Eriskay Love Lilt by Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser

Leggi in italiano

Diana Gabaldon

From “Drums of Autumn” of the Outlander saga written by Diana Gabaldon chapter 4.
In the future Roger sings many popular airs at the Celtic Festival in New England (Outlander Season 4, episode 3)
“He’d got them going with “The Road to the Isles,” a quick and lively clap-along song with a rousing chorus, and when they’d subsided from that, kept them going with “The Gallowa’ Hills” and a sweet slide into “The Lewis Bridal Song,” with a lovely, lilting chorus in Gaelic. He let the last note die away on “Vhair Me Oh,” and smiled, directly at her, she thought. ”
But in this point of the book we find an error because with the title “The Lewis Bridal Song” we mean the Marie’s Wedding, while the song to which Gabaldon refers (English text and refrain in Gaelic “Vair me o, ro van o”) is” Eriskay Love Lilt “!

It was Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser who popularized this sweet melody that she heard during her vacation on the island of Eriskay : “Bheir mi ò” (aka “Gradh Geal Mo Chridhe”) a song in Scottish Gaelic with a very sweet slow air; Marjorie arranged the melody and added a text in English (always from the pen of the rev. Kenneth MacLeod) titling Eriskay Love Lilt.

Judith Durham & The Seekers  ‘The Seekers At Home’ TV special (1967)

Siobhan Owen 

Alfred Deller 

Which woman would not want to hear so sweet verses?

Chorus
Vair me o, ro van o (1)
Vair me o ro ven ee,
Vair me o ru o ho
Sad I am without thee.
I
When I’m lonely, dear white heart (2),
Black the night and wild the sea;
by love’s light my foot finds
The old pathway to thee.
II
Thou’rt the music of my heart,
Harp of joy, o cruit mo chridh'(3),
Moon of guidance by night,
Strength and light thou’rt to me
III
In the morning, when I go
To the white and shining sea,
In the calling of the seals
Thy soft calling to me.

NOTE
1) no meanings only sounds
2)  a good, honest and generous person.
3) from scottish gaelic “harp of my heart”

ERISKAY

Eriskay  from the Old Norse for “Eric’s Isle”, is a small island of the Outer Hebrides. It is a rocky island connected to the largest South Uist island by a causeway: white beaches, crystal clear waters, seals and dolphins, hawks, buzzards, breathtaking views!

eriskay

A poem of remote lives:  Werner Kissling 1934 http://ssa.nls.uk/film.cfm?fid=1701
So you understand how music is an integral part of the harsh rural life of the past: a collective work acquired from a centuries-old experience and in balance with the earth, underlined by the traditional songs!!

http://www.visit-uist.co.uk/default.asp?page=39
http://www.eriskayselfcatering.co.uk/html/exploring.html

Eriskay Love Lilt: Vair me o, ro van o (Nenia d’amore di Eriskay)

Read the post in English

Diana Gabaldon

In “Tamburi d’Autunno” della saga “La Straniera” di Diana Gabaldon, capitolo 4.
Nel futuro Roger canta molti brani popolari al Festival Celtico nel New England (Outlander stagione 4, terzo episodio)
“Li aveva scaldati con “The Road to the Isles” una canzone ritmata e vivace con un ritornello stimolante da accompagnare con il battimani e, quando il suo effetto stava per affievolirsi, ecco che aveva riacceso gli entusiasmi con “The Gallowa’ Hills” per poi scivolare dolcemente in “The Lewis Bridal Song” con un bel refrain melodico in gaelico. Dopo aver lasciato svanire l’ultima nota su “Vhair Me Oh” sorrise, direttamente a lei, le parve.

Però in questo punto del libro troviamo un errore perchè con il titolo “The Lewis Bridal Song” s’intende la Marie’s Wedding, mentre la canzone a cui la Gabaldon si riferisce (testo in inglese e ritornello in gaelico “Vair me o, ro van o” ) è “Eriskay Love Lilt”!

E’ stata Marjorie Kennedy-Fraser a rendere popolare tra il grande pubblico questa dolce melodia che ascoltò durante la sua vacanza nell’isola di Eriskay: si trattava di “Bheir mi ò  (nota anche come “Gradh Geal Mo Chridhe”) un canto in gaelico scozzese con una dolcissima slow air; Marjorie arrangiò la melodia e aggiunse un testo in inglese (sempre dalla penna del poeta-reverendo Kenneth MacLeod) intitolandola Eriskay Love Lilt ( in italiano “Nenia d’amore di Eriskay”). 

Judith Durham & The Seekers per ‘The Seekers At Home’ TV special (1967)

Siobhan Owen voce da uccello del paradiso, una giovanissima cantane e arpista gallese (il suo sito qui)

Alfred Deller (nel video immagini dell’isola, un incanto)

Quale donna non vorrebbe sentirsi sussurrare così dolci versi?


Chorus
Vair me o, ro van o (1)
Vair me o ro ven ee,
Vair me o ru o ho
Sad I am without thee.
I
When I’m lonely, dear white heart (2),
Black the night and wild the sea;
by love’s light my foot finds
The old pathway to thee.
II
Thou’rt the music of my heart,
Harp of joy, o cruit mo chridh’ (3),
Moon of guidance by night,
Strength and light thou’rt to me
III
In the morning, when I go
To the white and shining sea,
In the calling of the seals
Thy soft calling to me.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ritornello 
Vair me o, ro van o
Vair me o ro ven ee,
Vair me o ru o ho
triste sono, senza te
I
Quando sono solo, caro cuore puro
oscura la notte e scatenato il mare,
i passi trovano, illuminati dall’amore,
il vecchio sentiero verso te.
II
Tu sei la musica del mio cuore
Arpa di gioia ” o cruit mo chridh‘”
luna che guidi nella notte
forza e luce tu sei per me
III
Al mattino quando vado
verso il mare spumoso e rilucente,
nel richiamo delle foche
(trovo) il tuo dolce richiamo per me.

NOTE
1) le parole non hanno significato in quanto sono solo suoni ossia la pronuncia delle corrispondenti frasi nella versione in gaelico scozzese
2) letteralmente “cuore bianco” ovvero una persona buona, onesta e generosa.
3) in gaelico scozzese letteralmente “arpa del mio cuore”

PER SAPERE TUTTO SULL’ISOLA

Eriskay è una piccola isola che fa parte delle Ebridi (le Ebridi Esterne) qui vi sbarcò il Bel Carletto nel 1745 alla volta della conquista del trono di Scozia. E’ un isola rocciosa collegata da una strada rialzata alla più grande isola South Uist: spiagge bianche, acque cristalline, foche e delfini, falchi, poiane, panorami mozzafiato!

eriskay

A poem of remote lives: i filmati di Werner Kissling nel 1934 http://ssa.nls.uk/film.cfm?fid=1701
Nel vedere il filmato si comprende come la musica sia parte integrante della dura vita contadina di un tempo: un lavoro collettivo acquisito da una secolare esperienza e in equilibrio con la terra, scandito dai canti della tradizione!

http://www.visit-uist.co.uk/default.asp?page=39
http://www.eriskayselfcatering.co.uk/html/exploring.html

FONTI
http://www.raretunes.org/performers/patuffa-kennedy-fraser/

Ar Hyd Y Nos (“All through the night)

On an ancient Welsh melody collected in “Musical Relics Of The Welsh Bards” (Edward Jones c.1784) John “Ceiriog” Hughes (1832-1887) wrote the poem “Ar Hyd Y Nos” which soon became a very popular and beloved traditional Welsh song , as well as a Christmas classic, also translated in many languages, and entitled in English “All through the night“.
[Su un’antica melodia gallese raccolta in “Musical Relics Of The Welsh Bards” (Edward Jones c. 1784) John “Ceiriog” Hughes (1832-1887) scrisse la poesia Ar Hyd Y Nos diventata presto una canzone tradizionale gallese molto popolare ed amata, nonchè un classico natalizio, tradotto anche in molte lingue, e intitolato in inglese “All through the night”.]

JOHN HUGHES

Hughes was a Welsh poet and well-known collector of Welsh folk tunes. Sometimes referred to as the ‘Robert Burns of Wales’. Ceiriog was born at Penybryn farm overlooking the village of Llanarmon Dyffryn Ceiriog, in the Ceiriog Valley, which was then in Denbighshire in north-east Wales. He worked as a railway clerk in Manchester and London. He was employed as a station master at Caersws railway station station from 1868.
Through his desire to restore simplicity of diction and emotional sincerity, he did for Welsh poetry what Wordsworth and Coleridge did for English poetry. He became famous winning a serious of prizes for his poems in the 1850s. His first collection of poetry was published in 1860 and is called Oriau’r Hwyr (“Evening Hours”). As well as writing poetry he wrote many light hearted lyrics which he adapted to old Welsh tunes, or the original music of various composers. Many of his songs were written to folk airs.

His fascination with Welsh folk music led to an investigation of the history of the music and particularly the harpists who would often accompany then. This led to a grand project to publish four volumes of Welsh airs, of which only the first volume actually made it to press in 1863: Cant O Ganeuon (“A Hundred Songs”).  Like many Welsh poets, he took a bardic name – “Ceiriog” – from the River Ceiriog, which flows through the Ceiriog Valley, where he was born. In his home village, the public library contains a memorial inscription to him. (from here)

[Hughes era un poeta gallese e noto collezionista di canzoni popolari gallesi. A volte indicato come “il Robert Burns del Galles”. Ceiriog è nato in una fattoria di Penybryn che sovrasta il villaggio di Llanarmon Dyffryn Ceiriog, nella valle di Ceiriog, che si trovava a Denbighshire, nel nord-est del Galles. Ha lavorato come impiegato ferroviario a Manchester e Londra. È stato impiegato come capostazione presso la stazione ferroviaria di Caersws dal 1868.
Attraverso il suo desiderio di ripristinare la semplicità della dizione e la sincerità emotiva, ha fatto per la poesia gallese ciò che Wordsworth e Coleridge hanno fatto per la poesia inglese. Divenne famoso vincendo una serie di premi per le sue poesie negli anni ’50 dell’Ottocento. La sua prima raccolta di poesie fu pubblicata nel 1860 e si intitola “Oriau’r Hwyr” (“Evening Hours”). Oltre a scrivere poesie, ha scritto molti testi spensierati che ha adattato a vecchie melodie gallesi o alla musica originale di vari compositori. Molte delle sue canzoni sono state scritte su arie popolari.
Il suo amore per la musica folk gallese lo portò a un’indagine sulla storia della musica e in particolare sugli arpisti che spesso accompagnavano quella musica. Ciò portò a un grande progetto per la pubblicazione di quattro volumi di arie gallesi, di cui solo il primo volume fu effettivamente stampato nel 1863: Cant O Ganeuon (“A Hundred Songs”). Come molti poeti gallesi, ha preso un nome da bardo – “Ceiriog” – dal fiume Ceiriog, che scorre attraverso la valle di Ceiriog, dove è nato. Nel suo villaggio natale, la biblioteca pubblica contiene un’iscrizione commemorativa su di lui.]

Ar Hyd Y Nos
(LA VERSIONE IN GAELICO GALLESE)

It’s a sweet lullaby among the stars
[E’ una dolce ninna nanna tra le Stelle..]
Ryan Davies

Siobhan Owen  (I, II in gaelic, III, IV in english)

Meinir Gwilym live

welsh gaelic
I
Holl amrantau’r sêr ddywedant
Ar hyd y nos.
Dyma’r ffordd i fro gogoniant
Ar hyd y nos.
II
Golau arall yw tywyllwch,
I arddangos gwir brydferthwch,
Teulu’r nefoedd mewn tawelwch
Ar hyd y nos.
III
O mor siriol gwena seren
Ar hyd y nos,
I oleuo’i chwaer ddaearen
Ar hyd y nos,
IV
Nos yw henaint pan ddaw cystudd,
Ond i harddu dyn a’i hwyrddydd
Rhown ein golau gwan i’n gilydd
Ar hyd y nos.
english version
I
Sleep, my love, and peace attend thee,
All through the night,
Guardian angels God will send thee,
All through the night.
II
Soft the drowsy hours are creeping,
Hill and vale in slumber sleeping,
I my loving vigil keeping,
All through the night.
III (literal translation)
O how cheerful smiles the star,
All through the night,
To light its earthly sister,
All through the night.
IV (literal translation)
Old age is night when affliction comes,
But to beautify man in his late days,
We’ll put our weak light together,
All through the night.

 english literal translation (from here)
I
All the star’s eyelids (1) say,
All through the night,
“This is the way to the valley of glory,”
All through the night.
II
Any other light is darkness,
To exhibit true beauty,
The Heavenly family in peace,
All through the night.
III
O how cheerful smiles the star,
All through the night,
To light its earthly sister,
All through the night.
IV
Old age is night when affliction comes,
But to beautify man in his late days,
We’ll put our weak light together,
All through the night.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ammiccando (1) le stelle dicono
per tutta la notte
“Questa è la via per la valle della gloria”,
per tutta la notte
II
Ogni altra luce è spenta
per mostrare la vera bellezza,
la Sacra Famiglia in pace,
per tutta la notte
III
Oh come sorride con gioia la stella
per tutta la notte
ad illuminare la sua sorella terrena
per tutta la notte!
IV
“Vecchiaia è la notte quando sofferenza ci affligge, ma per adornare l’uomo nei suoi ultimi giorni, accenderemo insieme la nostra pallida luce, per tutta la notte”

NOTE
1) eyelids letteralmente sono le palpebre

ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT

The title also indicates a series of pop rock songs, not to be confused with this sweet Christmas lullaby: on the same Welsh melody of “Ar Hyd Y Nos” they have been written many versifications in English, the most popular has become that of Sir Harold Boulton, written in 1884. The English versions focus more on the Christmas theme with choir of angels.
[Il titolo indica anche una serie di canzoni pop rock, da non confondere con questa dolcissima ninna-nanna di Natale: sulla stessa melodia gallese di “Ar Hyd Y Nos” sono stati scritte molte versificazioni in inglese, la più popolare è diventata quella di Sir Harold Boulton scritta nel 1884. Le versioni inglesi sono incentrate maggiormente sul tema natalizio con coro di angeli.. ]
The Irish Rovers in “Songs of Christmas” 1999

Celtic Ladies


I
Sleep my child and peace attend thee
All through the night
Guardian angels God will send thee
All through the night
II
Soft the drowsy hours are creeping
Hill and vale in slumber sleeping
God his loving vigil keeping
All through the night
III
While the moon her watch is keeping
All through the night
As the weary world is sleeping
All through the night
IV
Through your dreams you’re swiftly stealing (1)
Visions of delight revealing
Christmas time is so appealing (2)
All through the night
V
You my child, a babe of wonder
All through the night
Dreams you dream can break asunder
All through the night
VI
Children’s dreams, they can’t be broken
Life is but a lovely token
Christmas should be softly spoken
All through the night
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio, la pace ti accompagna,
per tutta la notte
Dio ti manderà gli Angeli a vegliare
per tutta la notte
II
Piano le sonnolente ore sono strisciate,
colline e valli fanno un sonnellino
vegliate dall’amorevole guardia di Dio,
per tutta la notte
III
Mentre la luna ci veglia
per tutta la notte
mentre il mondo stanco dorme
per tutta la notte
IV
Nei tuoi sogni ruberai ratto
visioni di feste gioiose
Il Natale è così allettante
per tutta la notte
V
Tu bambino mio, un bimbo meraviglioso
per tutta la notte
i sogni che sogni si possono ridurre in mille pezzi
per tutta la notte
VI
I sogni dei bambini, non possono essere infranti
la vita non è che un bel dono
Natale dovrebbe essere dolcemente pronunciato
per tutta la notte

NOTE
1) Nella versione di Sir Harold Boulton è invece  “O’er thy spirit gently stealing”
2) Nella versione di Sir Harold Boulton è invece “Breathes a pure and holy feeling”

LINK
http://plheineman.net/arhydynos.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ar_Hyd_y_Nos
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Welsh/ArHydYNos.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45769
http://www.mcglaun.com/thru_night.htm
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=4531
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=2422
https://babylullabymusic.bandcamp.com/track/all-through-the-night

A FAERIE’S LOVE SONG: BUAIN NA RAINICH

TITOLI: Buain Na Rainich, Tha Mi Sgith, Faery Love Song

La canzone è stata raccolta da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser (1857-1930) durante il suo soggiorno nelle Ebridi (isola di Eriskay) e registrata con i metodi del tempo (su cilindro). La versione però pubblicata nel 1909 in “Songs of the Hebrides” è stata modificata nel testo e anche arrangiata nella melodia.

LA VERSIONE IN GAELICO: BUAIN NA RAINICH

Liga Kļaviņa

Più comunemente conosciuta come Tha Mi Sgith (in inglese “I am tired”) la canzone narra di una storia d’amore tra una fanciulla e un Sidhe, un essere soprannaturale, una creatura fatata. La famiglia di lei venuta a conoscenza degli incontri nei boschi pensò bene di tenere segregata la figlia in casa e così il sidhe attende invano il ritorno della fanciulla e canta il dolore della perdita.
La struttura è tipica delle waulking songs e in Nuova Scozia è ancora cantata nella lavorazione del Tweed.

ASCOLTA Fiona J Mackenzie, 2006 (strofe da I a III)
ASCOLTA Jean Luc Lenoir in “Old Celtic & Nordic Ballads” 2012 (strofa IV).

ASCOLTA Alan Stivell che la propone in concerto dagli anni 70 trasformandola in un an dro

GAELICO SCOZZESE
Sèist (chorus)
Tha mi sgìth ‘s mi leam fhìn,
Buain na rainich, buain na rainich
Tha mi sgìth ‘s mi leam fhìn,
Buain na rainich daonnan
I
‘S tric a bha mi fhìn ‘s mo leannan
Anns a’ ghleannan cheothar
‘G èisteachd còisir bhinn an doire
Seinn sa choille chòmhail;
II
‘S bochd nach robh mi leat a-rithist
Sinn a bhitheadh ceòlmhor,
Rachainn leat gu cùl na cruinne,
Air bhàrr tuinne a’ seòladh.
III
Ciod am feum dhomh bhi ri tuireadh?
Dè ni tuireadh dhomhsa
‘S mi cho fada o gach duine
B’ urrainn tighinn gam chòmhnadh?
IV
Cùl an tomain, bràigh an tomain,
Cùl an tomain bhòidheach,
Cùl an tomain, bràigh an tomain,
H-uile là nam ònar

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus
I am weary all alone,
The whole day,
Cutting the bracken(1)
I
Often I was with my sweetheart
in the misty glens
Listening to the sweet choir of the grove/ Singing in the dense wood
II
It’s a pity that I am not with you again,/We would be tuneful
I would go with you to the ends of the earth
Sailing on the crest of the waves
III
What is the point of me being mournful/ What will a lament do for me/ And am I so far from any man
Who could come to my aid.
IV
Behind the knoll(2), the top of the knoll,/Behind the lovely knoll,
Behind the knoll, the top of the knoll,
Every day, all alone
tradotto da Cattia Salto
CORO
Sono stanco e solo
tutto il giorno
a tagliare felci
I
Spesso stavo con  il mio amore
nelle valli nebbiose
ad ascoltare il dolce mormorio dei rami che cantano nel folto del bosco
II
Peccato che non sono di nuovo con te, saremmo stati in armonia
vorrei andare con te ai confini del mondo
per navigare sulla cresta delle onde
III
Cosa è in me che mi addolora,
cosa mi farà lamentare,
sono così lontano dagli uomini
chi potrebbe venire in mio aiuto?
IV
Dietro il tumulo, in cima al tumulo
dietro l’amato tumulo
Dietro il  tumulo, in cima al tumulo
ogni giorno, da solo

NOTE
1) Braken è di origine norrena e si traduce come felce; andare a tagliare le felci era un lavoro riservato alle donne, con le felci si facevano lettiere per animali e giacigli per la notte; trovavano impiego nelle coltivazioni come antiparassitari e fertilizzanti. La felce era anche considerata una pianta commestibile (nonostante la sua moderata tossicità) da mangiare anche fresca; tuttavia l’uso principale (sia le fronde che i rizomi) è nella produzione della birra; i rizomi essiccati inoltre vengono ridotti in farina e utilizzati per la panificazione. Dal punto di vista medicinale la felce è “un’erba da fuoco” utilizzata per il trattamento delle bruciature e ustioni. E’ un erba di San Giovanni con proprietà magiche
2) i tumuli sotto i quali si ritiene siano nascoste le dimore delle creature fatate.

VERSIONE INGLESE: A FAERIE’S LOVE SONG

faeRiportato nel volume I delle “Songs of the Hebrides” (pag 90) il testo in inglese è composto da ritornello e tre strofe, non è una traduzione del gaelico ma è un arrangiamento sulla melodia tradizionale con il ribaltamento dei ruoli: è la figlia delle fate ad aspettare invano l’arrivo del suo amante mortale. Le ulteriori due strofe sono state aggiunte nel 2010 da Ruth Barrett e Cyntia Smith

 ASCOLTA su Spotify Eddi Reader

ASCOLTA Susan Young (strofe I, IV, III e V)

ASCOLTA Siobhan Owen (strofe III e IV)

ASCOLTA Savina Yannatou in Terra Nostra (strofe I e III)

CHORUS
Why should I sit and sigh,
Puin’ bracken, Puin’ bracken (1)
Why should I sit and sigh,
On the hillside dreary? (2)
I
When I see the plover rising,
Or the curlew wheeling,
Then I know(3) my mortal lover
Back to me is stealing.
II
When the day wears away,
sad I look a-down the valley
Ilka(4) sound wi’ a stound (5)
sets my heart a-thrilling
III
Oh, but there is something wanting
but I am weary
Come my blithe and bonny lad(6)
Come ower the the knowe(7) to cheer me
IV (strofa aggiuntiva)
When the moon begins her waning
I sit by the water
Where a man born of the sunlight(8)
Loved the Fairies daughter
V (strofa aggiuntiva)
Who is that I see before me?
Through the willow peering,
A smile as sweet as hawthorn blooming
My love is come to cheer me.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
Ritornello
Perchè dovrei sedermi e piangere
o raccogliere le felci
Perchè dovrei sedermi e piangere
sulla collina tenebrosa?
I
Quando vedo il piviere che si alza
o il chiurlo che gira in tondo
allora so che il mio amante mortale
è di ritorno da me furtivo
II
Quando il giorno svanisce
triste guardo giù nella valle
e ogni suono come una fitta
fa sobbalzare il mio cuore
III
Ma c’è qualcosa che voglio
e mi rattristo,
che venga il mio luminoso e bel ragazzo
che venga dalla collina a consolarmi
IV
Quando la luna inizia a calare
mi siedo accanto all’acqua
dove un uomo nato nella luce del sole amava la figlia delle Fate
V
Chi è che vedo davanti a me?
Attraverso il salice piangente
un sorriso dolce come il fiore del biancospino
il mio amore è venuto a consolarmi

NOTE
1) pulling bracken: diventa anche Broo in’ bracken, broo in’ bracken
2) cantato anche come: All alone and weary oppure All alone and worry
3) cantato anche come trow= trust, believe
4) each, every
5) stound= sharp pain
6) anche come traidee
7) knolls
8) nella versione di Susan Young dice “Where the one in silver starlight”

Alexander Keighley: A fantasy, 1915.

LA MELODIA: THA MI SGITH

Per finire la versione strumentale intitolata più spesso come  Tha Mi Sgith (“I am tired) o Cutting Bracken
Silly Wizard in “Wild and Beautiful” 1981 nel set Tha Mi Sgith/Eck Stewart’s March (A. Stewart/P. Cunningham) & MacKenzie’s Fancy suonato come uno strathspey nella seconda parte diventa un vivace e scatenato reel! La fisarmonica di Phil Cunningham, il banjo di Andy Stewart accompagnati da Martin Hadden (chitarra, tastiere e basso) e Gordon Jones (chitarra e bodhran)

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=12931 http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/foghlam/beag_air_bheag/songs/song_02/index.shtml http://thesession.org/tunes/647 http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukcuttingferns.php http://plheineman.net/cuttingbracken.htm http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/1/1b/IMSLP55851-SIBLEY1802.9594.bba1-39087012504124pp55-112.pdf

IF I WAS A BLACKBIRD

Una canzone piuttosto recente sebbene di autore anonimo risalente forse alla fine dell’ottocento o più probabilmente ai primi del novecento, “If I was a Blackbird” è stata resa molto popolare in Gran Bretagna e America negli anni 30 e 40 da Delia Murphy e negli anni 50 da Ronnie Ronalde. La melodia tradizionale è un valzer, rallentato spesso come slow air.
Molti studiosi ritengono il brano un lavoro di ricucitura  ottenuto mettendo insieme dei ‘floating verses’ presi da varie canzoni popolari (un mash-up si direbbe oggi) .

LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

E’ quella che va per la maggiore sulla falsariga di Delia Murphy, la versione testuale riportata è ripresa  in Colm O Lochlainn, “Irish Street Ballads” (Dublino, 1939)
Il tema è quello tipico dell’amore abbandonato qui unito con la disapprovazione del matrimonio da parte dei genitori a causa della bassa estrazione sociale del ragazzo.

ASCOLTA Joe Heaney

ASCOLTA Siobhan Owen live

ASCOLTA Cécile Corbel in Songbook Vol 1, 2006


I
I am young maiden, my story is sad
For once I was courted by a brave sailor lad (1);
He courted me truly by night and by day,
And now he has left me and gone far away.
CHORUS
If I were a blackbird I’d whistle and sing
I’d follow the ship (2) that my true love sails in
On the top rigging I’d there build my nest
And I’d pillow my head on his lily-white breast (3).
II
He sailed o’er the ocean, his fortune to seek
I miss(ed) his caresses, his kiss on my cheek
He courted my truly, his friendship was warm
And I long for the sight of his brave manly form (4)
III
He promised to take me to Donnybrook Fair (5)
And he’d buy me a red ribbon to tie up my hair
He then left me with a turn of the tide
And he promised to make me his own darling bride (6)
IV
His parents they chided me, I would not agree
That me and my bonnie (7) boy married should be
But let them deride me, or say what they will
While I’ve blood (8) in my body, he’s the lad I love still.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono una giovane fanciulla e la mia è una storia triste, una volta ero corteggiata da un coraggioso marinaio (1)
che mi amava sinceramente notte e giorno
ma oggi mi ha lasciato ed è partito.
RITORNELLO
Se fossi un merlo, potrei fischiettare e cantare,
seguirei la nave (2) su cui naviga il mio amore
e sulla crocetta potrei costruire il mio nido
e accoccolarmi sul suo candido
petto (3)

II
Navigava sull’oceano, in cerca di fortuna
mi mancavano le sue carezze e i suoi baci sulle  guance,
mi corteggiava con sincerità e la sua amicizia mi scaldava
e io desideravo la vista del suo corpo virile (4)
III
Mi promise di portarmi alla Fiera di Donnybrook (5)
e di comprarmi un nastro rosso da legare ai capelli,
poi mi lasciò al mutare della marea
e mi promise che mi avrebbe fatta la sua amata moglie (6)
IV
I suoi genitori mi rimproveravano e non erano d’accordo,
che io e il mio bel ragazzo (7) ci sposassimo,
ma lasciate che mi deridano e che dicano quello che vogliono,
finchè avrò sangue (8) nelle mie vene, lui è il ragazzo che amerò.

NOTE
1) oppure “For once I was carefree and in love with a lad”
2) oppure “vessel”
3) oppure “And I’d flutter my wings o’er his broad golden chest” (= dispiegare le ali sul suo ampio petto biondo)
4) oppure “He returned and I told him my love was still warm, He turned away lightly and great was his scorn” (= ritornava e io gli dicevo che il mio amore era ancora acceso, ma lui si voltava velocemente con grande sdegno)
5) Donnybrook Fair  era una grande fiera che si teneva a Dublino dal Medioevo e fino al 1850 e durava una quindicina di giorni: nell’Ottocento la fiera era incentrata principalmente sui divertimenti e gli spettacoli pubblici e sul gran consumo di bevande alcoliche. Una testimonianza di Charles William Grant (nato a Dublino nel 1881) ce la descrive: “I also remember Donnybrook Fair, which in olden days had provided revel for the Dublin populace. The crowds gathered on a Bank Holiday from all parts of Dublin to Irishtown Green, which was not far from my home in Sandymount. Outside cars, long cars, and every type of conveyance brought them to Irishtown during the Easter and Whit holidays (continua)
6) gli ultimi due versi nella versione di Delia Murphy dicono:
“And I know that some day he’ll come back o’er the tide,
And surely he’ll make me his own loving bride.”
oppure diventano “He offered to marry and to stay by my side
But then in the morning he sailed with the tide (= si offrì di sposarmi e di starmi accanto, ma al mattino salpò con la marea)
7) Delia dice “sailor”
8) Delia dice “While there’s breath in my body”

 LA VERSIONE SCOZZESE

La versione più conosciuta è però oggi quella di Andy M. Stewart, per i Silly Wizard, il quale l’aveva imparata dalla madre; Andy riarrangiò il testo trasponendolo dal punto di vista maschile, forse per questo alcuni sono portati a credere che la melodia sia un tradizionale scozzese.

Silly Wizard in Wild & Beautiful, 1981


I

I am a young sailor, my story is sad
Though once I was carefree and a brave sailor lad
I courted a lassie by night and by day
Ah, but now she has left me and sailed far away
CHORUS
Oh, if I was a blackbird, could whistle and sing
I’d follow the vessel my true love sails in/And in the top rigging, I would there build my nest
And I’d flutter my wings over her lily-white breast
II
Or if I was a scholar and could handle a pen
One secret love letter to my true love I’d send
And I’d tell of my sorrow, my grief and my pain
Since she’s gone and left me in yon flowery glen
III
I sailed over the ocean, my fortune to seek
And though I missed her caress and her kiss on my cheek
I returned and I told her my love was still warm
But she turned away lightly and great was her scorn
IV
I offered to take her to Donnybrook Fair
And to buy her fine ribbons to tie up her hair
I offered to marry and to stay by her side
But she says in the morning she sailed with the tide
V
My parents they chide me and will not agree
Saying that me and my false love, married should never be
Ah, but let them deprive me or let them do what they will
While there’s breath in my body, she’s the one that I love still
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un giovane marinaio e la mia storia è triste
eppure un tempo ero un bravo marinaio spensierato
che corteggiava una ragazza notte e giorno, ma oggi mi ha lasciato ed è salpata lontano.
RITORNELLO
Se fossi un merlo, potrei fischiettare e cantare, seguirei la nave su cui naviga il mio amore
e sulla crocetta potrei costruire il mio nido
e dispiegare le ali sul suo seno bianco come giglio
II
Se fossi uno studioso e sapessi maneggiare la penna
manderei in segreto, una lettera d’amore al mio vero amore
e le direi del mio dispiacere, rimpianto e piena
da quando se n’è andata e mi ha lasciato in questa valle fiorita
III
Navigavo sull’oceano, in cerca di fortuna
e sebbene mi mancassero le sue carezze e i suoi baci sulle guance,
ritornavo e le dicevo che il mio amore  era ancora acceso,
ma lei si girava velocemente facendo mostra di grande sdegno.
IV
Mi offrii di portarla alla Fiera di Donnybrook
per comprarle dei bei nastri da legare ai capelli,
le promisi di sposarla e di starle accanto
ma al mattino lei salpò con la marea
V
I miei genitori mi rimproveravano e non erano d’accordo,
dicevano che io e il mio falso amore
non avremmo dovuto sposarci,
ma lasciate che mi deridano e che dicano quello che vogliono,
finchè avrò fiato in corpo, lei sarà quella che amerò sempre.

LA VERSIONE GALLESE continua
FONTI
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/FSC38.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8648
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=74827
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/ifiwereablackbird.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/2618
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/25/blackbird.htm