The Saucy Sailor Boy

Leggi in italiano

The nineteenth-century image of sailor is rather stereotypical: Jack Tar is a drunkard and a womanizer, perhaps a slacker and troublemaker, always ready to fight.
In sea songs from the female point of view sailor is often an unfaithful liar who has a girlfriend in every port even if he has a wife and children at home. Ridiculed and rejected by some, he is instead sought by others who absolutely prefer the love of a sailor (Sailor laddie)!
Sailor is watched more often with distrust by women, as in the sea song entitled “The Saucy Sailor Boy” where a young “saucy” sailor courts a country girl: it’s a “love contrast” that fits in a long popular tradition of bucolic argument, in which a man and a woman duet with amorous skirmishes; generally woman refuses man’s proposals, to preserve her virtue or to better stimulate his desire; man, on the other hand, promises seas and mountains, as well as eternal love, riches and the certainty of a comfortable life, just to conquer the woman’s graces.
In Saucy Sailor, however, she rejects the sailor with ill grace, because his clothes still smell of tar; the music changes when sailor shows his money but it’s too late and sailor doesn’ t want  to marry her anymore!

SAILOR’S CLOTHES

Clothes of Poor Jack, a British sailor of the late eighteenth century, are anything but poor: he is wearing a popular variant of the knee-length trousers, a sort of very wide trouser skirt. He wears a black tall round hat, and his long hair is loose on his neck, a white shirt with a stiff collar and a red neckcloth; characteristic yellow double-breasted waistcoat with narrow vertical red stripes, and an elegant blue short jacket with a long row of white buttons; light blue socks and black shoes with a beautiful metal buckles.

Poor Jack, Charles Dibdin, 1790-1791, British Museum: he wears slops, wide knee-length pants. The hair worn long until the mid-nineteenth century were kept in order, stopping them behind the back of the neck in a tarred tail, hence the nickname Jack Tar

But sailors like all the workers and men of the people also wore long trousers which became a standard of men’s clothing after the French revolution.

THE SAUCY SAILOR BOY

Text is found in many nineteenth-century collections and broadside especially in Great Britain and America, and probably it has eighteenth-century origins (William Alexander Barret in his “English Folksong” published in 1891 believes that this song appeared in print in 1781 and he cites its great popularity among girls who work in Eastern London factories.
The Tarry Sailor from trad archives (Andrew Robbie of Strichen, Aberdeenshire)  
Quadriga consort: early-music version
Harbottle & Jonas (from Cornwall): a swing version

Steeleye Span from Below the Salt, 1972 ( I, and from III to VIII): standard version in the repertoires of singers and folk groups

Wailin Jennys 

SAUCY SAILOR BOY
I
“Come, my dearest, come, my fairest,
Come and tell unto me,
Will you pity (fancy) a poor sailor boy,
Who has just come from sea?”
II
“I can fancy no poor sailor:
No poor sailor for me!
For to cross the wide ocean
Is a terror to me.
III
You are ragged, love, you are dirty, love,/And your clothes they smell of tar./So begone, you saucy sailor boy,
So begone, you Jack Tar(1)!”
IV
“If I’m ragged, love, if I’m dirty, love,
If my clothes they smell (much) of tar,
I have silver in my pocket, love,
And of gold a bright (great) store.”
V (2)
When she heard those words come from him, On her bended knees she fell./”To be sure, I’ll wed my sailor,
For I love him so well.”
VI
“Do you think that I am foolish?
Do you think that I am mad?
That I’d wed with a poor country girl
Where no fortune’s to be had?
VII
I will cross the briny ocean/Where the meadows they are green (3);
Since you have had the offer, love,
Another shall have the ring.
VIII
For I’m young, love, and I’m frolicksome, (4)
I’m good-temper’d, kind and free.
And I don’t care a straw (5), love,
What the world says (thinks)of me.

NOTES
1) Jack Tar is a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. Seamen were known to ‘tar’ their clothes before departing on voyages, in order to make them waterproof, in the eighteenth century they were usually used to tar their long hair in a ponytail to prevent it from getting wet or that the wind ruffled it
2)  Steeleye Span :
And then when she heard him say so
On her bended knees she fell,
“I will marry my dear Henry
For I love a sailor lad so well.”
3) Steeleye Span: I will whistle and sing
4) Steeleye Span :
Oh, I am frolicsome and I am easy,
Good tempered and free,
5) or “I don’t give a single pin”

SEA SHANTY VERSION: The Tarry Sailor

Stan Hugill in his Shantyman Bible (Shanties from the Seven Seas) tells us that The Tarry Sailor (Saucy Sailor Boy) in addition to being a forebitter song was occasionally sung during the boring hours of pumping water from the bilge when the pumps were operated by hand!  (see sea shanty)

Hulton Clint 

THE TARRY SAILOR
I
Come on my fair ones,
Come on my fan ones,
Come and listen unto me.
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
II
No, indeed, I’ll wed no sailor
For they smell too much of tar!
You are ruggy, you are sassy,
get you gone Jackie Tar.
III
I have ship on all the ocean,
I have golden great galore
All my clothes they may be all in rags,
but coin can buy me more
IV
If I am ruggy, if I am sassy
And may by a tarry smell
I had silver in my pockets
For they knew can every tell
V
When she heard him that distressed
down upon her knees she fell
Saying “Ruggy dirty saylor boy
I love more than you can tell”
VI
Do you think that I’m foolish,
Do you think that I’m mad?
That I’d wed the likes of you, Miss,
When there’s others to be had!”
VII
No indeed I’ll cross the ocean,
And my ships shall spread her wings,
You refused me, ragged, dirty,
Not for you the wedding ring.

Scottish sailors were excellent dancers and part of their training consisted of practicing Sailor’s Hornpipe


second part

LINK
https://www.britishtars.com/2014/01/poor-jack-1790-91.html
https://www.mun.ca/mha/mlc/articles/introducing-merchant-seafaring/jack-tar.php
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/saucysailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=133473
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16440

RAMBLING SAILOR OR TRIM RIGGED DOXY?

Il galante soldato (o marinaio) che gira per mari e monti alla ricerca di fanciulle da corteggiare è un topico delle ballate del 700-800, questa in particolare ampiamente diffusa nei broadsides.
Durante il folk revival e la contestazione giovanile degli anni 60-70 questa tipologia di canti popolari era molto diffusa nei folk-club, ma in origine  il canto doveva trattarsi di una parodia ovvero erano le vanterie di un borioso sergente reclutatore convinto di essere un grande seduttore! (vedi prima parte)

La versione marinaresca della ballata prende una piega un po’ più esplicita e sboccata. Il testo si differenzia su due filoni principali uno più simile alla versione “rambling soldier” l’altro con il titolo di “Trim Rigged Doxy”

TRIM RIGGED DOXY

Si tratta di una forebitter song ammiccante e in chiave umoristica, la versione divulgata da Martin Carthy alla fine degli anni 60 racconta più nel dettaglio l’incontro amoroso tra l’ardito e bollente marinaio e una “trim-rigged doxy”; ma il finale non è per niente lieto: marinaio derubato e lasciato con il “bompresso” (per dirla come il marinaio) in fiamme!!

ASCOLTA Martin Carthy & Dave Swarbrick 1966


I
Oh, I am a sailor brisk and bold,
Long time I’ve sailed the ocean.
Oh, I’ve fought for king and the country too,
For honour and promotion.
So now, my brother shipmates, I bid you all adieu,
No more will I go to sea with you;
But I’ll ramble the country through and through
And I’ll be a rambling sailor.
II
Oh, it’s off to a village then I went
Where I saw lassies plenty;
Oh, I boldly stepped up to one of them
To court her for her beauty.
Oh, her cheeks, they were like the rubies red;
She’d a feathered bonnet a-covering her head.
Oh, I put the hard word on her(1) but she said she was a maid,
The saucy little trim-rigged doxy (2).
III
“Oh, I can’t and I won’t go along with you (3),
You saucy rambling sailor.
Oh, my parents, they would never agree
For I’m promised to a tailor.”
But I was hot shot eager to rifle her charms.
“A guinea,” says I, “for a roll in your arms.”
The deal was done and upstairs we went,
Myself and the trim-rigged doxy.
IV
Oh, it was haul on the bowline (4), let your stays’ls fall (5),
We was yardarm to yardarm (6) bumpin’.
My shot locker empty, asleep I fell
And then she fell into robbin’;
Oh, she robbed all my pockets of everything I had,
She even stole my new boots from underneath the bed,
And she even stole my gold watch from underneath my head,
The saucy little trim-rigged doxy.
V
And it’s when I awoke in the morning bright,
Oh, I started to roar like thunder.
My gold watch and my money too
She bore away for plunder.
But it wasn’t for my watch nor my money too,
For them I don’t value but I tell you true,
I think her little fire-bucket burned my bobstay(7), through
That saucy little trim-rigged doxy.
TRADUZIONE di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un marinaio vispo e ardito
a lungo ho navigato per mare,
ho combattuto per il re e anche per il paese
per l’onore e la carriera.
Così adesso, miei fratelli di mare, dico a tutti addio,
non andrò più per mare con voi:
ma viaggerò per il paese
in lungo e in largo
e sarò un marinaio vagabondo
II
Oh così andai in un villaggio
dove vidi ragazze a volontà;
mi avvicinai con coraggio a una di loro,
a corteggiarla per la sua beltà.
Oh le sue guance erano come rossi rubini,
portava un cappellino con la piuma per ricoprirle il capo.
Oh cercai di sedurla (1) ma lei disse di essere una fanciulla
-la donnina navigata con un bell’armamentario! (2)
III
“Oh non posso e non voglio essere d’accordo (3) con te
tu impertinente marinaio vagabondo.
Oh i miei genitori non acconsentiranno mai
perché io sono promessa a un sarto
Ma io ero un pezzo grosso desideroso di darci dentro
Una ghinea – dissi – per un giro tra le tue braccia
L’accordo fu preso e di sopra andammo,
me stesso e la donnina ben equipaggiata
IV
E fu un alare la bolina (4), e un issare fiocchi e controfiocchi (5),
sbattemmo pennone contro pennone (6)
e diedi fuoco alle polveri, poi caddi addormentato e allora lei mi derubò:
oh mi ripulì le tasche
di ogni avere
rubò persino i miei nuovi stivali da sotto il letto,
e rubò anche il mio orologio d’oro da sotto il cuscino,
la donnina navigata ben equipaggiata
V
E quando mi svegliai alla luce
del sole
oh iniziai a gridare forte come il tuono
il mio orologio d’oro e anche i miei soldi
mi ha derubato
Ma non era per l’orologio e neanche per i soldi
che a loro non do peso, ma a dire il vero
temo mi abbia attaccato lo scolo (7)
quella donnina navigata ben equipaggiata!

NOTE
1) tipica espressione australiana “Chiedere un favore, fare una proposta (indecente)”
2) per il significato di doxy vedi mudcat , nella traduzione ho voluto mantenere un termine “nautico”
3) la ragazza prima si professa fanciulla (maid nel senso di vergine) dichiarando di non voler concludere nessun affare con il marinaio, mentre in realtà cerca di alzare il prezzo della sua prestazione
4) Alare è un termine nautico che si dice per tirare con forza una cima (per i terricoli un cavo) orizzontalmente o verticalmente “alare la bolina”   è quando si tira verso prora il lato verticale sopra vento delle vele quadre, in modo che prendano il vento il meglio possibile, così l’andatura di bolina, nella navigazione a vela, è la rotta di una nave che naviga stringendo al massimo possibile il vento.
5) Staysail sono un tipo di velatura di forma triangolare che si usano per sfruttare al meglio il vento ovvero i fiocchi e controfiocchi; equivalente all’espressione italiana coi fiocchi e controfiocchi, eccellente, di gran soddisfazione, ma anche nel senso di fatto alla perfezione, completo di ogni cosa.
6) yardarm to yardarm letteralmente “pennone contro pennone” significa gomito a gomito, nel senso di molto vicini, nel contesto potrebbe evocare un arrembaggio.
7) ho tradotto in modo più libero la frase che letteralmente dice “il suo piccolo braciere (secchio per il fuoco) bruciò tutto il mio bompresso”. bobstay qui ha il significato di bowsprit anche se tecnicamente è uno strallo. Un’altra malattia venerea diffusa e ben più letale era al tempo la sifilide, ed è più probabile che proprio quella si sia beccato il nostro audace marinaio!

continua terza parte

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/ramblingsailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108324
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/03/24/week-31-the-rambling-sailor/
https://www.8notes.com/scores/6023.asp?ftype=gif
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=61414
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44919
https://thesession.org/tunes/12050
https://thesession.org/tunes/2696

Saucy Sailor Boy or Jack Tar in the sea shanty

Read the post in English

L’immagine ottocentesca del marinaio è piuttosto stereotipata: è Jack Tar, un ubriacone e donnaiolo, forse lavativo e piantagrane, sempre pronto a fare a pugni.
Nelle canzoni del mare dal punto di vista femminile il marinaio è spesso un bugiardo infedele che ha una ragazza in ogni porto anche se  tiene moglie e figli a casa. Ridicolizzato e respinto da alcune, è invece ricercato da altre che preferiscono in assoluto l’amore di un marinaio (vedi Sailor laddie)!
Il marinaio è guardato più spesso con diffidenza dalle donne, quando non proprio con disprezzo come nella sea song dal titolo “The Saucy Sailor Boy dove il giovane marinaio “insolente” corteggia una donna di campagna: assistiamo a quello che viene chiamato contrasto amoroso che si inserisce in una lunga tradizione popolare, per lo più di argomento bucolico, in cui un uomo e una donna duettano tra loro in una serie di schermaglie amorose; nel genere di questo filone poetico e/o canoro è sempre la donna a rifiutare le proposte dell’uomo, per preservare la sua virtù o per meglio stuzzicare l’appetito amoroso; l’uomo invece promette mari e monti, nonchè amore eterno, millanta ricchezze e la certezza di una vita agiata, pur di conquistare le grazie della donna.
In Saucy Sailor la donna però respinge il marinaio con mala grazia, perchè i suoi vestiti puzzano ancora di catrame; la musica cambia quando il marinaio tira fuori i soldi, così lei abbassa le sue arie da gran dama e gli promette di sposarlo; ora è la volta del marinaio a mostrarsi schizzinoso e a rifiutarla!

GLI ABITI DEL MARINAIO

I vestiti del Poor Jack, un marinaio britannico di fine Settecento sono tutt’altro che miseri: indossa una variante popolare delle braghe al ginocchio, una specie di gonna pantalone molto ampia. E’ probabile si tratti di una variante delle calzabraghe rinascimentali. (sono gli slops cioè i “mutandoni”, che diventeranno d’ordinanza nella Royal Navy)
Porta un cappello a cono nero con ampia falda, e ha i capelli lunghi sciolti sul collo, una camicia bianca dal colletto rigido  con una cravatta rossa annodata; caratteristico panciotto a doppio petto giallo a righine rosse, con una doppia fila di bottoni e un’elegante giacchetta corta blu con una lunga fila di bottoni bianchi; calze azzurrine e scarpe nere con una bella fibbia di metallo.

Poor Jack, Charles Dibdin, 1790-1791, British Museum indossa gli slops,i larghi pantaloni di tela al ginocchio. I capelli portati lunghi fino a metà ottocento erano tenuti ordinati fermandoli dietro la nuca in un codino catramato, da qui il nomignolo Giovannino Catrame (Jack Tar)

Ma i marinai come tutti gli operai e gli uomini del popolo portavano soprattutto i calzoni lunghi che diventarono uno standard dell’abbigliamento maschile dopo la rivoluzione francese.

THE SAUCY SAILOR BOY

Il testo si ritrova in molte collezioni ottocentesche e nei broadside soprattutto in Gran Bretagna e in America, e probabilmente ha origini settecentesche (William Alexander Barret nel suo “English Folksong” pubblicato nel 1891 ritiene che il brano sia comparso in stampa nel 1781 e cita la sua grande popolarità fra le ragazze che lavorano negli opicifi dell’Est London).
The Tarry Sailor dalle collezioni popolari (voce di Andrew Robbie di Strichen, Aberdeenshire)  
La versione più filologica è quella dei Quadriga consort
Quella più swing di Harbottle & Jonas (dalla Cornovaglia)

Steeleye Span in Below the Salt, 1972 (strofe I e da III a VIII), la versione che è diventata quella standard nei repertori dei cantanti e gruppi folk

Wailin Jennys 


I
“Come, my dearest, come, my fairest,
Come and tell unto me,
Will you pity (fancy) a poor sailor boy,
Who has just come from sea?”
II
“I can fancy no poor sailor:
No poor sailor for me!
For to cross the wide ocean
Is a terror to me.
III
You are ragged, love, you are dirty, love,/And your clothes they smell of tar./So begone, you saucy sailor boy,
So begone, you Jack Tar(1)!”
IV
“If I’m ragged, love, if I’m dirty, love,
If my clothes they smell (much) of tar,
I have silver in my pocket, love,
And of gold a bright (great) store.”
V (2)
When she heard those words come from him, On her bended knees she fell./”To be sure, I’ll wed my sailor,
For I love him so well.”
VI
“Do you think that I am foolish?
Do you think that I am mad?
That I’d wed with a poor country girl
Where no fortune’s to be had?
VII
I will cross the briny ocean/Where the meadows they are green (3);
Since you have had the offer, love,
Another shall have the ring.
VIII
For I’m young, love, and I’m frolicksome, (4)
I’m good-temper’d, kind and free.
And I don’t care a straw (5), love,
What the world says (thinks)of me.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Vieni mia cara, vieni mia bella
vieni e dimmi, ti potrebbe interessare un povero giovane marinaio,
appena arrivato dal mare?”
II LEI
“Non mi piace nessun povero marinaio,
nessun povero marinaio per me!
Perchè attraversare il vasto oceano
mi mette terrore
III LEI
Sei cencioso, cocco, e sporco,
i tuoi vestiti puzzano di catrame
così stai lontano, impertinente ragazzino, stai lontano Jack Tar(1)”
IV LUI
“Se sono cencioso, cara, e sporco
e i miei vestiti puzzano di catrame
ho argento nelle tasche, cara,
e oro in gran quantità”
V LEI
E allora quando lo sentì parlare così
sulle ginocchia piegate cadde
“Stanne certo, sposerò il mio marinaio
perchè lo amo così tanto”
VI LUI
“Credi che io sia scemo cara?
Credi che io sia pazzo?
A sposare una povera ragazza di campagna, dove non c’è fortuna da fare?
VII LUI
Attraverserò l’oceano salmastro
dove le terre sono verdi
e visto che tu hai rifiutato l’offerta, cara,
qualche altra ragazza porterà l’anello.
VIII LUI
Oh io sono giovane, cara
e un allegrone
di buon carattere, disponibile e libero
e non mi importa un fico secco, cara
di quello che il mondo pensa di me”

NOTE
1) Jack Tar è il termine comunemente usato, non necessariamente in senso dispregiativo, per indicare un marinaio delle navi mercantili o della Royal Navy. Probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame (in inglese “tar”) con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro. Erano anche soliti nel Settecento incatramare i capelli dopo averli racconti in una treccia o codino per impedire che si bagnassero e o che il vento li scompigliasse sul viso
2) la strofa negli Steeleye Span dice:
And then when she heard him say so
On her bended knees she fell,
“I will marry my dear Henry
For I love a sailor lad so well.”
3) vuol forse dire che il mare è come un prato verde? Negli Steeleye Span dice: I will whistle and sing
4) Negli Steeleye Span dice: Oh, I am frolicsome and I am easy,
Good tempered and free, (in italiano: Oh io sono uno allegro e disponibile,
di buon carattere e libero)
5) oppure “I don’t give a single pin” che è esattamente la stessa espressione

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY: The Tarry Sailor

Stan Hugill nella sua Bibbia degli Shantyman (Shanties from the Seven Seas) ci dice che la canzone The Tarry Sailor (Saucy Sailor Boy) oltre ad essere una forebitter song veniva occasionalmente cantata durante le noiose ore di pompaggio dell’acqua dalla sentina, quando le pompe si azionavano a mano! (vedere sea shanty)

Hulton Clint 

SAUCY SAILOR BOY
I
Come on my fair ones,
Come on my fan ones,
Come and listen unto me.
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
Could you fancy a boldly sailor lad
That has just come home from sea?
II
No, indeed, I’ll wed no sailor
For they smell too much of tar!
You are ruggy, you are sassy,
get you gone Jackie Tar.
III
I have ship on all the ocean,
I have golden great galore
All my clothes they may be all in rags,
but coin can buy me more
IV
If I am ruggy, if I am sassy
And may by a tarry smell
I had silver in my pockets
For they knew can every tell
V
When she heard him that distressed
down upon her knees she fell
Saying “Ruggy dirty saylor boy
I love more than you can tell”
VI
Do you think that I’m foolish,
Do you think that I’m mad?
That I’d wed the likes of you, Miss,
When there’s others to be had!”
VII
No indeed I’ll cross the ocean,
And my ships shall spread her wings,
You refused me, ragged, dirty,
Not for you the wedding ring.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Vieni mia bella,
vieni mia cara
vieni e dimmi, ti potrebbe interessare un povero giovane marinaio,
appena tornato a casa dal mare?”
Ti interesserebbe un povero giovane marinaio,  appena tornato a casa?”
II LEI
“No affatto, non sposerò nessun marinaio, perchè puzzano di catrame!
Sei cencioso, sei  sporco,
stai lontano Jack Tar”
III LUI
“Ho una nave sull’oceano
e ho una fortuna in oro;
i miei vestiti possono essere stracciati
ma i soldi ne possono comprare tanti
IV
“Se sono cencioso, se sono sporco
e se forse puzzo di catrame
ho argento nelle tasche,
perchè si sa quanto possa dire”
V LEI
Quando lo sentì così afflitto
cadde sulle ginocchia dicendo
“Cencioso e sporco marinaio
ti amo più di quanto tu possa dire”
VI LUI
“Credi che io sia scemo?
Credi che io sia pazzo?
A sposare una come te, signorina
quando ce ne sono altre da avere!
VII
Attraverserò l’oceano
e le mie navi dispiegheranno le vele
mi hai rifiutato, lacero e sporco
non è per te l’anello nunziale.”

I marinai scozzesi erano ottimi ballerini e parte del loro addestramento consisteva nell’esercitarsi nella Sailor’s Hornpipe


seconda parte

FONTI
https://www.britishtars.com/2014/01/poor-jack-1790-91.html
https://www.mun.ca/mha/mlc/articles/introducing-merchant-seafaring/jack-tar.php
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/saucysailor.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=133473
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16440