The importance of being.. Reily

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: A Fair Young Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

Joan Baez popularised this ballad with John Reily title in the 60s:  it is a classic love story of probable seventeenth-century origins, in which the woman remains faithful to her lover or promised spouse who has gone to war or embarked on a vessel. The song is classified as reily ballad because it is structured as a dialogue between the protagonist  (in disguise) usually called John or George, Willie or Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) and the woman, example of loyalty ( first part)

SECOND MELODY

The text of this version reminds me of the Oscar Wild comedy, “The Importance of Being Earnest” Wilde’s contradictory to Shakespeare in the famous Juliet declaration on the name of Romeo:
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

This is the melody in the American tradition as collected in the field (Providence, Kentucky) in the 30s by Alan Lomax. Joe Hickerson penned “There are two ballads titled “John (George)  Riley” in G. Malcolm Laws’s American Balladry  from British Broadsides (1957). In number N36, the returned man claims that  Riley was killed so as to test his lover’s steadfastness. In number N37,  which is our ballad, there is no such claim. Rather, he suggests they sail  away to Pennsylvania; when she refuses, he reveals his identity. In the many  versions found, the man’s last name is spelled in various ways, and in some  cases he is “Young Riley.” Several scholars cite a possible origin  in “The Constant Damsel,” published in a 1791 Dublin songbook.
Peggy’s learned the song in childhood from a field  recording in the Library of Congress Folk Archive: AFS 1504B1 as sung by Mrs.  Lucy Garrison and recorded by Alan and Elizabeth Lomax in Providence,  Kentucky, in 1937. This was transcribed by Ruth Crawford Seeger and included  in John and Alan Lomax’s Our Singing Country (1941), p. 168. Previously, the  first verse and melody as collected from Mrs. Garrison at Little Goose Creek,  Manchester, Clay Co., Kentucky, in 1917 appeared in Cecil Sharp’s English  Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians (1932), vol. 2, p. 22. Peggy’s  singing is listed as the source for the ballad on pp. 161-162 of Alan Lomax’s  The Folk Songs of North America in the English Language (1960), with  “melodies and guitar chords transcribed by Peggy Seeger.” In 1964  it appeared on p. 39 of Peggy’s Folk Songs of Peggy Seeger (Oak Publications.  edited by Ethel Raim). Peggy recorded it on  Folk-Lyric FL114, American Folk Songs for Banjo and her brother Pete included  this version on his first Folkways LP, FP 3 (FA 2003), Darling Corey (1950).” (from here)

The dialogue between them seems more like a skirmish between lovers in which she proves to be chilly and offended, while he, returned after leaving her alone for three years, jokingly pretends not to know her and asks her to marry him because he is fascinated by his graces! So in the end she yields and paraphrasing Shakespeare says “If you be he,  and your name is Riley..

Peggy  Seeger in “Heading for home”  2003


Pete Seeger in “Darling Corey/Goofing-Off Suite” 1993

Peggy  Seeger version
I
As I walked out  one morning early
To take the  sweet and pleasant air
Who should I  spy but a fair young lady
Her cheeks  being like a lily fair.
II
I stepped up to  her, right boldly asking
Would she be a  sailor’s wife?
O no, kind sir, I’d rather tarry
And remain single for all my life.
III
Tell me, kind  miss, and what makes you differ
From all the rest of womankind?
I see you’re  fair, you are young, you’re handsome
And for to  marry might be inclined.
IV
The truth, kind  sir, I will plainly tell you
I might have  married three years ago
To one John  Riley who left this country
He is the cause of all my woe.
V
Come along with  me, don’t you think on Riley,
Come along with  me to some distant shore;
We will set sail for Pennsylvanie
Adieu, sweet  England, forevermore.
VI
I’ll not go  with you to Pennsylvanie
I’ll not go  with you that distant shore;
My heart’s with  Riley, I will ne’er forget him
Although I may  never see him no more.
VII
And when he  seen she truly loved him
He give her  kisses, one two and three,
Says, I am  Riley, your own true lover
That’s been the  cause of your misery.
VIII
If you be he,  and your name is Riley,
I’ll go with  you to that distant shore.
We will set  sail to Pennsylvanie,
Adieu, kind friends, forevermore.

THIRD MELODY

In this version the identification is based on the ring that probably the two sweethearts had exchanged as a token of love before departure. A beautiful Celtic Bluegrass style version!

Tim  O’Brien in Fiddler’s Green 2005

I
Pretty fair  maid was in her garden
When a stranger came a-riding by
He came up to the gate and called her
Said pretty  fair maid would you be my bride
She said I’ve a true love who’s in the army
And he’s been gone for seven long years
And if he’s  gone for seven years longer
I’ll still be waiting for him here
II
Perhaps he’s on some watercourse drowning
Perhaps he’s on some battlefield slain
Perhaps he’s to a fair girl married
And you may never see him again
Well if he’s  drown, I hope he’s happy
Or if he’s on some battlefield slain
And if he’s to some fair girl married
I’ll love the girl that married him
III
He took his hand out of his pocket
And on his finger he wore a golden ring (1)
And when she saw that band a-shining
A brand new song her heart did sing
And then he  threw his arms all around her
Kisses gave her one, two, three
Said I’m your true and loving soldier
That’s come  back home to marry thee
NOTE
1)  the ring that they exchanged on the day of departure

SOURCES
http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/The%20constant%20maids%20resolution:%20or%20The%20damsels%20loyal%20love%20to%20a%20seaman
http://die-augenweide.de/byrds/songjk/john_riley.htm
http://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/john-riley
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN37.html
http://www.folklorist.org/song/John_(George)_Riley_(I)
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_38.htm

Fair Maid in the Garden: the ballad of John Riley

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: A Fair Young Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

Joan Baez popularised this ballad with John Reily title in the 60s (a lot of groups proposed it in that decade including Simon & Garfunkel, Judi Collins): it is a classic love story of probable seventeenth-century origins, in which the woman remains faithful to her lover or promised spouse who has gone to war or embarked on a vessel. The song is classified as reily ballad because it is structured as a dialogue between the protagonist (in disguise) usually called John or George, Willie or Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) and the woman, example of loyalty, and often appears a sign of recognition, for example, a gift exchanged or an object broken in half (other examples: “Her mantle so green“, “The Banks of Claudy“).

In most of these stories the man returns after a long time and, not recognized by the woman, tests her loyalty. But the girl refuses, saying she can not give him her heart because she is waiting for the return of her true love. The man so reassured, reveals himself and the two crown their love with marriage.
The story recalls the archetypal figures of Ulysses and Penelope, when Ulysses, in disguise, returns twenty years after to his Ithaca , and he is not recognized by his wife. It is also a subject of fiction, on men returning from war changed in physique and psyche or who are clearly another person, accepted in spite of everything by his wife mostly for practical reasons; she ends up preferring this new or different person to the previous husband!

The origin of the theme in English and American balladry has been identified in the seventeenth-century ballad entitled “The constant maids resolution: or The damsels loyal love to a seaman” found under the title “The Constant Damsel” in “The Vocal Enchantress” ( Dublin 1791) and in various nineteenth-century American publications under various titles. There are many text versions with small variations combined with different melodies

JOHN RILEY

Although a traditional song, it has been credited to Rick Neff and Bob Gibson (of the Byrds, the American version of the Beatles), in the album “Fifth Dimension” of 1966 (see): actually the song had already been recorded by the american folk singer Joan Baez in her second album released in 1960 with the title of “John Riley”; in the notes she writes traditional song, arrangement by Joan Baez; it is her version to become a standard!

Broceliande

Iernis


I
Fair young maid all in her garden,
strange young man passer-by, he said:
«Fair maid, will you marry me?».
This answer then was her reply:
II
‒ Οh, no, kind   sir, I cannot marry thee,
for I’ve a love and he sails the sea.
Though he’s been gone for seven years,
still no man shall marry me.
III
‒ What if he’s in some battle slain
or if he’s drowned in the deep salt sea?
What if he’s found another love
and he and his love both married be?
IV
‒ Well, if he’s in some battle slain
I will die when the moon doth wane.
And if he’s drowned in the deep salt sea,
then I’ll be true to his memory.
V
And if he’s found another love
and he and his love both married be,
I wish them health and happiness,
where they dwell across the sea.
VI
He pickes her up in his arms so strong
and kisses gave her: One, two, three.
‒ Say weep no more, my own true love,
for I’m your long-lost John Riley!
NOTE
1) seven is a recurring number in ballads to indicate the duration of a separation. The reference to the number seven is not accidental: it is a magic or symbolic number linked to death or change. If a husband left for the war and did not return within seven years, the wife could remarry.

second part

SOURCES
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15555
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=67277

Dark-Eyed Sailor, a reily ballad

Leggi in italiano

The song also known as “Fair Phoebe and her Dark-Eyed Sailor” originally from England, and is dated to a good approximation at the end of the nineteenth century. It is classified as a reily ballad or broken token ballad (because of the love pledge exchanged between the two lovers) on the model of a “return song” that was already the most popular in Classical times: in most of these ballads the man returns home after many years of absence at sea (war), and, not recognized by the woman, he puts her loyalty to the test. The girl, as a serious girl, refuses his courting because she has already been promised. The man so reassured, reveals himself to the woman and the two crown their love with marriage.

sailor-returnThe ballad recalls the archetypal figures of Ulysses and Penelope, when Ulysses, returned twenty years after the war (and his vicissitudes in the seas) to his Ithaca in disguise, is not recognized by his wife.

Collected in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and North America according to A.L. Lloyd all versions have a common matrix in the ballad published on a broadside printed by James Catnach (London 1813-1838) Flanders in “The New Green Mountain Songster” observes”The air to which it is almost universally sung, both in the old-country and American tradition, belongs to another ballad, “The Female Smuggler“.

Steeleye Span from “Hark! The Village Wait” (1970)

Christy Moore from Prosperus 1972

Quilty ( I, II, IV, VI, VII)

Olivia Chaney live The Mark Radcliffe Folk Sessions

I
As I went a walking (roved out ) one evening fair,
it being the summer(time) to take the air/I spied a female (maiden) with a sailor boy/and I stood to listen, I stood to listen/to hear what they might say.
II
He said “Young maiden (fair lady)
now why do you roam
all along by yonder Lee?”
She heaved a sigh and the tears they did roll, / “For my dark eyed sailor,
he ploughs the stormy seas.”
III
“‘Tis seven long years(1) since he left this land,
A ring he took from off his lily-white hand.(2)
One half of the ring is still here with me,
But the other’s rollin’
at the bottom of the sea.”
IV
He said “You can drive him from your mind/for another young man you surely will find.
Love turns a sight and it soon grows cold/ Like a winter’s morning
the hills are white with snow.”
V
She said “I’ll never forsake my dear
Although we’re parted this many a year/ Genteel(3) he was and a rake(4) like you/ To induce a maiden
to slight the jacket blue(5).”
VI
One half of the ring did young William show
She ran distracted in grief and woe
Sayin’ “William, William, I have gold in store(6)/ For my dark-eyed sailor
has proved his honour long”
VII
There is a cottage by yonder Lee,
the couple live there and do agree.
So maids be true when your lover’s at sea,
For a stormy morning
brings on a sunny day.
NOTES
1) Seven is a recurring number in ballads to indicate the duration of a separation. The reference to the number seven is not accidental: it is a magic or symbolic number linked to death or change. If a husband left for the war and did not return within seven years, the wife could remarry.
2) in this kind of ballads often appears an object through which the two lovers are recognized, either a gift exchanged or a ring broken in half as in this case
3) for gentle
4) A “rake” was a charming young lover of women, of songs, dedicated to gambling and alcohol, but also a lifestyle of fashion among the English nobles during the 17th century. And yet it is also a term used in a positive sense
5) wearing the blue jacket of the British sailor’s uniform
6) in other versions”I’ve lands and gold For my dark-eyed sailor so manly, true and bold

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/fair-young-maid-garden/
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/maine-lumberjacks/songs-ballads%20-%200208.htm
http://history.wiltshire.gov.uk/community/getfolk.php?id=926 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=80849 http://www.itma.ie/inishowen/song/dark_eyed_sailor_kate_doherty http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/thedarkeyedsailor.html http://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/dark-eyed-sailor/
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/13/sailor.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149660 https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN35.html

THE SOLDIER’S RETURN

Robert Burns scrisse la canzone “The Soldier’s Return” anche detta ” When wild war’s deadly blast was blawn” nel 1793 sulla melodia “The Mill, mill, O”, melodia conosciuta anche con il titolo di “The Quaker’s Wife” (ovvero Merrily Kissed the Quacker): Burns scrive di un soldato  “loyal, light heart” che, alla fine della guerra, ritorna nella sua amata Ayrshire e ritrova la sua fidanzata ancora fedelmente innamorata di lui, pronta a sposarlo.

Ma in effetti un mulino è ancora presente nel nuovo testo ed è quello detto Millmannoch nei pressi di Coylton lungo la Mannoch Road, oggi solo un rudere. Burns viveva all’epoca a Ellisland Farm e ben conosceva il posto.
La canzone ci parla di Gloria, Sacrificio e Patria, l’accento è posto sul senso dell’onore che ancora e lega l’uomo  e lo rende responsabile per la sua terra e il suo clan, i toni però sono dimessi e prevale la commozione: il suo primo pensiero è ritrovare la sua Nancy per scoprire se ancora lei sia innamorata. Il tema qui è tipico delle ballate popolari in cui la donna attende per sette anni il ritorno del suo fidanzato partito per la guerra.  Uno specifico filone è detto reily ballad o broken token ballad  (vedi) in cui il protagonista (sotto mentite spoglie) in genere chiamato John o George, Willie o Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) corteggia la donna: spesso compare un segno di riconoscimento ad esempio un dono scambiato o un oggetto spezzato a metà. In questo contesto è la coccarda a far scattare il riconoscimento

In rete ci sono poche registrazioni, ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers Live & In Session, 2007 (su Spotify (qui)

ASCOLTA Ian Bruce

ASCOLTA Henri’s Notions in John O’Dreams 2007

ASCOLTA

I
When wild war’s deadly blast was blown,
And gentle Peace returning.
Wi’ mony a sweet babe fatherless,
And mony a widow mourning,
I left the lines and tented field,
Where lang I’d been a lodger;
My humble knapsack a’ my wealth,
A poor and honest sodger.
II
A leal light(1) heart beat in my breast,
My hands unstain’d wi’ plunder;
For fair Scotia hame again,
I cheery on did wander.
I thought upon the banks o’ Coil(2),
I thought upon my Nancy;
I thought upon the witching smile,
That caught my youthful fancy.
III
At length I reach’d the bonnie glen,
Where early life I sported;
I pass’d the mill(3) and trysting thorn(4),
Where Nancy aft I courted.
Wha spied I but my ain dear maid,
Down by her mother’s dwelling?
And turn’d me round to hide the flood
That in my een was swelling!
IV
Wi’ alter’d voice, quoth I, Sweet Lass,
Sweet as yon hawthorn’s blossom,
O! happy, happy may he be,
That’s dearest to thy bosom!
My purse is light, I’ve far to gang,
And fain wad be thy lodger,
I’ve served my king and country lang:
Tak’ pity on a sodger.
V
Sae wistfully she gazed on me,
And lovelier was than ever;
Quote she, A sodger ance I lo’ed,
Forget him shall I never.
Our humble cot and hamely fare,
Ye freely shall partake o’t;
That gallant badge, the dear cockade(5),
Ye’re welcome for the sake o’t(6).
VI
She gazed – she redden’d like a rose –
Syne pale as ony lily;
She sank within my arms and cried,
Art thou my ain dear Willie?
By Him, who made yon son and sky,
By whom true love’s regarded,
I am the man! and thus may still
True lovers be rewarded.
VII
The wars are o’er, and I’m come hame,
And find thee still true-hearted;
Though poor in gear, we’re rich in love,
And mair we’se ne’er be parted.
Quoth she, My grandsire left me gowd
A mailin’ plenish’d fairly;
Then come, my faithful sodger lad,
Thou’rt welcome to it dearly!
VIII
For gold the merchant ploughs the main,
The farmer ploughs the manor;
But glory is the sodger’s prize,
The sodger’s wealth is honour.
The brave poor sodger ne’er despise,
Nor count him as a stranger:
Remember he’s his country’s stay,
In day and hour o’ danger.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Quando la raffica mortale della guerra fu esplosa
e la pace ritornò mite
con più di un caro bambino senza padre
e più di una vedova in lamento
lasciai il fronte e l’accampamento
dove fui a lungo stanziato
la mia umile bisaccia come sola ricchezza
un povero e onesto soldato
II
Un leale cuore leggero era nel mio petto
le mie mani senza la macchia delle ruberie
e per la bella Scozia, a casa di nuovo,
tutto allegro mi incamminai:
pensavo alle rive del Coil
pensavo alla mia Nancy
e sempre ricordavo il sorriso da incantatrice
che catturò il mio amore fanciullo.
III
Alla fine raggiunsi l’amata valle
dove passai gli anni della gioventù
superai il mulino e il biancospino fidato
dove spesso corteggiavo Nancy.
Chi ti vidi se non proprio la mia cara fanciulla
accanto all’abitazione delle madre
e mi voltai per nascondere le lacrime
che dai miei occhi stavano per sgorgare
IV
Con voce alterata dissi “Bella fanciulla
bella come quel biancospino in fiore
oh felice deve essere
colui che è così caro al tuo cuore!
Il mio borsellino è scarso, devo andare lontano
e mi piacerebbe essere il tuo ospite;
ho servito il mio re e il mio paese a lungo
abbi pietà di un soldato”
V
Così malinconicamente mi scrutava
più bella che mai
disse “Un soldato amavo una volta
e non potrò mai dimenticarlo.
La nostra umile casetta e un modesto desco
potrai liberamente spartire;
per quel fiero distintivo – la cara coccarda, sei il benvenuto ”
VI
Mi fissò e arrossì come una rosa
poi pallida come il giglio
affondò tra le mie braccia e gridò
“Sei tu il mio amato Willy?”
“Per Colui che ha fatto il sole e il cielo lassù
da chi il vero amore è ammirato
sono io l’uomo! E così i veri innamorati possono ancora essere ricompensati”
VII
“La guerra è finita e sono ritornato a casa
per trovare te ancora innamorata.
Sebbene di poche sostanze siamo ricchi in amore
e in più non saremo mai separati”
disse lei ” Mio nonno mi ha lasciato del denaro,
una fattoria ben fornita!
Vieni mio fedele soldatino
sono tuoi di tutto cuore”
VIII
Per i soldi il mercante prende il mare
l’agricoltore ara il terreno
ma la gloria è il premio del soldato
la ricchezza del soldato è l’onore!
Il povero soldato coraggioso mai disprezzate
nè reputatelo un estraneo:
ricordate che egli è il sostegno del suo paese
nel giorno e nell’ora del pericolo

NOTE
1) light heart= in italiano l’espressione indica la superficialità, ma in questo contesto il cuore del soldato è leggero perchè non ha pesi (amarezze e dolore) o infamie da portare
2) Coil, Coila, Kyle, è l’antico nome dell’Ayrshire.
3) il mulino della canzone è quello di Monach sul Coyle (South Ayrshire)
4) “trysting trees” sono alberi che per la loro aspetto o posizione sono diventati luoghi in cui darsi un appuntamento (in inglese tryst): in particolare sono i luoghi deputati agli incontri amorosi
5) La coccarda appuntata sul cappello è una moda del Settecento ed era indossata come simbolo della fedeltà a una certa ideologia. In Gran Bretagna la coccarda bianca indicava i giacobiti mentre i governativi indossavano la coccarda nera o blu, anche i reggimenti avevano i loro colori distintivi.
6) l’espressione “for the sake of it” è analizzata qui: la ragione per cui la ragazza accoglie il soldato è la coccarda appuntata al cappello; non lo accoglie tanto per fare, ma perchè gli ricorda l’innamorato partito soldato. E infatti subito dopo si chiede “Sei tu il mio amato Willy?”
TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
When wild war’s deadly blast was blown,
And gentle Peace returning.
With many a sweet babe fatherless,
And many a widow mourning,
I left the lines and tented field,
Where long I’d been a lodger;
My humble knapsack all my wealth,
A poor and honest soldier.
II
A loyal, light heart(1) was in my breast,
My hands unstained with plunder,
And for fair Scotia, home again,
I cheery on did wander:
I thought upon the banks of Coil(2),
I thought upon my Nancy,
And always I remembered the witching smile
That caught my youthful fancy
III
At length I reached the lovely glen,
Where early life I sported.
I passed the mill(3) and trysting thorn(4),
Where Nancy often I courted.
Who spied I but my own dear maid,
Down by her mother’s dwelling,
And turned me round to hide the flood
That in my eyes was swelling!
IV
With altered voice, said I:- ‘ Sweet girl,
Sweet as yonder hawthorn’s blossom,
O, happy, happy may he be,
That is dearest to your bosom!
My purse is light, I have far to go,
And fondly would be your lodger;
I have served my king and country long
Take pity on a soldier.’
V
So wistfully she gazed on me,
And lovelier was than ever.
Said she:- ‘ A soldier once I loved,
Forget him shall I never.
Our humble cottage, and homely fare,
You freely shall partake it;
That gallant badge – the dear cockade(5)
You are welcome for the sake of it!(6)’
VI
She gazed, she reddened like a rose,
Then, pale like any lily,
She sank within my arms, and cried:-
‘ Are you my own dear Willie?’
‘ By Him who made yonder sun and sky,
By whom true love is regarded,
I am the man! And thus may still
True lovers be rewarded!
VII
‘The wars are over and I am come home,
And find you still true-hearted.
Though poor in wealth, we are rich in love,
And more, we are never be parted.’
Said she:- ‘ My grandfather left me gold,
A farm stocked fairly!
And come my faithful soldier lad,
You are welcome to it dearly!’
VIII
For gold the merchant ploughs the main,
The farmer ploughs the manor;
But glory is the soldier’s prize,
The soldier’s wealth is honour!
The brave poor soldier never despise,
Nor count him as a stranger:
Remember he is his country’s stay
In day and hour of danger.

FONTI
http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/10TheSodgersReturn.jpg
http://www.burnsmuseum.org.uk/collections/object_detail/3.2535
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/624.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/14436
http://sangstories.webs.com/millmillo.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4844
https://thesession.org/tunes/12270
https://thesession.org/tunes/70
http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/earlyyears/merrilydancedthequakerswife.asp
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millmannoch

Dark-Eyed Sailor, una reily ballad dell’Ottocento inglese

Read the post in English

La canzone nota anche con il titolo di “Fair Phoebe and her Dark-Eyed Sailor” proveniente originariamente dall’Inghilterra, ed è databile con buona approssimazione alla fine dell’Ottocento. Viene classificata come reily ballad o broken token ballad (per via del pegno d’amore scambiato tra i due innamorati) sul modello di una “return song” che andava per la maggiore già ai tempi dei Classici: nella maggior parte di queste ballate l’uomo ritorna a casa dopo molti anni di assenza in mare (guerra), e, non riconosciuto dalla donna, ne mette alla prova la fedeltà, corteggiandola. La fanciulla, da ragazza seria e posata, rifiuta ogni “avance” perchè già promessa. L’uomo così rassicurato, si rivela alla donna e i due coronano il loro amore con il matrimonio.

sailor-return
La ballata richiama le figure archetipe di Ulisse e Penelope, quando Ulisse, ritornato dopo vent’anni dalla guerra (e dalle sue peripezie nei mari) alla sua Itaca sotto mentite spoglie, non è riconosciuto dalla moglie.

Raccolta in Inghilterra, Galles, Scozia, Irlanda e Nord America secondo A.L. Lloyd tutte le versioni hanno una matrice comune nella ballata pubblicata su un broadside stampato da James Catnach (Londra 1813-1838) Flanders in “The New Green Mountain Songster”, pp. 36-38, osserva “The air to which it is almost universally sung, both in the old-country and American tradition, belongs to another ballad, “The Female Smuggler“.

Steeleye Span in “Hark! The Village Wait” (1970) (strofe da I a VII)

Christy Moore Prosperus 1972 (strofe da I a VII)

Quilty (strofe I, II, IV, VI, VII)

Olivia Chaney live The Mark Radcliffe Folk Sessions


I
As I went a walking (roved out ) one evening fair,
it being the summer(time) to take the air/I spied a female (maiden) with a sailor boy/and I stood to listen, I stood to listen/to hear what they might say.
II
He said “Young maiden (fair lady)
now why do you roam
all along by yonder Lee?”
She heaved a sigh and the tears they did roll, / “For my dark eyed sailor,
he ploughs the stormy seas.”
III
“‘Tis seven long years(1) since he left this land,
A ring he took from off his lily-white hand.(2)
One half of the ring is still here with me,
But the other’s rollin’
at the bottom of the sea.”
IV
He said “You can drive him from your mind/for another young man you surely will find.
Love turns a sight and it soon grows cold/ Like a winter’s morning
the hills are white with snow.”
V
She said “I’ll never forsake my dear
Although we’re parted this many a year/ Genteel(3) he was and a rake(4) like you/ To induce a maiden
to slight the jacket blue(5).”
VI
One half of the ring did young William show
She ran distracted in grief and woe
Sayin’ “William, William, I have gold in store(6)/ For my dark-eyed sailor
has proved his honour long”
VII
There is a cottage by yonder Lee,
the couple live there and do agree.
So maids be true when your lover’s at sea,
For a stormy morning
brings on a sunny day.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo una bella sera d’estate,
per prendere una boccata d’aria
intravidi una femmina con un marinaio
e mi fermai per sentire
quello che si dicevano.
II
“Giovane fanciulla
perchè te ne vai
tutta sola tra le rocce?”
Lei sospirò e fece cadere una lacrima
“Per il mio marinaio dagli occhi scuri
che solca i mari in tempesta.
III
Sono sette anni (1) da quanto ha lasciato questo paese
e un anello lui si è sfilato dalla bianca mano (2).
Una metà dell’anello lo porto ancora con me,
ma l’altra metà
è finita in fondo al mare”
IV
“Levatelo dalla testa
e di certo un altro giovane uomo troverai.
L’amore è un colpo di fulmine e presto si raffredda
come un mattino d’inverno
le colline diventano bianche di neve.”
V
“Non dimenticherò mai il mio amore
sebbene ci siamo separati da molti anni
era gentile (3) e affascinante (4) come voi
tanto ad indurre una fanciulla
a prendere il mare (5)”
VI
Una metà dell’anello il giovane William mostrò.
Lei corse tra le sue braccia in lacrime
dicendo “William ho i soldi da parte (6)
per il mio marinaio dagli occhi neri
che ha dimostrato il suo onore”
VII
C’è una casetta lontana
lì la coppia vive sposata.
Così fanciulle siate certe che quando il vostro amore è in mare,
per una mattina tempestosa
ci sarà un giorno di sole!

NOTE
1) sono sempre sette gli anni della separazione e dell’attesa. Sette è un numero ricorrente nelle ballate per indicare la durata di una separazione. Il riferimento al numero sette non è casuale: è un numero magico o simbolico legato alla morte o al cambiamento. Un tempo la ferma del servizio militare durava sette anni, se un marito partiva per la guerra e non tornava entro i sette anni, la moglie poteva risposarsi.
2) nelle ballate di questo genere compare spesso un oggetto mediante il quale i due innamorati si riconoscono, sia un dono scambiato o un anello spezzato a metà come in questo caso
3) for gentle
4) La parola “Rake” si traduce in italiano con libertino forse un diminutivo di ‘rakehell’ (dissoluto), che, a sua volta, deriva dall’Islandese antico “reikall,” dal significato di “wandering” (nomade) o “unsettled” (instabile). Un “rake” era un affascinante giovane amante delle donne, delle canzoni, dedito al gioco d’azzardo e all’alcool, ma anche uno stile di vita di moda tra i nobili inglesi nel corso del 17° secolo. E tuttavia è anche un termine utilizzato in senso positivo
5) slight the jacket blue letteralmente significa indossare la giacca blu della divisa del marinaio inglese.
6) in altre versioni “I’ve lands and gold For my dark-eyed sailor so manly, true and bold

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/fair-young-maid-garden/
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/maine-lumberjacks/songs-ballads%20-%200208.htm
http://history.wiltshire.gov.uk/community/getfolk.php?id=926 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=80849 http://www.itma.ie/inishowen/song/dark_eyed_sailor_kate_doherty http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/thedarkeyedsailor.html http://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/dark-eyed-sailor/
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/13/sailor.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149660 https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN35.html

YOUGHAL IN IRISH SONGS

Una melodia dalle origini dimenticate, intitolata Calad n-Eocaill, poi “Youghal Harbour” con un testo in inglese seppur popolare per lo più nel Sud dell’Irlanda (Munster) è diventata famosa a fine Ottocento con il titolo di Boolavogue (una “irish rebel song” sulla rivolta di Wexford, con il testo scritto da Patrick Joseph Mccall vedi).

“Although overlooked by both Bunting and Petrie in their great collections, there can be no question of the antiquity of “Youghal Harbour” which by name and strain is still remembered in the south of Ireland. As a song it was printed in Irish, and under its Irish name “Eochaill” in Hardiman’s Irish Minstrelsy, London, 1831…” (in Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody – O’Neill p.37)

Il nome gaelico della piccola cittadina si traduce in inglese ‘yew wood’ cioè “foresta di tassi“, una località amena circondata dalle foreste, costruita proprio sull’estuario del Blackwater dalla parte della contea di Cork (sull’altra sponda inizia la contea di Waterford).
Se vi avanzano una ventina di minuti, merita guardare questo video documentario proprio sulla cittadina dal titolo “Town Out of Time” (2010) scritto e diretto da Michael Twomey, Film & Fotografia di Kieran McCarthy.

oppure la sua versione trailer

GUIDA ALL’ASCOLTO

La melodia è una slow air nota come “Calad n-Eocaill” o anche “Eochaill” che richiama l’antica melodia detta “Gus Breo“, presa in prestito anche dalla canzone australiana Moreton Bay.

MELODIA
spartito PW Joyce manuscripts qui

ASCOLTA The Dubliners con la melodia portata dal mandolino
ASCOLTA Margaret Knight con l’arpa (in Folk Melodies of the British Isles 1997)
ASCOLTA Matt Cunningham Eochaill (una magnifica versione con il whistle che a me fa venire in mente il sorgere del sole su una terra buia e addormentata)

ASCOLTA Florie Brown Idir Deighric gus Breo al violino
ASCOLTA Jimmy Power al violino 1976 in versione valzer lento

ALTRE MELODIE
Youghal Quay (reel)
ASCOLTA Vincent Griffin che la associa a The New Year’s in

Youghal Harbour è intitolata anche Mary of Cappoquin (Cappoquin o Capelkin contea di Waterford), e l’unica versione cantata che ho trovato in rete è quella raccolta sul campo dall’ITMA (Irish Traditional Music Archive) ASCOLTA

un’altra variante testuale inizia con:
As I roved out on a summer’s morning
Early as the day did dawn, continua

La storia descrive sostanzialmente l’incontro casuale tra due innamorati, per la strada che unisce Youghal a Cappoquin, i quali a suo tempo sono stati costretti a separarsi a causa della disapprovazione dei genitori di lei (o almeno questo è il motivo che l’uomo adduce come giustificazione per aver abbandonato la ragazza..), ma la versione testuale riportata da Eddie Butcher è una combinazione di due temi

Come riportato nella nota di Hugh Shields che commenta la registrazione sul campo 1966: “Eddie’s title is deceptive. The Munster Gaelic pastourelle ‘Eochaill’ – called ‘Fóchaill’ in Ulster – inspired broadside adaptations in English, one of which, our ‘Youghal harbour’1, begins with lines corresponding to Eddie’s 1.1–4 and also similar to the opening of a broadside favourite ‘Reilly from the county Cavan/Kerry’. All these songs are sung to the same popular air ‘Youghal harbour’; in Eddie’s, melodic similitude has led to a mingling of texts. V. 1.1–4 belongs to ‘Youghal harbour’, v. 3–5 to ‘Reilly’; the intervening text, 1.5–2.8, agrees thematically with ‘Youghal harbour1’ insofar as it describes a girl abandoned, but its exact source is unknown to me. Eddie’s song combines the theme of the abandoned girl with the inconclusive courtship of ‘Reilly’, in which a returning soldier fails to persuade a girl to give up her old love. The resulting lack of narrative definition recalls the lyricism of many songs in Irish; though the recurrent first person singular represents now the man, now one girl and now perhaps another, it binds together a strongly assertive expression of love unfulfilled.”

La canzone è classificabile come una reily ballad perchè è strutturata in forma di dialogo tra il protagonista (sotto mentite spoglie) in genere chiamato John o George, Willie o Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) e la donna, specchiato esempio di fedeltà. continua
I
Oh, Youghal harbour on a summer’s morning,
I met my darling upon the way;
The sun was shining, she looked so charming
I stopped a while and she just did say,
– Oh, Jamie, Jamie, are you going to leave me
Or are you going where bullets fly(1)?
A handsome youth and my dearest jewel,
I love you well and I can’t deny.
II
– Oh, Nancy darling, was I to marry you
What would your false-hearted parents say?
That they reared a daughter with such a fortune
And carelesslie she threw herself away.
Before that I would live at variance
All with your parents and brothers too –
It was them that banished you far from my arms –
Unto your charms I’ll now bid adieu.
III
As I walked up through the county Cavan(2)
To view the sweet and the bonds of love
Who did I spy but a charming fair maid,
She appeared to me like a turtle dove.
I stepped up to her and fondlie asked her
Would she consent to be a dragoon’s wife;
With modest blushes she thus made answer,
– Kind sir, I mean to lead a single life.
IV
Had I a-married I might have been married,
I could have been married many’s a year ago
To a man named Reilly(3) lived in this country,
It was him that caused my sad overthrow.
– Don’t depend on Reilly for he’ll deceive you
But come with me unto yon Irish shore
Where we’ll sail over to Pennsylvania,
Bid adieu to Reilly for evermore.
V(3)
– Was I to sail on yon brimy ocean,
The winds to blow and the seas to roar
I thought my very heart would have split asunder
When I thought on Reilly that I left on shore.
But youth and folly makes fair maids marry
And when they’re married then they must obey;
What can’t be cured must be endured,
So farewell, darling, for I’m away.
NOTE
1) in questa versione Nancy e Jamie si incontrano per una non precisata strada e lei è preoccupata, perchè teme di essere lasciata (per un’altra) o che il ragazzo si stia per arruolare per la guerra. Entrambi i temi sono dei classici nelle storie d’amore irlandesi
2) presumibilmente tra il primo e il secono incontro è passato un po’ di tempo Jamie è diventato un “dragoon” (un soldato a cavallo) e i due fingono di non riconoscersi: la donna si dichiara fedele al suo amante o promesso sposo partito per la guerra e l’uomo la mette alla prova. In questa versione il soldato Jamie che ha lasciato la sua Youghal incontra nella contea di Cavan una nuova ragazza e la corteggia, ma lei preferisce restare fedele al suo Reilly (che non vede da un anno e ne dovranno passare ben 7 prima che lei si possa dire sciolta dalla promessa di fedeltà)
3) la storia si conclude con un colpo di scena: la fanciulla alla fine decide di sposarsi invece di aspettare Reilly!

FONTI
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/sound/youghal_harbour_eddie_butcher http://thesession.org/tunes/4615 https://thesession.org/tunes/5322 https://thesession.org/tunes/2173 http://www.seannosbeo.ie/?page_id=147 http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/youghal-harbour

THE BANKS OF CLAUDY

ventoUna canzone tradizionale irlandese ampiamente diffusa nei broadsides ottocenteschi, anche scritta come Claudy Banks assai popolare in Gran Bretagna, in Nord America e Australia; il tema è un cosiddetto “reily ballad”  da considerarsi come una variante di “A fair young maid all in her garden“.
A traditional Irish song widely used in nineteenth-century broadsides, also written as Claudy Banks very popular in Britain, North America and Australia; the theme is a “reily ballad” to be considered as a variant of “A fair young maid all in her garden“.

La palma per aver annotato la canzone per conto della Folk Song Society va alla signora Kate Lee che trascrisse Claudy Banks dal canto della famiglia Copper. Claudy si trova nell’Irlanda del Nord e la versione australiana della canzone riporta anche Newry un paese vicino a Claudy, così si può ragionevolmente presumere che questa ballata prese vita in Irlanda, ma è stata per molto tempo ambientata in Gran Bretagna al punto che alcuni collezionisti scozzesi del XIX secolo affermarono che proveniva dal loro paese. Si tratta di quel genere di broadside ballad che fiorirono durante il periodo della guerra tra Gran Bretagna e Francia  per l’imperialismo territoriale al di fuori dell’Europa, quando un marinaio avrebbe potuto restare per molti anni lontano da casa senza possibilità di comunicare con la sua fidanzata rimasta a casa” (tradotto da qui)
The honour of noting the first folksong on behalf of the Folk Song Society went to Mrs Kate Lee who noted down Claudy Banks from the singing of the Copper family. Claudy is in the north of Ireland, and the Australian version of the song refers also to Newry, not too far from Claudy. So we may reasonably conclude that this ballad began life in Ireland. But it has long been acclimatised in Britain, and some nineteenth century Scottish collectors indeed claimed that it originated in that country. It belongs to a kind of broadside balladry that flourished during that long period of struggle between Britain and France for imperial domination outside Europe, when a sailor might be away for many years with little chance of communicating with a lover at home“. (from here)

LA MELODIA
The tune

La melodia non è univoca ma la più diffusa è quella della ballata irlandese The Handsome Cabin Boy.
The melody is not unique but the most widespread is that of the Irish ballad The Handsome Cabin Boy..
Howard Baer

RILEY  BALLADS

Il modello archetipo del tema è quello di Ulisse e Penelope: l’uomo (di solito il signor Riley) ritorna dopo molti anni passati per mare (tra guerre e avventure) e incontra (sotto mentite spoglie) la moglie (o la fidanzata) e la sottopone ad un test per avere la prova della sua fedeltà. L’uomo così rassicurato, si rivela alla donna.
Una situazione di genere ben antica, diventata ormai stereotipata, che  non per questo  cessa di emozionare chi canta e chi ascolta. In queste ballate ad un certo punto viene menzionato un dono che i due si sono scambiati prima della partenza e che viene mostrato alla fine in segno di riconoscimento, ma si tratta più di un corollario o un accessorio alla storia, un dettaglio che non compare in tutte le “riley ballads” proprio come come in “The Banks of Claudy”.
The archetypal model of the theme is that of Ulysses and Penelope: the man (usually Mr. Riley) returns after many years spent by sea (between wars and adventures) and meets (in disguise) his wife (or girlfriend) and he submits it to a test to have proof of his loyalty. The man so reassured, reveals himself to the woman.
A situation of a very ancient kind, which has become stereotypical, which does not cease to upset those who sing and those who listen. In these ballads at a certain point a gift is mentioned that the two exchanged before departure and which is shown at the end in recognition, but it is more a corollary or an accessory to the story, a detail that does not appear in all the “riley ballads” just like in “The Banks of Claudy”.

Mary Dillon in North 2013

VERSIONE M. Dillon
I
Twas on one summer’s evening (1),
I wandered from my home,
Down by a flowery garden
I carelessly did roam;
I overheard a damsel
in sorrow she complained,
All for her absent lover
who’s plowing the raging main(2).
II
I quickly than stepped up to her
And I took her by surprise.
I’ll own she did not know me
having dressed all in disguise;
Said I, “My fairy creature,
My joy and heart’s delight
How far you go to travel
This dark and dreary night?”
III
Unto the Banks of Claudy(3)
kind sir if you will show
Pity a lady distracted,
For it’s there I have to go;
for I am in search of a young man,
Johnny is his name,
and spied the Banks of Claudy
I’m told he does remain.”
III
“These are the banks of Claudy,
Fair maid, where on you stand
Don’t depend on Johnny
For he’s a false young man.
don’t depend on Johnny
For he’ll not meet you here
go carry with me to the green woods
No danger need you fear.
IV
“Oh Johnny was here tonight my dear,
he would keep me from all harm (4),
But he’s in the land of battle
All dressed in uniform;
He’s in the land of battle,
His foes to destroy,
Like a grecian king of honour (5)
Fought in the Wars of Troy.”
V
“O it’s six long weeks and better,
Since Johnny left the shore;
he’s sailed the green wild ocean,
Where the raging billows roar,
he sailed the green wide ocean,
For honour and for fame,
and they told his ship was wrecked
and lost on the coast of Spain.”
VI
When she heard this dreadful news,
She fell in deep despair,
by flopping of her arms
And a tearing out her hair;
Saying, “If my love he is gone (drowned)
There’s no man on earth I’ll take
to the lonesome groves and valleys
I will wander for his sake.”
VII
Oh it’s when he saw her loyalty
he could no longer stand
He flew into her arms saying,
“Betsy, I’m the lad.”
Saying, “Betsy, I’m the young man
The cause of all your pain
and since we’ve met on Claudy banks
We’ll never shall part again.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Era una sera d’estate (1)
che bighellonavo fuori casa
per un giardino fiorito,
vagando distrattamente,
ho sentito una damigella
addolorata che si lamentava,
per il suo innamorato assente,
a solcare il mare agitato (2).
II
Mi sono subito avvicinato a lei
prendendola di sorpresa,
anche se sapevo che non mi avrebbe riconosciuto essendo camuffato.
Mia incantevole creatura,
gioia e delizia del mio cuore,
quanto lontano dovete viaggiare
in questa notte buia e triste?
III
Fino  alle rive del Claudy (3)
gentile signore, se mostrerete pietà
per una poveretta confusa,
perchè è là che devo andare;
Sono in cerca di un giovanotto
di nome Johnny
e scruterò le rive del Claudy
(perchè) mi hanno che oggi ritorna
III
Queste sono le rive del Claudy,
bella fanciulla, proprio dove state
ma non cercate Johnny
perchè è un giovanotto bugiardo;
non cercate Johnny
perchè non lo incontrerete qui,
venite con me nel folto dei boschi
e non dovrete temere alcun pericolo“.
IV
Oh se Johnny fosse qui stanotte, mio caro, mi avrebbe protetta,
ma è sul campo di battaglia
con indosso l’uniforme
è nel campo di battaglia
a distruggere il nemico
come un re greco di parola (5)
che combatte nella guerra di Troia
V
Sono sei lunghe settimane o più
da quanto Johnny ha lasciato il paese,
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
dove ruggiscono le onde impetuose;
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
per l’onore e la fama,
ma dicono che la sua nave naufragò dispersa sulla costa della Spagna
VI
Quando seppe della terribile notizia
cadde nella cupa disperazione
dimenando le mani
e strappandosi i capelli.
Se il mio amore è morto,
non prenderò altro uomo in terra,
ma per boschi solitari e valli
vangherò in sua memoria
VII
E quando egli vide la sua fedeltà
non si trattenne più a lungo
dal gettarsi tra le sue braccia
Betsy, sono io il ragazzo
che è la causa di tutto il tuo dolore,
ma ora che ci siamo incontrati sulle rive del Claudy,
non ci separeremo mai più“.

NOTE
1) Mary modifica qualche verso restando però fedele  alla versione standard, l’incontro  talvolta è ambientato in un mattino di Maggio; la strofa d’apertura è un classico delle ballate popolari in cui la storia viene presentata come una testimonianza di una persona presente ai fatti accaduti, a garanzia della loro autenticità.
Mary modifies some verses but remains faithful to the standard version, the meeting is sometimes set on a morning in May; the opening stanza is a classic of folk ballads in which the story is presented as a testimony of a person present to the events, to guarantee their authenticity.
2) all’epoca di Shakespeare main= high sea; quando la Spagna era potenza coloniale con il temine “Spanish Main” si indicava una specifica parte di territorio compreso tra il Mare dei Caraibi e il Golfo del Messico. Termini spesso usate nelle ballate sono: “bounty main” “angry main” e “raging main” con accezione di mare mosso.
at the time of Shakespeare main = high sea; when Spain was a colonial power with the term “Spanish Main” it was indicated a specific part of territory between the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Terms often used in ballads are: “bounty main” “angry main” and “raging main” as a rough sea.
3) in Irlanda ci sono molti corsi d’acqua con il nome di Claude / Claudy / Cloddy / Caldy; alcuni ritengono che il riferimento vada al fiume Clyde (Scozia), altri che invece sia il villaggio di Claudy nel Derry (Irlanda del Nord) .. come sempre la discussione è accesa quando i due paesi si contendono l’origine di una canzone tradizionale!
in Ireland there are many watercourses with the name of Claude / Claudy / Cloddy / Caldy; some believe that the reference goes to the river Clyde (Scotland), others that it is the village of Claudy in Derry (Northern Ireland) .. as always the discussion is very hot when the two countries compete for the origin of a traditional song!
4) questo è l’unico verso che non sono proprio riuscita a capire cosa dice Mary, ho preso così come riferimento la versione standard
5) Menelao fu il re greco che andò a Troia con l’intento di riprendersi la moglie. Il paragone non mi sembra molto azzeccato, visto che Elena era fuggita con il troiano Paride!! L’immagine vuole probabilmente richiamare l’ardore guerresco di quando un tempo si combatteva impugnando la spada.
Menelaus was the Greek king who went to Troy with the intention of recovering his wife. The comparison does not seem very apt, as Elena had escaped with the Trojan Paris! The image probably wants to recall the martial ardour of the sword fights

Ballynameen Bridge, Claudy, Co. Derry

Anche i Fairport Convention registrarono la canzone con il titolo Claudy Banks (in Rhythm of the Time, 2008) da ascoltare su Spotify (qui) con una delle melodie alternative con cui viene cantata la canzone.
Altra melodia (una slow air del Donegal) nella versione di Loreena McKennitt (in Elemental 1985):  un andamento lento con il solo accompagnamento dell’arpa celtica, rumore d’oceano e grida di gabbiano in sottofondo.
Also the Fairport Convention recorded the song with the title Claudy Banks (in Rhythm of the Time, 2008) to listen to Spotify (here) with one of the alternative melodies with which the song is sung.
Another melody (a slow air of Donegal) in the version of Loreena McKennitt(in Elemental 1985): a slow melody with the only accompaniment of Celtic harp, ocean noise and seagull cries in the background.

VERSIONE L. McKennitt
I
As I walked out one morning
All in the month of May
Down by a flowery garden
I carelessly did stray
II
I overheard a young maid
In sorrow did complain
All for her absent lover
Who ploughs the raging main.
III
I boldly stepped up to her
And put her in surprise
I know she did not know me
I being in disguise.
IV
I says, “Me charming creature
My joy, my heart’s delight,
How far have you to travel
This dark and dreary night?”
V
“I’m in search of a faithless young man
Johnny is his name
And along the banks of Claudy
I’m told he does remain.”
VI
“This is the banks of Claudy,
Fair maid, where you stand
But don’t depend on Johnny
For he’s a false young man.
VII
“Oh, don’t depend on Johnny
For he’ll not meet you here
But tarry with me in yon green woods
No danger need you fear.”
VIII
“Oh, it’s six long weeks or better
Since Johnny left the shore
He’s crossing the wild ocean
Where the foam and the billows roar.
IX
“He’s crossing the wild ocean
For honour and for fame
But this I’ve heard, the ship was wrecked/All on the coast of Spain .”
X
Oh it’s when she heard this dreadful news/She flew into despair
By the wringing of her milk-white hands/And the tearing of her hair.
XI
Saying, “If Johnny he is drowned
No man on earth I’ll take
But through lonesome groves and valleys/I’ll wander for his sake.”
XII
Oh it’s when he saw her loyalty
No longer could he stand
He flew into her arms saying,
“Betsy, I’m the man.”
XIII
Saying, “Betsy, I’m the young man
The cause of all your pain
But since we’ve met on Claudy banks
We’ll never part again.”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre bighellonavo fuori casa una mattina nel mese di Maggio
nei pressi di un giardino fiorito,
incautamente mi smarrii,
II
Incontrai una damigella
addolorata che si lamentava,
per il suo innamorato assente,
a solcare il mare agitato .
II
Mi sono subito avvicinato a lei
prendendola di sorpresa,
anche se sapevo che non mi avrebbe riconosciuto essendo camuffato.
IV
Dico io “Mia incantevole creatura,
gioia e delizia del mio cuore,
quanto lontano dovete viaggiare
in questa notte buia e triste?
V
“Cerco un giovanotto infedele
di nome Johnny
per le rive del Claudy
mi hanno detto che si aggira
VI
Queste sono le rive del Claudy,
bella fanciulla, proprio dove state
ma non contate su Johnny
perchè è un giovanotto bugiardo;
VII
Non contate su Johnny

perchè non lo incontrerete qui,
ma venite con me nel folto dei boschi
e non dovrete temere alcun pericolo“.
VIII
Sono sei lunghe settimane o più
da quanto Johnny ha lasciato il paese,
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
dove ruggiscono le onde impetuose;
IX
ha navigato sul vasto oceano
per l’onore e la fama,
ma dicono che la sua nave naufragò
sulla costa della Spagna

X
Quando lei seppe della terribile notizia
cadde nella cupa disperazione
dimenando le mani bianco latte
e strappandosi i capelli
XI
dicendo “Se Johnny è annegato,
non prenderò altro uomo in terra,
ma per boschi solitari e valli
vangherò per amor suo
XII
E quando egli vide la sua fedeltà
non si trattenne più a lungo
dal gettarsi tra le sue braccia
Betsy, sono io il ragazzo
XIII

Betsy, sono io il ragazzo
che è la causa di tutto il tuo dolore,

ma ora che ci siamo incontrati sulle rive del Claudy, non ci separeremo mai più“.

LINK
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BanksClaudy.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/57.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/claudybanks.html http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-BanksClaudy.html http://www.joeheaney.org/default.asp?contentID=694 http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/bkofclau.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=28611 http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/domhnaill/banks.htm http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/compilations/banks.htm http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mckennitt/banks.htm

L’importanza di chiamarsi .. Reily

Read the post in English

TITOLI: A Fair Young Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

La ballata è stata resa popolare con il titolo di John Reily  da Joan Baez  negli anni 60: è una classica storia d’amore  di probabili origini seicentesche, in cui la donna resta fedele al suo amante  o promesso sposo partito per la guerra o imbarcato su un vascello. La canzone  viene classificata come reily ballad  perchè è strutturata in forma di dialogo tra il protagonista (sotto mentite spoglie) in genere chiamato John o George, Willie o Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) e la donna, specchiato esempio di fedeltà. (prima parte continua)

SECONDA MELODIA

Il testo di questa versione mi ricorda la commedia di Oscar Wild, “L’importanza  di chiamarsi Onesto” (in inglese The Importance  of Being Earnest) il contraddittorio di Wilde a Shakespeare nella  famosa dichiarazione di Giulietta sul nome di Romeo:
Che cos’è un nome? La rosa avrebbe lo  stesso profumo anche se la chiamassimo in un altro modo.
Dunque cambia il  nome, Romeo, e amiamoci tranquillamente.
“.

E’ questa la melodia riportata  dalla tradizione americana come collezionata sul campo (Providence, Kentucky)  negli anni 30 da Alan Lomax. Così scrive Joe Hickerson nelle note della versione di Peggy Seeger
Ci sono due ballate intitolate “John (George) Riley” in American Balladry di G. Malcolm Laws dal British Broadsides (1957). Nel numero N36, l’uomo ritornato afferma che Riley è stato ucciso, in modo da mettere alla prova la costanza della sua fidanzata. Nel numero N37, che è la nostra ballata, non esiste tale rivendicazione. Piuttosto, lui suggerisce di salpare per la Pennsylvania; quando lei rifiuta, rivela la sua identità. Nelle molte versioni trovate, il cognome dell’uomo è scritto in vari modi, e in alcuni casi è “Young Riley”. Diversi studiosi citano una possibile origine nel “The Constant Damsel”, pubblicato in un libro di canzoni del 1791 a Dublino.
Peggy ha imparato la canzone durante l’infanzia da una registrazione sul campo dell’Archivio Folk della Biblioteca del Congresso: AFS 1504B1 come cantata dalla signora Lucy Garrison e registrata da Alan ed Elizabeth Lomax a Providence, nel Kentucky, nel 1937. Questa versione è stata trascritta da Ruth Crawford Seeger e inclusa in Our Our Countrying (1941) di John e Alan Lomax, p. 168. In precedenza, il primo versetto e la melodia raccolti dalla signora Garrison a Little Goose Creek, Manchester, Clay Co., Kentucky, nel 1917, apparivano in “English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians” (1932) di Cecil Sharp, vol. 2, p. 22. Il canto di Peggy è elencato come la fonte della ballata in pp. 161-162 de “The Folk Songs of North America” (1960) di Alan Lomax, con “melodie e accordi di chitarra trascritti da Peggy Seeger”. Nel 1964 è apparsa a p. 39 di Folk Songs di Peggy Seeger (Oak Publications, a cura di Ethel Raim). Peggy ha registrato su Folk-Lyric FL114, American Folk Songs per Banjo e suo fratello Pete ha incluso questa versione sul suo primo LP Folkways, FP 3 (FA 2003), Darling Corey (1950).”

Il dialogo tra i due sembra qui più una schermaglia tra  innamorati in cui lei si dimostra freddina e offesa,  mentre lui, ritornato dopo averla lasciata da sola per tre anni, scherzosamente  finge di non conoscerla e le chiede di sposarlo perchè  affascinato dalle sue grazie! Così alla fine lei cede e parafrasando Shakespeare dice “If you be he,  and your name is Riley..

Peggy  Seeger in “Heading for home”  2003


Pete Seeger in “Darling Corey/Goofing-Off Suite” 1993


I
As I walked out  one morning early
To take the  sweet and pleasant air
Who should I  spy but a fair young lady
Her cheeks  being like a lily fair.
II
I stepped up to  her, right boldly asking
Would she be a  sailor’s wife?
O no, kind sir, I’d rather tarry
And remain single for all my life.
III
Tell me, kind  miss, and what makes you differ
From all the rest of womankind?
I see you’re  fair, you are young, you’re handsome
And for to  marry might be inclined.
IV
The truth, kind  sir, I will plainly tell you
I might have  married three years ago
To one John  Riley who left this country
He is the cause of all my woe.
V
Come along with  me, don’t you think on Riley, Come along with  me to some distant shore;
We will set sail for Pennsylvanie
Adieu, sweet  England, forevermore.
VI
I’ll not go  with you to Pennsylvanie
I’ll not go  with you that distant shore;
My heart’s with  Riley, I will ne’er forget him
Although I may  never see him no more.
VII
And when he  seen she truly loved him
He give her  kisses, one two and three,
Says, I am  Riley, your own true lover
That’s been the  cause of your misery.
VIII
If you be he,  and your name is Riley,
I’ll go with  you to that distant shore.
We will set  sail to Pennsylvanie,
Adieu, kind friends, forevermore.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo di mattina presto
per prendere una boccata d’aria fresca
ho visto una  bella giovinetta
dalle guance del pallor di giglio.
II
Mi sono fermato facendomi coraggio per chiederle
Volete essere la sposa di un marinaio?
O no,  signore, piuttosto
resto sola per tutta la mia vita!
III
Ditemi,  gentile signorina, che cosa vi differisce
dal resto del genere femminile? 
Eppure voi siete bella e giovane e cara
e siete di certo incline al matrimonio
IV
In verità, gentile signore, vi parlerò chiaro:
avrei potuto sposarmi  tre anni fa
con John Riley che lasciò questo paese 
causandomi un grande dolore
V
Venite con me, e non pensate a Riley,
venite  con me in qualche lido lontano, 
salperemo per la Pensilvania 
e addio alla dolce Inghilterra per sempre
VI
Io non andrò con voi in Pensilvania
e non  verrò con voi in qualche lido lontano,
il mio cuore è di Riley e non lo scorderò mai,
anche se non potrò mai più rivederlo
VII
E quando vide  che lei era sinceramente innamorata di lui le diede uno, due e tre baci
Io sono Riley, il tuo vero amore
che è stato causa del  tuo dolore
VIII
Se siete lui e il vostro nome è Riley 
verrò con voi per qualche lido lontano,
salperò per la Pensilvania. 
Addio cari amici, per sempre!

TERZA MELODIA

In questa versione testuale l’identificazione  dell’uomo viene avvallata dall’anello che probabilmente i due fidanzatini si erano scambiati  come pegno d’amore prima della partenza. Una bella versione in stile Celtic Bluegrass!

Tim  O’Brien in Fiddler’s Green 2005


I
Pretty fair  maid was in her garden
When a stranger came a-riding by
He came up to the gate and called her
Said pretty  fair maid would you be my bride
She said I’ve a true love who’s in the army
And he’s been gone for seven long years
And if he’s  gone for seven years longer
I’ll still be waiting for him here
II
Perhaps he’s on some watercourse drowning
Perhaps he’s on some battlefield slain
Perhaps he’s to a fair girl married
And you may never see him again
Well if he’s  drown, I hope he’s happy
Or if he’s on some battlefield slain
And if he’s to some fair girl married
I’ll love the girl that married him
III
He took his hand out of his pocket
And on his finger he wore a golden ring
And when she saw that band a-shining
A brand new song her heart did sing
And then he  threw his arms all around her
Kisses gave her one, two, three
Said I’m your true and loving soldier
That’s come  back home to marry thee
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Una bella giovane  fanciulla era nel giardino quando un forestiero a cavallo
venne al cancello e  la chiamò
Disse “Bella fanciulla vuoi sposarmi?”
e lei rispose ”  Ho un amore che è militare,
ed è via da sette anni,
e anche se starà via  altri sette anni
lo aspetterò ancora qui”
II
“Forse è  annegato in qualche fiume
o deceduto su qualche campo di battaglia
o magari  ha sposato una bella ragazza
e tu potresti non vederlo più”
«Se lui è annegato  spero sia felice,
o se è caduto in qualche campo di battaglia;
e se ha  sposato un’altra bella ragazza,
io amerò la ragazza che lo ha sposato ”
III
Lui si tolse la mano  dalla tasca
e al dito portava un anello d’oro (1)
e quando lei vide quella verga  brillare
una nuova canzone il suo cuore cantò
e allora lui l’abbracciò
e le  diede uno, due e tre baci
“Io sono il tuo amato soldato
che è ritornato  per sposarti”

NOTE
1) è il segno di riconoscimento, l’anello che si sono scambiati il giorno della partenza

FONTI
http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/The%20constant%20maids%20resolution:%20or%20The%20damsels%20loyal%20love%20to%20a%20seaman
http://die-augenweide.de/byrds/songjk/john_riley.htm
http://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/john-riley
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN37.html
http://www.folklorist.org/song/John_(George)_Riley_(I)
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_38.htm

Fair Maid in the Garden: la ballata di John Riley

Read the post in English

TITOLI: Fair Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

La ballata è stata resa popolare con il titolo di John Reily da Joan Baez negli anni 60 (un bel po’ di gruppi la proposero in quel decennio tra cui Simon&Garfunkel, Judi Collins ): è una classica storia d’amore di probabili origini seicentesche, in cui la donna resta fedele al suo amante o promesso sposo partito per la guerra o imbarcato su un vascello. La canzone viene classificata come reily ballad  perchè è strutturata in forma di dialogo tra il protagonista (sotto mentite spoglie) in genere chiamato John o George, Willie o Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) e la donna, specchiato esempio di fedeltà, e spesso compare un segno di riconoscimento ad esempio un dono scambiato o un oggetto spezzato a metà (altri esempi: “Her mantle so green“, “The Banks of Claudy“).

When-All-the-World-was-Young-PyleNella maggior parte di queste storie l’uomo ritorna dopo molto tempo e, non riconosciuto dalla donna, mette alla prova la sua fedeltà corteggiandola. Ma la fanciulla rifiuta dicendo di non potergli dare il suo cuore perchè è in attesa del ritorno del suo vero amore. L’uomo così rassicurato, si rivela alla donna e i due coronano il loro amore con il matrimonio.
La storia richiama le figure archetipe di Ulisse e Penelope, quando Ulisse, che ritorna dopo vent’anni dalla guerra (e dalle sue peripezie nei mari) alla sua Itaca sotto mentite spoglie, non è riconosciuto dalla moglie, e la interroga per mettere alla prova la sua fedeltà. E’ anche un tipico tema da romanzo, sugli uomini che ritornano dalla guerra cambiati nel fisico e nella psiche o che sono palesemente un’altra persona, accettata nonostante tutto dalla moglie per lo più per motivi pratici; la moglie finisce poi per preferire questa nuova o diversa persona al precedente marito!

L’origine del tema nella balladry inglese e americana è stata identificata nella ballata seicentesca dal titolo “The constant maids resolution: or The damsels loyal love to a seaman” ritrovata sotto il titolo di “The Constant Damsel” nel “The Vocal Enchantress” (Dublino 1791) e in varie pubblicazioni americane ottocentesche sotto vari titoli. Molte sono le versioni testuali con piccole variazioni abbinate a diverse melodie

PRIMA MELODIA: JOHN RILEY

Pur essendo un brano tradizionale è stato accreditato a Rick Neff e Bob Gibson (dei Byrds, la versione americana dei Beatles), nell’album “Fifth Dimension” del 1966 (vedi): in realtà la canzone era già stata registrata dalla folk singer americana Joan Baez nel suo secondo album  pubblicato nel 1960 con il titolo di “John Riley“; le note riportano brano tradizionale, arrangiamento di Joan Baez, è la sua versione ad essere diventata uno standard.

Broceliande

Iernis


I
Fair young maid all in her garden,
strange young man passer-by, he said:
«Fair maid, will you marry me?».
This answer then was her reply:
II
‒ Οh, no, kind   sir, I cannot marry thee,
for I’ve a love and he sails the sea.
Though he’s been gone for seven years,
still no man shall marry me.
III
‒ What if he’s in some battle slain
or if he’s drowned in the deep salt sea?
What if he’s found another love
and he and his love both married be?
IV
‒ Well, if he’s in some battle slain
I will die when the moon doth wane.
And if he’s drowned in the deep salt sea,
then I’ll be true to his memory.
V
And if he’s found another love
and he and his love both married be,
I wish them health and happiness,
where they dwell across the sea.
VI
He pickes her up in his arms so strong
and kisses gave her: One, two, three.
‒ Say weep no more, my own true love,
for I’m your long-lost John Riley!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Una bella giovane fanciulla era nel giardino
e un giovane forestiero le venne vicino
“Bella fanciulla, vuoi sposarmi?”
e con questa risposta replicò
II LEI
“Oh no, gentile signore, non posso sposarvi
Poiché io ho un amore per mare,
anche se è via ormai da sette anni, (1)
e non sposerò nessun altro uomo”

III LUI
“E se lui fosse stato ucciso in qualche battaglia
o annegato negli abissi salati dell’oceano,
o magari avesse trovato un altro amore
e si fossero sposati? ”
IV LEI
“Se è deceduto in qualche battaglia
io morirò al calar della luna
e se lui è annegato negli abissi salati dell’oceano,
sarò fedele alla sua memoria.
V
E se ha trovato un nuovo amore
e si è sposato con un’altra,
auguro loro salute e felicità,
ovunque vivano aldilà del mare ”
VI
Lui la prese tra le sue forti braccia
e le diede uno, due e tre baci
“Non piangere
più, amore mio
perchè io sono il tuo a lungo perduto John Riley”

NOTE
1) sette è un numero ricorrente nelle ballate per indicare la durata di una separazione. Il riferimento al numero sette non è casuale: è un numero magico o simbolico legato alla morte o al cambiamento. Un tempo la ferma del servizio militare durava sette anni, se un marito partiva per la guerra e non tornava entro i sette anni, la moglie poteva risposarsi.

seconda parte continua

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15555
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=67277

HER MANTEL SO GREEN

“Her Mantel So Green” è una  in ballata sullo sfondo delle guerre napoleoniche, in cui la donna deve testimoniare la sua fedeltà al fidanzato  partito per la guerra, disdegnando ogni altro corteggiatore. Nella maggior parte di queste storie l’uomo ritorna dopo molto tempo sotto mentite spoglie (una rivisitazione del ritorno di Ulisse dalla sua fedele e paziente Penelope).
La canzone viene classificata come reily ballad o broken token ballad perchè compare un segno di riconoscimento tra i due ad esempio un oggetto spezzato a metà o un dono scambiato (come in questo caso un anello). continua

charles-green-soldiers
Charles Green: la ragazza lasciata indietro 1880. Soldati che si imbarcano per le guerre napoleoniche

La canzone è strutturata in forma di dialogo tra il protagonista e la donna dal Mantello Verde . Il protagonista incontra la bella Nancy e le chiede di sposarlo, ma lei rifiuta graziosamente perchè è in attesa del ritorno del suo bel soldato partito per le guerre napoleoniche e che ha combattuto a Waterloo. Lui finge di aver conosciuto il ragazzo e di averlo visto morire nel campo di battaglia, ma non appena vede la ragazza che sta per essere colta da un malore, rivela la sua vera identità mostrandole l’anello.

ASCOLTA Sinead O’Connor nel Cd “Sean-Nós Nua“- 2002 (tranne la II strofa)

ASCOLTA un delicato arrangiamento di Kim Robertson (da I a VII)

Nella versione originaria la narrazione si svolge in 11 strofe


I
As I went out walking one morning in June,
To view the fair fields and the valleys in bloom,
I spied a pretty fair maid she appeared like a queen
With her costly fine robes and her mantle so green (1).
II
(I stood in amazement and was struck with surprise,
I thought her an angel that fell from the skies,
Her eyes were like diamonds, her cheeks like the rose,
She is one of the fairest that nature composed.)
III
Says I, “My pretty fair maid, won’t you come with me
We’ll both join in wedlock, and married we’ll be,
I’ll dress you in fine linen, you’ll appear like a queen,
With your costly fine robes and your mantle so green.”
IV
Says she “Now my Young man, you must be excused,
For I’ll wed with no man, so you must be refused;
To the green woods I will wander to shun all men’s view,
For the boy I love dearly lies in famed Waterloo.”
V
“Well if you’re not married, say your lover’s name
I fought in that battle, so I might know the same.”
“Draw near to my garment, and there you will see
His name is embroidered on my mantle so green.”
VI
In the ribbon of the mantle, there I did behold,
His name and his surname in letters of gold;
Young William O’Reilly appeared in my view
He was my chief comrade back in famed Waterloo.
VII
And as he lay dying I heard his last cry
‘If you were here, Lovely Nancy, I’d be willing to die;'(2)
And as I told her this story, in anguish she flew,
And the more that I told her, the paler she grew
VIII
So I smiled on my Nancy, “‘twas I broke your heart,
In your father’s garden that day we did part.
And this is the truth, and the truth I declare,
Oh here’s your love token the gold ring I wear.”
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre ero a passeggio un mattino di Giugno
per guardare i bei campi e le valli in fiore,
scorsi una graziosa fanciulla che sembrava una regina
con abiti preziosi e belli e il mantello così verde.
II
Stavo in contemplazione e fui colpito dalla sorpresa
credevo lei fosse un angelo caduto dal cielo,
gli occhi come diamanti, le guance come rose
era la più bella che Natura creò
III
Dissi io “Mia graziosa fanciulla volete venire con me?
Ci uniremo in matrimonio e saremmo sposati;
vi vestirò con del lino di qualità, voi sembrerete una regina
con i vostri abiti preziosi e belli e il manto così verde.
IV
Disse lei “Ora mio giovane signore, mi dovete scusare,
perché io non sposerò nessuno, così vi devo respingere;
per i boschi verdeggianti vagherò ed eviterò la vista degli uomini
perché il ragazzo che amo tanto, si trova nella famosa Waterloo”.
V
“Bene se voi non siete sposata, ditemi il nome del vostro amante.
Ho combattuto in quella battaglia, così potrei conoscerlo anch’io.”
“Disegnato sul mio vestito e dove potete vederlo,
il suo nome è ricamato sul mio mantello così verde”.
VI
Sul bordo del mantello là potevo ammirare
il nome e cognome in lettere dorate.
Il giovane William O’Riley apparve alla mia vista,
lui era il mio capo di camerata rimasto nella famosa Waterloo.
VII
E mentre lui giaceva morente, udivo il suo ultimo grido
“Se tu fossi qui amata Nancy sarei pronto a morire”
E mentre le raccontavo questa storia, lei cadeva in angoscia e più le raccontavo, più pallida lei diventava.
VIII
Così sorrisi alla mia Nancy, “Ti spezzai il cuore nel giardino di tuo padre, fu il giorno in cui dovemmo partire.
E questa è la verità e la verità che io affermo,
qui è il pegno del tuo amore l’anello dorato che porto”

 NOTE
1) come in molte canzoni d’amore le parafrasi nascondono l’amata nella verde terra d’Irlanda
2) la versione di Kim chiude la strofa con gli ultimi due versi della VIII: così  il giovane giura essere stato l’amico morto in battaglia ad avergli dato l’anello. E la ballata ha una chiusura ambigua. In queste versioni il canto prosegue con la fanciulla che  dice di voler sola a vagare per il bosco (“To the green woods I’ll wander, for the boy that I love,”)
E subito di seguito il verso un po’ ambiguo (“Rise up, lovely Nancy, your grief I’ll remove.”)
in italiano: “Alzati bella Nancy, il tuo dolore io cancellerò”

Si tratta del fantasma di William O’Riley che vuole consolarla per lasciarla libera di sposare il suo amico, o lo stesso William in carne ed ossa che si svela orami convinto del profondo amore che nutre Nancy per lui e deciso a interrompere il gioco crudele? “So I smiled on my Nancy, ‘twas I broke your heart, In your father’s garden that day we did part.

L’ultima strofa riporta la storia in terza persona, una caratteristica comune nelle canzoni del tempo, e accentua l’ambiguità della storia, aggiungendo fascino alla narrazione e alla sua interpretazione.
(This couple got married, I heard people say,
They had nobles attending on their wedding day;
Peace is proclaimed, and the war is all o’er,
You are welcome to my arms Nancy, for evermore.)
Questa coppia sposata, ho sentito dire,
ebbe dei nobili a partecipare al loro giorno di nozze
la pace è proclamata e la guerra è finita
che tu sia benvenuta tra le mie braccia Nancy, per sempre.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6681
https://thesession.org/tunes/2888