Archivi tag: Sir Harold Boulton

Outlander: Skye boat song

Leggi in italiano.

“E LA BARCA VA”

charlie e flora
Flora and the Prince

After the ruinous battle of Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart, then twenty-six, escaped and remained hidden for several months, protected by his faithful.
Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790), was 24 when he met the Bonnie Prince and helped him to leave the Hebrides; we see them depicted into a boat at the mercy of the waves, she wraps in her shawl and looks at the horizon as the sun sets, he rows with enthusiasm.
(here’s how it actually went: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

THE CROSSING AT SEA: THE ESCAPE OF CHARLES STUART

The “romantic” escape is remembered in “Skye boat song” written by Sir Harold Boulton in 1884 on a scottish traditional melody which is said to have been arranged by Anne Campbell MacLeod; a decade ago Anne was on a trip to the Isle of Skye and heard some sailors singing “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in English “The Cuckoo in the Grove”). “The Cuckoo in the Grove” was printed in 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, by Alfred Moffat, with a text attributed to William Ross (1762 – 1790). The melody is therefore at least dating back to the time of the story.

LO IORRAM
The song (in “Songs of the North” by Sir Harold Boulton and Anne Campbell MacLeod, London  1884)  is a “iorram”, not really a sea shanty: his function is giving rhythm to the rowers but at the same time it was also a funeral lament. The time is 3/4 or 6/8: the first beat is very accentuated and corresponds to the phase in which the oar is lifted and brought forward, 2 and 3 are the backward stroke. Some of these tunes are still played in the Hebrides as a waltz.

The song was a success: from the very beginning rumors circulated that they passed the text as a translation of an ancient Gaelic song and soon became a classic piece of Celtic music and in particular of traditional Scottish music (revisited from beat to smooth, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), countless instrumental versions (from one instrument – harp, bagpipe, guitar, flute – or two up to the orchestra) with classical arrangements, traditional, new age, also for military and choral bands.


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king(1)
Over the sea to Skye (2)
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked (3) in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head

III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again (4).

NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Who was the “Young Pretender”? Probably just a dandy with the Italian accent and the passion of the brandy, but how much was the charm that exercised on the Scottish Highlands! (see more)
2) Skye isle in theInner Hebrides, but it sounds like “sky” and therefore a metaphor, Charlie is a hero in the firmament
3)  “rocked” as in many sea songs and sea shanties it stand for “cradled by the sea”
4) in 1884 Charles Stuart was dust, but romantic literature maintained live the Jacobite spirit and songs still burned in hearts

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)In 1896 Robert Louis Stevenson wrote “Over the sea to Skye” (aka Sing Me a Song of a Lad That Is Gone) a new version of Sir Harold Boulton’s Skye Boat song, because he wasn’t satisfied with what it was written by an English baronet.
Charles Edward wasn’t a Bonny Prince any more but an old, sickness man, even if in his “golden” exile between Rome and Florence. Vittorio Alfieri describes him as tyrannic and always drunk husband (but he was in love with Louise of Stolberg-Gedern -Charles Edward’s fair-haired wife). The Prince, embittered and addicted to alcohol, died in Rome on 31 January 1788 (also abandoned by his wife four years ago).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
Robert Louis Stevenson 1896)
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?

III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.

OUTLANDER VERSION

Skye Boat song’s tune is a principal theme in Outlander tv series sung by Raya Yarbrough and arranged by Bear McCreary, from Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem,  referencing how Claire Randall travels 200 years back in time.
Outlander season I -The Skye Boat Song (Short)
Outlander Season I -The Skye Boat Song (Extended)
Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song (French version)

Outlander season 3  -The Skye Boat Song Caribbean version

I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul (1), she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye. 
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.


French Version
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone,
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun,
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
III
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye.
I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone
Say, could that lass be I?
Merry of soul she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rùm on the port
Eigg on the starboard bow
Glory of youth glowed in her soul
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there
Give me the sun that shone
Give me the eyes, give me the soul
Give me the lass that’s gone
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas
Mountains of rain and sun
All that was good, all that was fair
All that was me is gone
Notes
1) she was feeling very merry in her heart, she was happy

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

AR HYD Y NOS

Su un’antica melodia gallese raccolta in “Musical Relics Of The Welsh Bards” (Edward Jones c. 1784) John “Ceiriog” Hughes (1832-1887) scrisse la poesia Ar Hyd Y Nos diventata presto una canzone tradizionale gallese molto popolare ed amata, nonchè un classico natalizio, tradotto anche in molte lingue, e intitolato in inglese “All through the night”.

JOHN HUGHES

Hughes was a Welsh poet and well-known collector of Welsh folk tunes. Sometimes referred to as the ‘Robert Burns of Wales’. Ceiriog was born at Penybryn farm overlooking the village of Llanarmon Dyffryn Ceiriog, in the Ceiriog Valley, which was then in Denbighshire in north-east Wales. He worked as a railway clerk in Manchester and London. He was employed as a station master at Caersws railway station station from 1868.
Through his desire to restore simplicity of diction and emotional sincerity, he did for Welsh poetry what Wordsworth and Coleridge did for English poetry. He became famous winning a serious of prizes for his poems in the 1850s. His first collection of poetry was published in 1860 and is called Oriau’r Hwyr (“Evening Hours”). As well as writing poetry he wrote many light hearted lyrics which he adapted to old Welsh tunes, or the original music of various composers. Many of his songs were written to folk airs.
His fascination with Welsh folk music led to an investigation of the history of the music and particularly the harpists who would often accompany then. This led to a grand project to publish four volumes of Welsh airs, of which only the first volume actually made it to press in 1863: Cant O Ganeuon (“A Hundred Songs”).  Like many Welsh poets, he took a bardic name – “Ceiriog” – from the River Ceiriog, which flows through the Ceiriog Valley, where he was born. In his home village, the public library contains a memorial inscription to him. (tratto da qui)

LA VERSIONE IN GAELICO GALLESE

ASCOLTA Siobhan Owen live voce e arpa come doveva essere suonata nel Settecento e cantata nell’Ottocento (con la III strofa in inglese)

ASCOLTA Meinir Gwilym (molto fresca e naturale interpretazione accompagnata dalla chitarra)


GAELICO GALLESE
I
Holl amrantau’r sêr ddywedant
Ar hyd y nos.
Dyma’r ffordd i fro gogoniant
Ar hyd y nos.
II
Golau arall yw tywyllwch,
I arddangos gwir brydferthwch,
Teulu’r nefoedd mewn tawelwch
Ar hyd y nos.
III
O mor siriol gwena seren
Ar hyd y nos,
I oleuo’i chwaer ddaearen
Ar hyd y nos,
IV
Nos yw henaint pan ddaw cystudd,
Ond i harddu dyn a’i hwyrddydd
Rhown ein golau gwan i’n gilydd
Ar hyd y nos.

VERSIONE INGLESE
I
Sleep, my love, and peace attend thee,
All through the night,
Guardian angels God will send thee,
All through the night.
II
Soft the drowsy hours are creeping,
Hill and vale in slumber sleeping,
I my loving vigil keeping,
All through the night.

La traduzione letterale del gaelico gallese è una ninna nanna che promette la pace tra le Stelle..

TRADUZIONE letterale (da qui)
I
All the star’s eyelids (1) say,
All through the night,
“This is the way to the valley of glory,”
All through the night.
II
Any other light is darkness,
To exhibit true beauty,
The Heavenly family in peace,
All through the night.
III
O how cheerful smiles the star,
All through the night,
To light its earthly sister,
All through the night.
IV
Old age is night when affliction comes,
But to beautify man in his late days,
We’ll put our weak light together,
All through the night.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ammiccando (1) le stelle dicono
per tutta la notte
“Questa è la via per la valle della gloria”, per tutta la notte
II
Ogni altra luce è spenta
per mostrare la vera bellezza,
la Sacra Famiglia in pace,
per tutta la notte
III
E come sorride con gioia la stella
per tutta la notte
ad illuminare la sua sorella terrena
per tutta la notte!
IV
“La vecchiaia è la notte quando arriva la malattia, ma per adornare l’uomo nei suoi ultimi giorni, noi accenderemo la nostra pallida luce insieme
per tutta la notte”

NOTE
1) eyelids letteralmente sono le palpebre

ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT

Il titolo indica anche una serie di canzoni pop rock, da non confondersi con questa dolcissima ninna-nanna di Natale: sulla stessa melodia gallese di “Ar Hyd Y Nos” sono stati scritte molte versificazioni in inglese, la più popolare è diventata quella di Sir Harold Boulton scritta nel 1884. Le versioni inglesi sono incentrate maggiormente sul tema natalizio con coro di angeli.. ho però evitato le versioni per i cori
ASCOLTA (strofa I e II) in versione ninna-nanna
ASCOLTA The Irish Rovers in “Songs of Christmas” 1999 (è riprodotto tutto l’album, la canzone inizia a 34:50)

VERSIONE IRISH ROVERS
I
Sleep my child and peace attend thee
All through the night
Guardian angels God will send thee
All through the night
II
Soft the drowsy hours are creeping
Hill and vale in slumber sleeping
God his loving vigil keeping
All through the night
III
While the moon her watch is keeping
All through the night
As the weary world is sleeping
All through the night
IV
Through your dreams you’re swiftly stealing (1)
Visions of delight revealing
Christmas time is so appealing (2)
All through the night
V
You my child, a babe of wonder
All through the night
Dreams you dream can break asunder
All through the night
VI
Children’s dreams, they can’t be broken
Life is but a lovely token
Christmas should be softly spoken
All through the night
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio la pace ti accompagna, per tutta la notte
Dio ti manderà gli Angeli a vegliare
per tutta la notte
II
Piano le sonnolente ore sono strisciate
colline e valli fanno un sonnellino
vegliate dall’amorevole guardia di Dio
per tutta la notte
III
Mentre la luna ci guarda
per tutta la notte
mentre il mondo stanco dorme
per tutta la notte
IV
Nei tuoi sogni ruberai ratto
visioni di feste gioiose
Il Natale è così allettante
per tutta la notte
V
Tu bambino mio, un bimbo meraviglioso
per tutta la notte
i sogni che sogni si possono ridurre in mille pezzi
per tutta la notte
VI
I sogni dei bambini, non possono essere infranti
la vita non è che un bel dono
Natale dovrebbe essere dolcemente pronunciato
per tutta la notte

NOTE
1) Nella versione di Sir Harold Boulton è invece  “O’er thy spirit gently stealing”
2) Nella versione di Sir Harold Boulton è invece “Breathes a pure and holy feeling”

FONTI
http://plheineman.net/arhydynos.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ar_Hyd_y_Nos
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Welsh/ArHydYNos.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45769
http://www.mcglaun.com/thru_night.htm
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=4531
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=2422
https://babylullabymusic.bandcamp.com/track/all-through-the-night

E LA BARCA VA: IL PRINCIPE E LA BALLERINA, THE SKYE BOAT SONG

Read the post in English  

E LA BARCA VA

charlie e flora
Flora e il Bel Carletto

Dopo la rovinosa battaglia di Culloden (1746) Charles Stuart allora ventiseienne, riuscì a fuggire e a restare nascosto per parecchi mesi, protetto dai suoi fedelissimi.
Flora MacDonald aveva 24 anni quando incontrò  il Bonnie Prince e lo aiutò a lasciare le Ebridi, li vediamo raffigurati su una barchetta in balia delle onde, lei si avvolge nello scialle e guarda l’orizzonte, mentre il sole tramonta,  lui rema con foga.
(ecco com’è andata in realtà: Il Principe e la Ballerina)

LA TRAVERSATA IN MARE: LA FUGA DI CHARLES STUART

Il momento della fuga dalle Ebridi Esterne, per quanto “eroicomico”, è ricordato nella canzone “Skye boat song” (in italiano “La barca per Skye” ma anche” la barca per il cielo”) scritta da Sir Harold Boulton nel 1884 su di una melodia tradizionale che si dice sia stata arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod; una decina di anni prima Anne  stava facendo un’escursione sul Loch Coruisk, guarda caso proprio sull’isola di Skye e la sentì cantare da un gruppo di marinai; la canzone era “Cuchag nan Craobh” (in inglese “The Cuckoo in the Grove”) comparsa in stampa nel 1907 in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Highlands, di Alfred Moffat, con un testo attribuito a William Ross (1762 – 1790). La melodia è pertanto quantomeno risalente al tempo della vicenda.

LO IORRAM
Il brano è comparso nel libro Songs of the North pubblicato da Sir Harold Boulton e Anne Campbell MacLeod a Londra nel 1884. Nelle ristampe ed edizioni successive nel commento si fa riferimento alla melodia come a un “iorram” ossia a una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle Ebridi come valzer.

La canzone è stato un successo: fin da subito circolarono voci che spacciavano il testo come traduzione di una antico canto in gaelico e presto divenne un brano classico della musica celtica e in particolare della musica tradizionale scozzese inserito immancabilmente nelle compilation anche per matrimoni, fatto e rifatto in tutte le salse (dal beat al liscio, jazz, pop, country, rock, dance), innumerevoli le versioni strumentali (da un solo strumento – arpa, cornamusa, chitarra, flauto – o due fino all’orchestra) con arrangiamenti classici, tradizionali, new age, per bande anche militari e corali. Su Spotify è possibile trovare moltissime versioni del brano e proprio per tutti i gusti! Tra quelle strumentali le mie preferite sono quelle con la chitarra di Greg Joy, Pete Lashley, Tom Rennie, ma anche una versione con arpa e flauto di Anne-Elise Keefer e una versione “insolita” (con tanto di basso-tuba o oboe) dei Leaf!

ASCOLTA Carlyle Fraser


CHORUS
Speed bonnie boat,
like a bird on the wing,

Onward, the sailors cry
Carry the lad that’s born to be king
Over the sea to Skye
I
Loud the winds howl,
loud the waves roar,
Thunder clouds rend the air;
Baffled our foe’s stand on the shore
Follow they will not dare
II
Though the waves leap,
soft shall ye sleep
Ocean’s a royal bed
Rocked in the deep,
Flora will keep
Watch by your weary head
III
Many’s the lad fought on that day
Well the claymore could wield
When the night came silently, lay
Dead on Culloden’s field
IV
Burned are our homes, exile and death
Scatter the loyal men
Yet, e’er the sword cool in the sheath,
Charlie will come again
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
RITORNELLO
Veloce, bella barca,
come un uccello sulle ali

Avanti! Gridano i marinai!
Porta il ragazzo nato per essere re (1)
oltre il mare a Skye (2)
I
Forte ulula il vento,
forte ruggiscono le onde,
nubi minacciose riempiono il cielo;
frastornati i nostri nemici si fermano a riva e non osano seguirci
II
Benchè i flutti si accavallino,
il tuo sonno sarà docile
e l’oceano il letto del re
cullato dal mare (3),
Flora (4) vigilerà
vegliando sulla tua testa stanca
III
In molti combatterono quel giorno,
brandendo bene le spade, quando la notte venne in silenzio, giacevano morti  sul campo di Culloden (5).
IV
Bruciate le nostre case, esilio o morte,
dispersi gli uomini leali (6),
tuttavia prima che la spada si raffreddi nel fodero,
Carlo verrà di nuovo (7)


NOTE
Lost_Portrait_of_Charles_Edward_Stuart1) Chi era il “Giovane Pretendente”? Probabilmente solo un damerino con l’accento italiano e la passione del brandy, ma quanto fu il fascino che esercitò sugli scozzesi delle Highlandscontinua
2) L’isola di Skye nelle Ebridi Interne, ma suona come “cielo” e quindi una metafora, l’autore lo impalma come eroe nel firmamento
3)  “rocked” è da intendersi, come in molte sea song e sea shanty (e in qualche lullaby), nel senso di dondolio (della culla in particolare)
4) Flora MacDonald (1722 – 1790) che aiutò il principe nella fuga  continua
5) per l’approfondimento ho dedicato un’intera pagina ai Giacobiti vedi
6) la repressione inglese contro i giacobiti e i simpatizzanti fu brutale
7) nel 1884 Charles Stuart era ormai polvere, ma la letteratura romantica manteneva ancora vive le aspirazioni giacobite e i canti infiammavano ancora gli animi

CHARLES STUART “ULTIMO ATTO”

Charles_Edward_Stuart_(1775)Nel 1896 lo scrittore scozzese Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) scrisse una variante con nuove parole, evidentemente non soddisfatto di quanto scritto da un baronetto inglese.

Stevenson mette il canto in bocca allo stesso Charles, vecchio e disfatto nel suo esilio “dorato” tra Roma e Firenze. L’Alfieri ce lo descrive come irragionevole e sempre ubriaco padrone, ovvero querulo, sragionevole e sempre ebro marito (ma doveva avere il dente avvelenato essendo stato per anni l’amante della molto più giovane e bella moglie Luisa di Stolberg-Gedern contessa d’Albany). Il Principe sempre più amareggiato e dedito all’alcol, morì a Roma il 31 gennaio 1788 (abbandonato anche dalla moglie quattro anni prima).

OVER THE SEA TO SKYE
di Robert Louis Stevenson
I
Sing me a song of a lad that is gone,
Say, could that lad be I?
Merry of soul, he sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye
II
Mull was astern, Rum was on port,
Eigg on the starboard bow.
Glory of youth glowed in his soul,
Where is that glory now?
III
Give me again all that was there,
Give me the sun that shone.
Give me the eyes, give me the soul,
Give me the lad that’s gone.
IV
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun;
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
OLTRE IL MARE PER SKYE
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Cantami del ragazzo del passato
dici, “Potrei essere io quello?”
con l’avventura nel cuore(1), salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Mull era a poppa, Rum era a babordo, Eigg sulla prua a dritta.
Gloria di gioventù brillava nel suo spirito, dov’è quella gloria ora?
III
Dammi ancora tutto ciò che fu,
dammi il sole che risplendeva
dammi la visione (2), dammi l’anima
dammi il ragazzo del passato
IV
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari
montagne di pioggia e di sole;
tutto ciò che era buono e giusto
tutto quello che ero, è morto

NOTE
1) “merry of soul” inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice” (per esempio She’s a merry little soul)
2) letteralmente dammi gli occhi

LA VERSIONE OUTLANDER

Più recentemente la canzone “Over the Sea to Skye” è stata ripresa nella serie “The Outlander” dalla saga di Diana Gabaldon ed è subito skyemania..
Il testo è modellato sulla versione di Robert Louis Stevenson anche se ogni riferimento al bel Carletto è stato sostituito dal “viaggio nel tempo” della bella Claire Randall  (dal 1945 nel 1743)

ASCOLTA Raya Yarbroug


I
Sing me a song of a lass that is gone…
Say, “would that lass be I?”
Merry of soul, she sailed on a day
Over the sea to Skye.
II
Billow and breeze, islands and seas,
Mountains of rain and sun…
All that was good, all that was fair,
All that was me is gone.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Cantami di una ragazza del passato,
dici, “Potrei essere io quella?”
con l’avventura nel cuore (1) lei salpò un giorno oltre il mare per Skye.
II
Nuvole e brezza, isole e mari,
montagne con la pioggia e il sole
Tutto ciò  che era bello e buono,
tutto quello che ero è morto.

NOTE
1 ) “merry of sou” viene inteso come ” allegro nel cuore, felice”
la strofa in francese
Chante-moi l’histoire d’une fille d’autrefois,
S’agirait-il de moi?
L’ame légère elle prit un jour la mer
Over the sea to Skye

Versione ulteriormente riarrangiata da Bear McCreary in seguito al successo della serie e completata con le strofe di Robert Louis Stevenson
Outlander -The Skye Boat Song(Extended)

Outlander season II -The Skye Boat Song La versione francese

Per l’ambientazione nel Mar dei Caraibi Bear McCreary ha ulteriormente arrangianto la vecchia melodia tradizionale scozzese sviluppando l’elemento percussivo e melodico
Outlander Season III

 FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.electricscotland.com/history/women/wih9.htm
http://www.windsorscottish.com/pl-others-fmacdonald.php
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31609
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94755

THE CASTLE OF DROMORE

Una dolce ninna-nanna scritta (o raccolta?) da Sir Harold Boulton e pubblicata nel 1892 in “Songs of the Four Nations” e poi in “Songs Sung and Unsung“; nelle note descrittive si riporta “A Collection of Old Songs of the People of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales, for the most part never before published with complete words and accompaniments.” In particolare per la canzone The Castle of Dromore Boulton si dichiara come solo il curatore del brano. L’arrangiamento musicale parte da una vecchia melodia tradizionale irlandese detta “My Wife is Sick” collezionata da Edward Buntings tra i brani per arpa raccolti alla fine del 1818, definita dallo stesso Buntings come “antica”. Solo successivamente Douglas Hyde tradusse il brano in gaelico irlandese e alcuni credono, erroneamente, che il testo in gaelico sia l’originale più antico.

dromoreIL CASTELLO

Ci sono vari castelli con questo nome in Irlanda o luoghi detti Dromore che contengono castelli, (nelle contee di Down, Kerry, Limerick e Tyrone) ma quelli che si contendono l’attribuzione della canzone sono due.

Un castello con questo nome si trova vicino a Kenmare Contea del Kerry costruito nel 1830 per la famiglia Mahony in stile neogotico, che pare Sir Harold Boulton abbia visitato una cinquantina d’anni più tardi, e il fiume che vi scorre è detto Blackwater (nome peraltro dato genericamente a molti corsi d’acqua in tutta Irlanda). L’altro castello dallo stesso nome si trova nella Contea di Tyrone, il clan Owen indicato nei versi (i discendenti di Eoghan) possedeva un tempo quelle terre (Tyrone o Tir Eoghan).
VIDEO rovine del castello e ricostruzioni grafiche – castello Dromore, Limerick

LADY DROMORE

Il brano è conosciuto anche con il nome di “October Winds” dall’avvio del primo verso, e si trova a volte nelle compilations delle Celtic Christmas songs. La canzone è una ninna-nanna cantata da Lady Dromore per far addormentare il suo piccolo bambino, ma è anche un lamento agli antenati: dopotutto siamo in un antico castello e ogni castello ha il suo fantasma! Nell’ultima strofa la madre si rivolge al bambino esortandolo a non voler crescere troppo in fretta, a restare ancora sotto lo scudo protettivo del Castello dove vive in pace finchè non sarà abbastanza forte. A leggere tra le righe la madre accenna a una storia di sangue, vendette e lotte contro la famiglia, quel richiamare la protezione della Madonna solo su di lei e il bambino potrebbe stare a indicare la sua vedovanza e che il figlio dovrà crescere sano e forte per poter affrontare i loro nemici e vendicare il torto.

LA MELODIA
ASCOLTA John Francis arrangiamento per chitarra acustica (con tour per le rovine del castello)
molto delicata anche questa versione per arpa

ASCOLTA Clancy Brothers

ASCOLTA
Flying Column

ASCOLTA
Margie Butler


I
The October winds lament
Around the castle of Dromore
Yet peace is in her lofty halls
A pháiste gheal a stóir.(1)
Though autumn vines
may droop and die,
A bud of spring are you.
Chorus
Sing hushabye low, lah, loo, lo lan
Sing hushabye low, lah looII
II
Bring no ill wind
to hinder us
My helpless babe and me
Dread spirit of the Blackwater
Clan Owen’s wild banshee(2)
And holy Mary pitying us
in heaven for grace doth sue
III
Take time to thrive
my ray of hope
In the garden of Dromore
Take heed young eagle,
till your wings,
Are feathered fit to soar
A little rest and then our land
Is full of things to do
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
I venti di ottobre si lamentano
attorno al castello di Dromore
eppure è pace nelle sale nobili,
mio pallido fanciullo, mio tesoro. Sebbene le foglie d’autunno
possano cadere e perire,
tu sei la gemma di primavera.
Coro
Canta piano ninnananna  lah, loo, lo lan
Canta piano ninnananna  lah, loo, lo lan

II
Non portare il  vento malefico
ad ostacolarci,
il mio bambino bisognoso e me,
spirito maligno del Blackwater,
fata della morte(2) del clan Owen
e (tu), Santa Maria abbi pietà
e intercedi per noi nei Cieli.
III
Prenditi il tempo per crescere,
mio raggio di speranza,
nel giardino di Dromore,
fai attenzione, giovane aquilotto, finchè le tue ali
avranno piume adatte a sostenerti in volo, un po’ di riposo e poi per la nostra terra ci saranno tante cose da fare.

NOTE
1) lasciato in gaelico nel testo originario, significa “her pale children, her treasure”. Tradotto in metrica con: My loving treasure store
2) banshee: spirito della morte della tradizione irlandese, che si riteneva avvisasse la famiglia (di nobile stirpe), con la sua lugubre comparsa e il suo lamento, sulla morte imminente di un consanguineo. (continua) L’urlo della banshee è quello del vento che scuote gli alberi e la madre chiede ad un’altra madre potente, Maria, di tenere lontano da suo figlio la fata della morte (la morte dei neonati e dei bambini piccoli era molto diffusa) cioè il vento malato (ill wind) che è anche il lamento della banshee; ma la supplica è rivolta nello stesso tempo anche alla fata della morte, perchè taccia e stia lontana. Dread spirit of the Blackwater è lo spirito oscuro e terribile del fiume anch’esso minaccioso per la salute del bambino, il genius loci della zona che ha visto cadere molti antenati valorosi in battaglia!

TRADUZIONE IN GAELICO di Douglas Hyde
I
Tá gaotha an gheimhridh sgallta fuar,
Thart thimchioll an Drom’-mhóir,
Ach ann sna halla tá siothchán,
A pháiste gheal a stóir.
Ta gach sean-duilleog dul air crith,
ach is og an beannglan thú,
Curfá
Seinimis lothin lú ló lan
Seinim loithin lú ló
II
Nár thig aon droch-rud idir mé’s
mo naoidheanán gan bhrón,
Nar thig aon tais ó’n Abhainn Mhóir
na Bean-sidhe Chloinne Eoghain,
á Muire Máthair ós ár g-cionn
ag iarradh grása duinn;
III
A Róis mo chroídhe, a Slaithín ur
a’s gharrha an Drom’-mhóir,
Bí ag fás go mbeídh gach cleite beag,
mar sgiathán iolair mhóir,
Agus léim ann sin air fad an t-saoghail,
oibrigh a’s saothraigh clú

FONTI
http://www.irishpage.com/poems/dromore.htm
http://www.daltramontoallalba.it/paranormale/banshee.htm

LOCH TAY BOAT SONG

Iorram Loch Tatha è una slow air tradizionale arrangiata da Anne Campbell MacLeod mentre il testo è di Harold Boulton.

SIR HAROLD BOULTON

Sir Harold Boulton (1859 – 1935), inglese, eclettico personaggio dell’Ottocento, ricco imprenditore, filantropo, traduttore di canzoni in lingua gaelica ha curato “Songs of The North : Gathered Together from the Highlands and Lowlands of Scotland “, in 4 volumi (1885-1926), ma anche Songs of the Four Nations: A Collection of Old Songs of the People of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales (1892) e Our National Songs (3 volumi, 1923-31). Ha scritto Songs Sung and Unsung (1894) oltre a vari libretti sempre sui canti della Scozia, ha scritto anche un poemetto in versi dal titolo The Huntress Hag of Blackwater: A Mediaeval Romance (Londra: Philip Allan, 1926).

Uomo del suo tempo era innamorato della Scozia e delle sue tradizioni popolari e ha scritto molte canzoni ambientate in quella terra, ricche di spunti propri della poesia romantica. Con un vezzo tipico degli scrittori del tempo (e dei pre-romantici con James MacPerson in testa) gioca sull’ambiguità della “traduzione del gaelico” di antichi canti popolari e la loro riscrittura o composizione ex-novo.

LA CANZONE DEL BARCAIOLO

Loch Tay Boat Song nel libro Songs of the North Vol III è definita con il sottotitolo in gaelico una Iorram del Lago Tay ossia una canzone ai remi. Non proprio una shanty song,  un “iorram” (pronuncia ir-ram) aveva la funzione di dare il ritmo ai vogatori ma nello stesso tempo era anche un lamento funebre. Il tempo è in 3/4 o 6/8: la prima battuta è molto accentuata e corrisponde alla fase in cui il remo è sollevato e portato in avanti, 2 e 3 sono il colpo all’indietro. Alcune di queste arie sono ancora suonate nelle isole Ebridi come valzer. La melodia è stata raccolta sul campo dalla voce della signora Cameron a Inverailort, nel distretto di Moidart, nel 1870

Qui però siamo nel Perthshire nel “cuore della Scozia” come è definita la sua più affascinante regione, nel placido lago Tay e nel tramonto della sera, un barcaiolo canta per la sua nighean ruadh, la ragazza dai capelli rossi che l’ha lasciato.

Silly Wizard in “Kiss the tears away” 1983 (gli anni con la formazione in quattro qui con Phil Cunningham alle tastiere)

ASCOLTA Paul McKenna

ASCOLTA Graham Brown Band (per una buona metà la versione è strumentale)

ASCOLTA Jeff Snow versione strumentale per chitarra

TESTO DI SIR HAROLD BOULTON
I
When I’ve done my work of day,
And I row my boat away,
Doon the waters o’ Loch Tay,
As the evening light is fading,
And I look upon Ben Lawers(1),
where the after glory glows,
And I think on two bright eyes,
And the melting mouth below.
II
She’s my beauteous nighean ruadh,
She’s my joy and sorrow too.
And although she is untrue,
Well I cannot live without her,
For my heart’s a boat in tow,
And I’d give the world to know
Why she means to let me go,
As I sing horee, horo.
III
Nighean ruadh your lovely hair,
Has more glamour I declare
Than all the tresses rare,
`Tween Killin and Aberfeldy(2).
Be they lint white, brown or gold,
Be they blacker than the sloe,
They are worth no more to me,
Than the melting flake o’ snow.
IV
Her eyes are like the gleam,
O’ the sunlight on the stream,
And the song the fairies sing,
Seems like songs she sings at milking(3)
But my heart is full of woe,
For last night she bade me go
and the tears begin to flow,
As I sing ho-ree, ho-ro.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Quando il mio giorno di lavoro è finito, sulla barca remo lontano
nelle acque del Loch Tay
mentre la luce della sera svanisce,
e mi rivolgo verso Ben Lawers(1)
dove risplende l’ultimo chiarore,
sognando due occhi luminosi
e una bocca allegra sotto
II
Lei è la mia bella Ragazza dai capelli rossi, la mia gioia e anche il mio dolore
e sebbene insincera
non posso vivere senza di lei,
ma il mio cuore è una barca a traino,
e darei il mondo per conoscere
perchè lei mi vuole lasciare,
mentre canto horee horo
III
Ragazza dai capelli rossi, i tuoi bei capelli sono i più seducenti, io proclamo,
di tutte le trecce belle
da Killin a Aberfeldy(2).
Siano argento, castano o oro
o che siano più nere del prugnolo,
valgono meno per me
di un fiocco di neve disciolto.
IV
Oh i suoi occhi sono come il bagliore
della luce del sole sul torrente,
e come le canzoni delle fate
sono le canzoni che lei canta alla mungitura(3),
ma il mio cuore è pieno di dolore, perchè ieri sera lei mi ha lasciato e le lacrime cadono
mentre canto horee horo


NOTE
1) Ben Lowers: la più alta montagna del Perthshire
2) località intorno al lago Tay
3) la tradizione scozzese vanta una buon numero di canti in gaelico cantati durante la mungitura per tenere mansuete le mucche (vedi)

UNA VISITA AL LAGO TAY

Il Loch Tay è un lago che si estende tra i paesini di Killin e Kenmore, e la sua lunghezza è di 23 km. Con i suoi 150 metri di profondità è il sesto lago più profondo della Scozia e del Regno Unito. Il panorama migliore si gode dai due paesini citati in precedenza, dato che entrambe le rive sono fiancheggiate da catene montuose, tra cui spiccano le cime di Ben Lawers. A Killin, la vista è mozzafiato, infatti lì il lago si fonde con le rapide di Dochart, mentre Kenmore offre uno spettacolo più tranquillo e bellissimi tramonti. È un lago che nella regione del Perthshire offre una prospettiva e itinerari differenti da quelli più turistici attraverso le Highlands. (tratto da qui)

BICICLETTA.IT: Il Pertshire è una delle regioni più affascinati della Scozia. La faglia delle Highlands, formatasi durante l’era glaciale, la taglia in diagonale da ovest a est. A nord si trova la zona delle montagne e degli innumerevoli Lochs (laghi); a sud si trova invece una pianeggiante zona agricola. Questo significa che il paesaggio è sempre verdeggiante e ondulato, con molti punti panoramici. ‘Il cuore della Scozia’, ‘Il paese degli alberi giganteschi’ … se volete sapere perché la Scozia gode di tanta popolarità, dovete ritagliarvi un po’ di tempo per visitare queste regioni. I fiumi e i laghi tranquilli del Perthshire sono un’avventura indimenticabile. Caratteristiche di questo viaggio sono le piccole e attraenti cittadine, dove pace e relax regnano incontrastati, con colline ammantate di eriche, boschi aperti, ampie vallate, magnifiche spiagge sabbiose, pittoreschi villaggi di pescatori e numerose testimonianze del passato celtico e del presente innovatore. continua

800x442_3470_1883_1

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10153
http://thesession.org/tunes/9319/recordings