Row bullies row.. to New York

Leggi in italiano

“Liverpool Judies” (aka”Row, bullies, row”)  is a popular sea shanty  used as reported by Stan Hugill as Capstan shanty (but also as an forebitter) it is grouped into two main versions: one in which our sailor lands in San Francisco, the other in New York.
Both versions, however, always end up with the drunken or drugged boy who wakes up again on a ship where he has been boarded by a small group of crimps
Fraudulent conscription takes the name of “shanghaiinge“, especially in the north-west of the United States.
hanghaiinge

NEW YORK VERSION

Dirty deals in the harbor docks, drunken sailors and complacent “judies”.. but also a warning song to alert the young sailors who get drunk, because they risk ending up kidnapped and forced on board. Song best known as “Row, bullies, row”.
Stan Hugill tells us that the song must be sung with an Irish rhythm. The text is taken from “Shanties and Sailors Songs”, Hugill, Stan, (1969) (see)

Ian Campbell Group from Farewell Nancy, 1964 

The Foo Foo Band from The Foo Foo Band, 2000

I
When I wuz a youngster
I sailed wid de rest,
On a Liverpool packet
bound out to the West.
We anchored one day
in de harbour of Cork,
Then we put out to sea
for the port of New York.
Chorus
And it’s roll, row bullies roll (1),
Them Liverpool Judies (2)
have got us in tow (3).

II
For forty-two days
we wuz hungry an’ sore,
Oh, the winds wuz agin us,
the gales they did roar;
Off Battery Point (4)
we did anchor at last,
Wid our jib boom (5) hove in
an’ the canvas all fast.
III
De boardin’-house masters (6)
wuz off in a trice,
A-shoutin’ an’ promisin’
all that wuz nice;
An’ one fast ol’ crimp
he got cotton’d (7)  to me,
Sez he, “Yer a fool lad (foolish),
ter follow the sea.”
IV
Sez he, “There’s a job
is a waitin’ fer you,
Wid lashin’s o’ liqour
an’ begger-all (nothing) to do.
What d’yer say, lad,
will ye jump ‘er (8), too?”
Sez I, “Ye ol’ bastard,
I’m damned if I do.”
V
But de best ov intentions
dey niver gits far,
After forty-two days
at the door of a bar,
I tossed off me liquor
an’ what d’yer think?
Why the lousy ol’ bastard
‘ad drugs in me drink.
VI
Now, the next I remembers
I woke in de morn,
On a three-skys’l yarder
bound south round Cape Horn;
Wid an’ ol’ suit of oilskins
an’ three (two) pairs o’ sox,
An’ a bloomin’ big head
an’ a dose of the pox.
VII
Now all ye young sailors
take a warnin’ by me,
Keep a watch (an eye) on yer drinks
when the liquor is free,
An’ pay no attintion
to runner (9) or whore,
Or yer head’ll be thick
an’ yer fid (10) ‘ll be sore.

NOTES
1)  in this context roll and row are taken as a synonym
2) The word judy is a dialectal expression of Liverpool to indicate a generic girl (not necessarily a prostitute)
3) the term has become in the seafaring jargon synonymous with favorable winds that drive home (a ship that runs fast).
In this regard Italo Ottonello argues:
the mate stood in the gangway, rubbing his hands, and talking aloud to the ship, “Hurrah, old bucket! the Boston girls have got hold of the tow-rope!” and the like (from: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
At each change of the watch, those coming on deck asked those going below, “How does she go along?” and got, for answer, the rate, and the customary addition, “Aye! and the Boston girls have had hold of the tow-rope all the watch.”(from: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
4) New York, the island of Manhattan
5) Jibboom: it’s a bouncer, that is, an auction (boom) that protrudes from another auction.  Bowsprit or jib-boom extends the bowsprit and is in turn extended by the flying-jibboom
6) a boarding agent who, with more or less legal means, procured sailors to ships
7) “cottoned” =”attached” ,”caught on” (british slang); or says “likin ‘to me” or even “fancying”
8) crimp is offering the boy to help him in his craft and then tells him to leave the engagement on the ship from which he has landed to be part of his team of recruiters and make shangaiing
9)  derogatory term
10) a less cleaned version uses the term “yer knob’ll be sore” which means head of .. (an other head that is a little lower)

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/136.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/judies
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=69
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LiverpoolGirls/index.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61483

Row, bullies, row Liverpool Judies to Frisco

hells-pavement

Leggi in italiano

Here is a sea shanty that ended up in the repertoire of pirate songs, and also in the movie “Robin Hood Prince of Thieves” by Ridley Scott (2010) (see film version). The title with which it is best known rather than “Liverpool Judies” is anyway “Row, bullies, row”.

An extremely popular maritime song used as reported by Stan Hugill as Capstan shanty (but also as an forebitter) it is grouped into two main versions (with two different but interchangeable melodies): one in which our sailor lands in San Francisco, the other in New York.
Both versions, however, always end up with the drunken or drugged boy who wakes up again on a ship where he has been boarded by a small group of crimps
Fraudulent conscription takes the name of “shanghaiinge“, especially in the north-west of the United States.

FROM LIVERPOOL TO ‘FRISCO: ROW BULLIES ROW

Probably the most popular version, at least on the web, A. L. Lloyd comments :”The song of the Liverpool seaman who sailed to San Francisco with the intention of staying there, but who got himself shanghaied back to Merseyside again, was a favourite rousing forebitter, sometimes used at capstan work when the spokes were spinning easy.”

The Spinners 1966

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd

Sean Lennon & Charlotte Kemp Muhl from Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 CD1

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Sea Shanty Edition)

I
From Liverpool to ‘Frisco
a-rovin’ I went,
For to stay in that country
was my good intent.
But drinkin’ strong whiskey
like other damn fools,
Oh, I was very soon shanghaied(1) to Liverpool
CHORUS
singin’ Roll, roll, roll bullies, roll(2)!

Them Liverpool judies (3)
have got us in tow
II
I shipped in near Lasker
lying out(4) in the Bay,
we was waiting for a fair wind
to get under way.
The sailors on board
they was all sick and sore,
they’d drunk all their whiskey
and couldn’t get no more.
III
One night off Cape Horn
I willl never forget,
and It’s oh but a sigh(5)
when I think of it yet.
We was going bows
under the sail’s was all wet(6),
She was runnin’ (doin’) twelve knots wid her mainsky sunset (7).
IV
Well along comes the mate
in his jacket o’ blue(8)
He’s lookin’ for work for them outlaws(9) to do.
Oh, it’s “Up tops and higher!(10)”
he loudly does roar,
“And it’s lay aloft Paddy (11),
ye son of a-whore!”
V
And now we are sailing
down onto the Line,
when I think of it now,
oh we’ve had a hard (good) time.
The sailors box-haulin'(12)
them yards all around
to catch(beat) that flash clipper  (13)(packet) the Thatcher MacGowan.
VI
And now we’ve arrived
in the Bramleymoor Dock(14),
and all them flash judies
on the pierhead do flock.
Our barrel’s run dry
and me six quid advance,
I think (guess) it’s high time
for to get up and dance.
VII
Here’s a health to our Captain wherever he may be,
he’s a devil (bucko) on land
and a bucko (bully) at sea,
for as for the first mate,
that lousy (dirty) old brute,
We hope when he dies
straight to hell he’ll skyhoot.

NOTES
1) The verb “shanghaiinge” was coined in the mid-1800s to indicate the practice of violent or fraudulent conscription of sailors on english and american ships (it was declared illegal by the Seamen’s Act only in 1915!). The shanghaiing was widespread especially in the north-west of the United States. The men who ran this trade were called “crimps”.
The term implies the forced transport on board of the unfortunate on duty, sedated with a blow on the head or completely drunk. Upon awakening the poor man discovers that he has been hired as a sailor on the ship and he can not do anything but keep the commitment. Also written “I soon got transported back to Liverpool
2) or row (rowe is the Scottish word that stands for roll). The chorus wants to recall perhaps the use as rowing song by the whalers
3) The word “judy” is a dialectal expression of Liverpool to indicate a generic girl (not necessarily a prostitute); flash judies is a girlfriends. In the maritime language it became synonymous with favorable wind. AL Lloyd explains “When the ship was sailing at a fast speed, the sailors would say:” The girls have got hold of the tow-rope today. ”
4) other versions say “I shipped on the Alaska” or “A smart Yankee packet lies out”
5) ‘Tis oft-times I sighs
6) or: She was divin’ bows under with her sailors all wet
7) mainsky sunset is a way to give meaning to another misunderstood word: main skys’l set: or main skysail set- skysail = A set sail very high, above the royals.
8)  a hell of a stew
9) us sailors
10) “Fore tops’l halyards
11) most of the crews on the packet ship were Irish
12) box-Haulinga method of veering or jibing a square rigged ship, without progressing to leeward appreciably. It is performed by heading bow to windward until most speed is lost, but steerage way is still barely maintained. The bow is then turned back downwind to the side it came from, aftermost sails are brailed up to spill the wind and to keep them from counteracting the turning force of the foresails, and the ship allowed to pivot quickly downwind without advancing. They are, however, extended as soon as the ship, in veering, brings the wind on the opposite quarter, as their effort then contributes to assist her motion or turning. Box-hauling is generally performed when the ship is too near the shore to have room for veering in the usual way. (Falconer- 1779) from here
13 )the clippers were always competing with each other to obtain the shortest crossing time
14) Bramley-Moore Dock is a port basin on the Marsey River (Liverpool): it was inaugurated in 1848

To listen to the second melody with which the song is matched
Jimmy Driftwood from Driftwood at Sea 1962

PIRATE VERSION

Clancy Brothers version for  “Treasure Island” tv serie

I
On the Hispaniola (1)
lying out in the bay,
A-waitin’ for a fair wind
to get under way.
The sailors all drunk
and their backs is all sore,
Their rum is all gone
and they can’t get no more.
Chorus
Row, Row, bullies, row!
Them Liverpool girls
they have got us in tow. (2)
II
One night at Cape Horn
we was crossing the line
When I think on it
now we sure had a good time
She was divin’ bows under,
her sailors all wet,
She was doin’ twelve knots
with her mainskys’l set.
III
Here’s a health to the Captain where ‘er he may be,
He’s a friend to the sailor
on land and at sea,
But as for our chief mate,
the dirty ol’ brute
I hope when he dies straight
to hell he’ll sky hoot

NOTES
1) Hispaniola is the schooner purchased by Mr. Trelawney to go in search of the Treasure Island
2) the term has become in the seafaring jargon synonymous with favorable winds that drive home (a fast spinning ship)

ARCHIVE:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
 ‘Frisco
New York
from Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

LINK
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/liverpol.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/10/27-liverpool-judies.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://ilradicchioavvelenato.wordpress.com/tag/shanghaiing
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16994
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62354
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562

Go to sea once more

Leggi in italiano

“Go to sea once more”, an “American / English forebitter” (Stan Hugill) was the favorite song among the whale hunters.
In the song the sailor regrets being forced to go to sea again, because he has already spent all the money just earned, getting drunk he was robbed by a whore. The song is paired with “Holy Ground once more” with which it shares the tune and some verses.
Aka GO TO SEA NO MORE, OFF TO SEA ONCE MORE, JACKIE BROWN, SHANGHAI BROWN.

RAPPER BROWN

Italo Ottonellowrites “At the signing of the recruitment contract for long journeys, the sailors received an advance equal to three months of pay which, to guarantee compliance with the contract, was paid in the form of a promissory note, payable three days later that the ship had left the port, “if a sailor is sailed with that ship.” Everyone invariably ran to look for some complacent sharks who bought their promissory notes at a discounted price, usually forty percent, with much of the amount provided in kind. “The purchasers, boarding prosecutors and various procurers,” the enlisters, “as they were nicknamed,” were induced to ‘seize’ the sailors and bring them on board, drunk or drugged, with little or no clothes beyond what they were wearing, and squandering or stealing all the advances.
So behind the story there is probably the hand of the “sailor boarding-house master” that hired the thieves to rob the drunken sailors or put in league with some whore, all well-tested systems to peel the careless sailor just landed (see).
The authorities also closed an eye because the merchant companies made it convenient to have manpower always available for the hardest jobs (like the whaling ship) and the most unfavorable routes as those of the Arctic seas.

whale-ship

The Byrds record it with the title of “Jack Tarr The Sailor“. In some versions it is sung on the air of Greensleeves.

the Dubliners

Jerry Garcia & David Grisman from “Grateful Dawg” 1990

Ryan’s Fancy from “Songs From The Shows” 2001

Macy Gray from Son of Rogues Gallery Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2013,  a raspy voice, between soul and swing,

GO TO SEA NO MORE
I
When first I landed in Liverpool(1),
I went upon a spree
Me money alas I spent it fast,
got drunk as drunk could be
And when that me money was all gone, ‘twas then I wanted more
But a man must be blind
to make up his mind
to go to sea once more
CHORUS
Once more, boys, once more,
go to sea once more

II
I spent the night with Angeline(2)
too drunk to roll in bed
Me watch was new
and me money too,
in the morning with them she fled
And as I walked the streets about,
the whores they all did roar
“There goes Jack Strapp(3),
the poor sailor lad,
he must go to sea once more”
III
And as I walked the streets about,
I met with the Rapper Brown(4)
I asked him for to take me on
and he looked at me with a frown
He said “last time you was paid off
with me you could no score
But I’ll give you a chance
and I’ll take your advance
and I’ll send you to see once more”
IV
He shipped me on board
of a whaling ship(5)
bound for the arctic seas(6)
Where the cold winds blow
through the frost and snow
and Jamaica rum would freeze(7)
But worse to bear,
I’d no hard weather gear(8)
for I’d spent all money on shore
‘twas then that I wished
that I was dead
and could go to sea no more
V
So come all you bold seafaring men, who listen to me song
When you come off them long trips,
I’ll have you not go wrong
Take my advice, drink no strong drink, don’t go sleeping with them whores
Get married instead
and spend all night in bed
and go to sea no more

NOTES
1) in american version Frisco
2) or Last night I slept with Angeline
3) or Jack Sprad
4) Jack Ratcliff or Jackie Brown; in the American version it becomes Shanghai Brown famous in the city of San Francisco. The verb shanghaiing was coined around the mid-1800s to indicate the practice, much in vogue on American and British merchant ships, of violent or fraudulent conscription of  sailor. The shanghaiing was practiced above all in the north-west of the United States. The men who ran this “men’s trade” were called “crimps” and had no qualms to drug the beer of the victim with laudanum. So  Al Lloyd writes in Leviathan (1967) Who was Rapper Brown, the villain of the piece? Particularly during the latter days of sail, many lodging house keepers encouraged seamen to fall in debt to them, then signed them aboard a hardcase ship in return for the “advance note” loaned by the company to the sailor ostensibly to buy gear for the voyage. Paddy West of Great Howard Street, Liverpool, was well-known for this, likewise John da Costa of the same seaport. But we do not find Rapper Brown in this rogues’ gallery. Perhaps there’s some confusion here with the fearsome Shangai Brown of San Francisco, through whose ministrations many a British seaman awoke from a drunken or drugged sleep do find himself aboard a vessel for the bowhead whaling grounds of the Bering Sea, a trip few men in their senses signed for, unless desperately hard pushed”.


Shanghaied5)  whaler bark (barque) or whaler pack
6) the Arctic routes were the most feared by sailors, often the ships were trapped in the ice.
7)or Jamaica rum ‘twas free I think there is a hint of humor in the sentence and that means that the Jamaican rum was not found
8) or I’d no oilskins 

LINK
http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist11/sailors.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/offtoseaoncemore.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72360 http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2012/05/49-go-to-sea-once-more.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/11/tosea.htm http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/g/gotosean.html http://www.loc.gov/item/sm1849.461970/

Row bullies row.. to New York

Read the post in English

“Liverpool Judies” (anche”Row, bullies, row”)  è una sea shanty estremamente popolare utilizzata secondo quanto riferito da Stan Hugill come capstan shanty (ma anche come forebitter); si raggruppa in due principali versioni: una in cui il nostro marinaio sbarca a San Francisco, l’altra a New York. Entrambi le versioni finiscono però sempre con il ragazzo ubriaco o drogato che si sveglia di nuovo su una nave su cui è stato portato nottetempo da un gruppetto di “crimps” .
La coscrizione fraudolenta prende il nome di  “shanghaiinge”  diffuso soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti.hanghaiinge

VERSIONE NEW YORK

Traffici più o meno loschi nelle banchine portuali, marinai ubriachi e donnine compiacenti .. ma anche una warning song per mettere all’erta i giovani marinai che si ubriacano a terra, perchè rischiano di finire rapiti e imbarcati a forza. Il titolo con la quale è più conosciuta  questa versione è  “Row, bullies, row”.
Stan Hugill ci racconta che la canzone deve essere cantata con una cadenza irlandese .  Il testo è tratto da  “Shanties and Sailors Songs”, Hugill, Stan, (1969) (vedi)

Ian Campbell Group in Farewell Nancy, 1964 

The Foo Foo Band in The Foo Foo Band, 2000


I
When I wuz a youngster
I sailed wid de rest,
On a Liverpool packet
bound out to the West.
We anchored one day
in de harbour of Cork,
Then we put out to sea
for the port of New York.
Chorus
And it’s roll, row bullies roll (1),
Them Liverpool Judies (2)
have got us in tow (3).

II
For forty-two days
we wuz hungry an’ sore,
Oh, the winds wuz agin us,
the gales they did roar;
Off Battery Point (4)
we did anchor at last,
Wid our jib boom (5) hove in
an’ the canvas all fast.
III
De boardin’-house masters (6)
wuz off in a trice,
A-shoutin’ an’ promisin’
all that wuz nice;
An’ one fast ol’ crimp
he got cotton’d (7)  to me,
Sez he, “Yer a fool lad (foolish),
ter follow the sea.”
IV
Sez he, “There’s a job
is a waitin’ fer you,
Wid lashin’s o’ liqour
an’ begger-all (nothing) to do.
What d’yer say, lad,
will ye jump ‘er (8), too?”
Sez I, “Ye ol’ bastard,
I’m damned if I do.”
V
But de best ov intentions
dey niver gits far,
After forty-two days
at the door of a bar,
I tossed off me liquor
an’ what d’yer think?
Why the lousy ol’ bastard
‘ad drugs in me drink.
VI
Now, the next I remembers
I woke in de morn,
On a three-skys’l yarder
bound south round Cape Horn;
Wid an’ ol’ suit of oilskins
an’ three (two) pairs o’ sox,
An’ a bloomin’ big head
an’ a dose of the pox.
VII
Now all ye young sailors
take a warnin’ by me,
Keep a watch (an eye) on yer drinks
when the liquor is free,
An’ pay no attintion
to runner (9) or whore,
Or yer head’ll be thick
an’ yer fid (10) ‘ll be sore.
traduzione italiano di di Italo Ottonello
I
Quando era un giovanotto
ho navigato al meglio
su una nave postale di Liverpool
diretto all’Ovest.
Ci ancorammo per un giorno
nel porto di Cork
e poi prendemmo il mare
per il porto di New York.
CORO:
Vogate, vogate bulletti vogate
quelle ragazze di Liverpool ci hanno passato un [cavo di] rimorchio
II
Per 42 giorni
siamo stati affamati ed afflitti
perchè i venti erano contrari
e le tempeste ruggivano;
di fronte a Battery Point
ci ancorammo infine
con l’asta di fiocco rientrata
e tutte le vele serrate.
III
Gli arruolatori
accorsero in un attimo
strillando e promettendo
un sacco di belle cose;
un vecchio e grasso marpione
mi prese in simpatia
“Sei pazzo, ragazzo,
ad andare per mare-
IV
dice lui – C’è un lavoro
che ti aspetta
con liquore a volontà
e poco o niente da fare.
Cosa ne pensi, ragazzo,
non vuoi sbarcare?”
Dico io “Vecchio bastardo
che io sia dannato se lo farò”
V
Ma le migliori intenzioni
non vanno mai troppo lontano
e dopo 42 giorni
che ero sulla porta del bar
e mi bevevo il liquore,
cosa credete?
Quel vecchio bastardo pidocchioso
mise le droghe nel mio drink.
VI
Ora, il ricordo successivo
è che mi svegliai al mattino
su un grande trealberi
diretto a sud per doppiare Capo Horn;
con una vecchia tenuta cerata
e tre paia di calzini,
una fottuta testa pesante
e una buona dose di febbre.
VII
Quindi voi tutti giovani marinai,
datemi ascolto,
attenzione alle vostre bevande
quando il liquore è gratis!
E non date retta
alle passeggiatrici o alle puttane
o la vostra testa sarà pesante
e la vostra gola infiammata

NOTE
1) in questo contesto roll e row sono presi come sinonimo
2) La parola judy è un’espressione dialettale di Liverpool per indicare una generica ragazza (non necessariamente una prostituta)
3) il termine è diventato nel gergo marinaresco sinonimo di venti favorevoli che spingono verso casa (una nave che fila veloce).
A tal proposito Italo Ottonello argomenta:
Il primo ufficiale stava al barcarizzo, fregandosi le mani e dicendo ad alta voce alla nave, “Evviva, vecchia bagnarola! le ragazze di Boston ti hanno passato il cavo di rimorchio!” e cose del genere. (tratto da: Dana “Two years before the mast”)
(the mate stood in the gangway, rubbing his hands, and talking aloud to the ship, “Hurrah, old bucket! the Boston girls have got hold of the tow-rope!” and the like)
Ad ogni cambio di guardia, quelli che salivano in coperta chiedevano agli smontanti, “Di quanto siamo andati avanti?” e ricevevano, come risposta, la stima accompagnata dall’abituale aggiunta, “Aye! E le ragazze di Boston ci hanno passato il cavo di rimorchio per tutta la guardia!”. Da : idem come sopra
(At each change of the watch, those coming on deck asked those going below, “How does she go along?” and got, for answer, the rate, and the customary addition, “Aye! and the Boston girls have had hold of the tow-rope all the watch.”)
4) New York, l’isola di Manhattan
5) Jibboom: asta di fiocco.  E’ un buttafuori, cioè un’asta (boom) che sporge da un’altra asta. Il buttafuori del bompresso (bowsprit), detto – asta di fiocco (jib-boom) – prolunga il bompresso ed è a sua volta prolungata dall’asta – o bastone – di controfiocco (flying -jibboom); i buttafuori degli altri alberi permettono di armare delle vele supplementari prolungando i rispettivi pennoni.
6) un procacciatore d’imbarco che con mezzi più o meno leciti procurava marinai alle navi
7) “cottoned” =”attached” ,”caught on” (british slang); oppure dice “likin’ to me” o anche “fancying”
8) il marpione (crimp) sta offrendo al ragazzo di aiutarlo nel suo mestiere e quindi gli dice di lasciare l’ingaggio sulla nave da cui è sbarcato per fare parte della sua squadra di reclutatori e fare shangaiing
9) termine spregiativo
10) una versione meno ripulita utilizza il termine “yer knob’ll be sore” che significa testa di .. (tutta un’altra testa che si trova un po’ più in basso)

ARCHIVIO:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
la versione ‘Frisco
la versione New York
la versione dal film Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/136.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/judies
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=69
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/LiverpoolGirls/index.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61483

Row, bullies, row Liverpool Judies

Read the post in English

hells-pavementEcco una sea shanty che è finita nel repertorio dei canti pirateschi, e anche nel film “Robin Hood Principe dei Ladri” di Ridley Scott (2010) (versione film). Il titolo con la quale è più conosciuta piuttosto che “Liverpool Judies” (in italiano le ragazze di Liverpool) è  “Row, bullies, row”.

Una canzone marinaresca estremamente popolare utilizzata secondo quanto riferito da Stan Hugill come Capstan shanty (ma anche come forebitter) si raggruppa in due principali versioni (con due diverse melodie però intercambiabili): una in cui il nostro marinaio sbarca a San Francisco, l’altra in cui sbarca a New York.
Entrambi le versioni finiscono però sempre con il ragazzo ubriaco o drogato che si sveglia di nuovo su una nave su cui è stato imbarcato nottetempo da un gruppetto di crimps! 
La coscrizione fraudolenta prende il nome a metà ottocento di  “shanghaiinge“, una pratica diffusa soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti e dichiarata illegale solo nel 1915.

Un gruppo di crimps trasportano i marinai sedati sulle navi

VERSIONE FROM LIVERPOOL TO ‘FRISCO: ROW BULLIES ROW

Probabilmente la versione più diffusa, perlomeno sul web, A. L. Lloyd commenta :”La canzone del marinaio di Liverpool che salpò per San Francisco con l’intenzione di restarci, ma che è stato nuovamente coscritto per il Merseyside, era un’avvincente forebitter, a volte usata all’argano quando i raggi giravano facilmente

The Spinners 1966

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd (una versione testuale piuttosto simile)

Sean Lennon & Charlotte Kemp Muhl  in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 CD1

Assassin’s Creed Rogue (Sea Shanty Edition)


I
From Liverpool to ‘Frisco
a-rovin’ I went,
For to stay in that country
was my good intent.
But drinkin’ strong whiskey
like other damn fools,
Oh, I was very soon shanghaied(1) to Liverpool
CHORUS
singin’ Roll, roll, roll bullies, roll(2)!

Them Liverpool judies (3)
have got us in tow
II
I shipped in near Lasker
lying out(4) in the Bay,
we was waiting for a fair wind
to get under way.
The sailors on board
they was all sick and sore,
they’d drunk all their whiskey
and couldn’t get no more.
III
One night off Cape Horn
I willl never forget,
and It’s oh but a sigh(5)
when I think of it yet.
We was going bows
under the sail’s was all wet(6),
She was runnin’ (doin’) twelve knots wid her mainsky sunset (7).
IV
Well along comes the mate
in his jacket o’ blue(8)
He’s lookin’ for work for them outlaws(9) to do.
Oh, it’s “Up tops and higher!(10)”
he loudly does roar,
“And it’s lay aloft Paddy (11),
ye son of a-whore!”
V
And now we are sailing
down onto the Line,
when I think of it now,
oh we’ve had a hard (good) time.
The sailors box-haulin'(12)
them yards all around
to catch(beat) that flash clipper  (13)(packet) the Thatcher MacGowan.
VI
And now we’ve arrived
in the Bramleymoor Dock(14),
and all them flash judies
on the pierhead do flock.
Our barrel’s run dry
and me six quid advance,
I think (guess) it’s high time
for to get up and dance.
VII
Here’s a health to our Captain wherever he may be,
he’s a devil (bucko) on land
and a bucko (bully) at sea,
for as for the first mate,
that lousy (dirty) old brute,
We hope when he dies
straight to hell he’ll skyhoot.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Da Liverpool sono andato a San Francisco per farmi un giro
ed avevo tutta l’intenzione di rimanere in quel paese,
ma siccome ero ciucco perso
come tanti altri dannati sciocchi
sono stato subito coscritto a forza per Liverpool.
CORO
vogate bulletti vogate
quelle ragazze (fidanzatine) di Liverpool
ci hanno passato un [cavo di] rimorchio

II
Imbarcato sul Lasker
all’ancora nella baia
aspettavamo un vento favorevole
per prendere il via.
I marinai a bordo
erano tristi ed afflitti
avevano bevuto tutto il whisky
e non potevano averne dell’altro.
III
Una notte al largo di Capo Horn,
non la dimenticherò mai
e tiro un sospiro di sollievo
ogni volta che ci penso.
Stavamo per andare giù
con tutte le vele bagnate
(la nave) correva a 12 nodi
con le vele alte al vento.
IV
Ed ecco che arriva il primo (ufficiale)
con la sua blusa blu
cercando di far lavorare
quei fuorilegge
“Tirate su, più in alto
-con un forte ruggito –
oh issa Paddy
figlio di puttana”.
V
Adesso che stiamo navigando
sotto la linea (dell’Equatore),
quando ci penso ancora
abbiamo avuto una momento difficile.
I marinai hanno virato
sottovento
per prendere il veloce clipper
della Thatcher MacGowan.
VI
Poi siamo arrivati
nella darsena di Bramleymoore
con tutte quelle fidanzatine
che si adunavano sul molo.
Il nostro barile del rum era vuoto
e con le mie sei sterline della paga
credo sia proprio arrivato il momento
di andare a divertirsi.
VII
Ecco alla salute del nostro Capitano ovunque egli sia,
è un diavolo a terra
e un bullo in mare;
per quanto riguarda il primo ufficiale quel vecchio e porco bruto
speriamo che quando muore
vada dritto sparato all’inferno!

NOTE
1) Il verbo “shanghaiinge” è stato coniato verso la metà del 1800 per indicare la pratica di coscrizione violenta o fraudolenta dei marinai (è stata dichiarata illegale dal Seamen’s Act solo nel 1915!). Lo shanghaiing era diffuso soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti.  Gli uomini che  gestivano questo commercio venivano detti  “crimps”.
Il termine  implica il trasporto forzoso a bordo di una nave del malcapitato di turno, sedato con una botta in testa o completamente ubriaco. Al risveglio il poveretto scopre di essere stato ingaggiato come marinaio sulla nave e non può fare altro che mantenere l’impegno. Anche scritto come “I soon got transported back to Liverpool
2) oppure row (rowe è la parola scozzese che sta per roll). Il coro vuole richiamare forse l’uso come rowing song (una canzone per i rematori) dai balenieri
3) La parola judy è un’espressione dialettale di Liverpool per indicare una generica ragazza (non necessariamente una prostituta) letteralmente “quelle ragazze di Liverpool ci hanno preso a rimorchio” Nelle ultime strofe si specifica il termine come flash judies (traducibile con fidanzate). Nel linguaggio marinaresco è diventato sinonimo di vento favorevole. A.L. Lloyd così spiega “Quando la nave stava navigando a una velocità elevata, i marinai dicono:” Le ragazze hanno preso il cavo da rimorchio oggi..
4) altre versioni dicono “I shipped on the Alaska” oppure “A smart Yankee packet lies out”
5) ‘Tis oft-times I sighs
6) altra versione: She was divin’ bows under with her sailors all wet
7) mainsky sunset è un modo per dare senso ad un’altra parola incompresa: main skys’l set: ovvero main skysail set-  skysail= A sail set very high, above the royals.
8) oppure a hell of a stew
9) us sailors
10) oppure “Fore tops’l halyards
11) la maggior parte degli equipaggi sulle packet ship erano irlandesi
12) box-Haulinga method of veering or jibing a square rigged ship, without progressing to leeward appreciably. It is performed by heading bow to windward until most speed is lost, but steerage way is still barely maintained. The bow is then turned back downwind to the side it came from, aftermost sails are brailed up to spill the wind and to keep them from counteracting the turning force of the foresails, and the ship allowed to pivot quickly downwind without advancing. They are, however, extended as soon as the ship, in veering, brings the wind on the opposite quarter, as their effort then contributes to assist her motion or turning. Box-hauling is generally performed when the ship is too near the shore to have room for veering in the usual way. (Falconer- 1779) tratto da qui
13) i clipper di linea erano sempre in gara tra loro per ottenere il tempo di traversata più breve
14) Bramley-Moore Dock è un bacino portuale sul fiume Marsey (Liverpool): è stato inaugurato nel 1848

Per ascoltare la seconda melodia con cui viene abbinata la canzone
Jimmy Driftwood in Driftwood at Sea 1962

LA VERSIONE PIRATESCA

Ascoltiamola nella versione dei Clancy Brothers per la serie televisiva “L’Isola del Tesoro”


I
On the Hispaniola (1)
lying out in the bay,
A-waitin’ for a fair wind
to get under way.
The sailors all drunk
and their backs is all sore,
Their rum is all gone
and they can’t get no more.
Chorus
Row, Row, bullies, row!
Them Liverpool girls
they have got us in tow. (2)

II
One night at Cape Horn
we was crossing the line
When I think on it
now we sure had a good time
She was divin’ bows under,
her sailors all wet,
She was doin’ twelve knots
with her mainskys’l set.
III
Here’s a health to the Captain where ‘er he may be,
He’s a friend to the sailor
on land and at sea,
But as for our chief mate,
the dirty ol’ brute
I hope when he dies straight
to hell he’ll sky hoot
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sull’Hispaniola
all’ancora nella baia
aspettiamo un vento favorevole
per prendere il via.
I marinai tutti ubriachi
e con la schiena a pezzi
si sono bevuti tutto il rum
e non possono averne dell’altro.
Coro
Vogate bulletti, vogate
quelle ragazze di Liverpool, ci hanno passato un [cavo di] rimorchio

III
Una notte Capo Horn,
stavamo doppiando,
quando ci penso ora,
di certo ci è andata bene.
La nave stava per andare giù
con i marinai tutti fradici,
e filava a 12 nodi
con le vele alte al vento.
III
Ecco alla salute del nostro Capitano ovunque egli sia,
è un amico dei marinai
in terra e in mare;
ma per quanto riguarda il primo ufficiale quel vecchio e porco bruto
spero che quando muore
vada dritto sparato all’inferno!

NOTE
1) è la goletta acquistata dal Signor Trelawney per andare alla ricerca dell’Isola del tesoro
2) il termine è diventato nel gergo marinaresco sinonimo di venti favorevoli che spingono verso casa (una nave che fila veloce)

ARCHIVIO:
Liverpool judies (Row bullies row)
la versione ‘Frisco
la versione New York
la versione dal film Robin Hood (Alan Doyle)

FONTI
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/liverpol.htm
http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/10/27-liverpool-judies.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/liverpooljudies.html
http://ilradicchioavvelenato.wordpress.com/tag/shanghaiing
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16994
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62354
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=158562

Andare per mare ancora una volta

Read the post in English

Stan Hugill classifica “Go to sea once more” come un “American/English forebitter”  (vedi sea shanty) e siccome si parla di un imbarco su una baleniera diretta nel Mare Artico, era la canzone favorita tra i cacciatori di balene.
Nella canzone il marinaio si rammarica di essere costretto ad andare per mare ancora una volta, perchè ha già speso tutti i soldi appena guadagnati, ubriacandosi e facendosi derubare da una puttana. La canzone fa il paio con “Holy Ground once more” con la quale condivide la melodia e alcune strofe.

TITOLI ALTERNATIVI: GO TO SEA NO MORE, OFF TO SEA ONCE MORE, JACKIE BROWN, SHANGHAI BROWN.

RAPPER BROWN

Italo Ottonello scrive “All’atto della firma del contratto d’arruolamento per i viaggi di lungo corso, i marinai ricevevano un anticipo pari a tre mesi di paga che, a garanzia del rispetto del contratto, era erogato in forma di pagherò, esigibile tre giorni dopo che la nave aveva lasciato il porto, “sempre che detto marinaio sia salpato con detta nave”. Tutti, invariabilmente, correvano a cercare qualche ‘squalo’ compiacente che comprasse il loro pagherò ad un valore scontato, di solito del quaranta per cento, con molta parte dell’importo fornito in natura. Gli acquirenti, procuratori d’imbarco e procacciatori vari, – gli ‘arruolatori’, com’erano soprannominati – erano indotti a ‘sequestrare’ i marinai e portarli a bordo, ubriachi o drogati, con poco o niente vestiario oltre quello che avevano indosso, e sperperare o rubare loro tutto l’anticipo.”
Così dietro alla vicenda c’è probabilmente lo zampino del “sailor boarding-house master” (in italiano: “tenutari di pensioni per marinai”) di turno che assoldava dei prezzolati ladruncoli per derubare i marinai approfittando della loro ubriachezza o si metteva in combutta con qualche puttana, tutti sistemi ben collaudati per spennare il marinaio incauto appena sbarcato (vedi).
Le autorità del resto chiudevano un occhio perchè alle compagnie mercantili faceva comodo avere manovalanza sempre a disposizione anche per i lavori più duri (come sulle baleniere) e le rotte più sfavorevoli come quelle dei mari artici.

whale-ship

I Byrds la registrano con il titolo di “Jack Tarr The Sailor“. In alcune versioni è cantata sull’aria di Greensleeves che ricorda vagamente.

the Dubliners

Jerry Garcia & David Grisman in “Grateful Dawg” 1990

Ryan’s Fancy in “Songs From The Shows” 2001

Macy Gray in Son of Rogues Gallery Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2013, una voce particolare che c’è solo un aggettivo adatto: “rasposa”; l’arrangiamento tra il soul e lo swing, perfetto!


I
When first I landed in Liverpool(1),
I went upon a spree
Me money alas I spent it fast,
got drunk as drunk could be
And when that me money was all gone, ‘twas then I wanted more
But a man must be blind
to make up his mind
to go to sea once more
CHORUS
Once more, boys, once more,
go to sea once more

II
I spent the night with Angeline(2)
too drunk to roll in bed
Me watch was new
and me money too,
in the morning with them she fled
And as I walked the streets about,
the whores they all did roar
“There goes Jack Strapp(3),
the poor sailor lad,
he must go to sea once more”
III
And as I walked the streets about,
I met with the Rapper Brown(4)
I asked him for to take me on
and he looked at me with a frown
He said “last time you was paid off
with me you could no score
But I’ll give you a chance
and I’ll take your advance
and I’ll send you to see once more”
IV
He shipped me on board
of a whaling ship(5)
bound for the arctic seas(6)
Where the cold winds blow
through the frost and snow
and Jamaica rum would freeze(7)
But worse to bear,
I’d no hard weather gear(8)
for I’d spent all money on shore
‘twas then that I wished
that I was dead
and could go to sea no more
V
So come all you bold seafaring men, who listen to me song
When you come off them long trips,
I’ll have you not go wrong
Take my advice, drink no strong drink, don’t go sleeping with them whores
Get married instead
and spend all night in bed
and go to sea no more
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Dopo che sono sbarcato a Liverpool
sono andato a far baldoria,
il mio denaro ahimè l’ho speso subito ubriacandomi a più non posso
e quando i soldi erano tutti finiti
fu allora che ne volevo di più,
eppure un uomo deve essere cieco, 
per cambiare idea
e andare ancora per mare!
CORO
Una volta, ragazzi ancora una volta,
andare per mare ancora una volta 

II
Trascorsi la notte con Angelina
troppo ubriaco per andare a letto,
il mio orologio era nuovo
e anche i miei soldi
al mattino con essi lei fuggì,
e mentre vagavo per le strade,
le puttane vociavano tutte
” Ecco che arriva Jack Strapp,
il povero marinaio, che deve andare per mare ancora una volta”
III
E mentre camminavo per strada incontrai Rapper Brown,
gli chiesi di imbarcarmi
e lui mi guardò corrucciato dicendo
” L’ultima volta che sei stato saldato
non hai regolato i conti con me,
ma ti darò una possibilità
e prenderò il tuo anticipo e ti manderò per mare ancora una volta”
IV
Mi spedì a bordo
di una baleniera
diretta per i mari artici,
dove i venti freddi soffiano
tra il gelo e la neve
e il rum giamaicano congelerebbe,
ma ancora peggio da sopportare,
non ero equipaggiato per il brutto tempo, perchè avevo speso tutto il denaro a terra, fu allora che desiderai di essere morto e di non poter andare per mare ancora una volta
V
Così venite tutti voi fieri marinai,
che ascoltate la mia canzone,
quando ritornate da quei lunghi viaggi,
per non sbagliare, date retta al mio consiglio, non bevete bevande forti,
non andate a dormire con delle puttane,
piuttosto sposatevi
passate tutta la notte a letto
e non andrete più per mare

NOTE
1) nella versione americana la città diventa Frisco (San Francisco)
2) oppure Last night I slept with Angeline
3) oppure Jack Sprad
4) oppureJack Ratcliff o Jackie Brown; nella versione americana diventa Shanghai Brown famoso nella città di San Francisco. Il verbo shanghaiing e’ stato coniato verso la meta’ del 1800 per indicare la pratica, molto in voga sulla navi mercantili americane ed inglesi, di coscrizione violenta o fraudolenta di marinai a bordo delle navi. Lo shanghaiing era praticato soprattutto nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti. Gli uomini che gestivano questo “commercio di uomini” venivano detti “crimps” e non avevano scrupoli a drogare la birra del malcapitato con il laudano. Così scrive Al Lloyd in Leviathan (1967) “Chi era Rapper Brown, il nostro cattivo? Soprattutto negli ultimi giorni dell’età delle vela molti tenutari di pensioni per marinai incoraggiavano i marinai a contrarre debiti con loro, poi li arruolavano a bordo di una nave per prendere in cambio l’anticipo della paga rilasciata dalla compagnia al marinaio per comprarsi le attrezzature necessarie al lavoro. Paddy West  di Great Howard Street, Liverpool, era famoso in quest’attività come John da Costa nello stesso porto. Ma non troviamo Rapper Brown in questa galleria di brutti ceffi. Forse qui c’è un po’ di confusione con il terribile Shangai Brown di San Francisco per i cui uffici molti marinai britannici si svegliavano da un sonno dopo essersi ubriacati o essere stati drogati e si trovavano a bordo di un vascello a caccia di balene nel Mare di Bering, un viaggio a cui pochi uomini in pieno possesso delle loro facoltà avrebbero sottoscritto, a meno che non fossero spinti dalla disperazione.”


Shanghaied5) anche whaler bark (barque) o whaler pack
6) le rotte artiche erano le più temute dai marinai spesso le navi restavano intrappolate nei ghiacci.
7) oppure Jamaica rum ‘twas free (in italiano: il rum giamaicano era gratis) credo che ci sia una sfumatura umoristica nella frase e che voglia dire che il Rum giamaicano non si trovava
8) oppure I’d no oilskins (in italiano: non avevo giubba impeciata)

FONTI
http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist11/sailors.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/offtoseaoncemore.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=72360 http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2012/05/49-go-to-sea-once-more.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/11/tosea.htm http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/g/gotosean.html http://www.loc.gov/item/sm1849.461970/