The importance of being.. Reily

Leggi in italiano

TITLES: A Fair Young Maid all in her Garden, There Was A Maid In Her Father’s Garden, Pretty, Fair Maid in the Garden, John Riley, Johnny Riley, The Broken Token, The Young and Single Sailor

Joan Baez popularised this ballad with John Reily title in the 60s:  it is a classic love story of probable seventeenth-century origins, in which the woman remains faithful to her lover or promised spouse who has gone to war or embarked on a vessel. The song is classified as reily ballad because it is structured as a dialogue between the protagonist  (in disguise) usually called John or George, Willie or Thomas Riley (Rally, Reilly) and the woman, example of loyalty ( first part)

SECOND MELODY

The text of this version reminds me of the Oscar Wild comedy, “The Importance of Being Earnest” Wilde’s contradictory to Shakespeare in the famous Juliet declaration on the name of Romeo:
“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

This is the melody in the American tradition as collected in the field (Providence, Kentucky) in the 30s by Alan Lomax. Joe Hickerson penned “There are two ballads titled “John (George)  Riley” in G. Malcolm Laws’s American Balladry  from British Broadsides (1957). In number N36, the returned man claims that  Riley was killed so as to test his lover’s steadfastness. In number N37,  which is our ballad, there is no such claim. Rather, he suggests they sail  away to Pennsylvania; when she refuses, he reveals his identity. In the many  versions found, the man’s last name is spelled in various ways, and in some  cases he is “Young Riley.” Several scholars cite a possible origin  in “The Constant Damsel,” published in a 1791 Dublin songbook.
Peggy’s learned the song in childhood from a field  recording in the Library of Congress Folk Archive: AFS 1504B1 as sung by Mrs.  Lucy Garrison and recorded by Alan and Elizabeth Lomax in Providence,  Kentucky, in 1937. This was transcribed by Ruth Crawford Seeger and included  in John and Alan Lomax’s Our Singing Country (1941), p. 168. Previously, the  first verse and melody as collected from Mrs. Garrison at Little Goose Creek,  Manchester, Clay Co., Kentucky, in 1917 appeared in Cecil Sharp’s English  Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians (1932), vol. 2, p. 22. Peggy’s  singing is listed as the source for the ballad on pp. 161-162 of Alan Lomax’s  The Folk Songs of North America in the English Language (1960), with  “melodies and guitar chords transcribed by Peggy Seeger.” In 1964  it appeared on p. 39 of Peggy’s Folk Songs of Peggy Seeger (Oak Publications.  edited by Ethel Raim). Peggy recorded it on  Folk-Lyric FL114, American Folk Songs for Banjo and her brother Pete included  this version on his first Folkways LP, FP 3 (FA 2003), Darling Corey (1950).” (from here)

The dialogue between them seems more like a skirmish between lovers in which she proves to be chilly and offended, while he, returned after leaving her alone for three years, jokingly pretends not to know her and asks her to marry him because he is fascinated by his graces! So in the end she yields and paraphrasing Shakespeare says “If you be he,  and your name is Riley..

Peggy  Seeger in “Heading for home”  2003


Pete Seeger in “Darling Corey/Goofing-Off Suite” 1993

Peggy  Seeger version
I
As I walked out  one morning early
To take the  sweet and pleasant air
Who should I  spy but a fair young lady
Her cheeks  being like a lily fair.
II
I stepped up to  her, right boldly asking
Would she be a  sailor’s wife?
O no, kind sir, I’d rather tarry
And remain single for all my life.
III
Tell me, kind  miss, and what makes you differ
From all the rest of womankind?
I see you’re  fair, you are young, you’re handsome
And for to  marry might be inclined.
IV
The truth, kind  sir, I will plainly tell you
I might have  married three years ago
To one John  Riley who left this country
He is the cause of all my woe.
V
Come along with  me, don’t you think on Riley,
Come along with  me to some distant shore;
We will set sail for Pennsylvanie
Adieu, sweet  England, forevermore.
VI
I’ll not go  with you to Pennsylvanie
I’ll not go  with you that distant shore;
My heart’s with  Riley, I will ne’er forget him
Although I may  never see him no more.
VII
And when he  seen she truly loved him
He give her  kisses, one two and three,
Says, I am  Riley, your own true lover
That’s been the  cause of your misery.
VIII
If you be he,  and your name is Riley,
I’ll go with  you to that distant shore.
We will set  sail to Pennsylvanie,
Adieu, kind friends, forevermore.

THIRD MELODY

In this version the identification is based on the ring that probably the two sweethearts had exchanged as a token of love before departure. A beautiful Celtic Bluegrass style version!

Tim  O’Brien in Fiddler’s Green 2005

I
Pretty fair  maid was in her garden
When a stranger came a-riding by
He came up to the gate and called her
Said pretty  fair maid would you be my bride
She said I’ve a true love who’s in the army
And he’s been gone for seven long years
And if he’s  gone for seven years longer
I’ll still be waiting for him here
II
Perhaps he’s on some watercourse drowning
Perhaps he’s on some battlefield slain
Perhaps he’s to a fair girl married
And you may never see him again
Well if he’s  drown, I hope he’s happy
Or if he’s on some battlefield slain
And if he’s to some fair girl married
I’ll love the girl that married him
III
He took his hand out of his pocket
And on his finger he wore a golden ring (1)
And when she saw that band a-shining
A brand new song her heart did sing
And then he  threw his arms all around her
Kisses gave her one, two, three
Said I’m your true and loving soldier
That’s come  back home to marry thee
NOTE
1)  the ring that they exchanged on the day of departure

SOURCES
http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/The%20constant%20maids%20resolution:%20or%20The%20damsels%20loyal%20love%20to%20a%20seaman
http://die-augenweide.de/byrds/songjk/john_riley.htm
http://peggyseeger.bandcamp.com/track/john-riley
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LN37.html
http://www.folklorist.org/song/John_(George)_Riley_(I)
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_38.htm

The Animal Carol (Carol delle Bestie)

“The Friendly Beasts”, “The Song of the Ass”, “The Donkey Carol”, “The Animal Carol” or “The Gift of the Animals”, “The Gifts They Gave” is the English version of “Orientis Partibus” the Donkey carol chanted in the Church for the Feast of the Donkey.
“The Friendly Beasts”, “The Song of the Ass”, “The Donkey Carol”, “The Animal Carol” o “The Gift of the Animals”, “The Gifts They Gave” è la versione inglese di Orientis Partibus il canto dell’Asino salmodiato in Chiesa per la Festa dell’Asinello.

The English version was written only much more recently by Robert Davis (1881-1950), but it is only a Christmas song completely disconnected from its collegiate and carnival context.
Burl Ives included the song on his 1952 album Christmas Day in the Morning. Since then, it has been recorded by many other artists, including Harry Belafonte, Johnny Cash, Danny Taddei, Peter, Paul and Mary, and Sufjan Stevens.

La versione inglese fu scritta solo molto più recentemente da Robert Davis (1881-1950), ma è solo una canzoncina natalizia completamente scollegata dal suo contesto goliardico e carnascialesco. Burl Ives ha registrato la canzone nel suo album “Christmas Day in the Morning” (1952). Da allora, il brano è stato registrato da molti altri artisti, tra cui Harry Belafonte, Johnny Cash, Danny Taddei, Peter, Paul e Mary e Sufjan Stevens.
The initials six stanzas (donkey, cow, sheep, dove) were then integrated with further verses that include the most varied animals: camel, cat, dog, mouse, spider ..
Le iniziali sei strofe (asinello, mucca, pecora, colomba)  sono state poi integrate con ulteriori versi che comprendono i più svariati animali: cammello, gatto, cane, topo, ragno..

Johnny Cash in The Christmas Spirit 1963

Pete Seeger

The Lagos City Chorale An Igbo Christmas Carol (The Animal Carol)


I
Jesus, our Brother, strong and good,
Was humbly born in a stable rude,
And the friendly beasts around Him stood,
Jesus, our Brother, strong and good.
II
“I,” said the donkey, shaggy and brown,
“I carried your(1) mother uphill and down,
I carried your mother to Bethlehem town;
I,” said the donkey, shaggy and brown.
III
“I,” said the cow, all white and red,
“I gave you (2) my manger for your bed,
I gave you hay to pillow your head;
I,” said the cow, all white and red.
IV
“I,” said the sheep with curly horn,
“I gave you my wool for a blanket warm,
you wore my coat on Christmas morn;
I,” said the sheep with curly horn.
V
“I,” said the dove, from the rafters high,
“I cooed you to sleep that you should not cry,
we cooed you to sleep, my love and I;
I,” said the dove, from the rafters high.
VI
And “I” said the camel all yellow and black
“Over the desert upon my back
I brought him a gift in the wise men’s pack”
“I” said the camel all yellow and black
VII
“I” said the cat with velvet fur,
“Curled at his feet and for him did purr,
warming his toes so he nedd not stir”
“I” said the cat with velvet fur
VIII
Thus all the beasts, by some good spell (4),
in the stable dark were glad to tell
of the gifts they gave Emmanuel,
the gifts they gave Emmanuel.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Gesù fratello buono e gentile
nacque in un umido e piccolo ovile
attorno a lui gli animali amici a stavano a gioire
Gesù fratello buono e gentile
II
Io -disse l’asino scuro e arruffato-
Io la madre per monti e per valli ho portato
Io la madre a Betlemme ho portato
Io -disse l’asino scuro e arruffato-
III
Io – disse la mucca pezzata (3) –
io ti ho dato la mangiatoia per il letto
io ti ho dato il fieno per la testata
Io – disse la mucca pezzata –
IV
Io – disse la pecora dalle  corna ricurve-
io ti ho dato la mia lana per una coperta calda
da indossare la mattina di Natale
Io – disse la pecora dalle  corna ricurve
V
Io – disse la colomba dalle travi lassù-
io ho tubato sul tuo sonno perchè non piangessi,/ abbiamo tubato sul tuo sonno, il mio compagno ed io;
Io – disse la colomba dalle travi lassù
VI
Io – disse il cammello giallo e nero-
attraverso il deserto sulla mia schiena
ho portato per lui un dono nel bagaglio dei re Magi
Io – disse il cammello giallo e nero
VII
Io -disse il gatto con la pelliccia di velluto
mi sono acciambellato ai suoi piedi e per lui ho fatto le fusa
scaldando le sue dita per non farlo tremare,
Io -disse il gatto con la pelliccia di velluto
VIII
E così tutti gli animali, grazie a un incantesimo,
nella buia stalla erano felici di raccontare
il dono che diedero a Gesù
il dono che diedero a Gesù

NOTE
1) or his
2) or him
3) letteralmente bianca e rossa
4) In the popular tradition the night of the birth of Jesus is a magical night and the animals can speak, as well as at Epiphany. For the man, however, it is risky to spy on animals and listening, often in fact they announce the death of the victim. They feeded their animals well on the night before Christmas to prevent them from talking badly about their masters.
nella tradizione popolare la notte della nascita di Gesù è una notte magica e gli animali possono parlare, così pure all’Epifania.  Per l’uomo però è rischioso spiare gli animali per stare ad ascoltare, spesso infatti annunciano la morte del malcapitato. Era consuetudine nutrire bene i propri animali la notte della vigilia per evitare che parlassero male dei loro padroni.

LINK
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/friendly_beasts.htm
http://www.ramshornstudio.com/carol_of_the_beasts.htm
http://www.sharefollowserve.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/The-Friendly-Beasts.pdf

The Coasts of High Barbary

Leggi in italiano

The George Aloe and the Sweepstake o (The Coasts of) High Barbary is considered both a sea shanty and a ballad (Child ballad # 285) and certainly its original version is very old and probably from the 16th century. So ‘in the seventeenth-century comedy “The Two Noble Kinsmen” we read: “The George Alow came from the south, From the coast of Barbary-a; And there he met with brave gallants of war, By one, by two, by three-a. Well hail’d, well hail’d, you jolly gallants! And whither now are you bound-a? O let me have your company”

French_ship_under_atack_by_barbary_pirates

BARBARY PIRATES

The Muslim pirates of the African coasts came from what the Europeans called Barbary or Algeria Tunisia, Libya, Morocco (and more precisely the city-states of Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli, but also the ports of Salé and Tetuan).
The most correct definition is barbarian pirates because they attacked only the ships of Christian Europe (also doing raids in the Christian countries of the Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean to get slaves or to get the best redemptions). The term included Arabs, Berbers, Turks as well as European renegades.
In the affair there were also for good measure the Christian corsairs, which carried out the same raids along the coasts of Barbary (mainly the orders of chivalry of the Knights of Malta and the Knights of St. Stephen, but obviously in these cases it was a matter of “crusade” and not piracy !!

Although pirate activities were endemic in the Mediterranean Sea, the period of maximum activity of the barbarian pirates was the first half of the 1600s.

FIRST VERSION: a forebitter

Stan Hugill in his bible “Shanties From The Seven Seas” shows two melodies: one more ancient when the song was a forebitter and a faster one as a capstan chantey.
The oldest version of the ballad tells of two merchant ships The George Aloe, and The Sweepstake with George Aloe who avenges the sinking of the second ship using the same “courtesy” to the crew of the French pirate ship who had thrown into the sea the Sweepstake crew.
Pete Seeger

Joseph Arthur from  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (biography and records here) rock version

There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin’ down the coast
Of High Barbary
“Aloft there, aloft there”
Our jolly bosun cried
“Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an’ a-lee”
“There’s naught upon the stern, sir
There’s naught upon our lee
But there’s a lofty ship to wind’ard
An’ she’s sailin’ fast and free”
“Oh hail her, oh hail her”
Our gallant captain cried
“Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?” cried he
“Oh, I’m not a man-o-war
Nor privateer,” said he
“But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee”
For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
‘Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate’s mast away
“Oh quarter, oh quarter”
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank ‘em in the sea

SECOND VERSION: a sea shanty

The ballad resumed popularity in the years between 1795 and 1815 in conjunction with the attacks of Barbary pirates to American ships.

Tom Kines from “Songs from Shakespeare´s Plays and Songs of His Time”,1960
a version of how it was sung in the Elizabethan era

Quadriga Consort from Ships Ahoy 2013

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag  sea shanty version

The Shanty Crew

“Look ahead, look-astern
Look the weather in the lee!”
Blow high! Blow low!
And so sailed we.

“I see a wreck to windward,
And a lofty ship to lee!
A-sailing down along
The coast of High Barbary”
“O, are you a pirate
Or a man o’ war?” cried we.
“O no! I’m not a pirate
But a man-o-war,” cried he.
“We’ll back up our topsails
And heave vessel to.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you”.
For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate’s mast away.
“For quarter, for quarter”,
the saucy pirates cried
But the quarter that we showed them
was to sink them in the tide
With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea
But O! ‘Twas a cruel sight,
and grieved us, full sore,
To see them all a drownin’
as they tried to swim to shore

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/england/barbary.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=137331 https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/barbaree.html http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/barbareschi.htm http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/pirati.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_285

My Bonnie Highland Lassie sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

Under the title Hieland laddie (Highland lassie) a series of texts are grouped with the same melody (a traditional Scottish air) entitled “If thou’t play me fair play” or “The Lass of Livingston”

“Tune first published under the title “Cockleshell” in Playford‘s “Apollo’s Banquet” (London, 1690) and “Dancing Master”, 11th edition of 1701. It then appears in the “Drummond Castle Manuscript”, inscribed “A collection of Country Dances written for the use of His Grace the Duke of Perth, By Dav. Young, 1734.”
Earliest printing in Robert Bremner (1720 – 1789, music seller in Edinburgh) ‘s 1757 Collection” (from here)

MILITARY MARCH

In Scotland, the “marcing song” is synonymous with bagpipes! “Hieland laddie” was the march of all Scottish regiments before “Scotland the Brave”.

THE SCOTTISH DANCE

A particularly energetic dance competition

SEA SHANTY: Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie)

The melody was also used as a capstan and a “stamp and go” shanty, and (without the grand chorus) as a halyard shanty. It was popular on the Dundee Whalers, then later used (c. 1830’s and 40’s) as a work song for stowing lumber and cotton in the Southeastern and Gulf ports of the United States. Highland Laddie was used for long and slow maneuvers: hoisting sails above (2 pulls per chorus) or hauling up the anchor. It was sung in two voices: a solo asking the question (Where have been ye all the day, my Bonnie Laddie Hieland?) and the answer given in chorus by the crew (Way hay and away we go, Bonnie Laddie, Laddie Hieland). (from here)

Pete Seeger live

I
Was you ever in Quebec?
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
Stowing timber on the deck,
My bonny Highland laddie.
CHORUS
High-ho, and away we goes,
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
High-ho, and away we goes,
My bonny Highland laddie.

II
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen(1).
III
Was you ever in Baltimore
Dancing on the sanded floor?
IV
Was you ever in Callao(2)
Where the girls are never slow?
V
Was you ever in Merasheen(3)
Where you stayed fast to tree(4)?

NOTES
1) scottish song and scottish beauty
2) large port of Peru
3) or Merrimashee: there is an island of Merasheen in Newfoundland (Canada), but more likely is Miramichi, a small town in Canada, located in the province of New Brunswick; Merrimashee is also a large river that gives its name to the bay where flows into the Gulf of San Lorenzo. Often the sailors crippled the names of the places that they  did not know.
Italo Ottonello found this note: Merasheen, located on the southwestern tip of Merasheen Island in Placentia Bay, was one of the larger and more prosperous communities resettled. Settled by English, Irish and Scottish in the late 18th century, the community eventually became predominantly Roman Catholic with families of Irish descent. In an ideal location to prosecute the inshore cod fishery along with the herring and lobster fisheries in the ice-free harbour during winter and spring, it appeared that Merasheen would not succumb to the same fate as other small resettled communities.
This is how Ottonello observes: “it seems to hint at a generic stormy place, rather than a particular site”.
4) or “you tie up to a tree”, “Where you make fast to a tree”;

The Kingston Trio.
The checked stanzas are an addition of the group

Was you ever in Quebec
Bonny Laddie, Hielan’ laddie
Stowing timber on the deck
Bonny Hielan’ Laddie

Was you ever in Dundee
There some pretty ships you’ll see
“This Boston town don’t suit my notion
And I’m bound for far away
So, I’ll pack my bag and sail the ocean
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Mobile Bay
Loading cotton by the day
Was you ever ‘round Cape Horn
With the Lion and the Unicorn (1)
“One of these days and it won’t be long
And I’m bound for far away
You’ll take a look around and find me gone
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Monterey
On that town with three months pay
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen
“Farewell, dear friends, I’m leaving soon
And I’m bound for far away
We’ll meet again this coming June
And I’ll see you on another day”

NOTES
1) it is the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom, the lion symbolizes England and the unicorn of Scotland;

Bonnie Highland Lassie

Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage from Assassin’s Creed Rogue (sea shanty edition)

I
Were you ever in Roundstone Town (1)?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Roundstone Town?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Roundstone Town
Drinking milk and eating flour
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o
II
Were you ever in Bombay
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Bombay
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in old Bombay
Drinking coffee and bohay (2)
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

III
Were you ever in Quebec?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Quebec?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Quebec
Stowing timber up on deck
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o
IV
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I am fit to sweep the floor
As the lock is for the door
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

NOTE
1) Roundstone is a small fishing village near Connemara (County Galway)
2) Roundstone is a small fishing village near Connemara (County Galway)
2) bohea is a blend of black tea originating in the Wuyi mountain region of southeastern China; in practice it was once synonymous with tea

LINK
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hielladd.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/danze-scozzesi.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bonnie-hieland-lassie.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/wasuever.htm
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/1524
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_laddiegone.htm
http://compvid101.blogspot.it/2009/11/ktpete-seegertommy-makemludwig-von.html
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/donkey-riding.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/donkeyriding.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41062
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54643
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/h/hielandl.html
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/3031lyr5.htm

SWEET ROSEANNA

Fu Alan Lomax a registrare sul campo il canto di pescatori della Virginia e ad arrangiarlo come canto folk dal titolo “Sweet Roseanna” per il  Bright Light Quartette  (copyright 1960).
A metà tra il walzer lento e la ninna-nanna il canto era una volta utilizzato dai pescatori per coordinare gli sforzi nel tirare su le reti piene di pesci. Tutto sommato un canto triste per dirla con parole di Francesco De Gregori “Recuperavano le reti i pescatori e si sentiva cantare un canto, ma erano acqua le parole ed era triste quel canto…”  (in Miramare) Le strofe sono quanto mai varie, secondo l’estro dello shantyman.

ASCOLTA Elvis Perkins live 2010
ASCOLTA Pete Seeger & Arlo Guthrie live 1975 che adattava le strofe ai contesti in cui si trovava a cantare interagendo con il pubblico

ASCOLTA John Reilly & Friends live 2013

Sweet Roseanne, sweet Roseanne,
Bye-bye sweet Roseanna.
I thought I heard my baby say:
I won’t be home tomorrow.

Sweet Roseanne, my darlin’ child,
Bye-bye sweet Roseanna.
Sweet Roseanne, my darlin’ child,
I won’t be home tomorrow.

CHORUS
Bye-bye, bye-bye, bye-bye, bye-bye
Bye-bye sweet Roseanna.
Bye-bye, bye-bye, bye-bye, bye-bye
I won’t be home tomorrow.
The steamboat’s comin’ ‘round the bend,
Bye-bye sweet Roseanna.
She’s loaded down with harvestmen,
I won’t be home tomorrow.

Don’t you want to go home on your next payday?
Bye-bye sweet Roseanna.
Don’t you want to go home on your next payday?
I won’t be home tomorrow.

I’m goin’ away but not to stay,
Bye-bye sweet Roseanna.
I’m goin’ away but not to stay,
I won’t be home tomorrow.

ASCOLTA Kimsbersmen Scarica mp3


Oh, Ro-se-anne, sweet Ro-se-anne,
Bye bye my Ro-se-an-na
I’m goin’ away, but not to stay, (1)
And I won’t be home tomorrow.
A dollar a day’s a sailor(fishermen)’s pay
It’s easy come, easy slip (go) away
We’ll leave the port at the break of day(2)
we’ll sailing out across the bay (3)
Our ship (4) is sailing (coming) around the bend (5)
It(she)’s loaded down with fishermen (6)
TRADUZIONE
Oh Rosanna cara Rosanna
arrivederci mia Rosanna
vado via e non resterò
non sarò a casa domani
Un dollaro al giorno è una paga da marinai (pescatori)
è facile arrivare, è facile andare via.
Lasceremo il porto al sorgere
dell’alba
navigheremo per la baia.
La nostra nave è pronta alla partenza
è tutta piena di pescatori

Note
1) oppure “I’ll see you again but I dont know when”
2)” Were bound away at the break of day” oppure “We won’t be back for many a day”
3)” Around cape horn we’ll make our way” oppure “We’re sailing North, across the bay”
4) the boats oppure The steam boat
5) oppure “from Southend”
6) harvest men

ASCOLTA The Brothers Four in BMOC 1961


Sweet, Ro-sy-anne, my darlin’ child
The ocean is a sailor’ bride
We’ll cast out nets on the ocean blue
with every cast I’ll think of you
I though I heard the ocean (old man) said
Don’t you want to go home on your next payday? (7)
TRADUZIONE
Cara Rosanna, mia bambolina
l’oceano è la sposa del marinaio
getteremo le nostre reti nell’oceano azzurro
ho sentito il capitano dire:
non volete andare a casa il prossimo giorno di paga?

Note
7) We won’t be back till next payday

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6076
http://bartonpara.com/bp/wp-content/audio/lr/lr19.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/roseanna.htm

Gypsy Davy (Davey)

A traditional ballad about gypsies and the charm of the “exotic”: a beautiful lady abandons her husband to follow a gypsy, and although pursued and recalled to her responsibilities by her husband, she refuses to go home
From Scotland the ballad spread to England, Ireland and America in a great variety of lyrics and melodies.
Una ballata tradizionale sugli zingari e il fascino dell’”esotico”: una bella lady abbandona il marito per seguire un fascinoso zingaro, e sebbene inseguita e richiamata alle sue responsabilità dal marito, si rifiuta di tornare a casa.
Dalla Scozia la ballata si diffuse in Inghilterra, Irlanda e America in una grande varietà di testi e melodie.

Johnny Deep nel ruolo di Caesar nel film "The man who cried" - L'uomo che pianse 2000 Story background
SCOTTISH VERSIONS
RAGGLE TAGGLE GISPY (standard version)
THE ROVIN PLOUGHBOY (Bothy Ballads version)
JOHNNY FAA – THREE GYPSIES
 – Child #200 A
GYSPY LADDIE – SEVEN YELLOW GYPSIES – Child #200 B

SEVEN GYPSIES english versions
The Whistling Gypsy irish version
Gypsy Davey (irish version)

AMERICAN VERSIONS:
Black Jack Davey
Gypsy Davvy (Peter Seeger, Woody Guthrie)
Gypsy Davvy (Doc Watson, Sandy Danny)
Roving Gypsy (Celtic Canada)

GYPSY DAVY

In America the name of the gypsy is no longer Johnny Faa as in Scotland but becomes Jack Davy (Davey), nicknamed the Black.
In America il nome dello zingaro non è più Johnny Faa come in Scozia ma diventa Jack Davy (Davey), soprannominato il Moro. 

There’s more to life than money and social position, but the strength of one’s own ideas and feelings “… no matter how many times we have been defeated but how many times we have maneged to get up and fight again; and it doesn’t matter how little the life has given us, if we have the richness of music that can sometimes really heal our soul … “(Peter Seeger)
Nella vita non contano solo i soldi e posizione sociale, ma la forza delle proprie idee e dei propri sentimenti:  “… non importa quante volte siamo stati battuti e siamo stati sconfitti ma quante volte siamo riusciti a rialzarci e a combattere di nuovo; e non importa quanto poco la vita ci abbia dato se abbiamo la ricchezza della musica che può veramente, a volte, guarirci l’anima…” (Peter Seeger)

Pete Seeger in American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 3

Woody Guthrie

Arlo Guthrie

David Hawkins (voce, ghitarra) & Clark Sommers (contrabbasso) 2014


I
It was late last night when the boss came home
askin’ for his lady
The only answer that he got,
“She’s gone with the Gypsy Davey,
She’s gone with the Gypsy Dave.”
II
Go saddle for me a buckskin horse
And a hundred dollar saddle.
Point out to me their wagon tracks
And after them I’ll travel,
After them I’ll ride.
III
Well I had not rode to the midnight moon,
When I saw the campfire gleaming.
I heard the notes of the big guitar
And the voice of the gypsies singing
That song of the Gypsy Dave.
IV
There in the light of the camping fire,
I saw her fair face beaming.
Her heart in tune with the big guitar
And the voice of the gypsies singing
That song of the Gypsy Dave.
V
Have you forsaken your house and home?
Have you forsaken your baby?
Have you forsaken your husband dear
To go with the Gypsy Davy?
And sing with the Gypsy Davy?
The song of the Gypsy Dave?
VI
Yes I’ve forsaken my husband dear
To go with the Gypsy Davy,
And I’ve forsaken my mansion high
But not my blue-eyed baby,
Not my blue-eyed baby.
VII
She smiled to leave her husband dear
And go with the Gypsy Davy;
But the tears come a-trickling down her cheeks
To think of the blue-eyed baby,
Pretty little blue-eyed baby.
VIII
Take off, take off your buckskin gloves
Made of Spanish leather;
Give to me your lily-white hair
And we’ll ride home together
We’ll ride home again.
IX
No, I won’t take off my buckskin gloves,
They’re made of Spanish leather.
I’ll go my way from day to day
And sing with the Gypsy Davy
That song of the Gypsy Davy,
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Era sera tardi quando il marito giunse a casa
e chiese della sua signora
e la sola risposta fu
“Se n’è andata con lo zingaro Davey,
se n’è andata con lo zingaro Dave”
II
“Sellatemi il cavallo color camoscio
con la sella da cento dollari
mostratemi le tracce dei carozzoni
e dietro a loro viaggerò
li correrò dietro”
III
Non cavalcai che fino a mezzanotte
quando vidi i fuochi dell’accampamento
e udii le note del chitarrone
e la voce degli zingari cantare
quella canzone dello zingaro Dave
IV
Là nella luce del fuoco dell’accampamento
vidi il volto di lei brillare
il suo cuore in sintonia con il chitarrone
e la voce degli zingari cantare
quella canzone dello zingaro Dave
V
“Hai abbandonato la tua casa e la tua famiglia
hai abbandonato il tuo bambino?
Hai abbandonato il tuo caro marito
per andare con Gypsy Davy?
e cantare con Gypsy Davy
la canzone di con Gypsy Davy”
Vi
“Sì, ho abbandonato il mio caro marito
per andare con Gypsy Davy
e ho abbandonato la mia bella casa
ma non il mio bambino dagli occhi azzurri
non il mio bambino dagli occhi azzurri”
VII
Lei sorrise nel lasciate il suo caro marito
per andare con Gypsy Davy
ma le lacrime le colavano dalle guance
al pensiero del suo bambino dagli occhi azzurri, piccolo bimbo dagli occhi azzurri
VIII
“Togliti, togliti quei guanti color camoscio
fatti di pelle spagnola
dammi la tua mano bianca come giglio
e andremo a casa insieme
torneremo a casa insieme”
IX
“No, non mi tolgo i guanti color camoscio
fatti di pelle spagnola
prenderò la vita alla giornata
per cantare con Gypsy Davy
quella canzone di Gypsy Davy”

LINK
http://www.woodyguthrie.org/Lyrics/Gypsy_Davy.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/sandy.denny/songs/gypsydavey.html

LADY OF CARLISLE

Sull’origine della ballata “Lady of Carlisle” sono state fatte più illazioni che ricerche e forse la ballata ci giunge dal medioevo o forse dal Seicento. Di questa antica ballata resta oggi una versione in stile bluegrass, conservatasi presso le comunità  rurali dei Monti Appalachi. L’antecedente più prossimo è con buona probabilità d’origine tedesca: il poema di Schiller intitolato ‘Der Handshuh‘ (1797) che a sua volta è modellato su di un racconto aneddotico francese risalente al XVIII secolo sul toponimo di Rue des Lions a Parigi; per dare prova d’amore alla sua dama, un cavaliere si getta nella gabbia dei leoni (del serraglio reale) pur di riprende il guanto caduto. Schiller prese ispirazione da Les Mémoires de Messire Pierre de Bourdeilles, Seigneur de Brantôme (1666, Discours 10e) che dava per vera la storia come accaduta sotto il regno di Francesco I.

IL GUANTO DI FRIEDRICH VON SCHILLER

(tratto da qui)
Davanti al suo giardino dei leoni, in attesa di assistere alla lotta, sedeva il Re Francesco, e intorno a lui i Grandi del Regno, e in giro sulle alte balconate le dame facevano bella corona. E come lui fa cenno con un dito, si apre la grande gabbia e con passo cauto entra un leone, si guarda intorno silenzioso, con lunghi sbadigli, e scuote la criniera, e stira le membra, e si accuccia. A un nuovo cenno del re, si apre subito una seconda porta, da cui esce di corsa con salti selvaggi una tigre, e appena vede il leone, ruggisce forte descrive con la coda cerchi spaventosi, e allunga la lingua, e gira ombrosa intorno al leone ruggendo con rabbia, poi ringhiando si accuccia su un fianco. A un nuovo cenno del re saltano fuori da due gabbie aperte due leopardi contemporaneamente, che si lanciano con ardita voglia di lotta sulla tigre, che li afferra con le forti zampe, e il leone con un ruggito si rizza, poi si calma, e tutto intorno, vogliosi di uccidere, si muovono i feroci gattoni. Ed ecco, cade dalla balconata un guanto, da mano leggiadra, cade fra la tigre e il leone, proprio in mezzo. E al Cavaliere Delorges scherzando dispettosa si volge madamigella Cunegonda: “Cavaliere, se il vostro amore è così ardente come mi giurate ogni momento, andate a prendermi il guanto”. E il cavaliere corre veloce scende nella terribile gabbia con passo sicuro e dal punto più pericoloso prende il guanto con mano ardita. E con meraviglia e terrore guardano i cavalieri e le dame, e tranquillamente lui porta via il guanto, risuona la sua lode su ogni labbro, ma con dolce sguardo d’amore – che gli promette piaceri di voluttà – lo accoglie madamigella Cunegonda. E lui le getta il guanto in viso: “Ringraziamenti non ne voglio, madamigella”. E se ne va in quello stesso istante.

LA LADY SPIONAvan-dick-lucy-percy

Una nota lady, contessa di Carlise fu Lucy Percy (1599 -1660) una spia inglese di nobili natali. Fece parte della corte di Carlo I d’Inghilterra ed ebbe molti amanti; su di lei Alexandre Dumas modellò il personaggio di Milady per i suo romanzo d’appendice “I tre Moschettieri”.

Il gesto dovette sembrar molto romantico ai giovanotti del tempo, così varie versioni furono scritte nell’Ottocento tra cui una serie di broadside (vedi qui). Nelle ballate la prova d’amore diventa una contesa tra due pretendenti e il guanto è un più civettuolo ventaglio, accessorio inseparabile delle signore del Settecento/Ottocento.

Nella versione di Schiller la dama non ci faceva una bella figura ed era respinta dal cavaliere come donna superficiale e vanesia, mentre nella ballata è una donna più sensibile (che sviene davanti alla fossa dei leoni) e che non riuscendo a scegliere tra due valorosi soldati decide di dare il suo cuore a colui che le darà prova d’onore e di coraggio (e che la renderà di certo presto vedova).

E’ significativo tuttavia che l’oggetto gettato nella fossa dei leoni sia un ventaglio e non un guanto, entrato nella moda francese con Caterina de Medici e amato dalla regina Elisabetta I il ventaglio divenne  solo nel 1700 l’accessorio indispensabile di una dama. Ma in questo contesto il ventaglio è un simbolo?  Probabile, leggetevi quest’analisi di Michael Cope (qui)

This was another of the more than 700 songs Sam Henry collected in North Ulster and published week by week between 1924 and 1938 in The Northern Constitution of Coleraine, complete with brief notes and tonic sol-fa notation. The song seems to have been widespread in Ulster at one time and has also been well known in Scotland.
Cecil Sharp noted the earliest version of the story in a 17th century French autobiography, the events supposed to have actually happened at the court of François I. Sharp collected versions of the ballad in Somerset and in the Appalachians and it has also turned up widely along the north-eastern seaboard of the USA and Canada. Other titles for the song are The Fan and The Bold Lieutenant.” (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Pentangle in Solomon’s Seal (1972)
“Lady Of Carlisle” (traditional, arranged by Jansch, Renbourn, Thompson, Cox, McShee) — inizia a 30.05
In questo brano, con il quale si conclude il loro primo ciclo, i Pentangle tentano un ultimo ardito esperimento di mix di generi musicali. Il brano tradizionale è arrangiato come un roots blues del Sud degli Stati Uniti, con tanto di armoniche e chitarre suonate stile banjo, a testimoniare che anche gli influssi della musica tradizionale inglese hanno costituito il terreno di cultura da cui è nato il blues, e quindi il jazz e quindi il rock” (Alberto di Musica e Memoria tratto da  qui)

ASCOLTA Robert Hunter

ASCOLTA Pete Seeger con il titolo di “Down in Carlise”


I
Down in Carlisle there lived a lady
Being most beautiful and gay,
She was determined to stay a lady,
No man on earth could her betray.
II
Unless it was a man of honour
A man of honour and high degree,
And then approached two loving soldiers,
This fair lady for to see.
III
One being a brave lieutenant
A brave lieutenant and a man of war
The other being a brave (bold) sea captain,
Captain of the ship that come from afar.
IV
And hen up spoke this fair young lady,
Saying “I can’t be but one man’s bride,
if you’ll come back tomorrow morning,
On this case we will decide.”
V
She ordered her a span of horses
A span of horses at her command;
And down the road these three did travel
Till they come to the lions’ den.
VI
There they stopped and there they halted/These two soldiers stood gazing round;
And for the space of half an hour
That young lady lies speechless on the ground.
VII
And when she did recover,
Threw her fan  in the lions’ den
Saying, “Which of you to gain a lady
Will return her fan again?”
VIII
Then up spoke the brave lieutenant,
He raised his voice both loud and clear,
He said “You know I am a dear lover of women,
But I’ll not risk my life for love.”
IX
Then up spoke that brave sea captain.
He raised his voice both loud and high,
He said “You know I am a dear lover of women/ I will return her fan or die.”
X
Down in the lions’ den, he boldly entered,
The lions being both wild and fierce,
He marched around and in among them/ Safely returned her fan again.
XI
And when she saw her true lover coming
Seeing no harm had been done to him,
She threw herself against his bosom,
Saying, “Here is the prize that you have won.”
Traduzione riveduta da qui*
I
Laggiù nel Carlisle viveva una dama
era molto bella e gaia
decisa a restare una dama
nessun uomo sulla terra l’avrebbe ingannata.
II
A meno che fosse un uomo d’onore
un uomo d’onore e di alto lignaggio
E a quel punto arrivarono due uomini d’armi che volevano vedere questa bellissima dama.
III
Uno era un coraggioso tenente
un coraggioso tenente ed un uomo d’armi
L’altro era un coraggioso capitano, comandante della nave che era venuta da molto lontano
IV
Così parlo quella giovane e bella dama,
dicendo “Non posso essere che la sposa di uno solo, ma se voi tornerete domani mattina
a quel punto io deciderò”
V
Lei ordinò un tiro di cavalli
un tiro di cavalli al suo comando;
e giù lungo la strada i tre viaggiarono
finché arrivarono alla fossa dei leoni
VI
Lì si fermarono e lì si arrestarono
questi due soldati si rimirarono intorno
per una buona mezz’ora,
che quella giovane donna rimase a terra priva di sensi.
VII
E quando si riprese
gettò il suo ventaglio giù nella fossa dei leoni dicendo “Chi di voi per ottenere il favore di una dama
le riporterà il suo ventaglio?”
VIII
Allora parlò il coraggioso tenente
il suo tono di voce era forte e chiaro
egli disse “Voi sapete che amo le donne
ma non rischierò la mia vita per amore”
IX
Allora parlò il coraggioso capitano
il suo tono di voce era forte e chiaro
egli disse “Voi sapete che amo le donne
io riporterò il ventaglio o morirò”
X
Scese audacemente giù nella fossa dei leoni,
i leoni erano selvaggi e feroci
lui sfilò attorno e in mezzo a loro
e tornò sano e salvo con il ventaglio
XI
E quando vide il suo vero amore tornare
senza aver subito alcun danno
lei si gettò tra le sue braccia
dicendo “Ecco il premio che tu hai vinto”.

NOTE
*Alberto Musica &Memoria

FONTI
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_solomons_seal.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/thelionsden.html
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-LadyCarlisle.html
https://oldtimeparty.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/the-lady-of-carlisle/
http://www3.clearlight.com/~acsa/introjs.htm?/~acsa/songfile/LADYCARL.HTM
http://www.whitegum.com/introjs.htm?/songfile/LADYCARL.HTM
https://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LO25.html
http://dylanchords.info/00_misc/lady_of_carlisle.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=65185

Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier (Buttermilk Hill)

The Spinning Wheel, c.1855 (oil on panel)“Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier” (Buttermilk Hill) aka “Gone the Rainbow” is the American version of the Irish song “Siuil a Ruin“.
The lyrics of the song stand out from the Irish version from the addition in the first stanza of a Buttermilk Hill and, in some versions, from Johnny’s death in battle.
And yet the American versions often lose the cryingt call of the woman for the return of her love; rather she is resigned to her role, waiting for him to fulfill his duty as a soldier.
Johnny Has Gone For A Soldier” (Buttermilk Hill) o anche come “Gone the Rainbow” è la versione diffusa in America della irish song “Siuil a Ruin”.
Il testo della canzone si contraddistingue rispetto alla versione irlandese dall’aggiunta nella I strofa di una Buttermilk Hill e, in alcune versioni, dalla morte in battaglia di Johnny.
E tuttavia le versioni americane perdono spesso l’accorato richiamo della donna che invoca il ritorno del suo amore; piuttosto ella è rassegnata al suo ruolo di donna piangente, in attesa che lui compia il suo dovere di soldato.

He lays murdered on the field

In some versions Johnny dies on the battlefield
In alcune versione Johnny muore sul campo di battaglia

Pete Seeger in American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 4


I
Here I sit on Buttermilk Hill (1)
Here I sit and cry my fill
And my tears would turn a mill
Johnny has gone for a soldier
Chorus:
Shule shule, shule agrah (2)
Me, oh my, I loved him so
But only time will heal my woe
Johnny has gone for a soldier
II
I’ll sell my rod, I’ll sell me reel (3)
To buy my love a sword and shield
But now he lays murdered on the field
Johnny has gone for a soldier
Chorus X 2
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Seduta qui sulla Buttermilk Hill,
qui seduta a piangere a dirotto,
e le mie lacrime farebbero girare un mulino,
Johnny è andato militare
Coro
Vieni, vieni, vieni, amore mio,
o mio Dio, che amai tanto
ma solo il tempo lenirà il mio dolore 
Johnny è andato militare.
II
Venderei l’aspo e la conocchia
per comperare al mio amore spada e scudo
ma ora giace ucciso sul campo
Johnny è andato militare

NOTE
1) In Jackson County, Illinois, there is a place called Buttermilk Hill.
Nella contea di Jackson, nello Stato dell’Illinois, c’è una località chiamata Buttermilk Hill.
2) Come, come, come O love
3) trovato scritto anche come rock, rack sono parti del filatoio a ruota (spinning wheel)

John Tams in TV Sharpe’s Battle directed by Tom Clegg, episodio n 7 (1995)


I
Here I sit on Butternut Hill
Who would blame me cry my fill
Every tear would turn a mill
Johnny is gone for a soldier
Chorus:
Shule shule, shule agrah
His nets and creel are laid away
Till he comes back I’ll rue the day
Johnny is gone for a soldier
II
With fife’s and drums he marched away
War dost came he couldn’t stay
Till he comes back I’ll rue the day
Johnny’s gone for a soldier
III
I’ll sell my ruck, I’ll sell me reel
I’ll even sell my spinning wheel
Buy my love a coat of steel (1)
Johnny’s gone for a soldier
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Seduta qui sulla Butternut Hill,
chi biasimerebbe tutte le mie lacrime,
ogni lacrima da far girare un mulino,
Johnny è andato militare
Coro
Vieni, vieni, vieni, amore mio,
le sue reti e le nasse sono messe da parte
io maledico il giorno fino al suo ritorno
Johnny è andato militare.
II
Con pifferi e tamburi marciò via
la guerra è venuta e lui non poteva restare,
io maledico il giorno fino al suo ritorno,
Johnny è andato militare
III
Venderò l’aspo e la conocchia
e anche il mio filatoio a ruota
per comperare al mio amore una corazza d’acciaio, / Johnny è andato militare

NOTE
1) in my opinion the woman would be willing to sell her things to buy a good sword or armor (an anachronisticterm for a 700-800 soldier’s gear!), not because she wants to support his decision to go to fight, but because he could have some more chance of staying alive and returning to her safe and sound
a mio avviso la donna sarebbe disposta a vendere tutto ciò che ha di prezioso per comprare una buona spada o un’armatura (un temine un po’ anacronistico per l’armamentario di un soldato del 700-800!), non perchè voglia sostenere la sua decisione di andare a combattere, bensì perchè egli possa avere qualche chance in più di restare vivo e ritornare da lei sano e salvo

Versions similar to the Irish one
[Versioni simili a quella irlandese]

James Taylor & Mark O’Connor


I
There she sits on Buttermilk Hill
Oh, who could blame her cryin’ her fill
Every tear would turn a mill
Johnny has gone for a soldier
CHORUS
Me-oh-my she loved him so
It broke her heart just to see him go
Only time will heal her woe
Johnny has gone for a soldier
II
She sold her rock and she sold her reel
She sold her only spinning wheel
To buy her love a sword of steel
Johnny has gone for a soldier
III
She’ll dye her dress, she’ll dye it red
And in the streets go begging for bread
The one she loves from her has fled
Johnny has gone for a soldier
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Seduta là sulla Buttermilk Hill,
chi biasimerebbe tutte le sue lacrime,
ogni lacrima da far girare un mulino,
Johnny è andato militare
Coro
Lei lo amava così tanto
e le si spezzò il cuore quando lo vide partire
solo il tempo guarirà le sue pene
Johnny è andato militare
II
Vendette l’aspo e la conocchia
e anche il suo unico filatoio a ruota
per comperare al suo amore una spada d’acciaio, Johnny è andato militare
III
Si tingerà le gonne, le tingerà di rosso
e andrà per le strade a mendicare il pane
colui che amava da lei è fuggito
Johnny è andato militare

Solas in Solas 1996


I
Oh I wish I were on yonder hill
It’s there I’d sit and cry my fill
‘Til every tear would turn a mill
My Johnny’s gone for a soldier
II
Well, Johnny, my love, he went away
He would not heed what I did say
He won’t be back for many’s a day
My Johnny’s gone for a soldier
Chorus:
Shule, shule, shule a gra
Oh shule, oh shule and he loves me
When he comes back, he will marry me
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldierI
III
‘ll sell my rack, I’ll sell my reel
I’ll sell my only spinning wheel
And buy my love a sword of steel
My Johnny’s gone for a soldier
IV
I’ll dye my petticoat, I’ll dye it red
Around the world I’ll bake my bread
‘Til I find my love alive or dead
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
(Chorus)
V
But now my love, he has gone to France
To try his fortune to advance
If he returns, it is but a chance
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
(Chorus)
VI
I wish, I wish, I wish in vain
I wish I had my heart again
‘Tis gladly I would not complain
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
(Chorus 2x)
My Johnny, he has gone for a soldier
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Vorrei essere su quella collina 
dove mi siederei a piangere a dirotto
ed ogni lacrima girerebbe un mulino,
il mio Johnny è andato militare
II
Johnny, il mio amore, è partito
Non ha badato a quello che gli dicevo
non farà ritorno per un lungo tempo
il mio Johnny è andato militare
RITORNELLO
Vieni, vieni, vieni, amore mio,
presto, vieni da me, lui mi ama
quando ritornerà mi sposerà
il mio Johnny è andato militare
III
Venderò l’aspo e la conocchia,
venderò l’unico filatoio a ruota
per comprare una spada d’acciaio al mio amore
il mio Johnny è andato militare
IV
Mi tingerò le gonne, le tingerò di rosso
a mendicare il pane per il mondo
finché non troverò il mio amore vivo o morto
il mio Johnny è andato militare
(Ritornello)
V
Ma ora il mio amore è andato in Francia
per tentare di migliorare la sua sorte
c’è solo da sperare che ritorni
il mio Johnny è andato militare
(Ritornello)
VI
Vorrei, vorrei, vorrei ma invano,
vorrei riavere qui il mio amore,
e senz’altro non mi lamenterei
il mio Johnny è andato militare

And finally two instrumental versions
E infine due versioni strumentali

Goldmund

Mark Ferguson

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/sailing-lowlands.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/ye-jacobites.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6969
http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48603
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=336&lang=it
http://stec-173395.blogspot.it/2011/05/fuso-e-telaio.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30259
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/johnnys.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/shulegra.htm

Hieland laddie, Bonny laddie

Read the post in English

Sotto il titolo Hieland laddie (Highland lassie) si raggruppano una serie di testi con la stessa melodia (un tradizionale scozzese) dal titolo “If thou’lt play me fair play” ovvero “The Lass of Livingston”
Melodia dapprima pubblicata sotto il titolo “Cockleshell’s” in Apollo’s Banquet di Playford (Londra, 1690) e il Dancing Master del 1701. Poi ccompare nel “Manoscritto del castello di Drummond” con la scritta “Una raccolta di danze di campagna scritta per l’uso di sua Grazia il Duca di Perth da Dav. Young, 1734.” La prima stampa della canzone è nella raccolta del 1757 di Robert Bremner. (tradotto da qui)

Vediamoli in ordine sparso

LA MARCIA MILITARE

In Scozia la “marcing song” è sinonimo di cornamuse! “Hieland laddie” era la marcia di tutti i reggimenti scozzesi prima di “Scotland the Brave”.

LA DANZA SCOZZESE
Una danza da competizione particolarmente energica

SEA SHANTY: Bonny Laddie, Heiland Laddie (My Bonnie Highland Lassie)

Una versione testuale la colloca nelle canzoni marinaresche (vedi)
La melodia era anche usata come un capstan e una “stamp and go” shanty, e (senza il grande coro) come una halyard shanty. Era popolare tra le baleniere di Dundee, poi utilizzata (intorno al 1830 e agli anni ’40) come canzone di lavoro per stivare legname e cotone nei porti del sud-est e del Golfo degli Stati Uniti. Highland Laddie è stata utilizzata per lunghe e lente manovre: issare le vele  (2 tiri per coro) o levare l’ancora. Era cantata a due voci: lo shantyman che faceva la domanda (Dove sei stato tutto il giorno, mio bel ragazzo scozzese?) E la risposta data in coro dall’equipaggio (Way hay and away we go, Bonnie Laddie, Laddie Hieland)”. (tradotto da qui)

Pete Seeger live


Was you ever in Quebec?
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
Stowing timber on the deck,
My bonny Highland laddie.
CHORUS
High-ho, and away we goes,
Bonny laddie, Highland laddie,
High-ho, and away we goes,
My bonny Highland laddie.
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen(1).
Was you ever in Baltimore
Dancing on the sanded floor?
Was you ever in Callao(2)
Where the girls are never slow?
Was you ever in Merasheen(3)
Where you stayed fast to tree(4)?
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) in Quebec?
bel ragazzo delle Highland
A stivare il legname sul ponte?
Mio bel ragazzo delle Highland
CORO
In alto saliamo
bel ragazzo delle Highland
In alto saliamo
Mio bel ragazzo delle Highland
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) ad Aberdeen?
Ci sono le ragazze più belle che abbiate mai visto.
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) a Baltimora
a ballare sul pavimento tirato a lucido?
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) a Callao
dove le ragazze non sono per niente stupide?
Sei(siete) mai stato(i) a Merasheen
dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta?

NOTE
1) essendo la canzone originaria della Scozia ovviamente non si poteva non celebrare la bellezza delle sue donne
2) grande porto del Perù
3) anche scritto come Merrimashee c’è un isola di Merasheen a Terranova (Canada), ma più probabilmente è Miramichi, una cittadina del Canada, situata nella provincia del Nuovo Brunswick, ma anche un grande fiume che da il nome alla baia in cui sfocia, nel Golfo di San Lorenzo. Spesso i marinai ripetevano le canzoni ad orecchio ed era più probabile che venissero storpiati i nomi delle località che non si conoscevano.

La ricerca di Italo Ottonello ha trovato questa nota: Merasheen, located on the southwestern tip of Merasheen Island in Placentia Bay, was one of the larger and more prosperous communities resettled. Settled by English, Irish and Scottish in the late 18th century, the community eventually became predominantly Roman Catholic with families of Irish descent. In an ideal location to prosecute the inshore cod fishery along with the herring and lobster fisheries in the ice-free harbour during winter and spring, it appeared that Merasheen would not succumb to the same fate as other small resettled communities.
Così osserva Ottonello: “sembra accennare ad un generico luogo tempestoso, piuttosto che ad un sito in particolare“.

 4) letteralmente ” dove stavi saldo sull’albero” lo stesso concetto è espresso anche in una versione alternativa “you tie up to a tree” (con la precisazione di legarsi bene ad un albero), oppure è scritto anche come “Where you make fast to a tree”; ma Italo Ottonello traduce giustamente “tree” con “crocetta” [così imparo un nuovo (per me) termine nautico!] e la frase come “dove bisognava agguantarsi alla crocetta” (durante un periodo di mare cattivo)

 APPROFONDIMENTO: MA QUANTI ALBERI SU UNA NAVE!!
a cura di Italo Ottonello

TREE, n. In ship-building, pieces of timber are called chess-trees, cross-trees, roof-trees, tressel-trees, &c. (da DANA Seaman’s friend – Dictionary of sea terms) =quasi tutte parti della crocetta, che è la piattaforma al di sopra della coffa
Chess-trees. Pieces of oak, fitted to the sides of a vessel, abaft the fore chains, with a sheave in them, to board the main tack to. Now out of use. = gruetta o rinvio della mura
Il bozzello fisso a murata rappresenta il rinvio della mura o scotta di trinchetto. Qui è la scotta di trinchetto- foresheet>/span>
Cross-trees. Pieces of oak supported by the cheeks (*)and trestle-trees, at the mast-heads, to sustain the tops on the lower mast, and to spread the topgallant rigging at the topmast-head. barre costiere =parti della crocetta
(*)[Cheeks. The projections on each side of a mast, upon which the trestle-trees rest. = Maschette (sostegni della crocetta) – The sides of the shell of a block. =maschette di un bozzello]
Rough-trees (roof-trees). An unfinished spar = abete di rispetto (uno dei pezzi della dorma)
Trestle-trees (trassle-tree). Two strong pieces of timber, placed horizontally and fore-and-aft on opposite sides of a mast-head, to support the cross-trees and top, and for the fid of the mast above to rest upon = barre traverse (parti della crocetta)

The Kingston Trio. Le strofe vigolettate sono un’aggiunta del gruppo


Was you ever in Quebec
Bonny Laddie, Hielan’ laddie
Stowing timber on the deck
Bonny Hielan’ Laddie
Was you ever in Dundee
There some pretty ships you’ll see
“This Boston town don’t suit my notion
And I’m bound for far away
So, I’ll pack my bag and sail the ocean
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Mobile Bay
Loading cotton by the day
Was you ever ‘round Cape Horn
With the Lion and the Unicorn(1)
“One of these days and it won’t be long
And I’m bound for far away
You’ll take a look around and find me gone
And I’ll see you on another day”
Was you ever in Monterey
On that town with three months pay
Was you ever in Aberdeen
Prettiest girls that you’ve ever seen
“Farewell, dear friends, I’m leaving soon
And I’m bound for far away
We’ll meet again this coming June
And I’ll see you on another day”
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Siete mai stati in Quebec?
bel ragazzo delle Highland
A stivare il legname sul ponte?
bel ragazzo delle Highland
Siete mai stati a Dundee,
ci sono delle belli navi da vedere.
“La città di Boston non mi soddisfa
e mi sono imbarcato per lidi lontani,
così farò la mia borsa e navigherò sull’oceano
-ci vedremo un altra volta. “
Siete mai stati a Mobile Bay
a caricare cotone tutto il giorno?
Siete mai stati a Capo Horn
con il Leone e l’Unicorno ?
“Uno di questi giorni e non ci vorrà molto
salperò per lidi lontani,
ti guarderai intorno e io me ne sarò andato.
-ci vedremo un altra volta. “
Siete mai stati a Monterey
con la paga di tre mesi (da spendere)?
Siete mai stati ad Aberdeen,
ci sono le ragazze più belle mai viste!?
“Addio miei cari amici, preso me ne andrò
mi sono imbarcato per lidi lontani,
ci rivedremo di nuovo il prossimo giugno
-ci vedremo un altra volta.”

NOTE
1) su una nave inglese: è lo stemma reale del Regno Unito, il leone  simboleggia l’Inghilterra e l’unicorno la  Scozia;

Bonnie Highland Lassie

Nils Brown, Sean Dagher, Clayton Kennedy, John Giffen, David Gossage in Assassin’s Creed Rogue (sea shanty edition)


I
Were you ever in Roundstone Town (1)?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Roundstone Town?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Roundstone Town
Drinking milk and eating flour (2)
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o
II
Were you ever in Bombay
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Bombay
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in old Bombay
Drinking coffee and bohay (3)
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

III
Were you ever in Quebec?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Were you ever in Quebec?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I was often in Quebec
Stowing timber up on deck
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

IV
Are you fit to sweep the floor?
Bonnie Lassie Hieland Lassie,
Are you fit to sweep the floor (4)?
My bonnie hieland lassie-o
I am fit to sweep the floor
As the lock is for the door
Although I am a young maid
Come lately from my mammy-o

traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Sei mai stata a Roundstone?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei mai stata a Roundstone?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Ero spesso a Roundstone
a bere latte e farinata
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.
II
Sei mai stata a Bombay?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei mai stata a Bombay?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Ero spesso nella vecchia Bombay
a bere caffè e tè.
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.
III
Sei mai stata in Quebec?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei mai stata in Quebec?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Ero spesso in Quebec
a stivare il legname sul ponte.
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.
IV
Sei pronta a spazzare il pavimento?
Bella ragazza, ragazza delle Highland
Sei pronta a spazzare il pavimento?
Mia bella ragazza montagnina!
Sono pronta a spazzare il pavimento,
come la serratura lo è con la porta
sebbene sia una giovane fanciulla
l’ultima arrivata dalla mia mamma.

NOTE
1) Roundstone è un piccolo villaggio di pescatori vicino a Connemara (County Galway)
2) letteralmente “bere latte e mangiare farina” potrebbe voler dire fare colazione, ma potrebbe esserci un doppio senso
3) bohea è una miscela di tè nero originario della regione di montagna Wuyi del sud-est della Cina; in pratica un tempo era sinonimo di tè
4) anche questa strofa potrebbe avere un doppio senso erotico

FONTI
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/hielladd.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/danze-scozzesi.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bonnie-hieland-lassie.html
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/wasuever.htm
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/1524
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_laddiegone.htm
http://compvid101.blogspot.it/2009/11/ktpete-seegertommy-makemludwig-von.html
http://cornemusique.free.fr/ukhighlandladdie.php
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/donkey-riding.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/donkeyriding.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=41062
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54643
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/h/hielandl.html
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/3031lyr5.htm

High Barbary

Read the post in English

The George Aloe and the Sweepstake o (The Coasts of) High Barbary è considerata sia una sea shanty che una ballata (Child ballad #285) e di certo la sua versione originale è molto antica e probabilmente cinquecentesca. Così’ nella commedia seicentesca  “The Two Noble Kinsmen” leggiamo: “The George Alow came from the south, From the coast of Barbary-a; And there he met with brave gallants of war, By one, by two, by three-a. Well hail’d, well hail’d, you jolly gallants! And whither now are you bound-a? O let me have your company”

French_ship_under_atack_by_barbary_pirates

CORSARI BARBARESCHI

I pirati musulmani delle coste africane provenivano da quella che gli europei chiamavano Barberia (in inglese Barbary e in francese Côte des Barbaresques) ovvero Algeria Tunisia, Libia, Marocco (e più precisamente le città-stato di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli, ma anche i porti di Salè e Tetuan). La definizione più corretta è corsari barbareschi perchè assalivano solo le navi dell’Europa cristiana (compiendo inoltre razzie anche nei paesi cristiani della costa atlantica e del mediterraneo per procacciare schiavi o per ottenere lauti riscatti). Nel termine barbareschi si comprendevano arabi, berberi, turchi nonché i rinnegati europei. “I più attivi e organizzati corsari musulmani furono quelli con base nelle città costiere del Maghreb, soprattutto Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli. Con i loro entroterra, queste città costituivano degli stati corsari pressoché indipendenti dal lontano potere dei sultani di Istanbul. La pirateria contro i cristiani era una lucrosa attività (da non dimenticare il commercio o il riscatto degli schiavi catturati) perfettamente legale, spesso incoraggiata dagli stessi sultani ottomani, specialmente quando questi erano in guerra contro paesi cristiani. Nonostante varie spedizioni punitive da parte di Stati europei e persino dei neonati Stati Uniti d’America (contro Tripoli), l’attività corsara delle reggenze maghrebine (talvolta con strane, ma non troppo, alleanze come ad esempio quella con la Francia) continuò per alcuni secoli”. (tratto da qui)
Nell’affare c’erano anche per buona misura i corsari cristiani, che compivano uguali razzie lungo le coste della Barberia (principalmente gli ordini cavallereschi e marinari dei Cavalieri di Malta e dei Cavalieri di Santo Stefano, ma ovviamente in questi casi si parlava di “crociata” e non di pirateria!!) “Se per le reggenze di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli il prigioniero valeva essenzialmente il riscatto per i cristiani, invece, i prigionieri diventavano “schiavi” maghrebini – che raramente venivano richiesti indietro – i quali diventavano oggetto di commercio interno e venivano impegnati nel servizio pubblico (ad esempio come rematori sulle galere) o in ambito domestico (specie le donne), e particolarmente rilevante è il fenomeno degli schiavi africani utilizzati in Sicilia tra la fine del Quattrocento e l’inizio del Cinquecento per il lavoro nei campi. Da qui il famoso detto “Cu pigghia un turcu, è sou” (Chi arraffa un turco ne diventa proprietario) che fa da controcanto al più famoso “Mamma li turchi!” (Aiuto, arrivano i turchi!)”. (tratto da qui)

Per quanto le attività piratesche fossero endemiche nel Mar Mediterraneo il periodo di massima attività dei corsari barbareschi fu la prima metà del 1600.

PRIMA VERSIONE

Stan Hugill nella bibbia “Shanties From The Seven Seas” riporta due melodie una più antica quando la canzone era una forebitter e una più veloce come canto marinaresco (capstan chantey).
La versione più antica della ballata racconta di due navi mercantili The George Aloe, e The Sweepstake con la George Aloe che vendica l’affondamento della seconda nave usando la stessa “cortesia” alla ciurma delle nave pirata francese la quale aveva gettato in mare l’equipaggio della Sweepstake.
Pete Seeger

Joseph Arthur in  Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006 (biografia e dischi qui) in versione rock


There were two lofty ships
From old England came
Blow high, blow low(1)
And so sail we
One was the Prince of Luther
The other Prince of Wales
All a-cruisin’ down the coast
Of High Barbary
“Aloft there, aloft there”
Our jolly bosun cried
“Look ahead, look astern,
Look to weather an’ a-lee”
“There’s naught upon the stern, sir
There’s naught upon our lee
But there’s a lofty ship to wind’ard
An’ she’s sailin’ fast and free”
“Oh hail her, oh hail her”
Our gallant captain cried
“Are you a man-o-war
Or a privateer?” cried he
“Oh, I’m not a man-o-war
Nor privateer,” said he
“But I am salt sea pirate
All a-looking for me fee”
For Broadside, for broadside
A long time we lay
‘Til at last the Prince of Luther
Shot the pirate’s mast away
“Oh quarter, oh quarter”
Those pirates they did cry
But the quarter that we gave them
Was we sank ‘em in the sea
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano due alteri  vascelli
provenienti dalla vecchia Inghilterra, (tira forte, tira piano
che così salpiamo
)
Uno era il “Prince of Luther”
e l’altro il “Prince of Wales”,
entrambi a farsi un giretto per le coste della Barberia.
“A riva là
– il nostromo gridò –
guarda avanti, guarda a poppa,
guarda al tempo sottovento!”
“Non c’è niente a poppa, signore,
non c’è niente sottovento
ma c’è un vascello a sopravvento
e naviga veloce e spedito.”
“Maledizione, maledizione
– il nostro capitano gridò –
siete un militare
o un corsaro?”
“Non sono un militare
e nemmeno un corsaro – disse lui –
ma sono un pirata del mare
in cerca del mio compenso”
Siamo stati a sparare bordate
per molto tempo
finchè alla fine la Prince of Luther
colpì l’albero maestro dei pirati “Mercede”
– gridarono quei pirati –
ma la grazia che gli demmo
fu di affondarli in mare

NOTE
1) il verbo to blow significa sia colpire che soffiare; ci si aspetterebbe un “pull” o “haul” ma il significato resta quello di “tira”

SECONDA VERSIONE: la sea shanty

La ballata riprende popolarità negli anni tra il 1795 e il 1815 in concomitanza degli attacchi dei corsari barbareschi alle navi americane.

Tom Kines in “Songs from Shakespeare´s Plays and Songs of His Time”,1960 un versione di come era cantata in epoca elisabettiana

Quadriga Consort from Ships Ahoy 2013

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag in versione sea shanty

The Shanty Crew in versione sea shanty più estesa


“Look ahead, look-astern
Look the weather in the lee!”
Blow high! Blow low!
And so sailed we.

“I see a wreck to windward,
And a lofty ship to lee!
A-sailing down along
The coast of High Barbary”
“O, are you a pirate
Or a man o’ war?” cried we.
“O no! I’m not a pirate
But a man-o-war,” cried he.
“We’ll back up our topsails
And heave vessel to.
For we have got some letters
To be carried home by you”. (1)
For broadside, for broadside
They fought all on the main;
Until at last the frigate
Shot the pirate’s mast away.
“For quarter, for quarter”,
the saucy pirates cried
But the quarter that we showed them
was to sink them in the tide
With cutlass and gun,
O we fought for hours three;
The ship it was their coffin
And their grave it was the sea
But O! ‘Twas a cruel sight,
and grieved us, full sore,
To see them all a drownin’
as they tried to swim to shore
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
“Guarda avanti, guarda a poppa,
guarda al tempo sottovento!”
(tira forte, tira piano
che così siamo salpati)
“Vedo un relitto a sopravvento
e una nave altera  sottovento
che naviga lungo
la costa di Barberia.”
“Siete un militare
o un pirata?”
“Non sono un pirata
ma un soldato” – disse lui “Ammaineremo le vele
per l’abbordaggio
perchè abbiamo delle lettere da farvi portare a casa”
A bordate
si combatterono tutti sul mare
finchè alla fine la fregata
colpì l’albero maestro dei pirati “Mercede”
– gridarono quei pirati –
ma la grazia che gli demmo
fu di affondarli in mare.
Con sciabola e pistola
ci siamo battuti per tre ore
e la nave divenne la loro bara
e il mare la loro tomba.
Fu uno spettacolo crudele
che ci addolorò tanto
vedere il loro annegamento
mentre cercavano di nuotare fino alla riva.

NOTE
1) I pirati usano l’inganno per l’abbordaggio

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/barbary.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=137331 https://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/barbaree.html http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/barbareschi.htm http://www.ilportaledelsud.org/pirati.htm
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_285