Chuachag nan Craobh, Cuckoo Of The Grove

“Chuachag nan craobhis” (The Cuckoo of the Branches) is a Scottish Gaelic song composed by William Ross schoolmaster of Gairloch, Ross-shire, born 1762 he died of TB in 1790.  In this love song, the poet is addressing a cuckoo he heard in the woods. He is sad at being rejected by the woman he loved deeply
“Chuachag nan craobhis” (Il Cuculo del Boschetto) è canto in gaelico scozzese composto da William Ross maestro di scuola di Gairloch, Ross-shire, nato nel 1762, morì di tubercolosi nel 1790. In questa canzone d’amore il poeta si rivolge a un cuculo che ha sentito nei boschi. E’ triste per essere stato rifiutato dalla donna che ama profondamente.

Isabelle Watson · Christiane Rupp · Nikita Pfister in  Filidh Ruadh- Loch Maree – Ballades Ecossaises 2012

Stephen J. Wood

Kerrie Finlay & Marlene Rapson Yule

Fiona J. Mackenzie

A chuachag nan craobh, nach truagh leat mo chaoidh
Ag òsnaich ri oidhche cheòthar?
Shiùbhlainn le’m ghaol fo dhubhar nan craobh
Gun duin’ air an t-saoghal fheòraich
Thogainn ri gaoith am monadh an fhraoich
Mo leabaid ri taobh dòrainn
Do chrutha geal caomh bhi sinnte ri m’ thaobh
‘Us mise ‘gad chaoin phògadh

Chunna mi fhìn aisling, ‘s cha bhreug
Dh’fhàg sin mo chré brònach
Fear ma ri té, a pògadh a bhéil
A’ brìodal an déigh pòsaidh
Dh’ùraich mo mhiann, dh’àith’rraich mo chiall
Ghuil mi gu dian dòimeach
Gach cuisle, us féith, o ìochdar mo chléibh
Thug iad gu leum còmhla

Thuit mi le d’ghath, mhill thu mo rath
Strìochd mi le neart dòrainn
Saighdean do ghaoil sàidht’ anns gach taobh
Thug dhìom gach caoin còmhla
Mhill thu mo mhais, ghoid thu mo dhreach
‘S mheudaich thu gal bròin domh
‘S mu fuasgail thu tràth, le d’fhuran ‘s le d’fhàilt’
Is cuideachd am bàs dhomh-sa

 
English translation *
I
O cuckoo of the wood are not grieved at my mood?
At eve heavy-dewed, I’m suspiring;
I would stray with my love in the shade of the grove,
Where’er we might rove none enquiring;
I would face the wind’s breath on the hill of the heath,
My bed in the teeth of distresses,
Thy white form refined stretched out by my side
While I fond multiplied my caresses
II
I saw in a dream, no lie did it seem
What my heart made extremely sad,
A man with a maid whose lips he essayed
Nor fondling delayed, having wed,
It freshened my fire, renewed my desire,
I wept in my direful swither,
Each artery and vein from the depth of my frame,
They leaped unrestrained together.
III
By thine arrow I fell, thou my luck didst dispel,
I yielded by fell strength of weather,
And, alas, thy love dart is stuck in each part,
Thou has reft me my heart altogether.
Thou has ruined my face, and stolen my grace,
And deepened each trace of depression;
Unless thou beguile me with welcome and smile,
Death’s in a short while my obsession.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
O cuculo del bosco non ti senti afflitto dal mio umore?
Nella veglia umida di rugiada, sto sospirando
Vorrei allontanarmi con il mio amore all’ombra del boschetto,
Ovunque si possa vagare senza domande;
Vorrei fronteggiare il vento della brughiera sulla collina
Il mio letto consumato
La tua bianca forma tornita stesa al mio fianco, Mentre innamorato moltiplicavo le mie carezze
II
Vidi in un sogno, sembrava sincero
E ha addolorato il mio cuore, Un uomo con una fanciulla le cui labbra assaggiò; Nessuna tenerezza rimandata, essendo sposati,
Ha rinfrescato il mio fuoco, rinnovato il mio desiderio,  Piansi nella mia terribile agitazione, Ogni arteria e vena dalla profondità della mia impalcatura,
Esultarono scatenati insieme.
III
Al tuo dardo caddi, tu la mia buona sorte facesti allontanare
Mi sono arreso alla crudele forza della tempesta,
E, ahimè, il tuo dardo d’amore è conficcato in ogni parte,
Tu mi hai spezzato del tutto il cuore.
Mi hai rovinato il volto e rubato la grazia
E approfondito ogni traccia di depressione;
A meno che tu non mi accetti con il benvenuto e il sorriso,
La morte sarà tra poco la mia ossessione.

*una traduzione migliore per tempi migliori

Another version of the melody was later adapted for the Jacobite ‘Skye Boat Song‘. 
Un’altra versione della melodia è diventata la canzone giacobita dal titolo ‘Skye Boat Song‘. 

LINKS
https://archive.org/details/gaelicsongs00ross
https://www.electricscotland.com/history/gairloch/g242.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/macinnes/cuachag.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/15298/4
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/16968/4

Morag and the Kelpie

Leggi in italiano

In the most placid rivers of Ireland and in the dark depths of the Scottish lakes live water demons, fairy creatures, that feed on human flesh: they are “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich- mhara “(in English sea horse); to want to be picky kelpie lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while each uisge prefers the lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both. Similar creatures are also told in Norse legends (Bäckahästen, the river horse) – and Germanic (nix in the form of fish or frog). (first part)

MORAG AND THE KELPIE

At the summer pastures of the Highlands they are still told of the beautiful Morag (Marion) seduced by a kelpie in human form; she, while noticing the strangeness of her husband, did not understand his true nature, if not after the birth of their child and … she decided to abandoning baby in swaddling clothes and husband shapeshifter!

On the Isle of Skye they still sing a song in Gaelic, ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ or ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) the “Lullaby of the kelpie” a melancholy air with which the kelpie cradled his child without a mother, and at the same time a plea to Morag to return to them, both he and the child needed her.
Of this lament we know several textual versions handed down to today in the Hebrides. The melodies revolve around an old Scottish aria entitled “Crodh Chailein” (in English “Colin’s cattle) evidently considered a melody of the fairies.
Another song, sweet and melancholic at the same time, is entitled Song of the Kelpie or even ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

So translates from Scottish Gaelic Tom Thomson “I got up early, it would have been better not to” (see)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Scottish gaelic
Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
English translation *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
NOTE
English translation also here
1)  the kelpie, suffering from loneliness, leaves the lake early in the morning and takes on human form
2) the shapeshifter promises food and comfort to the girl to convince her to follow him, but he warns her, he is a nocturnal creature and will not wake up with her in the morning!
3) gamhna = cattle between 1 year and 2 years translates Tom Thomson stitks; that is heifer, the cow that has not yet given birth, the verse in addition to qualifying the work of the girl (herdswoman) also wants to be a compliment, in Italian “bella manza” as a busty woman, with abundant and seductive shapes
4) the kelpie remembers the night meeting when they had sex (and obviously nine months later their son was born)
5) after the good memories of the past it comes the present, the woman has discovered the true nature of her companion and she dislikes their child
6) continuing in the comparison the kelpie calls “calf” its baby, that is “small child”
7) A typical “exposition” of fairy children is described. A practice of “birth control” widespread in the countryside of Europe, was the abandonment of newborns in the forest, so that fairies would take care of them; once the practice was widespread both against illegitimate people, and newborns with obvious physical deformations or ill-looking. The custom of “exposing” the baby was connected with the belief that he was “swapped” or kidnapped by the fairies and replaced with a changeling, a shapeshifter who for a while resembles the human child, but ultimately always takes its true appearance.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson translates = speckled band (of withy). I searched the dictionary: it is a crown made by intertwining the branches of willow; it reminds me of the Celtic crowns of flowers and leaves

 

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald recorded it under the title “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” in 2001 (from Colla Mo Rùn) following the collection of Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

english translation *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II and IV
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
scottish gaelic
I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà

NOTE
1) The kelpie sings the lullaby to its child abandoned by the human mother and comforts him by telling him that when he grows up he’ll be a little heartbreaker

With the title of ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan the same story is present in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais, from the voice of three witnesses of the Isle of Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

A similar story is told in the island of Benbecula with the title of Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg see


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 sings another fragment with the title “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (see the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser below)

English translation *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling! Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.

NOTE
1) Mhórag or Mór is the name of the maiden loved by the kelpie
2) it is the incessant cry of the child abandoned by his human mother in the cold and without food
3) mountain between Gesture and Portree on the Isle of Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

With the title “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, the same fragment sung by Caera is also reported in the book of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (page 94)

Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
II
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
III
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

Sources
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

Dream Angus the scottish Sandy (l’omino dei sogni scozzese)

“Dream Angus” is the Scottish version of Sandman (affectionately called Sandy) a mythical character of Northern Europe folklore, the sandy wizard, who brings happy dreams sprinkling magic sand into the eyes of sleeping children. In the animated movie by Dreamworks “Rise of the Guardians” he is a mute character who communicates through images formed with his magic golden dust; always cheerful, provides children with beautiful dreams and unleashes their imagination.
[“Dream Angus” è la versione scozzese dell’Omino dei Sogni (in inglese Sandman chiamato affettuosamente Sandy) un personaggio mitico del folklore del Nord Europa, il mago sabbiolino, che porta sogni felici cospargendo di sabbia magica gli occhi dei bambini addormentati. Nella versione animata della Dreamworks “Le 5 Leggende” (in inglese “Rise of the Guardians”) è un personaggio muto che comunica attraverso immagini formate con la sua dorata polvere magica; sempre allegro, fornisce ai bambini dei bei sogni e sbriglia la loro immaginazione.]

 OleLukoie By Fagilewhispers.jpg

In the fairy tale of Andersen, Ole Lukøje (in English Ole-Luk-Oie) tells the sleeping children fantastic stories opening up an umbrella full of drawings on their heads (but only good children can make happy dreams, the disobedient ones sleep without dreams and the little man opens an umbrella without drawings on their heads). The italian Gianni Rodari has undergone the charm of this character dedicating him a nursery rhyme in which he outlined a mischievous but good-natured spirit.
[Nella fiaba di Andersen Ole Chiudigliocchi (Ole Lukøje in inglese Ole-Luk-Oie) racconta ai bambini addormentati delle storie fantastiche aprendo sopra alla loro testa un ombrello pieno di disegni (ma solo i bambini buoni possono essere felici nel sogni, quelli disobbedenti dormono senza sogni e l’omino apre sulle loro teste un ombrello senza disegni). Il nostro Gianni Rodari ha subito il fascino del personaggio dedicandogli una filastrocca in cui l’onimo dispettoso ma bonario dorme sotto il nostro comò di giorno.]

And yet Hoffmann recounts about Der Sandmann who is a dark version of the boogeyman: he snatch the eyes of the children who does not want to sleep to feed his ravenous offspring.
E tuttavia Hoffmann racconta dell’uomo della sabbia (Der Sandmann) che è una cupa versione dell’uomo nero: ai bambini che non volevano dormire strappava gli occhi per darli in pasto alla sua è famelica prole dal becco ricurvo come i rapaci della notte.]

Angus

In the Celtic mythology Angus (Aengus) is the god of youth, of poetic inspiration and love, son of the Nymph Boann and of the Dagda of the Tuatha Dé Danann. In a scottish goodnight song he is called “Dream Angus“, the god of dreams and by night he carries a bag full of dreams. His wife is Caer Ibormeith and their love story is the meeting of the twin souls that can not be separated.
[Nella mitologia celtica Angus (Aengus) è il dio della giovinezza, dell’ispirazione poetica e dell’amore, figlio della Ninfa Boann e del Dagda dei Tuatha Dé Danann. In una canzone della buonanotte è chiamato “Dream Angus”, il dio dei sogni e la notte porta una sacca piena di sogni in vendita. Sua moglie è Caer Ibormeith (Bacca di Tasso) la loro storia  è l’incontro delle anime gemelle che non possono essere separate. ]

Twin souls

Illustration from The Dream of Aengus, by Ted Nasmith

 According to the myth, Angus fell in love with a maiden he saw in his dreams.
But she was under a spell and to be able to free her, Angus had to recognize her while she was living in the form of a swan. After much research he knew he would have to waited till Samain for going to Lake Dragon’s Mouth (Loch Bel Dracon), where he found 150 swans tied to couples with silver chains.

[Secondo il mito, Angus si innamorò della fanciulla che vedeva nei suoi sogni. Ma la fanciulla era sotto un sortilegio e per poterla liberare Angus doveva riconoscerla mentre viveva nella forma di cigno. Dopo molte ricerche seppe di doverla aspettare per la festa di Samain al lago di Dragon’s Mouth (Loch Bel Dracon in italiano Bocca del Drago) dove trovò 150 cigni legati a coppie con catene d’argento.]

Aengus sings in front of the lake during his transformation into a swan [Aengus canta davanti al lago nella sua trasformazione in cigno]- John Duncan 1908

Angus turned into a swan to call Caer, so they flew together over the lake three times singing a sweet melody that fell asleep all Ireland for three days and three nights; now they live in Brugh Na Boinne (Newgrange).
[Angus si trasformò in cigno per poter chiamare la sua Caer, così volarono insieme sorvolando il lago per tre volte cantavano una dolce melodia che addormentò l’Irlanda per tre giorni e tre notti; ora dimorano nel Brugh Na Boinne (Newgrange).]

Yeats dedicates a poem to him The song of wandering Aengus published in 1899, in the collection of poems “The Wind among the reeds”.
The first to put the poem into music was the same Yeats who composed or adapted a traditional Irish melody: in 1907 he published his essay ‘Speaking to the Psaltery’ in which the poem is recited bardically, sung with the accompaniment of the psaltery; but many other artists were inspired by the text and composed further melodies. (see more)

Yeats gli dedica una poesia The song of wandering Aengus (La canzone di Aengus l’errante) pubblicata nel 1899, nella raccolta di poesie “The Wind among the reeds” (Il vento fra le canne). Il primo a mettere in musica la poesia è stato lo stesso Yeats che la compose o che vi adattò una melodia tradizionale irlandese : nel 1907 diede alle stampe il suo saggio ‘Speaking to the Psaltery’ in cui la poesia viene recitata alla maniera bardica ovvero cantata con l’accompagnamento del salterio; ma molti altri artisti furono ispirati dal testo e composero ulteriori melodie. continua

Dream Angus

Dream Angus is a legendary character in Scottish folklore that brings beautiful dreams to sleeping children.
From the moment Angus is born it is obvious that he is a gentle spirit and will be universally loved. Songbirds circle his head to serenade him to sleep as he rocks in his cradle, and the wildest hunting dog calms when in his presence.” (from qui)

Angus dei Sogni è un personaggio leggendario nel folklore scozzese che porta bei sogni ai bambini addormentati “Subito dalla sua nascita Angus è uno spirito gentile e sarà universalmente amato: gli uccelli canterini gli girano intorno alla testa per farlo addormentare, mentre si dondola nella culla, e il cane da caccia più selvaggio si calma quando è in sua presenza“.

Jackie Oates

Jean-Luc Lenoir in Old Celtic & Nordic Lullabies” 2016

Lynn Morrison


I
Can ye no hush your weepin’?
All the wee lambs are sleepin’
Birdies are nestlin’ nestlin’ together
Dream Angus is hirplin’ oer the heather
Chorus
Dreams to sell, fine dreams to sell
Angus is here wi’ dreams to sell
Hush my wee bairnie and sleep without fear
Dream Angus has brought you a dream my dear.
II
List’ to the curlew cryin’
Faintly the echos dyin’
Even the birdies and the beasties are sleepin’
But my bonny bairn is weepin’ weepin’
III (1)
Soon the lavrock sings his song
Welcoming the coming dawn
Lambies coorie doon the gither
Wi’ the yowies in the heather
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Perchè non smetti di piangere?
Tutti gli agnellini sono addormentati,
gli uccellini si stanno accoccolando insieme
Angus dei Sogni si aggira per la brughiera
Coro
Sogni da vendere, bei sogni da vendere
Angus è qui con i sogni da vendere
shhh mio piccolino, dormi senza paura
Angus dei Sogni ti ha portato un sogno mio caro
II
Ascolta il chiurlo che grida
piano si smorza l’eco
anche gli uccellini e le bestie dormono
ma il mio piccolino piange, piange
III
Presto l’allodola leverà il suo canto
per salutare l’arrivo dell’alba
gli agnelli si rannicchiano assieme
con le pecorelle nell’erica

NOTE
1) or
Sweet the lavrock sings at morn,
Heraldin’ in a bright new dawn.
Wee lambs, they coorie doon taegether
Alang with their ewies in the heather.

The musical arrangements are however for everyone.
[Gli arrangiamenti sono però per tutti i gusti]
Debra Fotheringham

The Corries

Annie Lennox

Nam bu leam fhin thu thaladhainn thu

The melody of Dream Angus is very similar to a Gaelic lullaby “Nam bu leam fhin thu thaladhainn thu“, which is believed to have been sung by a fairy to an abandoned human child in the forest. On the Isle of Skye (Hebrides) it is associated with MacLeods clan of Dunvegan, who took enchanted creatures as nurses for their children.
Christina Stewart reports a couple of legends associated with this song:
In an alternative story, the wife of the chief of the MacLeods gives birth to a baby, much to the joy of the family.  However, the mother is a fairy woman and while the child is still a baby, she is forced to return to her own people.  One night, there is a great feast going on in Dunvegan Castle and the nursemaid who is supposed to be caring for the child is so attracted by the colour and festivity that she leaves the baby sleeping and goes to watch.  While she is away, the baby wakens and begins to cry.  When she hears it, she comes back and finds a woman cradling the baby, singing this song to him.  She has wrapped the child in an embroidered, yellow covering.  As the child calms, the woman hands the child back to the nursemaid and leaves.  The story goes that the woman was the baby’s mother, returned to see that her child was kept from harm and the yellow cover was the so-called Fairy Flag of Dunvegan, a banner which the clan should wave at times of dire need.  Legend has it that this otherworldly banner has miraculous powers and when unfurled in battle, the clan MacLeod would invariably defeat their enemies.  It can only be waved 3 times, though, after which it will fall into dust.  The flag has been waved twice so far – in 1480 at Blàr Bàgh na Fala and ten years later at the Battle of Glendale.  The flag itself certainly exists and is a popular attraction at Dunvegan Castle.  There are many stories associated with it and it’s origins and this is not the only lullaby said to have been sung by the baby’s mother. (from here)

La melodia di Dream Angus è molto simile a una ninna nanna gaelica “Nam bu leam fhin thu thaladhainn thu”, che si ritiene sia stata cantata da una fata a un bambino umano abbandonato nella foresta. Sull’isola di Skye (Isole Ebridi) è associata al clan MacLeods di Dunvegan che prendeva delle creature fatate come balia per i figli.
Christina Stewart riporta un paio di leggende associate a questo canto “In una storia alternativa, la moglie del capo dei MacLeod da alla luce un bambino, tutto per la gioia della famiglia. Tuttavia, la madre è una fata e quando il bambino è ancora piccolo, è costretta a tornare dalla sua stessa gente. Una notte, c’è una grande festa in corso nel Castello di Dunvegan e la bambinaia che doveva prendersi cura del bambino è così distratta dalla festa che lascia il bambino addormentato e va a vedere. Mentre lei è via, il bambino si sveglia e comincia a piangere. Quando lo sente, torna e trova una donna che culla il bambino, cantando questa canzone per lui. Aveva avvolto il bambino in una coperta gialla ricamata. Mentre il bambino si calma, la donna restituisce il bambino alla balia e se ne va. La storia racconta che la donna era la madre del bambino, tornata a vedere che il suo bambino fosse al sicuro e la copertina gialla era la cosiddetta “Fairy Flag of Dunvegan”, uno stendardo che il clan avrebbe dovuto agitare nei momenti di estremo bisogno. La leggenda narra che questo vessillo ultraterreno abbia poteri miracolosi e quando dispiegato in battaglia, il clan MacLeod avrebbe invariabilmente sconfitto i loro nemici. Può essere sventolato solo 3 volte, dopo di che cadrà nella polvere. La bandiera è stata sventolata due volte finora – nel 1480 a Blàr Bàgh na Fala e dieci anni dopo nella Battaglia di Glendale. La bandiera di per sé certamente esiste ed è un’attrazione popolare al Castello di Dunvegan. Ci sono molte storie associate ad esso e alle sue origini e questa non è l’unica ninnananna che si dice sia stata cantata dalla madre del bambino.”

Christina Stewart in Bairn’s Kist 2011

Scottish gaelic
Thàladhainn, thàladhainn, thàladhainn thu
Nam bu leam fhìn thu, leanabh mo chìche
Nam bu leam fhìn thu, thàladhainn thu
Thàladhainn, thàladhainn, thàladhainn thu
English translation:
If you were mine, I would lull you
Lull, lull, lull you
If you were mine, child of my breast
If you were mine, I would lull you
Lull, lull, lull you
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Se tu fossi mio, ti cullerei
cullerei, cullerei
se tu fossi mio, bimbo del mio seno
se tu fossi mio, ti cullerei
cullerei, cullerei

LINK
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_dream.htm
http://bardmythologies.com/aengus-og/
http://www.kistodreams.org/dreamangus.asp
https://thesession.org/tunes/16464
http://www.ericdentinger.com/dream-angus_en.html
http://www.kistodreams.org/index.asp?pageid=652608

Outlander book: giving a new wife a fish

Leggi in italiano

FROM OUTLANDER BOOK

Diana Gabaldon

In the first book of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon chapter 16 Jamie recites, the day after their wedding, an old love song to Claire, giving her a fish.

A good size,” he said proudly, holding out a solid fourteen-incher. “Do nicely for breakfast.” He grinned up at me, wet to the thighs, hair hanging in his face, shirt splotched with water and dead leaves. “I told you I’d not let ye go hungry.”
He wrapped the trout in layers of burdock leaves and cool mud. Then he rinsed his fingers in the cold water of the burn, and clambering up onto the rock, handed me the neatly wrapped parcel.
“An odd wedding present, may be,” he nodded at the trout, “
“It’s an old love song, from the Isles. D’ye want to hear it?”
“Yes, of course. Er, in English, if you can,” I added.
“Oh, aye. I’ve no voice for music, but I’ll give you the words.” And fingering the hair back out of his eyes, he recited,
Thou daughter of the King of bright-lit mansions
On the night that our wedding is on us,
If living man I be in Duntulm,
I will go bounding to thee with gifts.
Thou wilt get a hundred badgers, dwellers in banks,
A hundred brown otters, natives of streams,
a hundred silver trout, rising from their pools

A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis

Alexander Carmichael in his “Carmina Gadelica” Vol II, reports the fragment of this old Scottish Gaelic song, translating into English, and assuming that the author was a Macdonalds of the Isle of Skye. (a clan renowned for the poetic fame of its exponents of prominence)
Skye is probably the island of the Hebrides more similar to the land of Avalon, privileged location of many fantasy films, but more recently a inflated destination for mass tourism (with all the negative aspects of high prices, streets overcrowded by tourist buses and even to the most inaccessible destinations you risk finding yourself in a large company)


English translation *
I
Thou daughter of the king of bright-lit mansions,
On the night that our wedding is on us,
If living man I be in Duntulm
I will go bounding to thee with gifts.
II
Thou wilt get an hundred badgers dwellers in banks,
An hundred brown otters native of streams,
Thou wilt get an hundred wild stags that will not come/ To the green pastures of the high glens.
III
Thou wilt get an hundred steeds stately and swift,
An hundred reindeer  intractable in summer,
And thou wilt get an hundred hummelled red hinds,
That will not go in stall in the Wolfmonth of winter
Scottish Gaelic
I
A nighean righ nan roiseal soluis (1),
An oidhche bhios oirnne do bhanais,
Ma ’s fear beo mi an Duntuilm (2)
Theid mi toirleum (3)  da d’earrais.
II
Gheobh tu ciad bruicean tadhal bruach,
Ciad dobhran donn, dualach alit,
Gheobh tu ciad damh alluidh nach tig
Gu innis ard ghleannaidh. (4)
III
Gheobh to ciad steud stadach, luath,
Ciad bràc (5) bruaill an t-samhraidh,
’S gheobh tu ciad maoilseach (6) maol, ruadh,
Nach teid am buabhall am Faoileach (7) geamhraidh

NOTES
* Alexander Carmicheall: evidently the composition of one of the Macdonalds of the Isles, several of whom were poets
1) roiseal soluis= fine bright light or display of light,
2) Duntulm  (Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Thuilm) is a township on the most northerly point of the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle Of Skye. The village is most notable for the coastal scenery coupled with the ruins of Duntulm Castle,
3) tòirleum: leum bras
4) Diana Gabaldon concludes the poem by adding a verse that recalls the comic situation created between the two protagonists “a hundred silver trout, rising from their pools”
5) bràc= brae= Beurla (reindeer)
6) bean an fhèid
7) Faoilteach= Wolfmonth, historical names for January include its original Roman designation, Ianuarius, the Saxon term Wulf-monath (meaning “wolf month“)

The symbolism of matrimonial gifts is evident: the abundance of herds is auspicious for the fertility of the couple.

LINK
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg2/cg2106.htm
http://www.electricscotland.com/books/pdf/carminagadelicah02carm.pdf
http://luideagbheag.blogspot.com/2016/11/a-nigheann-righ-nan-roiseal-soluis.html

https://www.thecastlesofscotland.co.uk/the-best-castles/scenic-castles/duntulm-castle/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/07/01/isola-di-skye-informazioni-generali/
https://50sfumaturediviaggio.com/2017/06/30/isola-di-skye-4-giorni-tra-le-nuvole/

Sting: Christmas at sea

The most beautiful adventures are not the ones we are looking for ..
[“Si può remare per tutto il giorno ma è quando si torna al calar della notte, e si guarda la stanza familiare, che trovi l’amore o la morte che ti attende accanto alla stufa; le più belle avventure non sono quelle che andiamo a cercare“.] (R.L.Stevenson)

In his “If On a Winter’s Night” (2009) Sting sings “Christmas at Sea” which text is taken from a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson with the addition of a chorus in Scottish Gaelic belonging to a waulking song from the Hebrides..
The music is by Sting and Mary Macmaster.
[Nel Cd di Sting “If On a Winter’s Night” (2009) tra i vari traditionals e carols natalizi troviamo un brano più particolare il cui testo è ripreso da una poesia di Robert Louis Stevenson con l’aggiunta di un coro in gaelico scozzese che appartiene ad una waulking song delle Isole Ebridi.
La musica è di Sting e di Mary Macmaster.]

Da ascoltare la versione degli italianissimi Practical Solution

STEVENSON’S POEM

Robert Louis Stevenson is a strange character and an anomalous Scottish who preferred (because of the poor health) the seas of the South to those of the North, and left in June 1888 for a trip through the Pacific islands where he spent the last six years of his life. And precisely in December 1888 this poem was published entitled “Christmas at Sea”.
Sting has extrapolated from the poem the central verses.
[Curioso personaggio Robert Louis Stevenson uno scozzese anomalo che preferì (a causa della cagionevole salute) i mari del Sud a quelli del Nord, e partito nel giugno del 1888 per un viaggio tra le isole del Pacifico vi trascorse gli ultimi sei anni della sua vita. E proprio nel dicembre del 1888 fu pubblicato questa poesia del titolo “Christmas at Sea”.  Del poema vengono estrapolate le strofe centrali]


I
All day we fought the tides
between the North Head (1) and the South (2)
All day we hauled the frozen sheets,
to ‘scape the storm’s wet mouth
All day as cold as charity (3),
in bitter pain and dread,
For very life and nature
we tacked from head to head.
II
We gave the South a wider berth,
for there the tide-race roared;
But every tack we made we brought
the North Head close aboard:
We saw the cliffs and houses,
and the breakers running high,
And the coastguard in his garden,
his glass against his eye.
III
The frost was on the village roofs
as white as ocean foam;
The good red fires were burning bright
in every ‘longshore home;
The windows sparkled clear,
and the chimneys volleyed out;
And I vow we sniffed the victuals
as the vessel went about.
IV
The bells upon the church were rung
with a mighty jovial cheer;
For it’s just that I should tell you how
(of all days in the year)
This day of our adversity
was blessed Christmas morn,
And the house above the coastguard’s
was the house where I was born.
V
And well I knew the talk they had,
the talk that was of me,
Of the shadow on the household
and the son that went to sea;
And O the wicked fool I seemed,
in every kind of way,
To be here and hauling frozen ropes
on blessed Christmas Day.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Tutto il giorno lottammo
contro i flutti tra Capo Nord (1) e il Sud (2),
tutto il giorno governammo le vele ghiacciate
per fuggire alla morsa umida della tempesta,
tutto il giorno al freddo senza pietà (3),
con acuta sofferenza e terrore,
per la vita stessa e la natura,
abbiamo virato da capo a capo
II
Ci tenevamo alla larga da Capo Sud,
che là la corrente ruggisce,
e a ogni virata che facevamo ci portavamo sempre più vicini alla Punta Nord:
vedevamo le scogliere e le case,
e i frangenti altissimi
e la guardia costiera nel suo giardino
scrutare con il cannocchiale
III
Il gelo era sui tetti del villaggio,
bianchi come la schiuma dell’oceano;
i fuochi rosso vivo, stavano scoppiettando
in ogni casa lungo la costa;
le finestre sfavillavano
e i comignoli sbuffavano;
giuro che si annusava il profumo delle vivande mentre il vascello procedeva.
IV
Le campane della chiesa stavano suonando potenti allegri saluti
perchè devo dirvi che
(di tutti i giorni dell’anno)
questo giorno della nostra tribolazione
era il mattino del santo Natale
e la casa sopra alla guardia costiera
era la casa dove sono nato
V
E bene conoscevo
i discorsi che si facevano su di me,
dell’ombra sulla famiglia
e del figlio andato per mare
e oh che povero sciocco sembravo,
da ogni punto di vista,
stare qui a alare le cime gelate
nel giorno del benedetto Santo Natale.

NOTE
1) Capo Nord porto di Sydney?
2) South Sea, South Head?
2) as cold as charity
it is an idiomatic phrase said with irony that indicates extreme indifference or coldness,: it is charity made by moral obligation, but without heart.
[è una frase idiomatica che indica un’estrema indifferenza o freddezza, letteralmente freddo come la carità, detto con ironia: è la carità fatta per obbligo morale, ma senza cuore.]

WAULKING SONG: Thograinn thograinn

The chorus of  “Christmas at Sea” is taken from a waulking song in Scottish Gaelic entitled “Òran Mòr Sgoirebreac” (in English “The Great Song of Scorrybreac”), from Hebrides islands: the full version of one of the fragments of the waulking song here
[Il coro di “Christmas at Sea” è preso da una waulking song delle Isole Ebridi in gaelico scozzese dal titolo “Òran Mòr Sgoirebreac” (in inglese “The great song of Scorrybreac”) la versione integrale di uno dei frammenti della waulking song qui]
Even in the ancient song who sings regrets not being at home, the lands of Scorrybreac are the ancestral lands of the MacNeacail clan (Mac Nicol) and Scorrybreac Castle (Portree Bay) on the Isle of Skye was for centuries the castle of MacNicols. (history of the MacNicol’s)
[Anche nell’antica canzone chi canta rimpiange di non essere a casa, le terre di Scorrybreac sono le terre ancestrali del clan MacNeacail (Mac Nicol) e Scorrybreac Castle (Portree Bay) nell’isola di Skye fu per secoli il castello dei MacNicols. (storia del clan MacNicol)]

The subject of the song would appear to be a Nicolson of Scorrybreck, and the occasion of its composition his marriage in the late seventeenth century to a sister of Iain Garbh MacLeod of Raasay.  (from here)
english version here
[Il soggetto della canzone sembrerebbe essere un Nicolson di Scorrybreck, e l’occasione per la composizione, il suo matrimonio alla fine del diciassettesimo secolo con una sorella di Iain Garbh MacLeod di Raasay. (da qui)
versione inglese qui]

Thograinn thograinn
Thograinn thograinn bhith dol dhachaidh
E ho ro e ho ro
Gu Sgoirebreac a chruidh chaisfhinn
E ho hi ri ill iu o
Ill iu o thograinn falbh
Gu Sgoirebreac a’ chruidh chais-fhionn
Ceud soraidh bhuam mar bu dual dhomh


I wish we were going home
E ho ro e ho ro
To Scorrybreac of the white-footed cattle
E ho hi ri ill iu o
To Scorrybreac of the white-footed cattle
The first blessing from me, as is my right
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei che fossimo a casa
E ho ro e ho ro
a Scorrybreac del bestiame con le zampe bianche, E ho hi ri ill iu o
a Scorrybreac del bestiame con le zampe bianche, il primo brindisi com’è mio diritto


LINK
https://popularvictorianpoetry.wordpress.com/an-anthology-of-popular-victorian-poetry/r-l-stevensons-christmas-at-sea-in-the-scots-observer-1888/
https://julianstockwin.com/2013/12/23/christmas-at-sea/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/oran_mor_sgoirebreac/
https://www.librarything.com/topic/171360
http://www.ondarock.it/recensioni/2015_hiddenorchestra_reorchestrations.htm

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/nicname.htm

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

M’IONAM AIR

The Spinning Wheel, c.1855 (oil on panel)Una madre delle Highland scozzesi canta al suo bambino per tenerlo buono, mentre lei è affaccendata nei lavori domestici, (continua) : si raccomanda che cresca forte affinchè da grande possa provvedere al benessere della madre.
La canzone proviene dall’immenso patrimonio dei canti in gaelico delle Isole Ebridi

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in Beautiful Wasteland 1997 la voce di Karen sembra quasi un sospiro, morbida come la coperta di lana, soffice come le piume del cuscino, e a tratti si leva come onda del mare..

GAELICO SCOZZESE
Sèist:
M’ionam air a ghille bheag
Cuin a bheir e gùn dhomh?
Cuin a bheir e còt’
Agus cleoc as a’ bhùth dhomh?
M’ionam air a ghille bheag
Cuin a bheir e gùn dhomh?
I
Nuair dh’fhàsas e làidir
‘S a dh’fhàgas e’n dùthaich
II
Bidh siùil ri croinn àrda
‘S mo ghràdhsa ga stiùireadh
III
Nuair ruigeas i na h-Innsean
Thig sìoda ‘gam ionnsaigh
IV
B’fhearr leam fhin gum beireadh an teile
‘N teile dhe na heireagan
B’fhearr leam fhin gum beireadh an teile
Dh’eireagan Shleit am maireach
V
Gheibheadh tu fhein, a ghaoil an t-ugh (x3)
Nam beireadh na heireagan bana


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
My thoughts are on the little boy
Wondering when he’ll bring me a gown?
When will he bring me a coat
Or a cloak from the store?
I
When he grows strong
And leaves the country
II
The sails will be on the tall masts
And my love will be at the helm
III
When the ship reaches the Indies
Then silk will come back in my direction
IV
I would prefer if the other(1) would bear the pullet hens
I would prefer if the other would bear
The hens of Sleat(2) tomorrow
V
You, love, would get the egg(3)
If the fair hen would lay

tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
I pensieri vanno al mio bambino
chiedendomi quando mi porterà un vestito
quando mi porterà una giacchetta
o una mantella dal negozio?
I
Quando diventerà forte
e lascerà il paese
II
Le vele saranno sull’albero maestro e il mio amore al timone
III
Quando la nave raggiungerà le Indie
allora mi porterà la seta
IV
Vorrei che l’altro portasse delle pollastrelle
vorrei che l’altro portasse
le galline di Sleat domani
V
Tu amore avrai l’uovo
se la bella gallina lo deporrà

NOTE
1) evidentemente si riferisce all’altro suo amore, il marito oppure all’altro figlio più grande che già lavora
2) Sleat è rinomata come “the garden of Skye”.
3) oh l’ovetto sbattuto con lo zucchero che un tempo le madri premurose preparavano per i loro bambini!

Loch Coruisk, isola di Skye dipinto di Sidney Richard Percy 1874

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/mionam.htm
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/25281/1;jsessionid=7A5B417BDD8B85383D3A23837B2D3716

Morag e il Kelpie

Read the post in English

Nei fiumi più placidi d’Irlanda e nelle profondità oscure dei laghi scozzesi vivono dei demoni acquatici, creature fatate mutaforma, che si nutrono di carne umana: sono “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi. (prima parte)

MORAG E IL KELPIE

Ai pascoli estivi delle Highlands ancora si narra della bella Morag (Marion) sedotta da un kelpie in forma umana; la fanciulla pur notando delle stranezze del marito non si accorse della sua vera natura, se non dopo la nascita del loro bambino e … se la diede a gambe abbandonando bambino in fasce e marito mutaforma!

Nell’isola di Skye  si canta ancora un canto in gaelico,  ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ oppure ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) la “Ninna nanna del kelpie” una nenia malinconica con cui il kelpie cerca di far addormentare il bambino rimasto senza mamma, e nello stesso tempo una supplica verso Morag perchè ritorni da loro, sia lui che il bambino hanno bisogno di lei.
Di questo lamento si conoscono diverse versioni testuali tramandate fino a oggi nelle Isole Ebridi. Le melodie girano intorno ad una vecchia aria scozzese dal titolo “Crodh Chailein” (in inglese “Colin’s cattle) evidentemente considerata una melodia delle fate (qui)
Un’altra melodia dolce e malinconica nello stesso tempo è intitolata Song of The Kelpie o anche ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

Così traduce Tom Thomson (vedi)”I got up early, it would have been better not to” (mi sono alzato presto ma era meglio se non lo facevo)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Traduzione inglese *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Mi sono alzato presto,
mi sono alzato presto
non l’avrei fatto,
ma fu l’angoscia che mi mandò fuori
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
C’era nebbia sulla collina,
nebbia sulla collina
e piovigginava
e mi sono imbattuto in una graziosa fanciulla
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Ti darò del vino
ti darò del vino
e ogni cosa che vorrai
ma non mi alzerò con te al mattino
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
bella manza
bella manza
ero insieme a te al pascolo
mentre gli altri dormivano
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
la bella moretta malvagia
la bella moretta malvagia
che mi ha dato un figlio
anche se lo ha allevato con freddezza
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
il bimbo della mia canzone
il bimbo della mia canzone
era accanto a una collinetta,
senza fuoco, protezione o riparo
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Morag amore mio
Morag amore mio, ritorna dal tuo piccino
e ti darò una bella ghirlanda variopinta
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.

NOTE
si veda anche la traduzione qui
1)  il kelpie, soffrendo di solitudine, esce dal lago di mattina presto e prende forma umana
2) il mutaforma promette cibo e agiatezze alla fanciulla per convincerlo a seguirlo, però l’avvisa, è una creatura notturna e non si sveglierà con lei al mattino!
3) gamhna= cattle between 1 year and 2 years traduce Tom Thomson stitks; in italiano= giovenca, la mucca che non ha ancora partorito, il verso oltre a qualificare il lavoro della fanciulla (mandriana) vuole essere anche un complimento, per dirla in italiano “bella manza” come donna procace, dalle forme abbondanti e seducenti
4) il kelpie ricorda l’incontro notturno quando i due hanno fatto sesso (e ovviamente nove mesi dopo è nato il loro figlioletto)
5) ecco che dopo i bei ricordi del passato arriva il presente, la donna ha scoperto la vera natura del compagno e ha voluto meno bene al bambino generato con lui
6) proseguendo nel paragone il kelpie chiama “vitellino” il suo bambino, un termine vezzeggiativo per small child
7) Morag nel fuggire ha abbandonato il bambino sotto una balma al freddo e senza protezione. Si descrive una tipica “esposizione” dei bambini delle fate. Una pratica di “controllo delle nascite” diffusa nelle campagne d’Europa, era l’abbandono dei neonati  nel bosco (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi, che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. L’usanza di “esporre” il neonato era connessa con la convinzione che  fosse stato “scambiato” ovvero rapito dalle fate e sostituito con un changeling, un mutaforma il quale per un po’ assomiglia al bambino umano, ma alla fine riprende sempre il suo vero aspetto.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson traduce= speckled band (of withy). Ho cercato sul dizionario: si tratta di una corona fatta intrecciando i rami di salice; in italiano = coroncina di vimini, mi richiama le coroncine celtiche di fiori e foglie

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald la registrano con il titolo di “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” nel 2001(in Colla Mo Rùn) dalla collezione di Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà
III=I
IV=II
Traduzione inglese *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio
Dormi bambino mio
Coro
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
piè veloce
come un grande cavallo sei tu
II
Caro figlio mio
mio bel cavallino
sei lontano dalla cittadina
sarai il più rinomato

NOTE
1) Il kelpie canta la ninna-nanna al figlioletto abbandonato dalla madre umana e lo conforta dicendogli che da grande sarà un ruba-cuori

Con il titolo di ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan la stessa storia è presente negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais, dalla voce di tre testimoni dell’isola di Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

Una storia analoga è raccontata nell’isola di Benbecula con il titolo di Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg vedi


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 ne riporta un altro frammento con il titolo di “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (vedasi la versione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser più sotto)

GAELICO SCOZZESE
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh, is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri do bheul beag baoth is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 

Traduzione inglese *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling!
Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara,
ritorna dal tuo piccolo bambino
e avrai una trota maculata dal lago!
Morag mia cara,
questa notte è umida
e piovosa per mio figlio
in una balma della collinetta,
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
Lasciato senza fuoco, senza cibo e rifugio,
ti lamenti senza sosta.
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio sdentato
alla tua sciocca bocca,
e io che canto ninnananne sul Monte Frochkie

NOTE
1) Mhórag o Mór è il nome della fanciulla amata dal kelpie è anche scritto A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh (Mhor mia, amore, mia gioia)
2) è il pianto incessante del bambino che ha freddo e fame, abbandonato dalla mamma umana. Anche se non esplicitato presumo che la madre abbia “esposto” il figlio, cioè l’abbia abbandonato all’aperto (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate o il kelpie; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. vedi
3) montagna tra Gesto e Portree sull’isola di Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

Con il titolo di “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, lo stesso frammento cantato da Caera è riportato anche nel libro di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser e Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (pag 94)

ASCOLTA la versione classica nell’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser

trasposizione inglese Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Amore mio, mia gioia
vieni dal tuo bimbo,
e le trote guizzeranno dal lago in abbondanza
Cuore mio, la notte è buia,
umida e piovosa.
Ecco il tuo bambino nella balma
II
Suvvia, amore mio, mia gioia,
c’è bisogno di fuoco qui,
bisogno di riparo e conforto
il nostro bambino sta piangendo accanto al  lago.
III
Sposa mia, cuore mio!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio
che bacia le tue dolci labbra
e io che canto vecchie canzoni per te
sul Monte Frochkie
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVIO CANTI
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

THE GABERLUNZIEMAN: QUANDO I RE GIRAVANO IN INCOGNITO

beggar
“The Beggar looking through his hat” attribuito a Jacques Bellange (1575-1616).

Una leggenda scozzese riporta l’abitudine di re Giacomo V di Scozia di travestirsi da mendicante (per andare in giro in mezzo al popolo a coglierne gli umori e a sedurre le belle ragazze di campagna). Era così consuetudine accogliere con premura ogni mendicante che bussasse alla porta come se si trattasse del re in persona!
La tradizione attribuisce la ballata allo stesso re Giacomo V (1512-1542), ai tempi non erano insoliti infatti i re che si dilettavano a comporre poesie e canzoni.
La prima apparizione in stampa è del 1724 (Tea-Table Miscellany), considerata dal professor Child  come una variante di “The Jolly Beggar” e classificata al numero 279 nel suo “English and Scottish Popular Ballads“. Con il titolo “Hi for the beggarman” “A beggarman cam ower the lea“, “A Beggar, A Beggar“, “The Auld Beggarman“, “The Beggarman”  oppure “The Gaberlunzie Man” la storia è sempre la stessa: il mendicante trova asilo per la notte in una fattoria, la bella figlia del fattore si lascia sedurre, i due spesso fuggono insieme.

THE JOLLY BEGGAR

La ballata è quasi scomparsa in Scozia, questa versione non ha il lieto fine, il mendicante ospitato in casa coglie i favori della figlia del contadino, ma non vuole prendersi le sue responsabilità, così continua a negare di avere nobili origini e viene buttato fuori casa dalla ragazza!
ASCOLTA Planxty live 1980 + The Wise Maid (anche All Around The World) un reel tradizionale irlandese


I
There was a jolly beggarman
Came tripping o’er the plain
He came unto a farmer’s door
A lodging for to gain
The farmer’s daughter she came down
And viewed him cheek and chin
She says “He is a handsome man
I pray you take him in”
CHORUS(1)

We’ll go no more a roving
A roving in the night
We’ll go no more a roving
Let the moon shine so bright
We’ll go no more a roving
II
He would not lie within the barn
Nor yet within the byre
But he would in the corner lie
Down by the kitchen fire
O then the beggar’s bed was made
Of good clean sheets and hay
And down beside the kitchen fire
The jolly beggar lay
III
The farmer’s daughter she got up
To bolt the kitchen door
And there she saw the beggar
Standing naked on the floor
He took the daughter in his arms
And to the bed he ran
“Kind sir, she says, be easy now
You’ll waken our goodman”
IV
“Now you are no beggar
You are some gentleman
For you have stolen my maidenhead
And I am quite undone”
“I am no lord, I am no squire
Of beggars I be one
And beggars they be robbers all
So you’re quite undone
V
She tok the bed in both her hands
And threw it at the wall
Says go you with beggar man
My maidenhead and all
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
C’era un allegro mendicante
che andava in giro per la pianura,
e arrivò alla porta di un contadino
a chiedere un riparo per la notte.
La figlia del contadino scese
e lo guardò in volto
e disse “E’ un bell’uomo,
ti prego di farlo entrare”
CORO (1)
Non andremo più in giro
in giro per la notte.
Non andremo più in giro,
che la luna brilli pure luminosa,
ma non andremo più in giro!
II
Lui non voleva stare nel fienile
e nemmeno nella stalla
ma in un angolo
vicino al fuoco del camino.
Allora il letto per il mendicante fu preparato con lenzuola ben pulite e pagliericcio e accanto al fuoco della cucina l’allegro mendicante si mise
III
La figlia del contadino si alzò
per serrare la porta della cucina
e lì vide il mendicante
nudo sul pavimento,
lui prese la figlia tra le braccia
e andò di corsa a letto
“Gentil Signore – lei disse – fate il bravo ora, svelate la vostra buona nascita”
IV
“Non siete un mendicante,
voi siete un gentiluomo
poiché avete preso la mia verginità
e mi avete proprio rovinata”
“Non sono un Lord e nemmeno un cavaliere, sono uno dei mendicanti
e i mendicanti sono tutti ladri
così voi siete davvero rovinata”
V
Lei prese il letto con entrambe le mani
e lo gettò contro il muro
“Vattene con il mendicante,
e tutta la mia verginità!”

NOTE
1) le strofe hanno ispirato Lord Byron (1788-1824)
I
So, we’ll go no more a-roving
So late into the night,
Though the heart be still as loving,
And the moon be still as bright.
II
For the sword outwears its sheath,
And the soul wears out the breast,
And the heart must pause to breathe,
And love itself have rest.
III
Though the night was made for loving,
And the day returns too soon,
Yet we’ll go no more a-roving
By the light of the moon.

seconda parte continua

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/oabeggar.html http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_279
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_280 http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C279.html http://www.contemplator.com/child/gaberlunz.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thebeggarman.html http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/secondary/genericcontent_tcm4554493.asp
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1954
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=118078
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54744 http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thebeggarladdie.html http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5884 http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/280-the-beggar-laddie.aspx