Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold, Groline and Her Young Sailor Bold, The Young Sailor Bold, The Nobleman ‘s Daughter, Caroline and Her Young Sailor Boy, A Rich Nobleman’s Daughter’, Young Caroline and The Sailor
sailor-pic
A love story between a young girl who denies her noble and wealthy family and her wealthy life for the love of a young and handsome sailor. For fear he forgets her, she embarks on the ship disguised as a sailor. When their ship returns to the port of London, the girl goes to her parents to request consent to their marriage.
The theme was very popular among the nineteenth-century broadside and the ballad was popularized by the popular tradition of England, Ireland, Scotland and North America. The melody combined with the text is not unique, here are reported only two: fromJoe Heaney (Rosin The Beau) and from Sara Makem (recorded by Bill Leader at the home of Sara, Keady, County of Armagh in 1967).

The cross-dressing ballads decline the theme of the disguise often combined with the sailor’s (sometimes soldier) farewell with the woman who begs him to take her with him, willing to dress up as a man to stand beside him; the image of a woman-warrior and strong, supported by the power of love and therefore willing to go against her family and social conventions is more a story from a novel than an actual chronicle, the women in those times were subdued to the father first and to the husband later, and very few could win the economic independence (there were then the poor ones who did not care about anyone and who ended up badly in the middle of a street, making all kind of work to barely manage to feed the children). These were the times of marriages combined by families and were based on appropriate alliances and young women were not allowed to fall in love with a handsome black-eyed sailor!

Sarah Makem from Sea Song and Shanties 1994

Andrea Corr from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

Joe Heaney 1964 (here)

I
There lived a rich Nobleman’s daughter/
Caroline is her name we are told/
One day from her drawing room window
She admired a young sailor bold
II
She cried – “I’m a Nobleman’s daughter
My income’s five thousand in gold
I forsake both my father and mother
And I’ll marry young sailor bold”
III
Says William- “Fair lady remember
Your parents you are bound to mind
In sailors there is no dependence
For they leave their true lovers behind”
IV
And she says – “There’s no one could prevent me/
One moment to alter my mind/
In the ships I’ll be off with my true love/
He never will leave me behind”
 
V
Three years and a half on the ocean
And she always proved loyal and true
Her duty she did like a sailor
Dressed up in her jacket of blue
VI
When at last they arrived back in England
Straightway to her father she went
“Oh father dear father forgive me
Deprive me forever of gold
Just grant me one favor I ask you
To marry a young sailor bold”
VII
Her father looked upon young William
And love and in sweet unity
“If I be spared till Tomorrow
It’s married this couple shall be”.

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/carolineandheryoungsailorbold.html
http://www.thecopperfamily.com/songs/collected/caroline.html
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=742
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/caroline_young_sailor_bold_pegmcmahon.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/15/caroline.htm
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN17.html
http://www.johnmorrish.com/folkhandbook/sailors.html

Emigrant Farewell

Leggi in italiano

“Farewell My Love and Remebre Me” also with the title “Our Ship Is Ready”, “The Ship Is Ready To Sail Away” or “My Heart is True”, but also “Emigrant Farewell” is the transposition in the Irish folk song of a broadside ballad entitled “Remember Me”, published in Dublin c.1867 (in the “Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads”).

The theme is that of the emigrant’s farewell  who is forced to separate from his true love; he leaves his heart in Ireland so his woman and his country become one in the memory.

In “Ulster Ballad Singer (1968)” Sarah Makem is noted: “Sarah’s melody is used quite often for songs of farewell in much the same way as the air “The Pretty Lasses of Loughrea” was used allover the country for lamentations or execution songs, (see Joyce’s Old Irish Folk Music and Song, pp 219-211). The two best-known printed versions of Sarah’s air are “Fare you well, sweet Cootehill Town” (Joyce, O.I.F.M.S., p 192) and “The Parting Glass” (Irish Street Ballads. p 69). But until such time as a system of notation is invented to record the true intervals of a folksinger’s interpretation, Sarah Makem’s version of this air must remain for study on disc or tape.”

The Boys of the Lough in Farewell and Rember Me, 1987 ( I, III, I)

Pauline Scanlon in Hush 2006 (I, III)
 La Lugh in Senex Puer 1999 (on Spotify): sad and gloomy tune on the piano with a few hints to the cello

I
Our ship is ready to bear(sail) away
Come comrades o’er the stormy seas
Her snow-white wings they are unfurled
And soon she will swim in a watery world
(chorus)
Ah, do not forget, love, do not grieve
For my heart is true and can’t deceive
My hand and heart, I will give to thee
So farewell my love and remember me
II
Farewell to Dublin’s hills and braes
To Killarney’s lakes and silvery seas
‘Twas many the long bright summer’s day/When we passed those hours of joy away(1)
III (3)
Farewell to you, my precious pearl
It’s my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
And when I’m on the stormy seas
When you think on Ireland, remember me
III (The Boys of the Lough )
Farewell my love as bright as pearl
my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
and when I am seal in the stormy seas
I’ll hope in Ireland, you’ll think on me
IV
Oh, Erin dear, it grieves my heart
To think that I so soon must part
And friends so ever dear and kind
In sorrow I must leave behind
Extra Rhymes La Lugh
V
It’s now I must bid a long adieu
To Wicklow and its beauties too
Avoca’s braes where lovers meet
There to discourse in absence sweet
VI
Farewell sweet Deviney, likewise the glen
The Dargle waterfall and then
The lovely scene surrounding Bray
Shall be my thoughts when far away
NOTES
1) or
Where’s many the fine long summer’s day/We loitered hours of joy away

second part:  “Old Cross of Ardboe”

http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/ready.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22322

THE FALSE BRIDE, LA VERSIONE IRLANDESE

La ballata della “Falsa Sposa” ovvero il tema dell’amore non corrisposto, risale sicuramente al 1600 ed è stata cantata un po’ per tutte le Isole Britanniche per secoli seguendo i canali della tradizione orale, la stampa nelle broadside ballads e nelle collezioni di arie tradizionali, sfaccettandosi in diverse versioni e anche arrangiamenti melodici. Solo all’inizio del XX secolo la ballata sembra essere passata di moda e relegata nelle “old Folk songs”, tuttavia in alcune sue varianti è stata recuperata durante il folk revival degli anni 60-70 e anche in più recenti registrazioni.

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: The Lambs on the green hills

Il brano fu pubblicato nel 1913 da Padraic Colum nel suo “Broadsheet Ballads” ed è una derivazione dello stesso tema. Il testo sviluppa la versione intitolata “I ance had a Lassie” pubblicata nella collezione di Greig e Duncan del 1908. Un corteggiatore non riesce a conquistare la mano della donna di cui è innamorato, la quale preferisce un altro uomo. Dopo aver partecipato al matrimonio della sua ex, il protagonista, come nella versione scozzese, si sdraia nella tomba per cercare la morte. (prima parte qui).

ASCOLTA Emmylou Harris & The Chieftains live 2003; la melodia è un valzer lento

ASCOLTA The Johnstons 2008

ASCOLTA Pauline Scanlon in Hush 2006 (che riprende la melodia dei Chieftains, ma con testo leggermente variato)


I
The lambs(1) on the green hills
they sport and they play,
And many strawberries
grow ‘round the salt sea(2).
How sad is my heart
when my own love’s away,
How many’s the ship sails the ocean.
II
The bride and bride’s party
to church they did go,
The bride she rode foremost,
she bears the best show.
And I followed after
with my heart filled with woe
to see my love wed to another.
III
The next time (3) I saw her
was in the church stand,
Gold ring on her finger,
her love by her hand.
Says I, “My wee lassie,
I will be your man (4),
Although you are wed to another”.
IV
The last time I saw her
was on the way home,
I rode on before her
not knowing where to roam.
Says I, “My wee lassie,
I will be the one,
Although you are wed to another”.
V
“Stop, stop,” says the groomsman,
“till I speak a word,
Would you risk your life (5)
on the point of my sword?
For courting so slowly
you have lost this fair maid,
So be gone for you’ll ne’er enjoy her.”
VI
So dig now my grave
both long wide and deep (6)
And strew it all over with primrose (7) so sweet.
And lay me down in it
to take my last sleep,
For that’s the sure way to forget her.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Gli agnelli (1) sui verdi colli
passano il tempo a giocare
e molte fragole
crescono nel mare salato (2)
e così triste è il mio cuore quando il mio amore è lontano, come molte sono le navi che navigano nell’oceano.
II
La sposa e i parenti della sposa
andavano in chiesa
la sposa incedeva davanti
ed è un vero spettacolo
ma io seguivo alla fine
con il cuore pieno di dolore
a vedere il mio amore sposare un altro
III
La prima volta (3) che la vidi,
era davanti alla chiesa
anello d’oro al dito,
il suo amore le dava la mano.
Mia piccola ragazza,
vorrei stare al tuo fianco 
anche se ti sei sposata un altro
IV
L’ultima volta che la vidi,
era sulla strada di casa
correvo davanti a lei,
non sapendo dove altro andare
O mia piccola ragazza
vorrei stare al tuo fianco
anche se ti sei sposata  un altro
V
Fermo – dice il testimone dello sposo – in fede mia
vuoi giocarti la vita
sulla punta di una spada?

Per aver corteggiato con poco ardore
hai perso questa bella fanciulla
vattene, non ti divertirai mai più con lei
VI
Scavatemi ora la fossa,
larga e piuttosto profonda
e cospargetevi sopra fiori profumati
e deponetemi
per dormire un ultima volta
perchè è il miglior modo per dimenticarla

NOTE
1) la nascita degli agnelli richiama la primavera
2) la strofa della versione scozzese così recita:
The men o’ yon forest they askit o’ me,
Hou many strawberries grew in the saut sea?
But I askit them back wi’ a tear in my ee’,
How many ships sail in the forest?
la strofa è una aggiunta del XVIII secolo riportata anche come stanza a sé nelle filastrocche per bambini: il significato è abbastanza chiaro, il protagonista ha più probabilità di trovare fragole nel mare e navi nella foresta che di ritrovare il suo amore. Non so se il paragone vuole parafrasare (con significato opposto) il noto detto scozzese “ci sono molti pesci nel mare” (e quindi ci sono molte navi nel mare) come frase consolatoria che in genere si dice a chi resta solo alla fine di una storia d’amore. Comunque la risposta alle domande retoriche è “Non c’è nessuna possibilità“.
in alcune versioni la frase viene ripetuta
3) oppure The first place
4) oppure I’ll be by your side
5) oppure Will you venture your life
6) oppure both large, wide and deep
7) oppure And sprinkle it over with flowers

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: I Courted a Wee Girl

La versione per molti aspetti è simile a “The lambs on the green hills”, anche se con termini meno sognanti, qui compare anche “il versetto della Buonanotte” ossia il commiato finale che il protagonista sconfitto lascia come monito agli ascoltatori.
Sarah Makem (Keady, Co. Armagh) ha cantato questa versione per Bill Leader nel 1967 (pubblicata sull’LP Mrs Sarah Makem: Ulster Ballad Singer). Pete Coe nelle note del suo CD Long Company. così ha commentato: Back to Sarah Makem again—this version is based on hers. The song is variously known as The Week Before Easter, The False Bride, and The Lambs on the Green Hill. No fanciful imagery, no strawberries growing in the salt sea etc. Mrs Makem got down to the plain misery of this song on betrayal and lost love.

ASCOLTA Dervish in “At the end of the day” 1996
The first song we heard from the singing of the late Mrs. Sarah Makem from Keady, County Armagh. We incorporated a piece of music into the song called ‘Josefin’s Waltz’ which we got from the Swedish group Väsen. The idea of blending the two together came about in a dressing room in Stockholm! The story of the man beign rejected by the woman in favour of a richer husband is very similar to another song – ‘The Lambs on the Green Hills’, in Colm O’ Lochlainn’s book Irish Street Ballads.

ASCOLTA Sofia Karlsson (strofe I, II, V, VIII)


I
I courted a wee girl for many’s the long day
And slighted all others who came in my way/And now she’s rewarded me to the last day /For she’s gone to be wed to another
II
The bride and bride’s party
to church they did go
The bride she rode foremost
she put the best show
And I followed after
with a heart full of woe
To see my love wed to another
III
The bride and bride’s party in church they did stand/ Gold rings on their fingers,/ a love(1) by the hand
And the man that she’s wed to
has houses and land
He may have her since I couldn’t gain her
IV
The next time I say her
she was seated down neat
I sat down beside her
not a bite could I eat
For I thought my love’s company far better than meat
Since love was the cause of my ruin
V
The last time I saw her
she was all dressed in white
And the more I gazed on her she dazzled my sight
I lifted my hat and I bade her goodnight
Here’s adieu(2) to all false-hearted lovers
VI
I courted that wee girl
for many’s the long day
And I slighted all others that came in my way/ And now she’s rewarded me to the last day/ For she’s gone to be wed to another
VII
So dig me a grave
and dig it down deep
And strew it all over with primrose so sweet
And lay me down in it for no more to weep
Since love was the cause of my ruin.
Tradotto da  Cattia Salto
I
Per tanto tempo ho corteggiato una ragazza
e insultavo tutti gli altri che mi capitavano a tiro;
e ora lei mi sta ripagando alla fine
perchè è andata a sposarsi un altro
II
La sposa e i parenti della sposa andavano in chiesa
la sposa incedeva davanti,
ed è un vero spettacolo,
ma io seguivo dietro
con il cuore pieno di dolore
a vedere il mio amore sposare un altro
III
La sposa e lo sposo stavano in chiesa
anelli d’oro alle dita,
un guanto (1) nella mano
e l’uomo che lei sposava
aveva case e terra,
lui poteva averla mentre io non la meritavo
IV
E la volta dopo che la vidi
era seduta per cenare, e mi sono seduto accanto a lei, e non riuscivo a mandare giù un boccone per pensare che la compagnia del mio amore era migliore del cibo, poichè  l’amore fu la causa della mia rovina
V
L’ultima volta che la vidi
era tutta vestita di bianco
e più la guardavo, più lei mi abbagliava la vista
mi levai il cappello per augurarle la buonanotte, ecco il mio addio (2) a tutte le false innamorate
VI
Per tanto tempo ho corteggiato una bella ragazza
e insultavo tutti gli altri che mi capitavano a tiro;
e ora lei mi sta ripagando alla fine
perchè è andata a sposarsi un altro
VII
Oh scavatemi una tomba
e scavatela profonda
e copritela con i fiori più profumati
e deponetemi giù perchè possa fare un lungo sonno
poichè l’amore fu la causa della mia rovina

NOTE
1)” l’amore le dava la mano” ma più  probabilmente un refuso per glove, l’altro senso della frase potrebbe essere: her love by her hand.
2) in altre versione bad luck

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/the-false-bride/
http://www.justanothertune.com/html/ilal.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thefalsebride.html
http://www.folksongsyouneversang.com/essays/126-2/
http://www.irishtune.info/tune/2337/

Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold

Read the post in English

TITOLI: Caroline and Her Young Sailor Bold, Groline and Her Young Sailor Bold, The Young Sailor Bold, The Nobleman ‘s Daughter, Caroline and Her Young Sailor Boy, A Rich Nobleman’s Daughter’, Young Caroline and The Sailor
sailor-pic
La storia è una storia d’amore tra una giovane fanciulla che rinnega la sua nobile e ricca famiglia e la sua vita agiata per amore di un giovane e bel marinaio. Per paura che lui la dimentichi, lei si imbarca sulla nave travestendosi da marinaio. Quando la loro nave ritorna nel porto di Londra la fanciulla si reca dai genitori per chiedere il consenso al matrimonio.
Il tema era molto popolare tra i broadside ottocenteschi e la ballata venne diffusa dalla tradizione popolare di Inghilterra, Irlanda, Scozia e Nord America. La melodia abbinata al testo non è univoca, qui ne sono riportate solo due quella di Joe Heaney (Rosin The Beau) e quella di Sara Makem registrata da Bill Leader a casa di Sara, Keady, Contea di Armagh nel 1967.

Le cross-dressing ballads declinano il tema del travestimento spesso abbinate al farewell del marinaio (a volte soldato) con la donna che lo supplica di prenderla con sé disposta a travestirsi da uomo pur di stargli al fianco; l’immagine di una donna-guerriera e forte, sostenuta dalla forza dell’amore e perciò disposta ad andare contro alla sua famiglia e alle convenzioni sociali è più un racconto da romanzo d’appendice che di cronaca vera, le donna in quei tempi sottostavano al padre prima e al marito dopo, e ben poche potevano conquistare l’indipendenza economica (c’erano poi quelle povere di cui non importava niente a nessuno e che finivano malamente in mezzo ad una strada o si ammazzavano di lavoro per riuscire a malapena a dare da mangiare ai figli). Erano i tempi dei matrimoni combinati dalle famiglie e si basavano su opportune alleanze e convenienti unioni e alle giovani donne non era consentito di innamorarsi di un bel marinaio dagli occhi neri!

Sarah Makem in Sea Song and Shanties 1994

Andrea Corr in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006.

Joe Heaney 1964 (here)


I
There lived a rich Nobleman’s daughter/
Caroline is her name we are told/
One day from her drawing room window
She admired a young sailor bold
II
She cried – “I’m a Nobleman’s daughter
My income’s five thousand in gold
I forsake both my father and mother
And I’ll marry young sailor bold”
III
Says William- “Fair lady remember
Your parents you are bound to mind
In sailors there is no dependence
For they leave their true lovers behind”
IV
And she says – “There’s no one could prevent me/
One moment to alter my mind/
In the ships I’ll be off with my true love/
He never will leave me behind”
V
Three years and a half on the ocean
And she always proved loyal and true
Her duty she did like a sailor
Dressed up in her jacket of blue
VI
When at last they arrived back in England
Straightway to her father she went
“Oh father dear father forgive me
Deprive me forever of gold
Just grant me one favor I ask you
To marry a young sailor bold”
VII
Her father looked upon young William
And love and in sweet unity
“If I be spared till Tomorrow(1)
It’s married this couple shall be”.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Laggiù viveva la figlia di un ricco nobiluomo,
dicono si chiamasse Carolina ;
un giorno dalla finestra della sua camera si mise ad ammirare un giovane audace marinaio
II
Si lamentò “Sono figlia di un nobiluomo,
le mie entrate sono di 5 mila pezzi d’oro, lascerò mio padre e mia madre
e sposerò il giovane audace marinaio
.”
III
Dice William ” Bella madama, ricorda quello che i tuoi genitori ti hanno raccomandato, di non fare affidamento sui marinai perchè si lasciano le loro innamorate alle spalle
IV
Dice lei “Non c’è nessuno che riuscirà a ostacolarmi,
o a  farmi cambiare idea per un istante.
Sulla nave me ne andrò con il mio innamorato
così non mi lascerà mai indietro”

V
Tre anni e mezzo sull’oceano
e sempre lei si mostrò leale e fidata, faceva il suo dovere come un marinaio vestita con la giacchetta blu.
VI
Quando alla fine ritornarono in Inghilterra
ditta da suo padre lei andò
O padre caro padre perdonami, diseredami pure,
ma piuttosto concedimi il favore che ti chiedo, di sposare un giovane audace marinaio

VII
Il padre prese in considerazione il giovane William e l’amore e la (loro) dolce unione
Se arriverò a domani(1)
questa coppia si dovrà sposare

NOTE
1) equivalente in italiano all’espressione idiomatica “Se non mi viene un colpo oggi”

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/carolineandheryoungsailorbold.html
http://www.thecopperfamily.com/songs/collected/caroline.html
http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=742
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/caroline_young_sailor_bold_pegmcmahon.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/15/caroline.htm
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN17.html
http://www.johnmorrish.com/folkhandbook/sailors.html

FACTORY GIRLS IN FOLK SONGS

The Factory girl” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese che accosta la struttura poetica e musicale delle “aisling songs” alle storie della quotidianità della rivoluzione industriale. Nelle “aisling songs” del XVII-XVIII secolo il poeta, di solito all’alba, incontra una bellezza simile a una dea (simbolo della Primavera secondo la tradizione medievale trovadorica). In questo genere poetico si festeggia l’arrivo della bella stagione e lo sbocciare dell’amore, ma nella ripresa irlandese la donna raffigura più o meno velatamente l’Irlanda e così dietro al genere si nascondeva l’amore patriottico che non poteva essere manifestato apertamente durante il dominio inglese..

In questa canzone fine Settecento – inizi Ottocento, il contesto è più propriamente di corteggiamento, in cui un uomo benestante si innamora (o incapriccia) di una bellezza popolana, una semplice e povera operaia di un opificio tessile. Diffusa in l’Irlanda del Nord (Contee di Armagh, Down, Tyrone e Fermanagh), Inghilterra e Scozia, la canzone è stata stampata su vari broadsides nel 1830. E tuttavia la storia si evolve in diverse versioni non tutte a lieto fine.

IL CORTEGGIATORE RESPINTO

In alcune versioni il corteggiatore viene dapprima respinto per la fretta di andare al lavoro
“Oh young man, excuse me, for now I must leave you
For yonder’s the sound of my factory bell”
E poi a causa delle differenze sociali:
“Oh love and temptation are our ruination Go find you a lady and may you do well For I am an orphan with ne’er a relation And besides, I’m a hard working factory girl”
Così si allontana ramingo (ovviamente in una valle nascosta dove nessuno lo possa riconoscere) per poter dare sfogo al suo dolore.

ASCOLTA The Bothy Band in “Out of the Wind into the Sun”, 1977
ASCOLTA Jim Doherty (Smug) 1986


I
As I went out walking one fine summers morning
The birds on yon bushes
did warble and sing
Gay lads and gay lasses
in couples were sporting
Going down to yon factory
their work to begin
II
I spied one amongst them
more fairer than any
Her cheeks like the red rose
than none could excel
Her skin like the lily
that grows in yon valley
And she was a hard-working
factory girl
III
l stepped up beside
more closely to view her
But on me she cast such a look of disdain
Saying “young man have manners
and do not come near me
For I’m a poor girl though
I think it no shame”
IV
“It’s not for to scorn you
fair maid I adore you
But grant me one favour
say where do you dwell?”
“Kind sir I’ll excuse you
for now I must leave you
For yonder’s the sound
of my factory bell”
V
“I have lands I have houses
I adorned them with ivy
l have gold in my pocket
and silver as well
And if you’ll come with me
a lady I’ll make you
And no more may you heed
yon factory bell”
VIII
With these words she turned
and with that she had left me,
And all for her sake
I’ll go wander away,
And in some deep valley,
where no one shall know me,
I shall mourn for the sake
of my factory girl.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo in una bella mattina d’estate,
gli uccelli nei cespugli
fischiettavano e cinguettavano,
ragazzi e ragazze
a gruppi amoreggiavano in allegria
tornando alla fabbrica
dove iniziare il lavoro.
II
Egli ne vide una tra di loro,
più bella di molte,
le sue guance come una rosa rossa
che nessun fiore può rivaleggiare,
l’incarnato come giglio
che cresce nella valle
ed era solamente un’operaia
della fabbrica.
III
Mi fermai  accanto a lei,
per vederla più da vicino
ma lei mi gettò uno sguardo di disprezzo dicendo: “Giovanotto, comportatevi da gentiluomo e non venitemi così vicino
perchè sono una povera ragazza,
anche se non me ne vergogno”
IV
“Non è per disprezzarti,
bella fanciulla io vi adoro,
ma concedetemi un favore,
ditemi dove abitate?”
“Buon Signore siete perdonato,
ma devo proprio lasciarvi
perchè risuona la sirena
della mia fabbrica”
V
“Ho terre e case
che adorno d’edera
ho monete d’oro nella tasca
e anche d’argento
e se verrete con me
vi farò una Signora
e non ascolterete
più la sirena della fabbrica”
VIII
A queste parole lei si voltò
e con ciò mi ha lasciato,
e per amor suo
andrò ramingo
in qualche valle oscura
dove nessuno mi conoscerà,
piangerò per amore
della mia operaia

IL MATRIMONIO VANTAGGIOSO

In alcune versioni  il corteggiamento si conclude con un matrimonio e la giovane ragazza diventa una signora che non ha più bisogno di lavorare.
Margaret Barry 1958 (strofe da I a III)

The Chieftains & Sinead O’Connor (strofe da I a III) in Tear of Stone, 1999

Eric Burdon (che aggiunge una IV strofa)


I
As I went out walking
one fine summer morning
The birds in the bushes
did whistle and sing
The lads and the lasses
in couples were courtin’ (sporting)
Going back to the factory
their work to begin
II
He spied one among them,
she was fairer then many
Her cheeks like the red rose
that blooms in the spring
Her hair(1) like the lily
that grows in Yon’ valley
She was only a hard-working
factory girl
III
He sat soft beside her,
more closely to view her
She says, “My young man,
don’t stare me so”(2)
“I gold in my pocket and silver as well”
“No more will I answer
that factory call”
IV
Now the years have gone past
from the days of our youth
Our home is now teemin’
with children at play
Life goes on in the village
you can still hear the whistle
“Hey there goes that lad with his factory girl.”
You can still hear the sound of the factory call.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo
in una bella mattina d’estate,
(come) gli uccelli nei cespugli
fischiettavano e cinguettavano,
(così) ragazzi e ragazze
a gruppi amoreggiavano
tornando alla fabbrica
a iniziare il lavoro.
II
Egli ne vide una tra di loro,
più bella di molte,
guance come una rosa rossa
che fiorisce in primavera,
capelli come giglio
che cresce nella valle
ed era solamente un’operaia
della fabbrica.
III
Le si avvicinò
per vederla meglio
Dice lei: “Giovanotto,
non fissatemi così”
“Ho oro e argento in tasca”
“Più non risponderò
a quel richiamo della fabbrica” .
IV
Ora gli anni sono passati
dai tempi della nostra gioventù,
la nostra casa è piena
di bambini che giocano,
la vita continua nel villaggio
puoi ancora sentire il fischio
“Ecco che va quel ragazzo con la sua operaia”
Puoi ancora sentire il richiamo della fabbrica

NOTE
1) in alcune versioni è riportato “skin” come sarebbe più logico
2) in questa versione testuale i dialoghi sono ridotti all’essenziale a discapito della comprensione del testo, così alla ritrosia di lei, lui risponde dicendole di essere ricco, e lei accetta di sposarlo

ASCOLTA Sarah Makem 1968. La melodia ricordata da Sarah è diversa da quella dalla irish traveller Margaret Barry . Nelle note dell’album “Mrs Sara Makem, Ulster Ballad Singer 1968 ” è scritto ” The air in the Soh Mode is particularly attractive and is related to “The Unspoken Farewell” (Gems of Melody, Pt. 1., Hardebeck)“.

I dialoghi sono un po’ più dettagliati, veniamo così a sapere che la ragazza è una povera orfanella sola al mondo, ma fiera oltre che bella.


I
As I went a-walking
one fine summer’s morning,
The birds on the branches
they sweetly did sing.
The lads and the lasses
together were sporting,
Going down to yon factory
their work to begin.
II
I spied a wee damsel more
fairer than Venus,
Her skin like the lily
that grows in the dell,
Her cheek like the red rose
that grew in yon valley.
She is my own only goddess;
she’s a sweet factory girl.
III
I stepped it up to her,
it was for to view her,
When on me she cast
a proud look of disdain.
“Stand off me! Stand off me
and do not insult me,
For although I’m a poor girl,
I think it no shame.”
IV
“I don’t mean to harm you
or yet, love, to scorn you,
But grant me one favour:
pray where to you dwell?”
“I am a poor orphan
without home or relations
And besides I’m a hard
working factory girl.”
V
Well, now to conclude
and to finish these verses,
This couple got married
and both are doing well.
So, lads, fill your glasses
and drink to the lasses
Till we hear the dumb sound
of the sweet factory bell.

traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo
in una bella mattina d’estate,
(come) gli uccelli sui rami
cantavano armoniosamente,
(così) ragazzi e ragazze
a gruppi amoreggiavano
tornando alla fabbrica
per iniziare il lavoro.
II
Vidi una damigella,
più bella di Venere,
l’incarnato come giglio
che cresce nella forra
le sue guance come una rosa rossa
che fiorisce nella valle.
Lei è la mia sola Dea
l’amabile operaia
III
Mi sono avvicinato a lei
per vederla (meglio)
ma lei mi gettò con orgoglio
uno sguardo di disprezzo
“Stammi lontano, lontano
e non insultarmi
perchè sebbene sia una povera ragazza, non me ne vergogno”
IV
“Non voglio farvi del male
o mia cara disprezzarvi,
ma rendimi un favore:
ditemi dove abitate?”
“Sono una povera orfana
senza casa e parentele
e inoltre sono un’operaia
che fa un duro lavoro”
V
Allora per farla breve,
e chiudere questi versi
questa coppia si è sposata
e tutti e due stanno bene.
Quindi ragazzi, riempite i vostri bicchieri e brindate alle ragazze
finchè sentiamo il suono sordo della campana della fabbrica.

FONTI
http://www.norbeck.nu/abc/lyrics.asp?rhythm=song&ref=110
http://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/songs/thefactorygirl.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=88929
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31323 http://www.itma.ie/inishowen/song/factory_girl_jim_doherty

RED IS THE ROSE

Di rose rosse sono piene le canzoni celtiche più sentimentali e molte sono già state inserite in questo database.

Red is the Rose” è la variante irlandese della ballata scozzese Loch Lomond. Non è insolito che le belle melodie si somiglino al di là e al di qua del North Channel (e tra gli appassionati fiocca la querelle su quale sia l’originale e chi ha copiato da chi), di questa non si conosce bene la provenienza, è stato Tommy Makem insieme ai Clancy Brothers a farla conoscere al grande pubblico a partire dagli anni ’60: Tommy, ricordato affettuosamente con il nome di Bardo di Armagh (vedi) aveva imparato la canzone dalla madre Sarah, cantante e grande collezionista di Armagh, Irlanda del Nord. Sempre tra le canzoni di Sarah Makem e per restare in tema floreale, vi rimando a “I wish my love was a red, red rose” .

La prima registrazione della canzone tuttavia  risale al 1934 con il titolo di My Bonnie Irish Lass; solo più recentemente è ritornata in auge dopo la versione dei The High Kings ..

RED IS THE ROSE: VERSIONE IRLANDESE

ASCOLTA Josephine Beirne & George Sweetman 1934
ASCOLTA Tommy Makem & Liam Clancy live
The Ennis Sisters (Terranova) + The Chieftains in “Fire in the kitchen” 1997

Nanci Griffin & The Chieftains in An Irish Evening, 1992 (che rendono sempre omaggio alla versione dei Clancy Brothers)

The High Kings in Memory Lane 2010

I versi sono molto semplici: due innamorati si dichiarano amore eterno, e si scambiano le promesse di matrimonio, ma la canzone è permeata dall’amarezza dell’abbandono, lui partirà (probabilmente per l’America) in cerca di lavoro.

I
Come over the hills, my bonny Irish lass(1)
Comer over the hills to your darling;
You choose the rose, love, and I’ll make the vow(2)
And I’ll be your true love forever.
Refrain:
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
And fair is the lily of the valley(3);
Clear is the water that flows from the Boyne(4)
But my love is fairer than any.
II
Down by Killarney’s green woods(5) that we strayed
And the moon and the stars they were shining;
The moon shone its rays on her locks of golden hair
And she swore she’d be my love forever.
III
It’s not for the parting that my sister pains
It’s not for the grief of my mother,
“Tis all for the loss of my bonny Irish lass
That my heart is breaking forever(6).
I
Vieni sulle colline mia bella
irlandese
vieni sulle colline dal tuo amore;
tu scegli la rosa, amore, e io farò le promesse
e sarò il tuo amore per sempre.
Ritornello:
Rossa è la rosa che cresce in quel giardino laggiù,
e bello è il mughetto;
chiara è l’acqua che scorre
dal Boyne
ma il mio amore è il più bello di tutti.
II
Giù dai boschi di Killarney che ci siamo allontanati
e la luna e le stelle brillavano;
la luna risplendeva con i raggi sulle ciocche dei suoi capelli d’oro,
e lei mi ha giurato
che sarà il mio amore per sempre.
III
Non soffro per la separazione da mia sorella
non è per la perdita di mia madre,
è per la perdita della mia bella irlandese
che il mio cuore è spezzato per sempre

NOTE
1) oppure a secondo di chi canta “my handsome Irish lad”
2) a leggere tra le righe il protagonista sta chiedendo una notte d’amore alla sua fidanzata e vuole convincerla a cedere la sua virtù (la rosa) con una promessa di matrimonio. Secondo la tradizione il matrimonio tra due persone che, anche senza testimoni, si fossero scambiati le promesse e avessero consumato il rapporto era socialmente valido.
3) il mughetto è un fiore delicato e profumatissimo che fiorisce in tutto maggio-giugno; nelle notti di luna piena il suo profumo diventa particolarmente intenso e inebriante
4) il fiume Boyne che scorre nel Leinster (Irlanda Orientale) è spesso richiamato nella mitologia irlandese: Brú na Bóinne (in italiano “la dimora del Boyne”) è uno dei più importanti siti archeologici del mondo con i grandi tumuli di Newgrange, Knowth e Dowth. La citazione allude a una specie di cuore dell’Irlanda, il santuario degli Antenati dell’Irlanda tribale.
5) Killarney si trova nel Kerry, all’estremità sud dell’isola e mi piace pensare che il bosco della canzone sia stato preservato nel Parco Nazionale (Killarney National Park) ricco di odorosi alberi secolari. In questa strofa veniamo a sapere che l’incontro d’amore notturno c’è effettivamente stato!!
6) nella versione americana diventa “That is leaving old Ireland forever” in cui si rende più esplicito l’abbandono degli affetti a causa dell’emigrazione. Come possibile “trait d’union” con le versioni scozzesi la somiglianza con la ballata Flora’s Lament For Her Charlie 1841 (qui)
It’s not for the hardships that I must endure,
Nor the leaving of Benlomond;
But it’s for the leaving of my comrades all,
And the bonny lad that I love so dearly.

RED IS THE ROSE: VERSIONE AMERICANA

Questa versione iniziò a circolare negli anni 70 e Joe Heaney ci dice di averla imparata dal nonno. Originario di Carna (Connemara, Irlanda) egli fu un moderno bardo, un cantore del popolo custode dei canti tradizionali (la maggior parte in gaelico); negli anni 50 e 60 è in viaggio tra Dublino e Londra per concerti, registrazioni e competizioni canore.
The folk music revival proved both a blessing and a curse to Joe.  He began to be féted by the ‘stars’ of this revival.  Some, like MacColl and Seeger, Lloyd and Hamish Henderson were earnestly trying to gain a knowledge and appreciation of his art.  And at a more popular level, groups like the Clancy Brothers and the Dubliners were genuinely attracted to him and respected him for what he stood for.  However, well-meant attempts by such groups to introduce him to popular audiences often came to grief.  It has to be remembered that such audiences were there only because the current fad was ‘the ballads’.  Their comprehension of sean-nós, or any other form of traditional singing, was zilch“.(tratto da qui)
Poco dopo Joe decide di trasferirsi definitivamente in America dove accanto al lavoro “per vivere” partecipò a festival diede concerti nei folk club e così via, fino a diventare insegnante (nel dipartimento di Etnomucologia) in alcune università..

ASCOLTA Joe Heaney 1996 nel sean nós di Connamara

51IzeFlH0lL__SL500_AA500_Questa versione è pressochè identica a quella irlandese privata però da più precise connotazioni geografiche, qui però manca la strofa in cui l’uomo chiede alla propria innamorata di trascorrere una notte d’amore nel bosco (l’ultima prima della partenza); alcuni perciò cantano una versione “sincretica” aggiungendo le strofe I e II della versione irlandese come strofe finali a questa. (vedi)

CHORUS
Red is the rose that in yonder garden grows,
Fair is the lily of the valley(3);
Clear are the waters that flow in yonder stream(4),
But my love is fairer than any
I
Over the mountains and down in the glen,
To a little thatched cot(7) in the valley;
Where the thrush and the linnet sing their ditty and their song,
And my love’s leaning over the half-door(8).
II
Down by the seashore on a cool summer’s eve(5),
With the moon rising over the heather;
The moon it shown fair on her head of golden hair,
And she vowed she’d be my love forever.
III
It is not for the loss of my own sister Kate,
It is not for the loss of my mother;
It is all for the loss of my bonnie blue-eyed lass,
That I’m leaving my homeland forever.

NOTE
4) il Boyne che scorre nel Leinster (Irlanda Orientale) della versione irlandese è diventato un generico “yonder stream
5) anche in questo verso il riferimento geografico “Down by Killarney’s green Woods that we strayed” diventa una “riva del mare” in una notte d’estate
7) il “thatched cottage” è la tipica “casetta di campagna” delle fiabe in pietra intonacata di bianco e con il tetto spiovente in paglia
8) “the half-door” in genere il cottage aveva un’unica porta d’accesso a sud una caratteristica “mezza-porta” divisa cioè in due pannelli, che si aprivano in modo indipendente: quello superiore poteva essere anche a vetro e veniva lasciato quasi sempre aperto per fare entrare la luce e far circolare l’aria; quello inferiore era in un unico battente di legno che rimaneva sempre chiuso, in modo che bambini e animali non potessero entrare (o uscire!). Al mezzo battente della porta si stava appoggiati restando in casa per spettegolare con i vicini o per fumare un po’ di tabacco!

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO PRIMA STROFA
Su per le montagne e giù per la valletta alla casina nella valle, dove il merlo e tordo cantano le loro canzoncine e il mio amore sta accanto alla porta.

FONTI
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/red-is-the-rose
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/06/rose.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/20/red.htm http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=1009
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7171 http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/j_heaney.htm
http://www.irlandando.it/cosa-vedere/sud/contea-di-kerry/killarney-national-park/ http://cottageology.com/information/irishcottagehistory/

 

THE BEGGARMAN’S SONG

13600Un mendicante girovago ritiene che il suo mestiere sia il migliore del mondo, perché così è libero (da ogni convenzione sociale, obblighi e consuetudini); quando ha fame chiede da mangiare, quando è stanco si siede a riposare e quando ha sonno dorme dove capita, magari in un fienile se piove. Incontrata una ragazza che gli fa notare il suo misero abbigliamento, le risponde che preferisce il suo genere di vita e che tutto il resto è superfluo.

LA MELODIA: RED HAIRED BOY

Il brano è conosciuto sotto vari titoli anche come sola versione strumentale e su thesession.org sono elencati come: An Carrowath, An Giolla Ruadh, The Auld Rigadoo, The Beggar Man, The Beggarman, Danny Pearl’s Favorite, Danny Pearl’s Favourite, Gilderoy, Guilderoy, Injun Ate A Woodchuck, The Jolly Beggar, The Jolly Beggarman, The Jolly Beggerman, The Journeyman, The Little Beggar Man, The Little Beggarman, The Little Beggerman, The Old Rigadoo, The Old Soldier With The Wooden Leg, The Red Haired Boy, The Red Haired Lad, The Red Headed Irishman, The Red-Haired Boy, The Redhaired Boy, The Rigadoo, Thy Redhaired Lad.

The Fiddler’s Companion riporta: “‘Red Haired Boy’ is the English translation of the Gaelic title “Giolla Rua” (or, Englished, “Gilderoy”), and is generally thought to commemorate a real-life rogue and bandit, however, Baring-Gould remarks that in Scotland the “Beggar” of the title is also identified with King James V. The song was quite common under the Gaelic and the alternate title “The Little Beggarman” (or “The Beggarman,” “The Beggar”) throughout the British Isles. For example, it appears in Baring-Gould’s 1895 London publication Garland of Country Song and in The Forsaken Lover’s Garland, and in the original Scots in The Scots Musical Museum. A similarly titled song, “Beggar’s Meal Poke’s,” was composed by James VI of Scotland (who in course became James the I of England), an ascription confused often with his ancestor James I, who was the reputed author of the verses of a song called “The Jolly Beggar.” The tune is printed in Bunting’s 1840 A Collection of the Ancient Music of Ireland as “An Maidrin Ruadh” (The Little Red Fox).  The melody is one of the relatively few common to fiddlers throughout Scotland and Ireland, and was transferred nearly intact to the American fiddle tradition (both North and South) where it has been a favorite of bluegrass fiddlers in recent times.”

La melodia, un’allegra hornpipe, a volte è suonata come un reel

ASCOLTA Vi Wickam (due violini)

ASCOLTA Norman Blake and Ed “Doc” Cullis: banjo e chitarra, ottimo bluegrass!!

JOHN DHU

Pur nella spensieratezza delle melodia,  c’è da riflettere che il nome del vecchio, John Dhu suona come il tipico nome riservato ai corpi non identificati negli ospedali e nelle camere mortuarie, John Doe.

La versione testuale è stata riportata da Sarah Makem (Irlanda del Nord) e resa famosa dal fratello Tommy
ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers &Tommy Makem
ASCOLTA The High Kings

ASCOLTA Buddy Greene con l’armonica
ASCOLTA Great Big Sea in Play 1997: “Rigadoon”  (Alan Doyle, Séan McCann, Bob Hallett, Darrell Power). Un’arrangiamento in stile rap! (anche il testo in questa rilettura diventa modernissimo)

ASCOLTA
Gaelic Storm in Three2001: la canzone diventa quasi uno scioglilingua rappato tanto è veloce con l’inizio delle voci che ripetono come un mantra “I am a little beggarman” a imitare il suono del digeridoo

CHORUS
Diddly-i-diddle-i-doodle-i-do-die-dum
Diddly-doo-dah-diddly-i-diddly-i-dum
Diddly-i-diddly-i-diddly-i-dee-dum
Diddly-doo-dah-diddly-i-doo-dah-dum


I
I am a little beggarman,
a-begging I have been
For three score(1) or more
in this little isle of green
I’m known from the Liffey
down to Segue(2)
And I’m known by the name
of old Johnny Dhu.
II
Of all the trades that’s going,
I’m sure begging is the best
For when a man is tired,
he can sit down and rest,
He can beg for his dinner,
he has nothing else to do
Only cut around the corner
with his old rig-a-doo (3)
III
I slept in the barn
right down at Caurabawn(4),
A wet night came on
and I slept until the dawn,
With holes in the roof
and the rain coming through,
And the rats and the cats,
they were playing peek-a-boo.
IV
When who did I waken
but the woman of the house
With her white spotty apron
and her calico blouse
She began to frighten,
I said, “Boo Ara, don’t be afraid,
ma’am, it’s only Johnny Dhu (5)”
V
I met a little flaxy-haired girl one day
“Good morning,
little flaxy-haired girl,” I did say
“Good morning, little beggarman,
and how do you do,
With your rags and your tags
and your old rig-a-doo(3)?”
VI
I’ll buy a pair of leggings
and a collar and a tie
And a nice young lady
I’ll fetch by and by
I’ll buy a pair of goggles,
I’ll color them blue (6),
And an old-fashioned lady
I will make her, too (7)
VII
Over the road with
me pack on me back
Over the fields with
me great, heavy sack
With holes in me shoes
and me toes peeping through
Singing, “Skinny-me-rink-a-doodle-o and old Johnny Dhu”
VIII
I must be going to bed
for it’s getting late at night
The fire’s all raked
and out goes the light
So now you’ve heard the story
of me old rig-a-doo
“It’s good-bye and God be with you,” says old Johnny Dhu
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sono un piccolo mendicante
e lo sono sempre stato,
ho passato più di sessanta anni
in questa isola verde,
mi conoscono dal Liffey
e fino a Seagew  (2)
con il nome di
il vecchio Johnny Dew.
II
Di tutti i mestieri da farsi,
mendicare è il migliore:
quando uno è stanco
si siede a riposare,
chiede la carità per mangiare,
non ha altro da fare
che sedersi nel suo angolo
con la sua vecchia filosofia.(3)
III
Ho dormito in un fienile
proprio a Caurabawn (4),
(quando) venne una nottata bagnata
e ho dormito fino all’alba
con i buchi nel tetto
e la pioggia che veniva giù,
con i topi e i gatti che
giocavano a nascondino.
IV
Ma chi si sveglia
se non la donna di casa,
con un grembiule bianco macchiato
e una camicia di cotone stampata?
Si prese uno spavento
e allora le ho detto :”Non aver paura donna sono solo Johnny Dew (5)”.
V
Ho incontrato una giovanetta bionda un giorno “Buon giorno
biondina” le ho detto
“Buon giorno mendicante,
come stai,
con i tuoi stracci, i rattoppi
con la sua vecchia filosofia (3)?”
VI
Mi comprerò un paio di calze,
un colletto e una cravatta,
e una signora elegante
incontrerò tra poco,
mi comprerò un paio di occhiali
e li colorerò di blu(6)
e farò di lei
una signora onesta (7).
VII
Via per la strada con
la borsa sulle spalle!
Via per i campi col
mio grosso sacco,
coi buchi nelle scarpe
e le dita che spuntano fuori
cantando “Skinny-me-rink-a-doodle-o e il vecchio Johnny Dew”
VIII
Devo andare a dormire
perchè si è fatta notte
il fuoco è spento,
smorzato il lume,
così avete sentito la storia
della mia vecchia filosofia
“Arrivederci e Dio sia con voi”
dice il vecchio Johnny Dew

NOTE
1) score vuole anche dire un gruppo o una serie di 20 quindi l’età del mendicante è di oltre 60 anni
2) probabilmente Seagoe in Armagh
3) rigadoo = carretta che i senza tetto si portano appresso (oggi il carrello della spesa dei super-market) oppure bastone da passeggio ma anche zaino;  il bastone da passeggio diventa il bastone da trasporto con dei sacchi o pacchetti legati sulla cima e portato a tracolla sulle spalle; altri propendono per il nome di una danza, dal francese Rigaudon – storpiato in inglese come rigadoon (rigadig), una danza di corte francese diventata popolare nell’ottocento (più precisamente un passo di danza.). Dallo Yorkshire osservano che con “Reet Good Do” si indica un session di musica con canti e racconti. Alcuni arrivano a unire i due significati osservano che nel portare un sacco appeso ad un bastone questo sembra che balli.
Ma potrebbe anche trattarsi di un cappotto o un vestiario.
Altri ancora osservano che il gaelico “riocht go dubh” che foneticamente si avvicina al nostro termine significa “a black/dirty/dismal shape/state/condition” traducibile come “disordinato” o confusionario con tutte le sfumature che la parola inglese “mess” comporta,
In senso lato a mio avviso  vuole indicare la summa della sua  filosodia di vita, un comportamento che segue alla lettera  l’insegnamento del filosofo greco Epicuro (vedi)
4) anche scritto come Currabawn
5) anche con il nome l’uomo ha voluto cancellare i legami con la sua stirpe (con tutto l’insieme di conseguenze che porta:  senso di appartenenza, obblighi morali, affetti)
6) una frase che può contenere molti significati:  colorare gli occhiali di azzurro ha un senso opposto al colorarli di rosa, il rosa è la visione positiva ed edulcorata della realtà, mentre l’azzurro prende una sfumatura negativa (in inglese blue vuol dire anche triste) più disincantata; una seconda interpretazione trovata in mudcats è che  l’uomo ha intenzioni oneste con la donna che corteggia e intende sposarla: per tradizione infatti la sposa deve portare qualcosa di blu al suo matrimonio.
7) la strofa prosegue  nei Gaelic Storm:
I’ve got the sky, I’ve got the road.
I’ve got the sky…The world is my home.

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/i-did-in-my-way-.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/566
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=3505&c=68 http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/REA_RED.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/beggar.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=126076
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6002

THE IRISH GIRL: I WISH MY LOVE WAS A RED RED ROSE

 “I Wish My Love Was a Red Red Rose” detta anche The Irish Girl o Let the Wind Blow High or Low, registrata da Sarah Makem (1900-1983) nel 1968 è inclusa nell’antologia “As  I Roved Out”. Popolare in Irlanda e in particolare nell’Irlanda del Nordsi (ma anche in Inghilterra e Scozia) presenta in un’infinità di varianti testuali, sebbene la versione  più moderna rimanga quella interpretata da Sarah Makem. Di fatto chi la canta aggiunge a piacere versi presi un po’ qui e là dai canti tradizionali, così non possiamo affermare che ci sia una versione definitiva di “The Irish Girl”.

Il testo non si  deve confondere con la scozzese “A red, Red Rose” ovvero “My love is a Red red rose” si tratta piuttosto di una variante di “O were my love yon lilac fair” (sembre rielaborata da Robert Burns): in “Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa”  l’uomo dichiara la sua passione e il desiderio ardente verso la sua innamorata, che però rifiuta i suoi approcci sessuali. Il tono della canzone è mesto, potrebbe essere scambiato per romanticismo in realtà è un canto “consolatorio”!

La prima strofa riprende un tema diffuso nelle ballate  popolare in cui fiori ed erbe sono un linguaggio  magico ben codificato e ricco di significati, che si ricollega a mio  avviso alla ballata “The Gardener” (Child #219) (vedi); viene da pensare che questa sia il punto di  vista maschile di quella, in cui l’uomo respinto esprime il suo rammarico.  Così collegandole veniamo a conoscere sempre più un pezzo della storia, come  se fossero i capitoli di un romanzo..

E l’uomo prosegue nella sua fantasia erotica: essere una farfalla  per suggere il nettare di quella rosa rossa o un uccello per farla  addormentare dolcemente e poi risvegliarla al sorgere dell’alba. Nella terza  strofa il sogno si fa meno bucolico e fuor di metafora, così i piaceri di un onesto irlandese: avere il bicchiere sempre pieno di liquore, le tasche piene  di soldi e la ragazza tra le braccia con cui rotolarsi nell’erba.

ASCOLTA Tim O’Brien&Jan Fabricius

ASCOLTA Bothy Band live

Pur essendo un canto maschile viene eseguito anche da voci femminili per il tono malinconico della melodia.
ASCOLTA Maev Ni Mhaolchatha

ASCOLTA Altan live


I
I wish my love was a red red rose(1)
Growing in yon garden fair
And I (me) to be the gardener
Of her I would take care
There’s not a month throughout the year, That my love I’d renew
I’d garnish her with flowers fine
Sweet William(2), Thyme(3), and Rue(4)
II
I wish I was a butterfly
I’d light on my love’s breast
And if I was a blue cuckoo(5)
I’d sing my love to rest
And if I was a nightingale
I’d sing the daylight clear
I’d sit and sing with (for) you Molly
For once I loved you dear
III
I wish I was in Dublin(6) town
And seated on the grass
In my right hand a jug of punch
And on my knee a lass
I’d call for liquor freely (7)
And I’d pay before I’d go
I’d roll my Molly in my arms
Let the wind blow high or low (8)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa, che cresce in quel bel giardino
e io essere il giardiniere
per prendermi cura di lei.
Non c’è  mese in tutto l’anno,
che io non rinnovi il mio amore
la adorno con freschi fiori,
garofanini dei poeti, timo
e ruta.
II
Se fossi una farfalla
mi poserei sul seno del mio amore
o un cuculo malinconico
canterei al mio amore mentre riposa; se fossi un usignolo,
annuncerei il chiarore del mattino,
e starei seduto a cantare con te Molly, perchè un tempo ti ho amato mia cara
III
Vorrei essere a Dublino
seduto sul prato
con alla destra una brocca di punch
e sulle ginocchia una ragazza,
ordinerei liquore (di marca) a volontà
e pagherei prima di andarmene,
abbraccerei la mia Molly
e che il vento soffi forte o piano.

NOTE
1) la Rosa rossa equivale sia all’amore romantico, che alla lussuria o  “passione sfrenata”, Nelle ballate popolari la rosa non è solo “una rosa” ma è il simbolo della passione amorosa; l’allusione al fiore più intimo e segreto della donna. Sebbene un tempo le fanciulle fossero educate a preservarsi caste e pure fino al matrimonio, la loro stessa ingenuità le poteva far cadere facile preda dei mascalzoni, che con false promesse matrimoniali, le inducevano a concedere il loro “pegno d’amore”; così le rose nelle canzoni celtiche sono associate alla sfortuna
2) Sweet William è il dianthus barbatus il garofano dei poeti che simboleggia la galanteria maschile
3) il timo è il simbolo della purezza, intesa come rettitudine  coerenza
4) la ruta è simbolo del rimpianto. La bella Molly ha  preferito mantenere la sua verginità: così contrapponendo il garofano dei  poeti che sta per la mascolinità al timo che è la purezza femminile resta il  rimpianto (la ruta) per il mancato appagamento.
5) il canto del cuculo è particolarmente armonioso
6) il nome della città varia a secondo dei luoghi in cui è cantata la canzone
7) il call drink non è un semplice ordine di liquore, ma un ordine in cui il cliente specifica la marca che vuole bere e si differenzia dai liquori a basso costo che sono in serviti dai barman nelle richieste generiche. La sfumatura si perde nella traduzione in italiano, a meno di aggiungere un aggettivazione a liquore.
8) ancora un’allusione sessuale

ASCOLTA Tim Dennehy (con delle strofe aggiuntive di suo pugno)


I
I wish my love was a red, red rose,
Growing in yon garden fair
And me to be the gardener
‘Tis of her I would take care.
There is not a month throughout the year/But my love I would renew.
I’d garnish her with flowers fine
Sweet William, thyme and rue.
II
I wish I was a butterfly
I’d light on my love’s breast
Or if I was a blue cuckoo
I’d sing my love to rest.
If I but was a nightingale
I’d sing ‘til the daylight clear.
I’d sit and watch with you my love
For once I loved you dear.
III
The first time that I met my love
Was in the market square.
The look that passed between us then
My heart it did ensnare
But fate displayed its cruel hand
And we were forced to part.
Farewell my own dear Mary
You’re my joy my own sweetheart.
IV
For love it is a sharpened sword
That sears and tears apart.
It brings great rhapsodies of joy
But still can break your heart.
Oh painful joy oh joyous pain
From dawn ‘til night does fall.
It was better to have loved and lost
Than never loved at all.
V
And Mary I’m so lonely now
Without you all the while.
I miss your lovely wish and cheer
I miss your gentle smile.
Before I go to sleep at night
Before my eyes I close.
I pray that God may guide you right
You’re my lovely Irish rose.
VI
And I wish you were beside me now
And seated on the ground.
A warm embrace, your smiling face
Your fragrance all around.
I’d call your name so gently then
As I did oft times before
And I’d roll you in my arms my love
Let the wind blow high or low.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa, che cresce in quel bel giardino
e io essere il giardiniere
per prendermi cura di lei.
Non c’è  mese in tutto l’anno
che io non rinnovi il mio amore
la adorno con freschi fiori,
garofanini dei poeti, timo e ruta.
II
Se fossi una farfalla
mi poserei sul seno del mio amore
o un cuculo malinconico
canterei al mio amore mentre riposa; se fossi un usignolo,
annuncerei il chiarore del mattino,
e starei sedutoa guardarti amore mio, perchè un tempo ti ho amato mia cara
III
La prima volta che vidi il mio amore
era nella piazza del mercato
Lo sguardo che ci scambiammo tra di noi, mi conquistò il cuore
ma il destino posò la sua crudele mano
e fummo costretti a separarci.
Addio, Mary mia cara
tu sei la mia gioia, il mio tesoro
IV
Perchè amore è una spada affilata
che riserva dispiaceri e lacrime
porta grandi rapimenti di gioia
e tuttavia ti può spezzare il cuore.
Oh le pene d’amore
dall’alba al tramonto!
Era meglio aver amato e perso
che non aver amato mai!
V
Mary sono tutto solo oggi
senza di te tutto il tempo.
Mi mancano i tuoi saluti della buonanotte, mi manca il tuo dolce sorriso, prima di andare a dormire
prima di chiudere gli occhi.
Prego che Dio ti aiuti,
sei la mia amata rafazza irlandese.
VI
Vorrei che tu fossi qui ora
seduta a terra.
Un caldo abbraccio, la faccia sorridente, il tuo profumo tutt’intorno, chiamerei il tuo nome così dolcemente, poi come facevo spesso prima,
ti abbraccerei, amore mio
e che il vento soffi forte o piano.

Dall'”Irish Peasant Songs in the English Language” di Patrick Weston Joyce (Londra: Longmans, Green and Co., 1906), pag 2: THE IRISH GIRL:   “This beautiful air, and the  accompanying words, I have known since my childhood; and both are now  published for the first time.* (* More than half a century ago I gave this  air to Dr. Petrie: and now I find—after printing the above—that it is  included in the Stanford-Petrie collection of Irish Music recently published  (No. 657): with my name acknowledged. But the words have never hitherto been  published.)
I have copies of the song on broadsheets,  varying a good deal, and much corrupted. The versions I give here of air and  words are from my own memory, as sung by the old people of Limerick when I was a child; but I have thought it  necessary to make some few restorations.”

Patrick Weston Joyce paragona i versi di Robert Burns (contenuti nella sua poesia “O were my love yon lilac fair” del 1793)  con quelli dell’Irish girl, versioni entrambe molto “spinte” a livello  erotico.

IRISH GIRL
“Oh, gin my love were yon red rose
That grows upon the castle wa’;
And I mysel a drap o’ dew
Into her bonnie breast to fa’!
Oh, there beyond expression blest,
I’d feast on beauty a’ the night,
Seal’d on her silk-saft faulds to rest,
Till fley’d awa by Phoebus’ light.”

ROBERT BURNS
I wish my love was yon red, red rose
That grows on the garden wall,
And I to be a drop of dew,
Among its leaves I’d fall—
‘Tis in her sacred bosom
All night I’d sport and play,
And pass away the summer night
Until the break of day

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Se il mio amore fosse quella rosa rossa
che cresce tra le mura del castello,
ed io una goccia di rugiada
che cade tra il suo bel seno!
Oh lì con somma benedizione onorerei la bellezza tutta la notte, sigillato nelle sue pieghe di soffice seta per riposare e volare via alla luce di Febo
O were my love yon lilac fair
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse quella rossa rosa rossa, che cresce tra le mura del giardino, e io essere una goccia di rugiada,  tra i suoi petali cadrei fino al suo sacro seno,
tutta la notte ci giocherei e mi divertirei, e ci trascorrerei la notte estiva fino al sorgere del giorno

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/flower-blossoms-joy/
http://www.sceilig.com/i_wish_my_love_was_a_red_red_rose.htm
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.CFM?threadID=29537
http://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/theirishgirl.html
http://www.folksongsyouneversang.com/essays/170-2/

FAREWELL MY LOVE AND REMEMBER ME

Read the post in English

“Farewell My Love and Remebre Me” anche con il titolo “Our Ship Is Ready”, “The Ship Is Ready To Sail Away” o “My Heart is True”, ma anche semplicemente “Emigrant Farewell” è la trasposizione nella tradizione popolare irlandese di una broadside ballad dal titolo Remember Me, pubblicata a Dublino c.1867, e archiviata nelle “Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads”.

Il tema è quello dell’addio dell’emigrante  che è costretto a separarsi dalla sua fidanzata; lui lascia il suo cuore in Irlanda e la donna e il paese diventano tutt’uno nello straziante ricordo.

Nelle note dell’album di Sarah Makem, “Ulster Ballad Singer” 1968 è scritto in  merito alla canzone: “la melodia di Sara è frequentemente usata per i canti dell’addio prorpio come la melodia The Pretty Lasses of Loughrea era usata in tutto il paese per i lament o i canti dei condannati  [canzoni della forca]. Le due versioni stampate più famose della melodia di Sarah sono  “Fare you well, sweet Cootehill Town” (Joyce, O.I.F.M.S., p 192) e “The Parting Glass” (Irish Street Ballads. p 69). Ma finchè non sarà inventato un sistema di notazione per riportare gli intervalli di tempo nell’interpretazione di un cantante folk, la versione di questa melodia su disco è basilare per lo studio”

ASCOLTA The Boys of the Lough in Farewell and Rember Me, 1987 (strofe I, III variante, I)

Un arrangiamento un po’ swing
Pauline Scanlon in Hush 2006 (strofe I, III)
ASCOLTA La Lugh in Senex Puer 1999 (su Spotify)
melodia triste e cupa al piano con pochi accenni al violoncello


I
Our ship is ready to bear(1) away
Come comrades o’er the stormy seas
Her snow-white wings they are unfurled
And soon she will swim in a watery world
(chorus)
Ah, do not forget, love, do not grieve
For my heart is true and can’t deceive
My hand and heart, I will give to thee
So farewell my love and remember me
II
Farewell to Dublin’s hills and braes
To Killarney’s lakes and silvery seas
‘Twas many the long bright summer’s day/When we passed those hours of joy away(2)
III (3)
Farewell to you, my precious pearl
It’s my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
And when I’m on the stormy seas
When you think on Ireland, remember me
IV
Oh, Erin dear, it grieves my heart
To think that I so soon must part
And friends so ever dear and kind
In sorrow I must leave behind
Extra Rhymes La Lugh
V
It’s now I must bid a long adieu
To Wicklow and its beauties too
Avoca’s braes where lovers meet
There to discourse in absence sweet
VI
Farewell sweet Deviney, likewise the glen
The Dargle waterfall and then
The lovely scene surrounding Bray
Shall be my thoughts when far away
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La nave è pronta a salpare, venite, compagni, sul mare in tempesta;
le sue ali bianche come la neve sono spiegate,
e presto navigheremo sul mondo delle acque.
Coro
Non piangere, amore, non ti rattristare,
perchè il cuore è sincero e non mente;
ti darò la mia mano e il mio cuore,
così, addio amore mio e ricordati di me.
II
Addio alle colline di Dublino e alle valli,
fino ai laghi argentei di Killarney;
dove delle molte lunghe giornate estive,
abbiamo speso le ore in allegrezza.
III
Addio a te, mia perla preziosa
sei la mia amata ragazza dai capelli scuri e occhi azzurri
e quando sono sugli oceani in tempesta
e quando tu ripensi all’Irlanda, ricordami
IV
Oh amata Irlanda, il mio cuore piange,
a pensare che così presto io devo partire;
e gli amici mai così cari e gentili,
nel dolore devo lasciare alle spalle.
V
E ora devo dare l’addio
a Wicklow e anche alle sue bellezze
le colline di Avoca dove si incontrano gli amanti
per parlare in dolce solitudine
VI
Addio dolce Deviney, e valle
la cascata di Dargle e poi
il bel paesaggio che circonda Bray
sarete nei miei pensieri quando sarò lontano

NOTE
1) anche scritto come “sail away”
2) oppure
Where’s many the fine long summer’s day
We loitered hours of joy away
3)The Boys of the Lough variante strofa
Farewell my love as bright as pearl
my lovely dark-haired, blue-eyed girl
and when I am seal in the stormy seas
I’ll hope in Ireland, you’ll think on me
( in italiano:
addio amore mio luminosa come una perla
la mia bella dai capelli neri e gli occhi azzurri
e quando navigo nel mare in tempersta
spererò che tu in Irlanda penserai a me)

continua: “Old Cross of Ardboe”

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/ready.htm
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/eire/fareyewe.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22322

IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY

Una volta, la donna che partoriva un figlio al di fuori del matrimonio, era considerata una donnaccia, ripudiata dalla famiglia e a malapena ripagata, dal padre del bambino, con qualche moneta; molte di questa sventurate finivano, se non sulla strada a prostituirsi di male in peggio nelle case della Maddalena.

THE MAGDALENE HOUSE

magdalene-sisterIn Irlanda le donne che partorivano fuori dal matrimonio erano punite (mentre gli uomini non erano ritenuti responsabili) e letteralmente carcerate in strutture “caritatevoli” dette “Magdalene Laundries“: bastava essere troppo bella o violentata dal marito o abusata da fratelli, padri e parenti per finire nelle Case della Maddalena (la prima casa venne fondata da una donna Lady Arbella Denny a Dublino nel 1766) e si consiglia caldamente di vedere “The Magdalene Sister” (2002) diretto da Peter Mullan, il film-denuncia dei soprusi subiti dalle ragazze nelle Case della Maddalena. continua

Così per inculcare dei saldi principi morali nelle fanciulle e scoraggiarle ad abbandonarsi alle gioie del sesso, la saggezza popolare faceva ricorso alle warning songs!

IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY

Anche con il titolo di: The Forsaken Mother And Child, The Cruel Father, It Was On A Winter’s Morning, The Snowstorm

La canzone è stata raccolta dalla tradizione orale in Irlanda  del Nord
ASCOLTA Sarah Makem, Armagh, 1952

( la troviamo in stampa in Folksongs of Britain and Ireland, Kennedy 1975 e anche in America in “Songs of the Newfoundland Outports” vol 2, in  Kenneth Peacock 1965 con il titolo The Forsaken Mother And Child ). Herbert Hughes ha raccolto nel Donegal un frammento della canzone con il titolo The Fanaid Grove, (in Irish Country Songs, Vol I 1909). La ballata è spesso suonata all’arpa celtica, come una ninna-nanna, su di una melodia triste.

La donna scacciata dalla famiglia e abbandonata dal suo falso innamorato, ammonisce le altre di non cedere alle lusinghe di un uomo, specialmente se di rango superiore al proprio, e di non lasciarsi abbagliare dalla bellezza di un giovanotto che è comunque fugace come neve al sole.
Il destino della donna, se non fosse riuscita a farsi sposare da qualche onesto lavoratore, sarebbe stato molto crudele, difficilmente sarebbe stata assunta a servizio a causa della sua immoralità e molto più facilmente sarebbe finita sulla strada!

ASCOLTA June Tabor in “Abyssinians” 1993 una voce ricca di sfumature, un’interpretazione sincera che sottolinea la disperazione della ragazza

ASCOLTA Dolores Kane in Tideland 2001


I
It was in the month of January,
the hills were clad in snow
And over hills and valleys,
to my true love I did go
It was there I met a pretty fair maid,
with a salt tear in her eye
She had a wee baby in her arms,
and bitter she did cry
II
“Oh, cruel was my father,
he barred the door on me
And cruel was my mother,
this fate she let me see
And cruel was my own true love,
he changed (1) his mind for gold
Cruel was that winter’s night,
it pierced my heart with cold”
III
Oh, the higher that the palm tree grows, the sweeter is the bark
And the fairer that a young man speaks, the falser is his heart
He will kiss you and embrace you,
‘til he thinks he has you won
Then he’ll go away and leave you
all for another one
IV
So come all you
fair and tender maidens,
a warning take by me
And never try to build your nest
on top of a high tree
For the roots (2), they will all wither,
and the branches all decay
And the beauties of a fair young man,
will all soon fade away”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era il mese di Gennaio,
le colline erano coperte dalla neve,
e mentre per colline e valli
dal mio vero amore andavo
incontrai una graziosa fanciulla
lacrime amare avea agli occhi,
e un bambino tra le braccia,
e tristemente si lamentava.
II
“O crudele fu mio padre
che mi chiuse la porta in faccia,
e crudele fu mia madre
che mi lasciò a questo destino,
e crudele fu il mio vero amore
che cambiò la sua intenzione con l’oro,
crudele fu quella notte d’inverno
che mi trafisse il cuore con il ghiaccio.
III
Oh, più in alto cresce la palma
e più dolce è la sua corteccia,
così più dolcemente parla un uomo,
più falso è il suo cuore;
lui vi bacia e abbraccia
mentre pensa di avervi conquistate,
poi se ne andrà via
e vi lascerà per un’altra.
IV
Così venite voi
belle e giovani fanciulle,
un avvertimento prendete da me:
non cercate mai di costruire il vostro nido sulla cima di un albero alto (2),
perchè tutte le radici (3) si seccheranno
e tutti i rami cadranno
e la bellezza di un grazioso giovanotto
presto svanirà”

NOTE
1) l’uomo invece di sposarla come era nelle intenzioni (prima di ottenere la virtù della donna) preferisce darle un po’ di soldi e sbarazzarsi di lei e del bambino. Altri intendono invece che siano stati i genitori della ragazza a pagare l’amante povero per allontanarlo da ogni pretesa matrimoniale, ma così non si spiega perchè abbiano buttato fuori casa anche la figlia!! In altre versioni s’intende che il giovane sia andato via dal paese in cerca di fortuna, perchè troppo povero per mettere su una famiglia.
2) il verso è condiviso in molte altre warning songs sul tema dell’amore tradito o falsamente corrisposto. Vedasi “The verdant braes of Screen“, P stands for Paddy
3) a volte scritto come “leaves”

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/ songs/itwasinthemonthofjanuary.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45014 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=126475 http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/17/forsaken.htm http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/13/morning.htm http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Fanaid_Grove http://tunearch.org/wiki/Fanaid_Grove