All for me Grog

Leggi in italiano

Yet another drinking song, “All for me Grog”, in which “Grog” is a drink based on rum, but also a colloquial term used in Ireland as a synonym for “drinking”.
grogThe song opens with the refrain, in which our wandering sailor specifies that it is precisely because of his love for alcohol, tobacco and girls, that he always finds himself penniless and full of trouble. To satisfy his own vices, johnny sells from his boots to his bed. More than a sea shanty it was a forebitter song or a tavern song; and our johnny could very well be enlisted in the Royal Navy, but also been boarded a pirate ship around the West Indies.

Nowadays it is a song that is depopulated in historical reenactments with corollaries of pirate chorus!
Al Lloyd (II, I, III)

The Dubliners from The Dubliners Live,1974

AC4 Black Flag ( II, III, VI)

 CHORUS
And it’s all for me grog
me jolly, jolly grog (1)
All for my beer and tobacco
Well, I spent all me tin
with the lassies (2) drinkin’ gin
Far across the Western Ocean
I must wander

I
I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since first I came ashore with me plunder
I’ve seen centipedes and snakes and me head is full of aches
And I have to take a path for way out yonder (3)
II
Where are me boots,
me noggin’ (4), noggin’ boots
They’re all sold (gone) for beer and tobacco
See the soles they were thin
and the uppers were lettin’ in(5)
And the heels were lookin’ out for better weather
III
Where is me shirt,
me noggin’, noggin’ shirt
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see the sleeves were all worn out and the collar been torn about
And the tail was lookin’ out for better weather
IV
Where is me wife,
me noggin’, noggin’ wife
She’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see her front it was worn out
and her tail I kicked about
And I’m sure she’s lookin’ out for better weather
V
Where is me bed,
me  noggin’, noggin’ bed
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see I sold it to the girls until the springs were all in twirls(6)
And the sheets they’re lookin’ out for better weather
VI
Well I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since I’ve been ashore for me slumber
Well I spent all me dough
On the lassies don’t ye know
Across the western ocean(7)
I will wander.

NOTES
1) grog: it is a very old term and means “liqueur” or “alcoholic beverage”. The grog is a drink introduced in the Royal Navy in 1740: rum after the British conquest of Jamaica had become the favorite drink of sailors, but to avoid any problems during navigation, the daily ration of rum was diluted with water.
2) lassies: widely used in Scotland, it is the plural of lassie or lassy, diminutive of lass, the archaic form for “lady”
4) nogging: in the standard English noun, the word means “head”, “pumpkin”, in an ironic sense. Being a colloquial expression, it becomes “stubborn” (qualifying adjective)
5) let in = open
6) the use of the mattress is implied not only for sleeping
7) western ocean: it is the term by which the sailors of the time referred to the Atlantic Ocean

A GROG JUG

1/4 or 1/3 of Jamaican rum
half lemon juice (or orange or grapefruit)
1 or 2 teaspoons of brown sugar.
Fill with water.

Even in the warm winter version: the water must be heated almost to boiling. Add a little spice (cinnamon stick, cloves) and lemon zest.
It is a classic Christmas drink especially in Northern Europe.

 GROG

( Italo Ottonello)
The grog was a mixture of rum and water, later flavored with lemon juice, as an anti-scorb, and a little sugar. The adoption of the grog is due to Admiral Edward Vernon, to remedy the disciplinary problems created by an excessive ration of alcohol (*) on British warships. On 21 August 1740 he issued for his team an order that established the distribution of rum lengthened with water. The ration was obtained by mixing a quarter of gallon of water (liters 1.13) and a half pint of rum (0.28 liters) – in proportion 4 to 1 – and distributed half at noon and half in the evening. The term grog comes from ‘Old Grog’, the nickname of the Admiral, who used to wear trousers and a cloak of thick grogram fabric at sea. The use of grog, later, became common in Anglo-Saxon marines, and the deprivation of the ration (grog stop), was one of the most feared punishment by sailors. Temperance ships were called those merchant ships whose enlistment contract contained the “no spirits allowed” clause which excluded the distribution of grog or other alcohol to the crew.
 (*) The water, not always good already at the beginning of the journey, became rotten only after a few days of stay in the barrels.
In fact, nobody drank it because beer was available. It was light beer, of poor quality, which ended within a month and, only then, the captains allowed the distribution of wine or liqueurs. A pint of wine (just over half a liter) or half a pint of rum was considered the equivalent of a gallon (4.5 liters) of beer, the daily ration. It seems that the sailors preferred the white wines to the red ones that they called despicably black-strap (molasses). Being destined in the Mediterranean, where wine was embarked, was said to be blackstrapped. In the West Indies, however, rum was abundant.

LINK
http://www.drinkingcup.net/navy-rum-part-2-dogs-tankys-scuttlebutts-fanny-cups/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5512
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/allformegrog.html
http://www.lettereearti.it/mondodellarte/musica/la-lingua-delle-ballate-e-delle-canzoni-popolari-anglo-irlandesi/

Lovely On The Water

Leggi in italiano  

Lover’s separation is a theme widespread in the english balladry and that of a sailor and a young maid it’s probably originated in the eighteenth century, as we find it in the illustrations of the time.

LOVELY ON THE WATER

The ballad “Lovely on the water”, collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in the early 1900s, come from a broadside titled “Henry and Nancy, or the Lover’s Separation“. The story begins in the idyll of spring with two lovers walking, but that’s their farewell, the sailor has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants her to stay home waiting for him. Although he professed to face the war for his country, the need for a wage is certainly the primary cause of his patriotism.

The Sailor’s Farewell, Charles Mosley (mid-eighteenth century) in National Maritime Museum .

Steeleye Span recorded Lovely on the Water in 1971 for their second album, “Please to See the King” and the sleeve notes commented”Certain folk songs had great popularity, and have been reported over and again, from end to end of the country. Others—including some masterpieces—seem to have had but tiny circulation. So Lovely on the Water, with a gorgeous melody and significant words, has been found only once, by Vaughan Williams at South Walsham, a few miles from Norwich. The song starts idyllically and ends ominously, like a sunny day that clouds over. The singer, a Mr Hilton, had fourteen verses, but Vaughan Williams, often a bit careless about texts, mislaid some. Missing verses probably concerned the familiar situation in which the girl volunteers to disguise herself as a seaman, in order to sail with her lover, but is hurriedly dissuaded.” (from here)
We find those missing verses in the text of the broadside “Henry and Nancy” (here)
Steeleye Span in “Please to See the King” 1971

Ken Wilson in “Not Before Time

Dhalia`s Lane in Hollymount 2005

Martha Tilston & Maggie Boyle in The Sea 2014 in  

LOVELY ON THE WATER *
I
As I walked out one morning
in the springtime of the year
I overheard a sailor boy
likewise a lady fair
They sang a song together
made the valleys for to ring
While the birds on the spray in the meadows gay
Proclaimed the lovely spring
II
Said Willy unto Nancy
“Oh we soon must sail away
For its lovely on the water
to hear the music play.
For our Queen she do want seamen
so I will not stay on shore
I will brave the wars for my country
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
III
Poor Nancy fell and fainted,
but soon he brought her to,
For it’s there they kissed and they embraced
and took a fond adieu.
“Come change your ring (1) with me my love
For we may meet once more;
but there’s One above that will guard you, love,
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
IV
Four pounds it is our bounty
and that must do for thee
For to help the aged parents
while I am on the sea
For Tower Hill[2] is crowded
with mothers weeping sore (3)
For their sons are gone to face the foe
Where the blundering cannons roar” 

Notes
1) the ring will be the proof of identity of the lovers who will sometimes remain separated for long years
2) Tower Hill in in London,London Borough of Tower Hamlets
3) while the men go to fight the enemy, the women greet them weeping because they know that many of them will never return home

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
english version: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
english version: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
american/irish version: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lovely-water.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/lovelyonthewater.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/187.html
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/16873

http://www.britishtars.com/2014/03/the-sailors-farewell-date-unknown.html

Its Lovely On The Water To Hear The Music Play

Read the post in English  

Il tema della separazione tra i due innamorati è molto diffuso tra le ballate popolari e quella tra marinaio e giovane fidanzatina si è originato probabilmente nel Settecento, così almento lo ritroviamo nelle illustrazioni dell’epoca.

LOVELY ON THE WATER

La ballata “Lovely on the water”, raccolta da Ralph Vaughan Williams agli inizi del 1900, proviene da un foglio volante (broadside) dal titolo “Henry and Nancy, or the Lover’s Separation” la cui pubblicazione è fatta risalire tra il 1860 a il 1880 (vedi) . La storia inizia nell’idillio della primavera con due innamorati che passeggiano, ma quello è il loro addio, l’uomo si è arruolato nella Royal Navy e vuole che lei resti a casa ad aspettarlo.
Sebbene il giovane professi di voler affrontare la guerra per il bene del paese, il bisogno di un salario è certamente la causa prima del suo patriottismo.

The Sailor’s Farewell, Charles Mosley (metà XVIII secolo) in National Maritime Museum .

Nelle note di copertina dell’Album “Please to See the King” 1971 è così riportato “Alcune canzoni tradizionali hanno avuto una grande popolarità, e sono state diffuse in un lungo e in largo per il paese.  Altre —compresi dei capolavori—sembra abbiano avuto una minima diffusione. Così Lovely on the Water, con una melodia splendida e parole eloquenti, è stata trovata solo una volta, da Vaughan Williams a South Walsham, a pochi kilometri da Norwich. Il canto inizia in modo idilliaco e finisce minacciosamente come un giorno di sole che si rannuvola. Il cantante Mr Hilton, aveva quattordici versi, ma Vaughan Williams, spesso un po’ incurante dei testi, ne ha tralasciati alcuni. I versi mancanti probabilmente riguardavano la situazione consueta in cui la ragazza vuole travestirsi da marinaio, per salpare con il suo amante, ma viene subito dissuasa”
Steeleye Span in “Please to See the King” 1971

Ken Wilson in “Not Before Time” (la versione testuale differisce in parte da quella riportata)

Dhalia`s Lane in Hollymount 2005

Martha Tilston & Maggie Boyle in The Sea 2014 in  


I
As I walked out one morning
In the springtime of the year
I overheard a sailor boy
Likewise a lady fair
They sang a song together
Made the valleys for to ring
While the birds on the spray in the meadows gay
Proclaimed the lovely spring
II
Said Willy unto Nancy
“Oh we soon must sail away
For its lovely on the water
To hear the music play
For our Queen she do want seamen
So I will not stay on shore
I will brave the wars for my country
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
III
Poor Nancy fell and fainted
But soon he brought her to
For it’s there they kissed and they embraced
And took a fond adieu
“Come change your ring(1) with me my love
For we may meet once more
But there’s One above that will guard you love
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
IV
Four pounds it is our bounty
And that must do for thee
For to help the aged parents
While I am on the sea”
For Tower Hill(2) is crowded
With mothers weeping sore (3)
For their sons are gone to face the foe
Where the blundering cannons roar
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino,
agli inizi di primavera,
ho sentito un giovane marinaio
e la sua bella donna
cantare una canzone insieme:
risuonava tra le valli,
mentre gli uccelli tra i prati verdeggianti di rugiada,
proclamavano la bella primavera.
II
Disse Willy a Nancy
“Oh, presto dobbiamo salpare,
perchè è bello sul mare
ascoltare cantare la musica.
La nostra regina ha bisogno di marinai,
quindi non voglio restare a terra.
Affronterò le battaglie per il mio paese
dove i cannoni ad alta voce tuonano”.
III
La povera Nancy cadde e svenne
ma subito lui la sostenne,
e lì si baciarono
e si abbracciarono
e si diedero un addio affettuoso.
“Vieni a scambiare il tuo anello con il mio, amore mio,
perchè noi ci rincontreremo ancora,
se ci sarà un Dio in alto che veglierà su di te amore,
dove i cannoni ad alta voce tuonano.
IV
Quattro sterline, è la nostra paga,
che ti farà comodo,
per aiutare i genitori anziani
mentre io sono per mare “.
Perché Tower Hill è affollata
dalle madri addolorate e piangenti,
per i loro figli che sono andati ad affrontare il nemico,
dove i cannoni ad alta voce tuonano.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) Tower Hill è un punto elevato della città di Londra a nord-ovest della Torre di Londra, presso London Borough of Tower Hamlets
3) mentre gli uomini vanno a combattere il nemico, le donne li salutano piangenti perchè sanno che molti di loro non ritorneranno più a casa

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
versione sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lovely-water.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/lovelyonthewater.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/187.html
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/16873

http://www.britishtars.com/2014/03/the-sailors-farewell-date-unknown.html

All for me grog: Tutto per il bere!

Read the post in English

Ennesima drinking song, “All for me Grog” dal titolo che è tutto un programma (in italiano “Tutto per il mio bere“), in cui “Grog” è una bevanda a base di rum, ma anche un termine colloquiale usato in Irlanda come sinonimo di “drinking”.
grogLa canzone si apre con il ritornello, nel quale il nostro marinaio vagabondo specifica che è proprio a causa del suo amore per l’alcol, il tabacco e le ragazze, che si ritrova sempre squattrinato e pieno di guai. Per soddisfare i propri vizi, l’uomo si vende di tutto cominciando con gli stivali e, finendo con il letto. Più che un canto di lavoro dei marinai (sea shanty) era un canto nei momenti di riposo, alla fine della giornata e nelle taverne del porto; e il marinaio potrebbe benissimo essere arruolato nella Royal Navy, ma anche imbarcato su una nave pirata in giro per le Indie occidentali.

Ai nostri giorni è una canzone che spopola nelle rievocazioni storiche con corollario di coretti pirateschi!
Al Lloyd (strofe II, I, III)

The Dubliners in The Dubliners Live,1974

AC4 Black Flag (strofe II, III, VI)

 
CHORUS
And it’s all for me grog
me jolly, jolly grog (1)
All for my beer and tobacco
Well, I spent all me tin
with the lassies (2) drinkin’ gin
Far across the Western Ocean
I must wander

I
I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since first I came ashore with me plunder
I’ve seen centipedes and snakes and me head is full of aches
And I have to take a path for way out yonder (3)
II
Where are me boots,
me noggin’ (4), noggin’ boots
They’re all sold (gone) for beer and tobacco
See the soles they were thin
and the uppers were lettin’ in(5)
And the heels were lookin’ out for better weather
III
Where is me shirt,
me noggin’, noggin’ shirt
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see the sleeves were all worn out and the collar been torn about
And the tail was lookin’ out for better weather
IV
Where is me wife,
me noggin’, noggin’ wife
She’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see her front it was worn out
and her tail I kicked about
And I’m sure she’s lookin’ out for better weather
V
Where is me bed,
me  noggin’, noggin’ bed
It’s all sold for beer and tobacco
You see I sold it to the girls until the springs were all in twirls(6)
And the sheets they’re lookin’ out for better weather
VI
Well I’m sick in the head
and I haven’t been to bed
Since I’ve been ashore for me slumber
Well I spent all me dough
On the lassies don’t ye know
Across the western ocean(7)
I will wander.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto* 
CORO
Darei tutto per bere,
oh il mio allegro grog,
darei tutto per birra e tabacco;
beh, ho speso tutti i soldi
in donne  e bevendo gin,
e lontano sull’Atlantico
devo andare ramingo!

I
Ho un gran mal di testa
e non sono stato a letto,
da quando sono sceso a terra con il bottino,
ho visto centopiedi e serpenti
e la mia testa è piena di dolori
e devo ancora trovare la via d’uscita da qui.
II
Dove sono i miei stivali,
i miei testardi, testardi stivali?
Li ho venduti per la birra e il tabacco,
sai le suole erano consumate
e le punte si erano aperte
e i tacchi hanno visto
tempi migliori.
III
Dov’è la mia camicia?
La mia testarda, testarda camicia?
L’ho venduta per la birra e il tabacco,
sai le maniche erano un straccio
e il colletto liso
e la coda dietro aveva visto tempi migliori.
IV
Dov’è mia moglie,
la mia testarda, testarda moglie?
L’ho venduta per la birra e il tabacco,
sai la faccia le si era sciupata
e il suo didietro ho preso a calci,
sono sicuro che ha visto tempi migliori!
V
Dov’è il mio letto,
il mio testardo, testardo letto?
L’ho venduto per la birra e il tabacco.
Sai, l’ho venduto alle ragazze
che sanno come far saltare le molle
e le lenzuola hanno visto
tempi migliori.
VI
Alla fine ho un gran mal di testa
e non sono andato a letto
da quando sono sbarcato per la mia libera uscita, beh ho speso tutti i miei quattrini per le ragazze sconosciute
e sull’Atlantico
andrò ramingo.

NOTE
* (revisionata da qui)
1) grog: colloquiale termine usato in Irlanda come sinonimo di drinking; è un termine molto antico e ha il significato di “liquore” o “bevanda alcolica”. Il grog è una bevanda introdotta nella Royal Navy nel 1740: il rum dopo la conquista britannica della Giamaica era diventata la bevanda preferita dai marinai, ma per evitare problemi durante la navigazione, la razione giornaliera di rum era  diluita con l’acqua.
2) lassies. Questa parola, molto usata in Scozia, è il plurale di lassie o lassy, diminutivo di lass, la forma arcaica di lady “signora”
3) yonder: “là”, “quello”, “quello là”- La frase letteralmente si traduce “devo prendere una strada per la via d’uscita quella là” Marco Zampetti traduce “devo trovare la strada fino in culo alla luna
4) nogging: nell’inglese standard sostantivo, il vocabolo significa “testa”, “zucca”, in senso ironico. Essendo un’espressione colloquiale, diventa “testardo” (aggettivo qualificativo)
5) let in = lasciare entrare, quindi per estensione tradotto con “aperto”
6) Marco Zampetti traduce “finche’ le molle schizzino fuori ” qui è implicito l’uso del materasso non solo per dormire
7) western ocean: è il termine con cui i marinai dell’epoca si riferivano all’Oceano Atlantico

RICETTA del GROG a bicchiere

1/4 o 1/3 di rum giamaicano
succo di mezzo limone (o arancia o di pompelmo)
1 o 2 cucchiaini di zucchero di canna.
Riempire il resto del bicchiere con acqua.

Anche in versione invernale caldo: l’acqua deve essere scaldata quasi a bollitura, si aggiungono tutti gli altri ingredienti nel bicchiere (se di vetro che sia temperato per le bevande calde). Aggiungere a piacere un po’ di spezie (bastoncino cannella, chiodi di garofano) e la scorza di limone. E’ una classica bevanda natalizia specialmente nel Nord Europa.

IL GROG

(di Italo Ottonello)
Il grog era una miscela di rum ed acqua, in seguito aromatizzata con succo di limone, come antiscorbutico, e poco zucchero. L’adozione del grog si deve all’Ammiraglio Edward Vernon, per porre rimedio ai problemi disciplinari creati da un’eccessiva razione d’alcolici (*) sulle navi da guerra britanniche. Il 21 agosto 1740 egli emanò, per la sua squadra, un ordine che stabiliva la distribuzione del rum allungato con acqua. La razione era ottenuta miscelando un quarto di gallone d’acqua (litri 1,13) e mezza pinta di rum (litri 0,28) – in proporzione 4 a 1 – e distribuita metà a mezzogiorno e metà la sera. Il termine grog deriva da ‘Old Grog’, soprannome dell’Ammiraglio, che in mare usava indossare dei pantaloni e un tabarro di spesso tessuto di grogram. L’uso del grog, in seguito, divenne comune nelle marine anglosassoni, e la privazione della razione (grog stop), era una delle punizioni più temute dai marinai. Temperance ships, erano dette quelle navi mercantili il cui contratto d’arruolamento conteneva la clausola “no spirits allowed” che escludeva la distribuzione di grog o altri alcolici all’equipaggio.
NOTA (*) L’acqua, non sempre buona già all’inizio del viaggio, diventava putrida solo dopo pochi giorni di permanenza nei barili.
Di fatto nessuno la beveva in quanto era disponibile la birra. Si trattava di birra leggera, di scarsa qualità, che terminava nel giro di un mese e, solo allora, i capitani consentivano la distribuzione di vino o liquori. Una pinta di vino (poco più di mezzo litro) o mezza pinta di rum erano considerati l’equivalente di un gallone (4,5 litri) di birra, la razione giornaliera. Sembra che i marinai preferissero i vini bianchi a quelli rossi che chiamavano spregiativamente black-strap (melassa). Essere destinati in Mediterraneo, dove si imbarcava il vino, era detto to be blackstrapped. Nelle Indie occidentali, invece, abbondava il rum.

FONTI
http://www.drinkingcup.net/navy-rum-part-2-dogs-tankys-scuttlebutts-fanny-cups/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5512
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/allformegrog.html
http://www.lettereearti.it/mondodellarte/musica/la-lingua-delle-ballate-e-delle-canzoni-popolari-anglo-irlandesi/

The Lowlands of Holland

“The Low Lands of Holland” is a popular lament in the British Isles that fits into the tradition of anti-war songs or the protest and anti-recruitment songs of the Anglo-American balladry, it is also a love song in which it is exalted loyalty amorous, which defies distance and even death.
“The Low Lands of Holland” è un lament  popolare nelle Isole Britanniche che si inserisce nel filone dei canti contro la guerra ovvero i canti di protesta e anti-reclutamento della balladry anglo-americana, è anche una love song in cui si esalta la fedeltà amorosa, che sfida la lontananza e anche la morte.

Arthur Hughes The Sailing Signal Gun 1881Perhaps written during the wars between England and Holland for the predominance on the seas of the 17th century, we find it (with the title The Sorrowful Lover’s Regrate ) in the broadsides of the second half of the ‘700; the song is still very popular during the Napoleonic wars.
Di probabile origine seicentesca forse scritta durante le guerre tra Inghilterra e Olanda per il predominio sui mari del 17° secolo, la ritroviamo (con il titolo The Sorrowful Lover’s Regrate – Il lamento dell’amante addolorata) (vedi) nei broadsides della seconda metà del ‘700; la canzone è ancora assai popolare durante le guerre napoleoniche.

Widespread in all the British Isles – in 7 textual versions (without counting the small variations) and at least 5 different melodies – it is the story of a young woman who, on the very night of the wedding, is abandoned by the groom, who joins the Royal Navy to go to fight in the “Lowlands of Holland.”
Diffusa in tutte le Isole Britanniche – in 7 versioni testuali (senza contare le piccole varianti) e almeno 5 diverse melodie – è la storia di una giovane donna che, la notte stessa delle nozze, è abbandonata dallo sposo, il quale si arruola in marina per andare a combattere nelle “Lowlands of Holland.”

“IRISH” VERSION: “there’s men enough in Ireland “

This version, which explicitly refers to Ireland, is the version released by the Dubliners in the 70s, very similar to the textual version testified by Paddy Tunney 
Questa versione in cui si fa esplicito riferimento all’Irlanda è quella diffusa negli anni 70 dai Dubliners molto simile alla versione testuale testimoniata da Paddy Tunney 

Paddy Tunney  (various 60s recordings) (I, II, III, IV, V) the melody has become the “standard” slow and melancholic one
(varie registrazioni anni 60) (I, II, III, IV, V) la melodia è diventata quella “standard” lenta e malinconica

The Dubliners reproduce this song in the 70s however, interpreting the melody in marching time (I-slow, II, III, V)
la ripropongono negli anni 70 nei circuiti dei folk clubs interpretando però la melodia a tempo di marcia (I -lenta, II, III, V)

The Chieftains & Natalie Merchant in Tears of Stone – 1999, (I, II, IV) 
the cd was recorded in collaboration with the female voices of the international folk rock scene. The melody is slow, melancholy and goes well with the sad and bitter tone of history and the voice of Natalie (the American folk rock poet).
Cd registrato in collaborazione con le voci femminili della scena folk rock internazionale. La melodia è lenta, malinconica e ben si abbina al tono triste e amaro della storia e alla voce di Natalie (la poetessa statunitense del folk rock)

Sandy Denny


I
On the night that I (1) was married
And upon my marriage bed
There came a bold sea captain
And he stood at my bedhead
Saying, “Arise, arise, young wedded man
And come along with me
To the lowlands of Holland (2)
To fight the enemy”.
II
Now then, Holland is a lovely land
And upon it grows fine grain
Surely ‘tis a place of residence
For a soldier to remain
Where the sugar cane is plentiful
And the tea grows on the tree
Well, I never had but the one sweetheart
And now he’s gone far away from me
III
Said the mother to her daughter
‘Give up your soil and bed
Is there ne’er a man in Ireland (3)?
That will be your heart content”
Way there’s men enough in Ireland
But alas there is none for me
Since high wind and stormy sea’s
Have parted me love and me
IV 
For the stormy winds began to blow
and the seas did loudly roar
and the captain and his gallant ship
was never see no more
V
I will wear no stays around my waist (4)
Nor combs all in my hair
I will wear no scarf (5) around my neck
For to save my beauty there (6)
And never will I marry (7)
Not until the day that I die
Since these four winds and these stormy seas
Came between my love and I (8)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
La sera che mi (1) ero appena sposata
accanto al mio letto di nozze
venne un coraggioso capitano
e stava ritto al capezzale
dicendo: “Alzati alzati, giovane sposo
e vieni con me
nei Paesi Bassi d’Olanda(2)
a combattere il nemico”.
II
Così l’Olanda è un paese meraviglioso
e ci cresce buon grano,
di sicuro è un posto dove vivere
per la ferma di un soldato,
dove la canna da zucchero è rigogliosa
e il tè cresce sugli alberi.
Beh, non avevo che un amore
e ora è andato molto lontano da me.
III
Disse la madre alla figlia
“Abbandonare casa e letto!
Ci sarà mai un uomo in Irlanda (3)
che ti farà felice?”
“Ci sono abbastanza uomini in Irlanda,
ma ahimè nessuno è per me,
da quando venti forti e oceani tumultuosi
mi hanno separata dal mio amore.
IV
Perchè i venti di tempesta iniziarono a soffiare
e i mari ruggirono con fracasso
e il capitano e la sua intrepida nave
non si videro mai più
V
Non mi metterò cintura in vita (4)
né pettinini fra i capelli,
non indosserò fazzoletti (5) intorno al collo
per mantenere la mia bellezza (6)
e non mi sposerò mai (7)
fino al giorno della mia morte,
da quando venti forti e oceani tumultuosi
si misero tra il mio amore e me.” (8)

NOTE
1) ho preferito far dire la prima strofa alla donna , anche se nelle ballate si salta spesso da palo in frasca senza nessun preavviso così la frase potrebbe essere detta dallo sposo.
2) Holland =the Dutch colonies in the West Indies or more probably the New Holland, that is Australia. But it could also be Surinam or Dutch Guyana. In the sea / shanty songs the Lowlands are more generally the Caribbean islets.
In realtà con l’Olanda si intendono le colonie olandesi nelle Indie Occidentali o molto più probabilmente la New Holland cioè l’Australia visto che ci crescono le piantine del tè e la canna da zucchero. Ma potrebbe trattarsi anche del Suriname ovvero la Guyana olandese.  Nelle sea song/shanty song le Lowlands sono più in generale le isolette caraibiche.
3) Paddy Tunney:”Galway”
4) The Dubliners: “I’ll wear no shoes all on my feet”
5) a scarf or a handkerchief (kerchiefs) is a sign of modesty “As bodices were cut lower and lower, silk and lace scarves were much used to preserve modesty (while at the same time, of course, drawing attention to a lady’s assets). Frothy muslin buffon scarves were often pinned about the breast, sometimes layered as high as the chin in an attempt to enhance the area’s perceived shape and size.” (from  here) see also
scritto come scarf o come handkerchief è un segno di modestia “Mentre i corpetti venivano tagliati sempre più in basso, le sciarpe di seta e di pizzo venivano usate per preservare la modestia (attirando naturalmente. l’attenzione sulle sostanze di una donna). I vaporosi fazzoletti da collo
di mussola venivano spesso appuntate intorno al seno, a volte a strati alti fino al mento nel tentativo di accrescere le dimensioni apparenti della zona“.
6) The Dubliners “For to shade my beauty fair”
7) she declares eternal loyalty to her new husband, despite having been abandoned on their wedding night.
la donna dichiara eterna fedeltà al suo novello sposo, nonostante sia stata abbandonata nella notte delle nozze.
8) or “Have parted me love and me” Probably the young man died in the war or drowned in the sea and the widow declares her mourning, it is in this context of lament that the widow swears eternal loyalty to the groom, a declaration of intent that does not necessarily correspond to reality
Probabilmente il giovane è morto in guerra o annegato in mare e la vedova dichiara il suo lutto, è proprio in questo contesto di lament che la vedova giura eterna fedeltà allo sposo, una dichiarazione d’intenti che non necessariamente corrisponderà alla realtà  

“SCOTTISH” VERSION: “there’s men enough in Galloway “

In the other most widespread text, the story is set in the Scottish Galloway, So they write in the notes of their first album the Steeleye Span “Although it happens quite often in the field of folk music that many versions of a particular song are reported, it is rare that, so in the case of of Lowlands of Holland, completely differing story lines are recorded. James Reeves (The Everlasting Circle) suggests that “there may have been an original in which a young bridegroom is pressed for service in the Netherlands, but in some of the later versions Holland appears to have become New Holland, the former name for Australia, which has perhaps been confused with the Dutch East Indies.” The words of the version we perform refer to Galloway (Scotland) but the song crops up in all parts of the British Isles. Our tune was learned from Andy Irvine, a former member of Sweeney’s Men. ” (from here)
Nell’altro testo più diffuso la vicenda è ambientata nel Galloway scozzese
Così scrivono nelle note del loro primo album gli Steeleye Span: “Anche se spesso nel campo della musica folk sono riportate molte versioni di una particolare canzone, è raro tuttavia che, come nel caso di “Lowlands of Holland”, vengano registrate trame completamente diverse. James Reeves (The Everlasting Circle ) suggerisce che “potrebbe esserci stato un originale in cui un giovane sposo viene arruolato forzosamente per combattere nei Paesi Bassi, ma in alcune versioni successive l’Olanda sembra essere diventata New Holland, l’antico nome per l’Australia, che forse è stato confuso con le Indie orientali olandesi “. Le parole della versione che eseguiamo si riferiscono al Galloway (Scozia), ma la canzone risuona in tutte le parti delle Isole britanniche. La nostra melodia è stata appresa da Andy Irvine, un ex membro degli Sweeney’s Men.” 

The Corries

Steeleye Span in “Hark! The Village Wait1970

Ye Vagabonds (Brían and Diarmuid Mac Gloinn) live version and in their debut album ‘Half Blind’ 2017 Paddy Tunney melody
versione live e nel loro album di debutto ‘Half Blind’ 2017,  l’arrangiamento riprende la versione melodica di Paddy Tunney 


I
The love that I have chosen
I”ll therewith be content
And the salt sea shall be frozen
before that I repent
Repent it shall I never
until the day I dee
But the lowlands of Holland
has twined my love and me.
II
My love lies in the salt sea
and I am on the side
It’s enough to break a young thing’s heart
what lately was a bride.
But lately was a bonny bride
with pleasure in her e’e.
But the lowlands of Holland
has twined my love and me.
III
My love he built a bonny ship
and set her on the sea
With seven score (1) good mariners
to bear her company.
But there’s three score of them is sunk
and three score dead at sea
And the lowlands of Holland
has twined my love and me.
IV
My love has built another ship
and set her on the main
And nane but twenty mariners
all for to bring her hame.
But the weary wind began to rise,
the sea began to roll
And my love then and his bonny ship
turned widdershins about.
V
There shall nae a quiff (2) come on my head
nor comb come in my hair
And shall neither coal nor candlelight
shine in my bower mair.
And neither will I marry
until the day I dee
For I never had a love but one
and he’s drowned in the sea.
VI
“Oh hold your tongue my daughter dear,
be still and be content.
There’s men enough in Galloway (3),
you need not sore lament.”
“Oh there’s men enough in Galloway,
alas there’s none for me
For I never had a love but one
and he’s drowned in the sea.”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Sarò sempre contenta
dell’amore che ho scelto
e il mare piuttosto si congelerà
prima che me ne penta,
non avrò mai a pentirmi
finchè avrò vita,
ma le terre basse d’Olanda
hanno legato il mio amore e me in uno

II
Il mio amore giace nel mare salato
e io sono al sicuro,
è abbastanza per spezzare un giovane cuore
di una novella sposa
che poco prima era una bella sposa
con la gioia negli occhi:
ma le terre basse d’Olanda
hanno legato  il mio amore e me in uno

III
Il mio amore costruì una bella nave
e la mise in mare
con 140 bravi marinai
per tenerle compagnia
ma una sessantina sono andati a fondo
e una sessantina morti in mare
e le terre basse d’Olanda hanno
legato  il mio amore e me in uno

IV
Il mio amore ha costruito un’altra nave
e messa in mare
con appena 20 marinai
per portarla a casa
ma un vento teso iniziò ad alzarsi
e il mare incominciò a rollare
e il mio amore allora con la sua bella nave furono presi nel vortice.
V
Non mi metterò una cuffietta in testa
nè mi pettinerò i capelli
nè carbone o candela
brillerà nella mia camera,
e mai mi sposerò
fino al giorno della mia morte
perchè non avevo che un amore
ed è affogato in mare.

VI
“Tieni a freno la lingua figlia mia
stai zitta e accontentati.
Ci sono abbastanza uomini nel Galloway
non c’è bisogno che ti lamenti”
“Ci sono abbastanza uomini nel Galloway ;
ma non per me
perchè non avevo che un amore
ed è affogato in mare.”

NOTE
1) score= 20
2) in the 1700s Scottish married women, for decency and modesty wore a cap with frills and ribbons
letteralmente ciuffo: nel 700 le donne scozzesi maritate, per decenza e modestia, non restavano a capo scoperto in pubblico, ma indossavano una cuffietta con gale e nastri 
3)  a south-west region of Scotland which gave birth to Robert Burns
regione sud-ovest della Scozia che diede i natali a Robert Burns

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/arthur-mcbride.htm
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?songid=6646
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3770

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=79881
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=3318&lang=it
https://mainlynorfolk.info/martin.carthy/songs/lowlandsofholland.html