2005 che la restituisce come una sea shanty per sole voci a “chiamata e risposta”

The Once in The Once 2009


I (1)
There is a young maiden,
she lives all a-lone
She lived all a-lone on the shore-o
There’s nothing she can find
to comfort her mind
But to roam all a-lone on the shore, shore, shore
But to roam all a-lone on the shore
II
‘Twas of the young (2) Captain
who sailed the salt sea
Let the wind blow high, blow low
I will die, I will die,
the young Captain did cry
If I don’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
III (3)
I have lots of silver,
I have lots of gold
I have lots of costly ware-o
I’ll divide, I’ll divide,
with my jolly ship’s cres
If they row me that maid on the shore, shore, shore…
IV (4)
After much persuasion,
they got her aboard
Let the wind blow high, blow low
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Here’s adieu (5) to all sorrow and care, care, care…
V  (6)
They replaced her away
in his cabin below
Let the wind blow high, blow low
She’s so pretty and neat,
she’s so sweet and complete
She’s sung Captain and sailors to sleep, sleep, sleep…
VI (7)
Then she robbed him of silver,
she robbed him of gold
She robbed him of costly ware-o
Then took his broadsword
instead of an oar
And paddled her way to the shore, shore, shore…
VII
Me men must be crazy,
me men must be mad
Me men must be deep in despair-o
For to let you away from my cabin so gay
And to paddle your way to the shore, shore, shore…
VIII (8)
Your men was not crazy,
your men was not mad
Your men was not deep in despair-o
I deluded your sailors as well as yourself
I’m a maiden again on the shore, shore, shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una giovane fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia- o
e non trovava niente con cui confortare il suo animo,
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia
così vagava tutta sola sulla spiaggia
II
C’era un giovane capitano
che salpò sull’oceano,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire
– gridava il giovane capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
III
Ho tanto argento
ho tanto oro,
ho tante cose preziose
che dividerò, dividerò
con la mia ciurma
se mi porteranno quella fanciulla
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …”
IV
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portarono a bordo
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
la sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
per fargli dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni.
V
La sistemarono  fin
nella sua cabina sottocoperta,
(che il vento soffi in lungo e in largo)
Era così bella e pura,
dolce e ben fatta e
cantò per far addormentare il capitano e i marinai.
VI
Allora lo derubò dell’argento
lo derubò dell’oro
lo derubò delle cose preziose,
usò il suo spadone
come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia …
VII
“Oh i miei uomini sono furiosi
i miei uomini sono arrabbiati
i miei uomini sono sprofondati nella disperazione più cupa
perchè sei fuggita da una cabina così allegra e hai vogato per ritornare alla spiaggia”.
VIII
“I tuoi uomini han poco da essere furiosi e arrabbiati
I tuoi uomini han poco da essere disperati, ho beffato i tuoi marinai e anche te
e sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
La versione testuale del John Renbourn group differisce di poco dalla versione di Stan
1) There was a young maiden, who lives by the shore
Let the wind blow high, blow low
no one could she find to comfort her mind
and she set all a-lone on the shore,
she set all a-lone on the shore
2) oppure Sea
3) The captain had silver, the captain had gold
And captain had costly ware-o
All these he’ll give to his jolly ship crew
to bring him that maid on the shore
4) And slowly slowly she came upon board
the captain gave her a chair-o
he sited her down in the cabin below
adieu to all sorrow and care
5) nella versione di Renbourn la frase è più chiara, sono le pene d’amore che il capitano cerca di alleviare stuprando la fanciulla!
6) She sited herself in the bow of the ship
she sang so loud and sweet-o
She sang so sweet, gentle and complete
She sang all the seamen to sleep
7) She part took of his silver, part took of his gold
part took of his costly ware-o
she took his broadsword to make an oar
to paddle her back to the shore,
8) Your men must be crazy, your men must be mad
your men must be deep in despair-o
I deluded at them all as has yourself
again I’m a maiden on the shore,

 Solas in “Sunny Spells And Scattered Showers” (1997) (la recensione dell’album qui)


I
There was a fair maid
and she lived all alone
She lived all alone on the shore
No one could she find for to calm her sweet mind (1)
But to wander alone on the shore, shore, shore
To wander alond on the shore
II
There was a brave captain
who sailed a fine ship
And the weather being steady and fair (2)/”I shall die, I shall die,”
this dear captain did cry
“If I can’t have that maid on the shore, shore, shore
If I can’t have that maid on the shore”
III
After many persuasions
they brought her on board
He seated her down on his chair
He invited her down to his cabin below
Farewell to all sorrow and care
Farewell to all sorrow and care (3).
IV
“I’ll sing you a song,”
this fair maid did cry
This captain was weeping for joy
She sang it so sweetly, so soft and completely
She sang the captain and sailors to sleep
Captain and sailors to sleep
V
She robbed them of jewels,
she robbed them of wealth (4)
She robbed them of costly fine fare
The captain’s broadsword she used as an oar
She rowed her way back to the shore, shore, shore
She rowed her way back to the shore
VI
Oh the men, they were mad and the men, they were sad
They were deeply sunk down in despair
To see her go away with her booty so gay
The rings and her things and her fine fare
The rings and her things and her fine fare
VII
“Well, don’t be so sad and sunk down in despair
And you should have known me before
I sang you to sleep and I robbed you of wealth
Well, again I’m a maid on the shore, shore, shore
Again I’m a maid on the shore”
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
C’era una bella fanciulla
che viveva tutta sola
viveva tutta sola sulla spiaggia
e non trovava nessuno con cui placare il suo animo sereno
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia,
sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
così vagava sola sulla spiaggia.
II
C’era un coraggioso capitano
che salpò su una bella nave,
e il tempo era stabile e bello
“Vorrei morire, vorrei morire* – gridava questo egregio capitano –
se non posso avere quella fanciulla sulla spiaggia spiaggia,
se non posso avere quella fanciulla ”
III
Dopo molte chiacchiere
la portano a bordo,
la fece sedere accanto alla propria sedia e la invitò nella sua cabina,
per dimenticare tutto il dolore e le preoccupazioni
IV
“Ti canterò una canzone ”
– gridò questa bella fanciulla.
Il capitano stava piangendo per la gioia, lei cantò così amabilmente, così dolcemente,
cantò per addormentare il capitano e i marinai, per addormentare il capitano e i marinai
V
Li derubò dei gioielli,
li derubò della salute ,
li derubò del cibo raffinato e costoso, usò lo spadone del capitano come un remo
e vogò per ritornare alla spiaggia, sulla spiaggia, spiaggia,
e vogò per ritornare sulla spiaggia.
VI
Oh gli uomini divennero pazzi
e gli uomini divennero tristi, sprofondarono nella disperazione più cupa
nel vederla andarsene tutta contenta con la refurtiva,
gli anelli e le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato,
gli anelli le sue cose e
il cibo raffinato.
VII
“Non siate così tristi e affranti dalla disperazione,
avreste dovuto riconoscermi prima, cantai per farvi addormentare e vi rubai la salute
e adesso sono di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia, spiaggia, spiaggia
di nuovo una fanciulla sulla spiaggia”

NOTE
1) la frase avrebbe più senso se fosse invece “per placare il suo animo inquieto”
2) il riferimento al bel tempo non è casuale, infatti l’avvistamento di una sirena era sinonimo dell’avvicinarsi di una tempesta
3) ovvero per sollazzarsi con la fanciulla (presumibilmente vergine)
4) la donna non è solo una ladra ma una creatura fatata che ruba la salute dei marinai

FONTI
Folk Songs of the Catskills (Norman Cazden, Herbert Haufrecht, Norman Studer)
http://home.olemiss.edu/~mudws/reviews/catskill.html
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung24.htm

https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=50848
http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/s/stan_rogers/the_maid_on_the_shore.html https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/themaidontheshore.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35649
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51828 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/maid.htm http://www.8notes.com/scores/5463.asp