Boney was a warrior

Leggi in italiano

A sea shanty  originally born as a street ballad on the Napoleonic wars: Napoleon embodied the hopes for independence and the revolutionary demands of the European populations and the American colonies (Ireland in the lead); loved by the poorer layers as well as by intellectuals, it is the romantic hero par excellence, in its greatness and its fall. Nowadays, no one siding with Napoleon, but two centuries before, the spirits flared up for him!

Napoleone Bonaparte

SEA SHANTY VERSION

AL Lloyd wrote “A short drag shanty. These simple shanties were uses when only a few strong pulls were needed, as in boarding tacks and sheets and bunting up a sail in furling, etc. Boney was popular both in British and American vessels and in one American version Bonaparte is made to cross the Rocky Mountains.”: there are many text versions that all portray the victories and defeats of Napoleon in a few lines. The melody recalls the Breton maritime song “Jean François de Nantes” (with text in French)
C’est Jean François de Nantes OUE, OUE, OUE
Gabier sur la fringante Oh mes bouées Jean François
(here)
The adventure “Asterix in Corsica” pays homage to the shanty giving the name Boneywasawarriorwayayix to the chief of the resistance in Corsica

Paul Clayton


Boney(1) was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A warrior, a tarrier(2),
John François (3)
Boney fought the Prussians,
Boney fought the Russians.
Boney went to Moscow,
across the ocean across the storm
Moscow was a-blazing
And Boney was a-raging.
Boney went to Elba
Boney he came back again.
Boney went to Waterloo
There he got his overthrow.
Boney he was sent away
Away in Saint Helena
Boney broke his heart and died
Away in Saint Helena

NOTES
1) Boney diminutive for Napoleon. The origin of the name is uncertain may mean “the Lion of Naples”, the first illustrious name was that of Cardinal Napoleone Orsini (at the time of Pope Boniface VIII)
2) terrier = mastiff
3) or Jonny Franswor! quote from the Breton maritime song Jean-François de Nantes

.. the punk-rock version with irony
Jack Shit in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI 2006

I
Boney(1) was a warrior
A warrior a terrier(2)
Boney beat the Prussians
The Austrians, the Russians
Boney went to school in France
He learned to make the Russians dance
Boney marched to Moscow
Across the Alps through ice and snow.
II
Boney was a Frenchy man
But Boney had to turn again
So he retreated back again
Moscow was in ruins then
He beat the Prussians squarely
He whacked the English nearly
He licked them in Trafalgar’s Bay(1)
Carried his main topm’st away
III
Boney went a cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian(2)
Boney went to Saint Helen’s
He never came back again
They sent him into exile
He died on Saint Helena’s Isle
Boney broke his heart and died
In Corsica he wished he stayed

NOTES
1) The battle of Trafalgar saw the British outnumbered but Nelson’s unconventional maneuver (a position called in military jargon to T) displaced the enemy line up arranged in a long line (the excellent study in see), the only blow inflicted by the French was the death of Nelson. England was an unequaled naval power for the French and the Spanish, so Napoleon renounced the invasion of Great Britain who became the mistress of the seas until the First World War
2) the ship that brought Napoleon into exile on Saint Helena was Bellerephon but the name was crippled in Billy Ruffian or Billy Ruff’n by his sailors not sufficiently well-known to appreciate the references to Greek mythology.

JOHN SHORT VERSION


The authors write in the short Sharp Shanties project notes “Short’s words were few—a mere two and a half verses—but sufficient to indicate that his, like every other version of the shanty, essentially followed Napoleon Bonaparte’s life story to a greater or lesser extent depending on the length of the job in hand (although, as Colcord points out, some versions introduced inventive variations on his life). We have simply borrowed some (of the true) verses from other versions—but by no means all that were available!.. Perhaps, we are again dealing with a shanty that changed its purpose—Jackie has chosen a slower rendition which may be more appropriate to the time. Sharp noted: “Mr. Short sang ‘Bonny’ not ’Boney’, which is the more usual pronunciation; while his rendering of ’John’ was something between the French ’Jean’ and the English ’John’.” (tratto da qui)

Jackie Oates from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2

Boney was a warrior,
Wey, hay, yah
A bulling fighting tarrier,
John François
First he fought the Russians
then he fought the Prussians.
Boney went to Moscow,
Moscow was on fire oh.
We licked him in Trafalgar’s
Billy ??
Boney went to Elba
he came back to make another show
Boney went to Waterloo
and than he maked his overthrow.
Boney went to a-cruising
Aboard the Billy Ruffian.
Boney went to Saint Helena
Boney he didn’t get back
Boney broke his heart and died
in Corsica he should stay
Boney was a general
A ruddy, snotty general.

An interesting version in the folk environment comes from Maddy Prior who sings it like a nursery rhyme with the cannon shots and the drum roll in the background
Maddy Prior from Ravenchild 1999


Boney was a warrior
Wey, hey, ah
A warrior, a terrier
John François
He planned a distant enterprise
A great and distant enterprise.
He is off to fight the Russian bear
He plans to drive him from his lair.
They left with banners all ablaze
The heads of Europe stood amazed.
He thinks he’ll beat the Russkies
And the bonny bunch of roses. (1)

NOTES
1) english soldiers

FRENCH SHANTY: Jean-François de Nantes

Les Naufragés live

C’est Jean-François de Nantes
Oué, oué, oué,
Gabier de la Fringante
Oh ! mes bouées, Jean-François
Débarque de la campagne
Fier comme un roi d’Espagne
En vrac dedans sa bourse
Il a vingt mois de course
Une montre, une chaîne
Qui vaut une baleine
Branl’bas chez son hôtesse
Carambole et largesses
La plus belle servante
L’emmène dans la soupente
En vida la bouteille
Tout son or appareille
Montre et chaîne s’envolent
Attrape la vérole
A l’hôpital de Nantes
Jean-François se lamente
Et les draps de sa couche
Déchire avec sa bouche
Il ferait de la peine
Même à son capitaine
Pauvr’ Jean-François de Nantes
Gabier de la Fringante.

LINK
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/boney-was-a-warrior/
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/boney.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boney.html http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/boneywas.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=84540 https://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=1560890
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/french.htm

Sally Brown roll and go

Leggi in italiano

In the sea shanties Sally Brown is the stereotype of the cheerful woman of the Caribbean seas, mulatta or creole, with which our sailor  tries to have a good time.

Probably of Jamaican origin according to Stan Hugill, it was a popular song in the ports of the West Indies in the 1830s.
The textual and melodic variations are many.

FIRST VERSION: WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO

In this version the chorus is split into two short sentences repeated by the crew in sequence, after each verse of the shantyman, and is more properly a halyard shanty.

Paul Clayton “Sally Brown” from LP. “Sailing And Whaling Songs Of The 19th Century” 1954

Oh Sally Brown she’s a creole(2) lady,
Way, hey, roll(1) and go
Sally Brown’s a gay old lady,
spend my money on (with)(3) Sally Brown.
Sally Brown she has a daughter,
Sent me sailin’ ‘cross the water.
Oh seven long years I courted Sally,
Then she said she would not marry.
She wouldn’t have no tarry (4) sailor,
Wouldn’t have no greasy whaler.
Sally Brown I’m bound to leave you,
Sally Brown I’ll not deceive you.
Sally Brown she took a notion (5),
Sent me sailin’ ‘cross the ocean.

NOTE
1)The term “Creole” can be understood in two exceptions: from the Spanish “crillo”, which originally referred to the first generation born in the “New World”, sons of settlers from Europe (Spain or France) and black slaves. The most common meaning is that which refers to all the black half-bloods of Jamaica from the color of the skin that goes from cream to brown and up to black-blue. In the nineteenth century with this term was also indicated a small elite urban society of light skin in Louisiana (resident mostly in New Orleans) result of crossings between some beautiful black slaves and white landowners who took them as lovers.
2) the term is generically used by sailors to say many things, in this context for example could mean “sail”.
3) change the article immediately makes the difference “I spend the money on” Sally implies that I pay for his sexual performance “I spend the money with” Sally is more bland ..
4) tarry is a derogatory term to distinguish the typical sailor. More generally Jack Tar is the term commonly used to refer to a sailor of merchant ships or the Royal Navy. Probably the term was coined in 1600, alluding to the tar with which the sailors waterproofed their work clothes.
5) the lady to get rid of the sailor (left without money) sends him back to work, probably on a whaler

Free Women of Color with their Children and Servants in a Landscape, Agostino Brunias

Jim Horne


I shipped on board of a Liverpool liner,
Way, hey, roll and go
bunked long side the 49 ers
spend my money on Sally Brown.
O, Sally Brown, of New York City(1),
O, Sally Brown you’re very pretty
O, Sally Brown’s a bright mulatter,
She drinks rum and chews tobaccer.
O, Sally Brown’shes a Creole lady, (2)
She’s the mother of a yellow baby(3).
Sally’s teeth are white and pearly,
Her eyes are blue, her hair is curly.
Seven long years I courted Sally,
Sweetest girl in all the valley.
Seven long years she wouldn’t marry,
And I no longer cared to tarry.
So I courted her only daughter,
For her I sail upon the water.
Now my troubles are all over,
Sally’s married to a dirty soldier

NOTE
1) the shanty is also widespread on the packet ships in Liverpool-New York routes, so Sally lives in the city of New York
2)in this description the Creole girl is a mulatto from the skin in the clearest gradation, with blue eyes and wavy hair
3) or from the skin with a caramel tinge

ARCHIVE

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

LINKS
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html

We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!

Leggi in italiano

“We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”, the title of a popular albeit short sea shanty, it means much more than its literal translation.

IS PADDY DOYLE  A BOARDING MASTER..

According to Stan Hugill, Paddy Doyle is the prototype of the boarding masters: Joanna Colcord misidentifies him with Paddy West. (see first part)

Boarding houses are pensions for sailors, present in every large sea port. “They are held by boarding masters, of dubious reputation, that provide ” accommodation and boarding “. Often they welcome the sailors “on credit.” On the advance received by the boarders at the time of enrollment, they refer to food and lodging, and with the rest they provide their clothing and equipment of poor quality “. (Italo Ottonello).

Sailors then usually purchased a sea bag with dungarees, oilskins, sea boots, belt, sheath, knife and a pound of tobacco from the boarding master.
So the first month (or the first months depending on the advance) the sailor works to pay the boarding master, “We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots!”

a typical boarding house of Liverpool

OR A COBBLER?

According to other interpretations Paddy Doyle was a good Liverpool shoemaker “known to all the “packet rats”* sailing out of that port for the excellency of his sea-boots, and beloved for his readiness to trust any of the boys for the price of a pair when they were outward bound across “the big pond.” (Fred H. Buryeson)
* slang term for sailors

SEA SHANTY

Perfect shanty for short haulers, used expressly to collect the sails on the yard or to tighten them.

The song is short because the work does not last long. Thus wrote A.L. Lloyd “This is one of the few shanties reserved for bunting the fore or mainsail. Men aloft, furling the sail, would bunch the canvas in their hands till it formed a long bundle, the ‘bunt’. To lift the bunt on to the yard, in order to lash it into position, required a strong heave. Bunt shanties differ from others in that they employed fewer voices, and were sung in chorus throughout. Paddy Doyle, the villain of this shanty, was a Liverpool boarding house keeper.” and he continues in another comment The men stand aloft on foot-ropes and, leaning over the yard, the grab the bunched-up sail and try to heave the ‘sausage’ of canvas on to the yard, preparatory to lashing it in a furled position. The big heave usually comes on the last word of the verse, sometimes being sung as ‘Pay Paddy Doyle his his hup!’ But if the canvas was wet and heavy, and several attempts were going to be needed before the sail was bunted

Assassin’s Creed Black Flag

The Clancy Brothers&Tommy Makem

Paul Clayton who adds the verse  “For the crusty old man on the poop”

To me Way-ay-ay yah!(1)
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle(2) for his boots!
We’ll all drink whiskey(3) and gin!
We’ll all shave under the chin!
We’ll all throw mud at the cook(4)!
The dirty ol’ man’s on the poop! (5)
We’ll bouse (6) her up and be done!
We’ll pay Paddy Doyle for his boots! (7)

NOTES
1) a non sense line than other versions such as “Yes (yeo), aye, and we’ll haul, aye”. The strongest accent falls on the last syllable of the verse that corresponds to the tear-off maneuver for hoisting a sail
2) In other versions are used more sea terms and inherent to the sailor work: We’ll tauten the bunt, and we’ll be furl, aye; We’ll bunt up the sail with a fling, aye ; We’ll skin the ol’ rabbit an’ haul, aye.
3) or brandy
4) figure of speech to insult or talk badly
5) poop means both stern-aft and shit
6) bouse= nautical term its meanings: 1) To haul in using block and tackle. 2) To secure something by wrapping with small stuff. 3) To haul the anchor horizontal and secure it so that it is clear of the bow wave.In the context the reference is to the sail that is collected in a ‘bunt’, it is raised to fix it to the yard
7)In the context of the shanty the sailor complains of food and discipline and also having to pay Paddy Doyle for his poor equipment!

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/paddyd.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/paddydoyle.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=135246
http://www.liverpoolpicturebook.com/2013/01/WGHerdman.html

Hurrah For the Black Ball Line!

Leggi in italiano

At the beginning of the nineteenth century the commercial demands of ships always faster and less “armed” compared to the previous century (era of massive galleons, vessels and frigates): so the Clipper was born, ships for the transport of goods, without frills and with more sails. They are the latest models of sailing ships, the apogee of the Age of sailing, then soon the engines will take over .. and the repertoire of the sea shanties will end up among the curiosities of antique dealers (or in the circuits of Folk music).

THE CLIPPER

Clippers traveled the two most important trade sea routes: China – England for tea and Australia – England for wool, they were competing with each other to reach maximum speed and arrive first, because the higher price was fixed by the first ship that reached the port. (see more)
The ships were famous for the harsh discipline on board and for the brutality of its officers: but the recruitment of the sailors was constant given the brevity of the engagement. The ships with the most terrible name were called “bloodboat” and its crew (mostly Irish sailors) “packet rats“.

“BLACK BALL” LINE

The Black Ball Line was the first shipping company to offer a transatlantic line service for the transport of passengers and goods. Born in 1817 from the idea of Jeremiah Thompson, with four clippers covering the route between Liverpool and New York, the Black Ball remained in business for about sixty years. The Black Ballers, were also postal and derived the name from their flag (the company logo) red forked with a black disk in the middle.

In addition to the red flag, the Black Ball were distinguished by a large black ball also designed on the bow sail

The Company was renowned for its scrupulous organization of departures that took place on the first of the month, with any weather; it had very fast ships and the journey from England to America, mostly against the wind, lasted generally “just” four weeks, while the return, with the wind in its favor, could last less than three weeks. The business was profitable despite the competition, in fact in 1851 the company James Baines & Co. of Liverpool adopted the same name and the same flag of the Black Ball Line! The Black Ball Line of James Baines & Co. also operated on the route between Liverpool and Australia.

Given the premises it could not therefore miss a sea shanty on the Black Ball line (probable origin 1845): the text versions are many, compared to few recordings on YouTube

W. Symons. – Patterson, J.E. “Sailors’ Work Songs.” Good Words 41(28) (June 1900) Public Domain

 “Hurrah For the Black Ball Line”

Peter Kasin  with  introduction and demonstration of the type of work combined with the singing
 Ewan MacColl – The Blackball Line 0:01 (Rare UK 8″ EP record released on Topic Records in 1957)

I served my time in the Black Ball line
To me way-aye-aye, hurray-ah
with the Black ball line I served me time
Hurrah for the Black Ball Line
The Black Ball Ships are good and true
They are the ships for me and you (1)
(For once there was a Black Ball Ship
That fourteen knots an hour could clip
You will surely find a rich gold mine(2)
Just take a trip in the Black Ball Line)
Just take a trip to Liverpool (3)
To Liverpool, that Yankee school
The Yankee sailors (4) you’ll see there
With red-top boots (5) and short-cut hair
(At Liverpool docks we bid adieu
To Poll and Bet and lovely Sue
And now we’re bound for New York Town
It’s there we’ll drink, and sorrow drown)

NOTES
1) even if it seems an advertising spot, the reality for the crews boarded on the Black Ballers was harder: the first officer was usually ruthless and violent to maintain discipline and keep the speed standard of the crossing high
2) this verse refers, at the time of the gold fever that broke out in California in 1848
3) between the beginning and the mid-nineteenth century the majority of British immigrants boarded from the port of Liverpool
4) even if the captain was American (the ships were equipped with the best captains money of the time could buy), the sailors were not only American but often English, Irish and Scandinavian
5) red was the dominant color of sailors uniform also in the cuffed boots

Foc’sle Singers & Paul Clayton (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings 1959) 


In the Black Ball line I served my time
Hurrah for the Black Ball line
In the Black Ball line I had a good time
Hurrah for the Black Ball line
The Black Ball Ships are good and true
They are the ships for me and you
For once there was a Black Ball Ship
That fourteen knots an hour(1) could clip(2)
Her yards were square(3), her gear all new,
She had a good and gallant crew
One day whilst sailing on the sea,
They saw a vessel on their lee,
They knew it was a pirate craft,
All armed with guns before and aft,
They did not fear as you may think
But made the pirates water drink

NOTES
(text from here, see also an extended version here)
1)1 knot is worth 1 mile / h, so 14 knots means 14 miles per hour
2) To clip it = to run with speed
3)  “in seamens language, the yards are square, when they are arranged at right angles with the mast or the keel. The yards and sails are said also to be square, when they are of greater extent than usual. “

Roger Watson from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor (Vol 1)

Tozer calls this shanty an anchor song, Whall gives it for windlass, Colcord for halyard. Hugill says that he disagrees with the collectors who attribute shanties to specific jobs. Short, who gave it to Sharp as a capstan shanty, gave only one verse (“In Tapscott’s Line…”) and the words Sharp published are, frankly, unbelievable (e.g. “It was there we discharged our cargo boys” and “The Skipper said, that will do, my boys”). Both Colcord and Hugill also comment on Sharp’s published words. We have utilised fairly standard Blackball Line verses, slightly bent towards Short’s Tapscott Line theme. There is a degree of cynicism in this text—Tapscott was a con-man: he advertised his ships as being over 1000 tons when, in reality, they were 600 tons at the most!” (from here)


In Tapscott (1) line we’re bound to shine
A way, Hooray, Yah
In Tapscott line we are bound
to shine
Hooray for the Black Ball Line.
In the Black Ball line I served my time
in the Black Ball I wasted me prime.
Just you’ll take a trip to Liverpool
To Liverpool, a Yankee school.
Oh the Yankee sailors you’ll see there
With red-top boots and short-cut hair.
Fifteen days is a Black Ball ride(2)
but Tapscott ship are a thousand
ton.
At Liverpool docks we bid adieu
for Tapscott ship and golden crew.
In Tapscott line we are bound to shine
In Tapscott line we are bound to shine

NOTES
1) William and James Tapscott were brothers who organized the trip for immigrants from Britain to America (the first based in Liverpool and the second in New York) often taking advantage of the ingenuity of their clients. Initially they worked for the Black Ball Line and then set up their own transport line that provided a very cheap trip to the Americas, so the conditions of the trip were terrible and the food poor. In 1849 William Tapscott went bankrupt and was tried and convicted of fraud against the company’s shareholders.  see more
2) legendary racing competitions were hired between the American and British companies: under the motto “play or pay” two ships left New York on February 2, 1839, it was the first challenge between the Black baller Columbus, 597 tons, Captain De Peyster and the Sheridan of the Dramatic Line 895 tons; Columbus won the race in 16 days, while Sheridan arrived in Liverpool two days later
“England, frankly confessing herself beaten and unable to compete with such ships as these, changed her attitude from hostility to open admiration. She surrendered the Atlantic packet trade to American enterprise, and British merchantmen sought their gains in other waters. The Navigation Laws still protected their commerce in the Far East and they were content to jog at a more sedate gait than these weltering packets whose skippers were striving for passages of a fortnight, with the forecastle doors nailed fast and the crew compelled to stay on deck from Sandy Hook to Fastnet Rock.” ~ Old Merchant Marine, Ch VIII. “The Packet Ships of the Roaring Forties”

LINK
https://hubpages.com/education/Legends-of-the-Blackball-Line
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/12/74-hooraw-for-blackball-line.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/LxA489.html http://warrenfahey.com/fc_maritime8c.html http://www.well.com/~cwj/dogwatch/chanteys/Black%20Ball%20Line.html http://www.oceannavigator.com/October-2011/Nov-Dec-2011-Issue-198-Hurrah-for-the-Black-Ball-Line/ http://www.contemplator.com/sea/blkball.html http://anitra.net/chanteys/blackball.html
http://warrenfahey.com/ccarey-s13.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-focsle-singers/songs-and-shanties/american-folk-celtic/music/album/smithsonian
http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/smithsonian_folkways/SFW40053.pdf
http://www.exmouthshantymen.com/songbook.php?id=61

Admiral Benbow ballads

Leggi in italiano

The heroic exploits of Admiral John Benbow (1653-1702) are sung in some contemporary ballads dating back to the days of the Spanish Civil War. He was called “the Brother Tar” because he started his military carrier from below, as a simple sailor; thanks to his ingenuity, the courage and help of his mentor Admiral Arthur Herbert, Count of Torrington.
His activity, except for a parenthesis in which he gave himself to the merchant navy (1686-1689), was dedicated to the Royal Navy. He left the army the degree of master, after being brought before the court martial because of a dispute against an officer, it should be noted that the code of conduct between the officers was very rigid (and even today with military degrees there is little to joke) and after having brought his public apology to Captain Booth of the Adventure and repaid the fine with three months of work without pay, Benbow decided to resign. The following year he became the owner of the frigate Benbow roamed the Mediterranean and the English Channel hunting for pirates, earning the reputation of a skilled and ruthless captain. Returning to the navy in 1689 with the rank of third lieutenant on the Elizabeth, after four months he obtained the rank of commander of the York and he distinguished himself in the naval actions along the French coasts; he was then sent to the West Indies to eradicate piracy and in 1701 he was appointed vice-admiral. It is said that King William had offered the command to several gentlemen who refused (because of the climate) and so he exclaimed “I understand, we will spare the gentlemen and we will send to the Antilles the honest Benbow”

Tarpaulin&Gentleman

In the early English Navy there was a system of voluntary training: a captain used to take care of young boy and instruct them as long as they were unable to pass the aptitude test. However, there remained a dividing line between the tarpaulin officer, without a high social status and the gentleman officer, the privileged aspirant. In fact, the gentlemen obtained their license of ensign more for relationships of kinships that for merits, so that in 1677 it was introduced an entrance examination that had to precede a compulsory three-year training. But in 1730 they preferred to return to the old system of voluntary training.

THE LAST BATTLE

His last action, off the coast of Cape Santa Marta , was against Admiral Jean Du Casse and his fleet: from 19 to 25 August 1702; Benbow had seven ships at his command but his captains proved unwilling to obey orders: only on the afternoon of the first day a fight was waged and only the flagship and the Ruby under captain George Walton chased French ships with the intent to give battle, while the other english ships were kept out. The Ruby was put out of action on the 22nd and at this point the Falmouth in command of Samuel Vincent decided to line up with Benbow, but it was seriously damaged and forced to retreat, the same Benbow besieged by the French ships and subjected to a cannon shot had a mangled leg and he was brought below deck, where a war council was held with his officers who had all gathered together on board the flagship.
To see the war action in detail see

from Master and Commander

Benbow was determined to pursuit of battle, but his captains, believing they had no chance of victory, recommended him merely of pursuing the French ships: Benbow, convinced that a mutiny was being carried out against him, gave the order to return in Jamaica and sent his commanders beheind the court martial on charges of insubordination; Captain Richard Kirby and Captain Cooper Wade were found guilty and shot. Despite the amputation of his leg Benbow died two months after the battle and was buried in Kingston.

ADMIRAL BENBOW BY CECIL SHARP

The melody is equally popular and it is shared with the Captain Kidd ballad giving life to a melodic family used for various songs.
Among the songs of the sea in the series Sea Shanty Edition for the fourth episode of the video game Assassin’s Creed that include some ballads about the brave captains, to celebrate the victories or heroic deeds that led them to death.
The version in Assassin’s Creed from the text transcribed by Cecil Sharp on the song of Captain Lewis of Minehead (1906) the strophes, however, are halved (I, II, VI)

I
Come all you seamen bold
and draw near, and draw near
Come all you seamen bold and draw near
It’s of an Admiral’s fame Brave Benbow (1) was his name
How he sailed up on the main (2)
you shall hear, you shall hear
II
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight, for to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail in a keen and pleasant gale
But his captains they turn’d tail in a fright (3), in a fright
III
Says Kirby unto Wade (4), “We will run, we will run.”
Says Kirby unto Wade, “We will run. For I value no disgrace
nor the losing of my place
But the enemy I won’t face
Nor his guns, nor his guns.”
IV
The Ruby (5) and Benbow fought the French, fought the French,
The Ruby and Benbow Fought the French.
They fought them up and down
‘Til the blood came trickling down
‘Til the blood came trickling down Where they lay, where they lay.
V
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot, by chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot.
Brave Benbow lost his legs
And all on his stumps he begs
“Fight on, my English lads
‘Tis our lot, ‘tis our lot.”
VI
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried, Benbow cried
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried
“Let a cradle now in haste on the quarterdeck (6) be placed
That the enemy I may face
‘Til I die, ‘Til I die
Mary Evans Picture Library : J R Skelton in Lang, “Outposts of Empire” 1910

NOTES
1) Benbow made his career in the ranks of the Royal Navy in the late 1600s until he became Vice-Admiral
2) the West Indian Sea
3) in a fright: panicked
4) the captains who left the battle were tried and sentenced to death by desertion
5) the Ruby supported the attack of the flagship Breda against the French vessels
6) Benbow despite the injured leg (which will be amputated) wants to continue to give orders on the bridge and so requires a cradle to be able to remain seated and stretch the leg crushed, provisionally bandaged by the doctor

COPPER FAMILY VERSION

Paul Clayton, from “Whaling and sailing songs from the days of Moby Dick” 1954

I
It was often at Marais
Calling Benbow by his name
He fought on the raging main
You must know
Oh, the ship rocks up and down
And the shots are flying round
The enemy tumbling down
There they lay, there they lay
II
‘Twas Reuben (1) and Benbow
Fought the French, fought the French
‘Twas Reuben and Benbow
Fought the French,
Down on his old stump he fell
And so loudly he did call
Fight ye on, me English lads
‘Tis my lot, ’tis my lot
III
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried, Benbow cried
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried,
Let a bed be fetched in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed
That the enemy I might face
‘Til I die, ’til I die
IV
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died, Benbow died
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died
What a shocking sight to see
When Benbow was carried away
He was carried to Kingston church (2)
There he lay, there he lay

NOTES
1) the Ruby supported the attack of the flagship Breda against the French vessels
2) he was buried in the Parish Church of Kingston (Jamaica)

ADMIRAL BENBOW BY WILLIAM CHAPPELL

Entitled “Benbow, the Brother Tar’s song” the ballad was written by William Chappel in his “Old English Popular Music”.
“The tune is a variant of Love Will Find Out the Way, first published in 1651. Originally, it circulated in the world of fashion, but after 1680 it seems to have passed almost exclusively into the keeping of agricultural workers. Chappell collected it from hop-pickers in the mid nineteenth century, and Lucy Broadwood found it in Sussex in 1898.” (from here)
The action is very inaccurate (see above)
June Tabor & Martin Simpson from A cut above, 1982

I
We sailed from Virginia
and thence to Fayall
Where we watered our shipping
and then we weighed all.
Full in view on the seas, boys,
seven sails we did espy;
We mannéd our capstans
and weighed speedily.
II
Now the first we come up with was a brigantine sloop (1)
And we asked if the others was as big as they looked;
Ah, but turning to windward,
as near as we could lie
We saw there were ten (2) men of war cruising by.
III
We drew up our squadron in very nice line
And boldly we fought them for full four hours time;
But the day being spent, boys, and the night a-coming on
We left them alone till the early next morn.
IV
Now the very next morning the engagement proved hot
And brave Admiral Benbow received a chain shot;
And as he was wounded to his merry men he did say,
“Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away!”
V
Now the guns they did rattle and the bullets did fly,
But brave Admiral Benbow for help would not cry;
“Take me down to the cockpit, there is ease for my smarts,
If my merry men see me, it would sure break their hearts.”
VI
Now, the very next morning by break of the day
They hoisted their topsails and so bore away;
We bore to Port Royal where the people flocked much
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church (3).
VII
Come all you brave fellows, wherever you’ve been,
Let us drink to the health of our King and our Queen,
And another good health to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance (4) of great Admiral Benbow.

NOTES
1) the French fleet under the command of Admiral Du Casse was escorting a convoy of troops, the flagship Breda captured the Anne, originally an English ship captured by the French
2) they were actually only 5
3) Benbow was buried in the Parish Church of Kingston (Jamaica)
4) in his honor Robert Louis Stevenson in his book “Treasure Island” inserts an “Admiral Benbow Inn” at the beginning of the story

LINK
https://www.historytoday.com/sam-willis/dark-side-admiral-benbow
http://bravebenbow.com/
http://bravebenbow.com/?page_id=136
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=137
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2169
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=109642
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56280
http://reelyredd.com/admiral-benbow-song.htm

https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/admiralbenbow.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/admiralbenbow.html

Le ballate dell’ammiraglio Benbow

Read the post in English

Le gesta eroiche dell’Ammiraglio John Benbow (1653-1702) sono cantate in alcune ballate coeve risalenti ai tempi della Guerra di secessione spagnola. Era chiamato “the Brother Tar” perchè diede la scalata alla catena del comando militare dal basso, come semplice marinaio; grazie al suo ingegno, al coraggio e all’aiuto del suo mentore l’ammiraglio Arthur  Herbert, Conte di Torrington.
La sua attività, tranne una parentesi in cui si diede al commercio privato (1686-1689), fu dedicata alla marina militare. Lasciò la marina con il gradi di luogonentente (master, cioè l’ufficiale di rotta) dopo essere stato portato davanti alla corte marziale a causa di una battutaccia contro un ufficiale, c’è da rilevare che il codice di comportamento tra gli ufficiali era molto rigido (e ancora oggi con i gradi militari c’è ben poco da scherzare) e dopo aver porto le sue pubbliche scuse al capitano Booth dell’Adventure e ripagato la multa con tre mesi di lavoro senza paga, Benbow pensò bene di dimettersi. L’anno successivo diventato proprietario della fregata Benbow scorazzò per il mediterraneo e nel canale della Manica a caccia di pirati guadagnandosi la fama di capitano abile e spietato.  Rientrato nel giungo del 1689 nella marina militare con il grado di terzo luogotenente sull’ Elizabeth,  dopo nemmeno quattro mesi ottenne il grado di comandante della York e si distinse nelle azioni navali contro le coste francesi; venne mandato poi nelle Indie Occidentali a debellare la pirateria  e nel 1701 fu nominato vice-ammiraglio. Si dice che re Guglielmo avesse offerto il comando a parecchi gentlemen che però rifiutarono (a causa del clima) e così esclamò “Ho capito, risparmieremo i damerini e manderemo alle Antille l’onesto Benbow”

Tarpaulin&Gentleman

Nella Marina inglese degli inizi vigeva il sistema dell’addestramento volontario: un capitano prendeva al servizio dei giovani e li istruiva fintanto che non fossero in grado di superare l’esame attitudinale. Restava comunque una linea di demarcazione tra il tarpaulin officer, privo di alto status sociale e il gentleman officer, l’aspirante privilegiato. Di fatto i gentlemen ottenevano la loro patente di guardiamarina più per relazioni di parentele a fronte di una preparazione in mare superficiale, cosicchè nel 1677 fu introdotto un esame di ammissione che doveva precedere un addestramento di tre anni obbligatorio (oppure il candidato doveva avere già fatto esperienza nella marina mercantile). Ma nel 1730 si preferì ritornare al vecchio sistema dell’addestramento volontario.

L’ULTIMA BATTAGLIA

La sua ultima battaglia, al largo di Capo Santa Marta sulle coste dell’attuale Colombia,  fu quella ingaggiata contro l’ammiraglio Jean Du Casse e la sua flotta: la battaglia con relativo inseguimento durò dal 19 al 25 agosto 1702; Benbow aveva al suo comando sette navi ma i suoi capitani si dimostrarono poco propensi ad ubbidire agli ordini: solo nel pomeriggio del primo giorno venne ingaggiato un combattimento e solo la nave ammiraglia e la Ruby sotto il capitano George Walton si diedero all’inseguimento delle navi francesi con l’intento di dare battaglia mentre le altre navi si mantenevano defilate. La Ruby fu messa fuori combattimento il 22 e a questo punto la Falmouth  al comando di Samuel Vincent decise di schierarsi con Benbow, ma venne seriamente danneggiata e costretta a ritirarsi, lo stesso Benbow assediato dalle navi francesi e sottoposto a una bordata di cannonate si trovò con una gamba maciullata e venne portato sottocoperta, dove si tenne un consiglio di guerra con i suoi ufficiali nel frattempo riunitisi tutti a bordo dell’ammiraglia.
Per vedere in dettaglio l’azione di guerra vedi qui

dal film Master and Commander

Benbow era determinato a proseguire l’inseguimento per dar battaglia ma i suoi capitani ritenendo di non avere possibilità di vittoria raccomandavano di limitarsi a inseguire le navi francesi: Benbow convinto che si stesse mettendo in atto un ammutinamento nei suoi confrontii diede l’ordine di tornare in Giamaica e mandò i suoi comandanti davanti alla corte marziale con l’accusa di insubordinazione; il capitano Richard Kirby e il capitano Cooper Wade vennero riconosciuti colpevoli e fucilati. Nonostante l’amputazione della gamba  Benbow morì due mesi dopo la battaglia e venne sepolto a Kingston.

ADMIRAL BENBOW DI CECIL SHARP

La melodia è altrettanto popolare e si accomuna alla ballata Captain Kidd dando vita a una sorta di famiglia melodica utilizzata per varie canzoni.
Tra le canzoni del mare nella serie Sea Shanty Edition per il quarto episodio del video-gioco Assassin’s Creed si annoverano alcune ballate sui capitani coraggiosi, per celebrarne le vittorie o le gesta eroiche che li hanno portati alla morte.
La versione in Assassin’s Creed dal testo trascritto da Cecil Sharp sul canto del Capitano Lewis di Minehead (1906) le strofe però sono dimezzate (I, II, VI)


I
Come all you seamen bold
and draw near, and draw near
Come all you seamen bold and draw near
It’s of an Admiral’s fame Brave Benbow (1) was his name
How he sailed up on the main (2)
you shall hear, you shall hear
II
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight, for to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail
For to fight
Brave Benbow he set sail in a keen and pleasant gale
But his captains they turn’d tail in a fright (3), in a fright
III
Says Kirby unto Wade (4), “We will run, we will run.”
Says Kirby unto Wade, “We will run. For I value no disgrace
nor the losing of my place
But the enemy I won’t face
Nor his guns, nor his guns.”
IV
The Ruby (5) and Benbow fought the French, fought the French,
The Ruby and Benbow Fought the French.
They fought them up and down
‘Til the blood came trickling down
‘Til the blood came trickling down Where they lay, where they lay.
V
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot, by chain shot,
Brave Benbow lost his legs
By chain shot.
Brave Benbow lost his legs
And all on his stumps he begs
“Fight on, my English lads
‘Tis our lot, ‘tis our lot.”
VI
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried, Benbow cried
The surgeon dress’d his wounds Benbow cried
“Let a cradle now in haste on the quarterdeck (6) be placed
That the enemy I may face
‘Til I die, ‘Til I die
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Bravi marinai venite tutti più vicino, più vicino,
Bravi marinai venite tutti
più vicino,
vi voglio raccontare del coraggioso Ammiraglio Benbow
di come navigava in mare
ascoltate, ascoltate.
II
Il coraggioso  Benbow alzò le vele
per lottare, per lottare
il coraggioso  Benbow alzò le vele
per lottare,
il coraggioso  Benbow alzò le vele
con un vento forte di burrasca
ma i suoi capitani fuggirono per vigliaccheria , per vigliaccheria.
III
Disse Kirby a Wade “Scappiamo
scappiamo”
Disse Kirby a Wade “Scappiamo
perchè non valuto il disonore
o la perdita della mia posizione,
ma i nemici non voglio affrontare
e nemmeno i loro cannoni, i cannoni”
IV
La Ruby e Benbow combattevano  i francesi, combattevano i francesi.  la Ruby e Benbow combattevano francesi
li combatterono in lungo e in largo
finchè il sangue iniziò a sgorgare
finchè il sangue iniziò a sgorgare,
à dove stavano, là dove stavano
V
Il coraggioso Benbow perse le sue gambe, per un colpo di cannone,
il coraggioso Benbow perse le sue gambe, per un colpo di cannone
il coraggioso Benbow perse le sue gambe, e sulle stampelle implora
” Combattete, inglesi
è il nostro destino, il nostro destino”
VI
Il chirurgo fasciò le sue ferite
Benbow gridò, Benbow gridò
Il chirurgo fasciò le sue ferite
Benbow gridò
“Portatemi subito una culla
e mettetela sul cassero
che i nemici combatterò
fino alla morte, fino alla morte.”
Mary Evans Picture Library : J R Skelton in Lang, “Outposts of Empire” 1910

NOTE
1) Benbow fece carriera nei ranghi della Marina Inglese sul finire del 1600 fino a diventare Vice-Ammiraglio
2) il mare delle Indie Occidentali
3) in a fright: in preda al panico
4) i capitani che abbandonarono la battaglia vennero processati e condannati a morte per diserzione
5) la nave Ruby sostenne l’attacco  dell’ammiraglia Breda contro i vascelli francesi
6) Benbow nonostante la gamba ferita (che gli verrà amputata) vuole continuare a impartire gli ordini  sul ponte di comando e così richiede una culla per poter restare seduto e distendere la gamba maciullata, fasciata in modo provvisorio dal medico di bordo (non sappiamo cosa ci facesse una culla a bordo di una nave da guerra e in effetti in altre versioni diventa una brandina o  un lettino)

LA VERSIONE DELLA FAMIGLIA COPPER

Paul Clayton, in “Whaling and sailing songs from the days of Moby Dick” 1954


I
It was often at Marais
Calling Benbow by his name
He fought on the raging main
You must know
Oh, the ship rocks up and down
And the shots are flying round
The enemy tumbling down
There they lay, there they lay
II
‘Twas Reuben (1) and Benbow
Fought the French, fought the French
‘Twas Reuben and Benbow
Fought the French,
Down on his old stump he fell
And so loudly he did call
Fight ye on, me English lads
‘Tis my lot, ’tis my lot
III
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried, Benbow cried
When the doctor dressed his wound
Benbow cried,
Let a bed be fetched in haste
On the quarterdeck be placed
That the enemy I might face
‘Til I die, ’til I die
IV
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died, Benbow died
On Tuesday morning last
Benbow died
What a shocking sight to see
When Benbow was carried away
He was carried to Kingston church (2)
There he lay, there he lay
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Spesso si trovava a Marais
si chiamava Benbow di nome,
di come combattè in mare
dovete sapere.
Oh la nave rollava su e giù
e i colpi volavano
il nemico facevano a pezzi
là dove stavano, là dove stavano
II
C’erano la Ruby e Benbow
a combattere i francesi, combattere i francesi. C’erano Reuben e Benbow
a combattere i francesi
dal suo moncone cadde
e così forte gridò
” Continuate a combattere, inglesi
è la mia sorte, è la mia sorte”
III
Quando il dottore fasciò la ferita
Benbow gridò, Benbow gridò
quando il dottore fasciò la ferita
Benbow gridò
“Che un lettino sia subito
portato sul cassero
che i nemici combatterò
finchè non morirò, finchè non morirò.”
IV
Il mattino di martedì scorso
Benbow morì, Benbow morì,
il mattino di martedì scorso
Benbow morì
che orribile visione
quando Benbow fu portato via
fu portato alla chiesa di Kingston
là giace, là giace.

NOTE
1) la nave Ruby sostenne l’attacco  dell’ammiraglia Breda contro i vascelli francesi
2) fu sepolto nella Chiesa Parrocchiale di Kingston (Giamaica)

ADMIRAL BENBOW DI WILLIAM CHAPPELL

Intitolata “Benbow, the Brother Tar’s song” la ballata fu trascritta da William Chappel nel suo “Old English Popular Music”.
“La melodia è una variante di Love Will Find Out the Way, pubblicata per la prima volta nel 1651. Inizialmente circolava nei salotti alla moda, ma dopo il 1680 passò nelle canzoni della classe lavoratrice in paricolare dei contadini. Chappell la collezionò tra i raccoglitori di luppolo a metà del XIX secolo e Lucy Broadwood la trovò nel Sussex nel 1898.” (tratto da qui)
Il racconto della battaglia è molto impreciso
June Tabor & Martin Simpson in A cut above, 1982


I
We sailed from Virginia
and thence to Fayall
Where we watered our shipping
and then we weighed all.
Full in view on the seas, boys,
seven sails we did espy;
We mannéd our capstans
and weighed speedily.
II
Now the first we come up with was a brigantine sloop (1)
And we asked if the others was as big as they looked;
Ah, but turning to windward,
as near as we could lie (2)
We saw there were ten (3) men of war cruising by.
III
We drew up our squadron in very nice line
And boldly we fought them for full four hours time;
But the day being spent, boys, and the night a-coming on
We left them alone till the early next morn.
IV
Now the very next morning the engagement proved hot
And brave Admiral Benbow received a chain shot;
And as he was wounded to his merry men he did say,
“Take me up in your arms, boys, and carry me away!”
V
Now the guns they did rattle and the bullets did fly,
But brave Admiral Benbow for help would not cry;
“Take me down to the cockpit, there is ease for my smarts,
If my merry men see me, it would sure break their hearts.”
VI
Now, the very next morning by break of the day
They hoisted their topsails and so bore away;
We bore to Port Royal where the people flocked much
To see Admiral Benbow carried to Kingston Church (4).
VII
Come all you brave fellows, wherever you’ve been,
Let us drink to the health of our King and our Queen,
And another good health to the girls that we know,
And a third in remembrance (5) of great Admiral Benbow.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Siamo salpati da Virginia
e poi da Fayall
dove abbiamo  imbarcato le provviste d’acqua poi siamo salpati.
In piena vista sui mari, ragazzi,
sette vele abbiamo adocchiato;
abbiamo levato l’ancora
e salpato rapidamente.
II
La prima nave che raggiungemmo era un brigantino
e abbiamo chiesto se gli altri erano grandi come sembravano;
Ah, ma virando al vento,
più vicino che si poteva
abbiamo visto che c’erano dieci navi da guerra che s’avvicinavano
III
Abbiamo schieratola nostra batteria in una linea molto precisa
e arditamente li abbiamo combattuti per ben quattro ore;
ma la giornata era trascorsa, ragazzi, e la notte stava arrivando
li abbiamo lasciati soli fino al mattino seguente.
IV
La mattina dopo, la battaglia si è dimostrato rovente
e il coraggioso Admiral Benbow ha ricevuto un colpo di cannone;
e mentre era ferito ai suoi uomini, ha detto,
“Prendetemi tra le vostre braccia, ragazzi, e portami via!”
V
Ora i cannoni hanno tuonato e le pallottole fischiato,
ma il coraggioso ammiraglio Benbow  non avrebbe pianto per chiedere aiuto;
“Portami giù nella cabina, per dare sollievo ai miei dolori
se i miei uomini mi vedessero, si spezzerebbero i loro cuori. ”
VI
Ora, il giorno dopo, al sorgere
del sole
loro [le navi francesi] issarono le vele e così si allontanarono;
noi ci portammo a Port Royal, dove la gente si affollava
per  vedere l’Ammiraglio Benbow portato a Kingston Church.
VII
Vieni tutti bravi compagni, ovunque voi siate
Beviamo alla salute del nostro re e della nostra regina,
un altro brindisi alla salute delle ragazze che conosciamo,
e il terzo in ricordo del grande ammiraglio Benbow.

NOTE
1) Il termine è di origine italiana (derivato da brigante, nella sua espressione originaria di componente una brigata, cioè gruppo di più persone da cui il termine). Infatti nel Quattrocento e nel Cinquecento il brigantino a vele latine era utilizzato frequentemente come unità per la guerra di corsa e la pirateria. Il brigantino era impiegato principalmente come cargo o nave di scorta; ebbe grande diffusione nel Mar Mediterraneo e nell’Europa del nord. (da wikipedia)
Le navi da guerra francesi al comando dell’ammiraglio Du Casse stavano scortando un convoglio di trasporto truppe. la nave ammiraglia Breda catturò la galera Anne , originariamente una nave inglese catturata dai francesi
2) è l’andatura di bolina quando la nave “stringe il vento”
3) le navi da guerra francesi erano in realtà solo 5 (come scorta alle navi da carico)
4) Benbow fu sepolto nella Chiesa Parrocchiale di Kingston (Giamaica)
5) in suo onore Robert Louis Stevenson nel suo libro “L’isola del Tesoro” inserisce una “Admiral Benbow Innall’inizio della storia

FONTI
https://www.historytoday.com/sam-willis/dark-side-admiral-benbow
http://bravebenbow.com/
http://bravebenbow.com/?page_id=136
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=137
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2169
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=109642
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56280
http://reelyredd.com/admiral-benbow-song.htm

https://mainlynorfolk.info/copperfamily/songs/admiralbenbow.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/admiralbenbow.html

THE TURKISH REVERLY

Una sea ballad molto popolare nel circuito folk anglo-americano conosciuta con vari titoli (“The Sweet Trinity”, “The Golden Vanity”, “The Golden Willow Tree”) appare in stampa in foglio volante (broadside) nel 1635 con il titolo di Sir Walter Raleigh Sailing In The Lowlands.Il professor Child la riporta in tre versioni (Child ballad #286) collegandola storicamente al vascello di Sir Walter Raleigh “The Sweet Trinity”, un personaggio impopolare, di quella nuova nobiltà nata dal mondo degli avventurieri, spocchiosa ma anche infida.
Nella ballata  si narra un evento rocambolesco quanto improbabile: l’affondamento di una nave nemica bucandone lo scafo con un non ben precisato attrezzo! (vedere introduzione)

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA

Una versione sentimentale viene dalla Virginia, da una registrazione sul campo di Horton BarkerChilhowie / St. Clair’s Bottom risalente al 1932 ripresa da Paul Clayton nel suo album “Whaling and Sailing Songs from the Days of Moby Dick”.
Così si riporta nelle note “The ballad probably originated about the middle of the 17th century when the Barbary pirates (known as Turks) raided shipping in the English Channel and even looted coastal towns.” He transcribed and learned his version from a 1932 aluminum recording of one of the best American traditional singers, Horton Barker of Chilhowie / St. Clair’s Bottom, Virginia, in the collection of the Virginia Folklore Society.”

Il nome che viene dato alla nave berbera pirata è declinato in molte varianti che non sempre sono il titolo della ballata: “The Turkish Reveille,” “The Turkish Revelee,” “The Turkish Rebilee” and “The Turkish Revoloo,” “The Turkish Revelry,” “The Turkish Revelrie,” “The Kish Rebel Lee,” “The Turkish Revelee,” “The Turkish Shilveree,” e “The Turkish Travelee.”

ASCOLTA Paul Clayton in “Whaling and Sailing Songs from the Days of Moby Dick” 1957

ASCOLTA Loudon Wainwright III in Rogue’s Gallery, Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys ANTI 2006 (versione che riprende quella di Paul Clayton del 1957)


I
There was a little ship
and she sailed on the sea
and the name of the ship was the Turkish Revelry(1)
she sailed down in that lonely lonesome water, she sailed on the lonesome sea
II
Up stepped a little sailor
saying “What will you give to me(2)
to sink that ship to the bottom of the sea? If I sink her in the lonely lonesome water ..
III
“I have a house and I have some land
and I have a daughter that shall be at your command(3)
if you sink her in the lonely
IV
He bowed on his breast
and away swam he
and he swam till he came to the Turkish Revelry
she sailed down in that lonely …
V
He had a little awe
all made for to bore(4)
and he bored nine holes in the bottom of the floor
and he sink her in the lonely …
VI
He bowed on his breast
away swam he
and he swam till he cam to the Golden Willow Tree
as she sailed on the lonely …
VI
“Captian o’ captian
will you be good as your word
or either take me up on board
for I’ve sunk her
in that lonely …”
VII
“No I won’t be
as good as my word(5)
or neither will I take you up on board
though you’ve sunk her
in that lonely ..”
VIII
“If it were not for
the love I bear your men(6)
I would sink you the same just as I sank them
I’d sink you in that lonely …”
IX
He bowed on his breast
and downward sunk he
bidding a farewell to the Golden Willow Tree
he sunk in that lonely …
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era una piccola nave
che navigava sul mare
e il nome della nave era
“the Turkish Revelry”(1)
navigava in quelle acque solitarie
di un mare solitario.
II
Avanti si fece un giovane marinaio,
dicendo “Cosa mi darete(2)
per mandare quella nave sul fondo dell’oceano?
Se l’affondassi nelle acque solitarie..”
III
“Ho una casa e delle terre
e ho una figlia che sarà al tuo comando(3),
se tu la affondassi nelle acque solitarie..”
IV
Il ragazzo si piegò in avanti
e via nuotò
e nuotò finchè raggiunse la
“Turkish Revelry”
che navigava sulle acque solitarie
V
Ebbe una piccola indecisione
di dove bucare(4),
ma poi fece 9 buchi sul fondo della chiglia
e l’affondò nelle acque solitarie..
VI
Si piegò in avanti
e lontano nuotò
e nuotò finchè raggiunse la “Golden Willow Tree”
che navigava nelle acque solitarie..
VI
“Capitano o capitano,
mantenete fede alla vostra parola,
prendetemi a bordo
perchè ho affondato la nave
in quelle acque solitarie..”
VII
“No, non voglio
essere di parola(5)
e nemmeno prenderti a bordo
sebbene tu abbia affondato la nave
in quelle acque solitarie ..”
VIII
“Se non fosse per l’amore che porto ai vostri uomini(6)
vi affonderei come ho affondato l’altro equipaggio
vi affonderei in quelle acque solitarie.. 
IX
Si piegò in avanti
e verso il basso affondò
mandando un addio alla Golden Willow Tree
affogò in quelle acque solitarie..

NOTE
1)i pirati musulmani delle coste africane provenivano da quella che gli europei chiamavano Barberia (in inglese Barbary e in francese Côte des Barbaresques) ovvero Algeria Tunisia, Libia, Marocco (e più precisamente le città-stato di Algeri, Tunisi e Tripoli, ma anche i porti di Salè e Tetuan). La definizione più corretta è corsari barbareschi perchè assalivano solo le navi dell’Europa cristiana (compiendo inoltre razzie anche nei paesi cristiani della costa atlantica e del mediterraneo per procacciare schiavi o per ottenere lauti riscatti). Nel termine barbareschi si comprendevano arabi, berberi, turchi nonché i rinnegati europei. Per quanto le attività piratesche fossero endemiche nel Mar Mediterraneo il periodo di massima attività dei corsari barbareschi fu la prima metà del 1600. Le ballate sui pirati “turchi” riprendono popolarità negli anni tra il 1795 e il 1815 in concomitanza degli attacchi dei corsari barbareschi alle navi americane. continua
2) l’eroico mozzo non era poi così disinteressato a guadagnarci qualcosa oltre che la fama, e prima di prestare il suo aiuto chiede una contropartita
3) il capitano nell’immediatezza del pericolo promette non solo una ricompensa in denaro ma anche la mano della figlia, una promessa esorbitante data la differenza sociale tra i due, che ci si aspetterebbe più estorta dal giovane durante una trattativa che offerta spontaneamente dal capitano (a meno che non ci fosse già la malafede in partenza!)
4) il giovane mozzo dopo essersi diretto sotto lo scafo nemico lo buca in più punti facendolo affondare! Che fosse un’impresa realizzabile è del tutto opinabile, forse era passata per la testa di qualche “stratega dei mari” l’idea della formazione di un corpo di “sommozzatori” che si immergono sotto lo scafo per bucarlo! Poi sono arrivati i sottomarini…
5) il capitano, molto poco nobilmente, si rimangia la promessa e per nulla riconoscente, non intende riprendere a bordo il giovane mozzo
6) il giovane però non vuole rivalersi sulla nave e il suo equipaggio e si lascia annegare.

LA MELODIA CON PIU’ BRIO: THE GOLDEN VANITY

Ecco come diventa la stessa melodia velocizzata e in stile bluegrass!

ASCOLTA The Almanac Singers in “The Very Best Of American Folk titolo” The Golden Vanity

ASCOLTA Crooked Still in “Some Strange Country”, 2011 titolo “The Golden Vanity” nel video live 2009 , un arrangiamento molto personale in progressive bluegrass


I
There was a little ship
and she sailed on the sea
and the name of the ship was the Turkish Revelry(1)
she sailed upon the low, the lonesome low, she sailed upon the lonesome sea
II
She had not been out many more weeks than three
When she was overtaken by the Turkish Revelry
Sailing on the low..
III
Then up spoke a little cabin boy
saying “What will you give to me(2)
if I will them destroy?”
If I sink her in the low ..

IV
“The man who them destroys”,
the captain then replied
“It’s five thousand pounds
and my daughter for your bride”
If you sink them in the low..”
V
The boy smote his breast,
and down jumped he
He swam until he came to the Turkish Revelry
Sailing on the low…

VI
He had a little tool,
made for the use
He bored nine holes in her hull all at once
He sank her in the low …

VII
He swam back to the ship,
he beat upon the side
Crying “Captain pick me up,
I’m waving with the tide”
“I’m sinking in the low
VIII
“I will not pick you up”,
the Captain then replied
“I’ll shoot you, I’ll drown you,
I’ll sink you in the tide
I’ll sink you in the low…
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era una piccola nave
che navigava sul mare
e il nome della nave era “the Turkish Revelry”(1)
navigava nelle acque solitarie
di un mare solitario.
II
Non erano passate che più di tre settimane
quando fu superata dalla Turkish Revelry
navigava nelle acque solitarie…
III
Avanti si fece giovane mozzo,
dicendo “Cosa mi darete(2)
se li distruggerò?
Se l’affondassi nelle acque solitarie..”
IV
“All’uomo che li distruggerà –
allora il capitano rispose –
andranno 5mila sterline
e mia figlia in sposa(3),
se tu li affondassi nelle acque solitarie..”
V
Il ragazzo si piegò in avanti
e giù si gettò
e nuotò finchè raggiunse la “Turkish Revelry”
che navigava sulle acque solitarie
VI
Aveva un piccolo attrezzo
fatto per lo scopo(4), e fece 9 buchi sul fondo della chiglia in un colpo solo
e l’affondò nelle acque solitarie..
VII
Nuotò di ritorno alla nave
e diede un colpo sulla fiancata
gridando “Capitano prendimi su
sto nuotando contro corrente
sto affondando nelle acque solitarie..
VIII
“Non ti tirerò su –
il capitano allora rispose-
ti sparerò e ti annegherò(5)
ti affonderò nella corrente
ti affonderò nelle acque solitarie..

NOTE
4) qui la fantasia popolare si dilunga nell’immaginare come si potesse far affondare una nave perforandone lo scafo: ecco un prodigioso attrezzo che con un colpo riesce a fare 9 buchi
5) il capitano, molto poco nobilmente, si rimangia la promessa e per nulla riconoscente, non intende riprendere a bordo il giovane mozzo, anzi per essere certo che muoia gli spara pure!!

continua

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49885
http://web.lyon.edu/wolfcollection/songs/riddlegolden1260.html
http://www.harbourtownrecords.com/peterslyricsgoldenvanity.htm

HILO IN THE SEA SHANTIES

shanty_balladUna serie di canzoni marinaresche (sea shanty) hanno come soggetto il termine Hilo una parola diventata altro nel gergo marinaresco e condivisa da tutti gli shantymen.

Stan Hugill scrive: “…we will now run through those worksongs woven around the word ‘Hilo’. Hilo is a port in the Hawaiian group, and, although occasionally shellbacks may have been referring to this locality, usually it was a port in South America of which they were singing–the Peruvian nitrate port of Ilo. But in some of these Hilo shanties it was not a port, either in Hawaii or Peru, to which they were referring. Sometimes the word was a substitute for a ‘do’, a ‘jamboree’, or even a ‘dance’. And in some cases the word was used as a verb–to ‘hilo’ somebody or something. In this sense its origin and derivation is a mystery. Furthermore, since shanties were not composed in the normal manner, by putting them down, it is on paper quite possible many of these ‘hilos’ are nothing more than ‘high-low’, as Miss Colcord has it in her version of We’ll Ranzo Ray. Take your pick!” (tratto da qui)

HILO SOMEBODY

Come dice A.L Lloyd Hilo a volte vuol dire semplicemente “Hullo” oppure “Haul-o”
ASCOLTA Alan Mills su Spotify
ASCOLTA Ewan MacColl su Spotify

La strofa è ripetuta due volte seguita dai due ritornelli del coro


The blackbird sang unto our crew.
Hilo boys, Hilo(1).
The blackbird sang unto our crew.
Oh Hilo somebody, Hilo.
The blackbird sang so sweet to me.
We sailed away to Mobile Bay(2).
And now we’re bound to London Town.
I thought I heard the old man say:
“Just one more pull, and then belay.”
Hooray my boys, we’re homeward bound
We’ll soon be home in London town
And then we rolled on the street(3)
We’ll spend our money fast and free
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il merlo cantò alla nostra ciurma salve(tirate) ragazzi, salve(tirate),
Il merlo cantò alla nostra ciurma
salve a tutti (tirate tutti)
il merlo cantò dolcemente per me. Siamo salpati da Mobile Bay
e adesso siamo diretti alla città di Londra.
Credo di aver sentito dire dal capitano
“Ancora un tiro e poi è finito”.
Evviva ragazzi siamo diretti a casa, saremo preso a casa nella città di Londra
e poi andremo in giro(3)
a spendere il nostro denaro in fretta e senza freni

NOTE
1) heave-o, haul: vira e ala. Alare è un termine nautico che si dice per tirare con forza una cima o un cavo orizzontalmente o verticalmente
2) Mobile, città portuale dell’Alabama nel Golfo del Messico, già capitale della Louisiana francese. Mobile passò sotto il controllo britannico (Florida) e finì sotto il dominio spagnolo (dal 1780 al 1812) per poi diventare territorio degli Stati Uniti. “Tra il 1819 ed il 1822, con la creazione delle piantagioni, la popolazione aumentò a dismisura, inoltre, a favorire lo sviluppo cittadino vi era la sua posizione geografica, al centro delle tratte commerciali tra l’Alabama ed il Mississippi. Si sviluppò particolarmente il settore legato alla vendita ed al commercio del cotone, tanto che nel 1840, Mobile era seconda solo a New Orleans per esportazione del prezioso materiale.” (Wikipedia).
3) una delle tante Paradise street dei porti dedicate ai marinai con pubs, locande e donnine

TOM’S (JOHNNY) GONE TO HILO

Una canzone nostalgica e malinconica forse un po’ troppo lenta per il tipo di lavoro a cui era dedicata (halliard shanty) così commenta A.L Lloyd ” The slow tempo of Tom’s Gone suited the crew when the pull was heavy, but it was no favourite with the officers, who liked to hear the shanties going brisker.” Le versioni testuali sono moltissime, ma la melodia è sempre la stessa seppur con alcune variazioni. L’ispirazione della melodia è probabilmente afro-americana, anche se non si esclude una matrice irlandese. Probabilmente ogni nave aveva la sua versione preferita, tra le tante ne ho scelte due, una dal punto di vista del marinaio, l’altra della sua fidanzatina che è rimasta a casa.

ASCOLTA Bob Davenport in Farewell Nancy: Sea Songs and Shanties, 1964


Tommy’s gone on a whaling ship,
Away to Hilo!
Oh, Tommy’s gone on a damn long trip,
Tom’s gone to Hilo!
He never kissed his girl goodbye,
He left her and he told her why
She’d robbed him blind (4) and left him broke,
He’d had enough, gave her the poke(5)
His half-pay went, it went like chaff,
She hung around for the other half
She drank and boozed his pay away,
With her weather-eye on his next pay day
Oh Tommy’s gone and left her flat,
Oh Tommy’s gone and he won’t come back
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy è partito su una baleniera
diretto a Ylo,
Tommy è partito per un viaggio maledettamente lungo,
Tom è andato a Ylo
Non diede mai il bacio d’addio alla ragazza che aveva lasciato, e le disse anche il perchè: lo aveva derubato di tutto (4) e lasciato a pezzi,
lui ne aveva avuto abbastanza e le aveva dato il benservito (5),
metà della sua paga era volata via come pula
e lei gli gironzolava intorno per l’altra metà,
bevendo e tracannandosi la sua paga
con lo sguardo vigile sul prossimo giorno di paga.
Tommy se n’è andato e ha lasciato il suo appartamento
Tommy se n’è andato e non ritornerà!

NOTE
4) to steal=stealing all or most of what someone has
5) prosegue con il doppio senso

In queste versioni  è la ragazza abbandonata dal marinaio (stufo per le sue troppe pretese) a lamentarsi!

ASCOLTA  Gavin Friday & Shannon McNally in  Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 su Spotify


Tommy’s gone what shall I do?
ehi ho to Hilo!
Oh, Tommy’s gone and I’ll go too
Tom’s gone to Hilo!
Hilo Tom he loves me.
He thinks of me when out to sea
Tommy’s gone to Callao
Tommy’s gone to Callao
Tommy’s gone to Vallipo
He’ll dance with spanish girls, I know
Tommy’s gone to Rye-o Grand
Tommy’s gone for the yellar sand.
Tommy’s gone to Singapore
I’ll never see Tommy no more,
Tommy’s gone what shall I do?
Oh, Tommy’s gone and I’ll go too
Tommy’s gone for evermore,
I’ll never see my Tom no more.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa fare?
ehi ho a Ylo
Tommy se n’è andato e ci andrò anch’io
Tom è andato a Ylo
Ylo Tom mi ama
e mi pensa quando è per mare
Tommy è andato a Callao
Tommy è andato a Callao
Tommy è andato a Vallipo
e ballerà con le ragazze spagnole, lo so
Tommy è andato a Rio Grande
Tommy è andato per la sabbia gialla
Tommy è andato a Singapore
non vedrò Tommy mai più
Tommy se n’è andato, cosa fare?
Tommy se n’è andato e ci andrò anch’io
Tommy se n’è andato per sempre
e non vedrò il mio Tom mai più

ASCOLTA Ian Giles su Spotify
 ASCOLTA Paul Clayton


My Johnny’s gone, what shall I do?
My Johnny’s gone to Hilo.
And if he says so I’ll go too,
My Johnny’s gone to Hilo.
Hilo-a Hilo,
My Johnny’s gone and I’ll go too,
My Johnny’s gone to Hilo.
My Johnny’s sailed away to sea,
A mermaid’s lover he’ll surely be
My Johnny’s sailed from off of these shores,
I’ll never see my Johnny no more
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il mio Johnny se n’è andato, cosa fare?
Il mio Johnny è andato a Ylo
e se dice così ci andrò anch’io
Il mio Johnny è andato a Ylo
Ylo, Ylo
il mio Johnny è andato e ci andrò anch’io
Il mio Johnny è andato a Ylo

Il mio Johnny ha preso il mare
e di sicuro diventerà l’amante di una sirena (1),
il mio Johnny ha preso il largo da questi lidi
e non rivedrò il mio Johnny mai più!

NOTE
1) nel senso che affogherà

HILO JOHNNY BROWN

ASCOLTA Brasy

Sally is the girl that I love dearly,
‘Way-hey, Sally-o!
Oh, Sally is the girl that I love dearly,
Hilo, Johnny Brown, stand to your ground!

Poor Old Man (Johnny Come Down to Hilo)

ASCOLTA Keith Kendrick in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


I
Oh a poor old man come a-riding by (1)
Says I “Old man your horse will die”
Johnny come to Hilo,
Poor old man!
Chorus:
Oh! wake her, Oh! shake her,
Oh! shake that girl with the blue dress on!
Johnny come to Hilo,
Poor old man.
[And after a years I saw an happy news
with salting gun with sailors use]
Johnny come to Hilo..
[We hoisted up to the main yard high
and I wish all along the bay]
Johnny come to Hilo..
II
Round Cape Horn with frost and snow
Round Cape Horn we all must go
Johnny come to Hilo..
When we go up to Hilo town
we met that flash girl dance round
Johnny come to Hilo..
Oh poor old man come riding by
Says “Old man your horse would die”
Johnny come to Hilo..

[] non riesco a capire la pronuncia delle parole

traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il povero Vecchio viene a cavallo
dico io “Vecchio il tuo cavallo morirà”
Johnny vieni a Hilo
povero capitano
coro
Oh svegliala, squotila
Oh squoti quella ragazza con il vestito blu, Johnny vieni a Hilo
povero capitano
[..
…]
Johnny vieni a Hilo
[..
..]
II
A doppiare Capo Horn con il gelo e la neve, a doppiare l’Horn dobbiamo andare Johnny vieni a Hilo
Quando andiamo nella cittò di Hilo,
incontriamo quella ragazzina che ci gira intorno Johnny vieni a Hilo
Il povero Vecchio viene a cavallo
dico io “Vecchio il tuo cavallo morirà”
Johnny vieni a Hilo


NOTE
1) dalla sea shanty Dead horse

continua le versioni di John Short

FONTI

http://www.kbapps.com/lyrics/sailor-shanties/JohnnycomedowntoHilo.php
http://ingeb.org/songs/ineverse.html
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2007/apr/21/featuresreviews.guardianreview17
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2666
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15683
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/tomsgonetohilo.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/hilojohnnybrown.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Toms_gone_to_Hilo
http://ingeb.org/songs/otomysgo.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/514.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/tomhilo
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/TomsGoneToHilo/index.html

MAID OF AMSTERDAM OR OF PLYMOUTH? WHAT A-ROVING BOY!!!

Con il titolo di “A-roving” si indicano alcune canzoni marinaresche (sea shanty) risalenti (con discordi pareri tra gli studiosi) all’epoca Tudor o quantomeno al regno di Elisabetta I.
Altri le collegano alla canzone tradizionale scozzese “The  Jolly Beggar” con cui condividono il ritornello.
Si narra ovvero di una relazione sessuale tra il protagonista e una fanciulla più o meno “innocente”.
Nella versione che iniziò a circolare nelle raccolte di sea shanties a metà Ottocento è una capstan chanty occasionalmente cantata anche come “canzone ricreativa” nelle ore libere  (forebitter song) o nei momenti conviviali a terra. Il nostro marinaio è in cerca di ricreazione dopo essere sbarcato nel porto (di Amsterdam o di Plymouth)

MAID OF AMSTERDAM

Una prima versione è tratta dal film “Moby Dick” (1956)  con i marinai che bevono ai tavoli dello “Spouter Inn” a New Bedford. E’ evidentemente descritto un rapporto sessuale tra una “donnina del porto” e un marinaio, con parole che all’epoca non aveva bisogno di sottotitoli per essere comprese.

In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
and she was mistress of her trade
I’ll go no more a roving..
Her cheeks were red, her eyes were brown,
Mark well what I do say,
Her cheeks were red, her eyes were brown,
Her curly hair was hanging down
I’ll go no more a roving…

Paul Clayton  in Whaling And Sailing Songs 1954


I
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Who was always pinchin’ the sailor’s trade.
I’ll go no more a roving with you fair maid!
A rovin’, a rovin’,
Since rovin’s been my ru-i-in,
I’ll go no more a roving,
With you fair maid!
II
I took this maiden for a walk,
I took this maiden for a walk,/She wanted some gin and didn’t she talk.
III
She said, “You sailors I love you so,”
“All you sailors, I love you so,”
And the reason why I soon did know.
IV
She placed her hand upon my knee (1)
She placed her hand upon my knee,
I said “Young miss, you’re rather free.”
V
I gave this miss a parting kiss,
I gave this miss a parting kiss,
When I got aboard my money I missed.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla, ascoltate bene quello che ho da dirvi,
ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla
che era sempre in affari
con i marinai.
Non verrò più in giro con te bella.
In giro, in giro, da quando andare in giro è stata la mia rovina
non andrò mai più in giro
con te mia bella fanciulla!

II
Ho portato a spasso la fanciulla,
Ho portato a spasso la fanciulla,
ma lei voleva del gin e non parlava.
III
Disse “Amo così tanto voi marinai,
tutti voi marinai, amo così tanto”
e il perchè presto saprò!
IV
Mise la mano sul mio ginocchio
Mise la mano sul mio ginocchio
“Signorina come siete generosa!”
V
Le diedi il bacio dell’addio
Le diedi il bacio dell’addio e quando salii a bordo i miei soldi erano spariti!

NOTE
1) in altre versioni la strofa dice il contario cioè è l’uomo a fare la prima mossa
I placed my hand upon her knee—
She said, ‘Young man, you’re rather free.’

Nelle collezioni e raccolte di sea shanty si riportano numerose varianti testuali (vedi) in questa versione ad esempio, il galante incontro è bruscamente interrotto dalla comparsa di un teutonico marito, e si conclude molto probabile  con una bella scazzottata finale anche se non menzionata, infatti alla fine della storia il nostro marinaio raccomanda gli altri compagni di stare attenti a prendersi troppe libertà con le donne sposate!!


I
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
And she was mistress of her trade.
I’ll go no more a roving with you fair maid!
A roving, a roving,
Since roving’s been my ru-i-in,
I’ll go no more a roving,
With you fair maid!
II
I asked this maid to take a walk,
I asked this maid out for a walk,
That we might have some private talk.
III
Then a great big Dutchman rammed my bow,
For a great big Dutchman rammed my bow,
And said “Young man, dees ees meine frau!”
IV
Then take fair warning boys from me,
So take fair warning boys from me
With other men’s wives, don’t make too free
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla,
ascoltate bene quello che ho da dirvi,
ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla
che era sempre in affari con i marinai.
Non verrò più in giro con te bella.
In giro, in giro
o da quando andare in giro è stata la mia rovina non andrò mai più in giro
con te mia bella fanciulla!
II
Ho chiesto alla ragazza di fare una passeggiata, perchè dovevamo fare una conversazione in privato
III
Allora un grande e grosso Olandese speronò la mia nave(1),
Allora un grande e grosso Olandese speronò la mia nave
e disse: “Giovanotto questa essere la mia signora!”(2)
IV
Così prendete un buon suggerimento da me, ragazzi,
con le mogli degli altri uomini, non prendetevi troppe libertà,

NOTE
1) termine nautico
2) pronunciare la frase con accento tedesco

MAID OF PLYMOUTH

La versione testuale per il progetto Short Sharp Shantie sosta il porto in Inghilterra e aggiunge qualche ulteriore strofa nella “progressione anatomica” del corteggiamento.
ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


I
In Plymouth town there lived a maid,
bless you young women
In Plymouth town there lived a maid,
Mind well what I do say,
In Plymouth town there lived a maid,
And she was a mistress of her trade.
I’ll go no more a-roving with you,
fair maid./ 
A-roving, a-roving,
since roving’s been my ru-i-in,
I’ll go no more a-roving
with you, fair maid.

II
I took this fair maid for a walk,
I took this fair maid for a walk,
I took this fair maid for a walk,
And we had such a loving talk.
III
I took her hand within my own
I took her hand within my own
I took her hand within my own,
and said, “I’m bound for my old town”
IV
I put my arm around her waist
I put my arm around her waist
I put my arm around her waist
said she “Young man you are in great haste”
V
I put my hand upon her knee
I put my hand upon her knee
I put my hand upon her knee/ said she “Young man you’re much too free!”
VI
I put my hand upon her thigh
I put my hand upon her thigh
I put my hand upon her thigh
said she, “Young man, you’re not too hight!”
VII
I leaved that fair maid over the stile
I leaved that fair maid over the stile
I leaved that fair maid over the stile
and nine months after she had a little child
VIII
This girl she left me broken bent (1)
This girl she left me broken bent
This girl she left me broken bent
so back to see I quickly went
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
A Plymouth viveva una fanciulla,
che siano benedette le fanciulle
A Plymouth viveva una fanciulla, badate bene a quello che ho da dirvi,
A Plymouth viveva una fanciulla
che era una professionista della strada
Non verrò più in giro con te bella.
In giro, in giro, da quando andare in giro è stata la mia rovina
non andrò mai più in giro
con te mia bella fanciulla!

II
Ho portato a spasso questa bella fanciulla, ho portato a spasso questa bella fanciulla e abbiamo fatto una piacevole conversazione
III
Le presi la mano tra le mie
Le presi la mano tra le mie
e dissi “Sono in partenza per le mia vecchia città”
IV
Le misi il braccio attorno alla vita
Le misi il braccio attorno alla vita
Le misi il braccio attorno alla vita
e lei disse “Giovanotto andate di fretta!”
V
Le misi la mano sul ginocchio
Le misi la mano sul ginocchio
Le misi la mano sul ginocchio e lei disse “Giovanotto siete troppo in libertà”
VI
Le misi la mano sulla coscia
Le misi la mano sulla coscia
Le misi la mano sulla coscia
e lei disse “Giovanotto non siete troppo alto!”
VII
Lasciai quella graziosa fanciulla alla porta, asciai quella graziosa fanciulla alla porta
e nove mesi dopo ebbe un piccolo bambino
VIII
La ragazza mi lasciò a pezzi
La ragazza mi lasciò a pezzi
La ragazza mi lasciò a pezzi
così ritornai presto a rivederla

NOTE
1) la frase allude al contagio di una malattia venerea

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/aroving.html
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Maid_of_Amsterdam
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/amsterdam/index.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=336
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=337
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/maidams.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5070
http://boundingmain.com/lyrics/a_rovin.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/inplymo.html

Sally Brown Way, hey roll and go

Read the post in English

Nei sea shanties Sally Brown è lo stereotipo della donnina allegra dei mari caraibici, mulatta o creola, con la quale il nostro marinaio di turno cerca di spassarsela.

Di probabile origine giamaicana secondo Stan Hugill, era un  canto popolare nei porti delle Indie Occidentali negli anni 1830.
Le varianti testuali e melodiche sono molte.

PRIMA VERSIONE: WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO

In questa versione il coro si sdoppia in due brevi frasi ripetute dalla ciurma in sequenza, dopo ogni verso dello shantyman, ed è più propriamente una halyard shanty .

Paul Clayton “Sally Brown” in LP. “Sailing And Whaling Songs Of The 19th Century” 1954

Oh Sally Brown she’s a creole(2) lady,
Way, hey, roll(1) and go
Sally Brown’s a gay old lady,
spend my money on (with)(3) Sally Brown.
Sally Brown she has a daughter,
Sent me sailin’ ‘cross the water.
Oh seven long years I courted Sally,
Then she said she would not marry.
She wouldn’t have no tarry (4) sailor,
Wouldn’t have no greasy whaler.
Sally Brown I’m bound to leave you,
Sally Brown I’ll not deceive you.
Sally Brown she took a notion (5),
Sent me sailin’ ‘cross the ocean.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
Sally Brown  è una signora creola
Way, hey, salpa e vai
Sally Brown è una allegra vecchia signora
spendo i miei soldi su (con) Sally Brown.
Sally Brown ha una figlia
che mi ha mandato per mare
Per sette lunghi anni ho corteggiato Sally, poi mi ha detto che non si voleva sposare.
Non voleva avere un marinaio catramoso
non voleva avere un baleniere untuoso.
Sally Brown ti sto per lasciare
non ti tradirò.
Sally Brown ha deciso di
mandarmi a navigare sull’oceano.

NOTE
1) Il termine “creolo” può essere inteso in due eccezioni: dallo spagnolo “crillo”, che originariamente si riferiva alla prima generazione nata nel “Nuovo Mondo”, figli di coloni dall’Europa (Spagna o Francia) e gli schiavi neri. Il significato più comune è quello che si riferisce a  tutti i neri mezzosangue della Giamaica dal colore della pelle che passa dal color crema al marrone e fino al nero-blu. Nell’Ottocento con questo termine si indicava anche una piccola società urbana elitaria di pelle chiara nella Louisiana  (residente per lo più a New Orleans) risultato degli incroci tra le belle schiave nere e i proprietari terrieri bianchi che le prendevano come amanti.
2) il termine viene genericamente utilizzato dai marinai per dire molte cose, in questo contesto per esempio potrebbe significare “salpa”. “Roll” inoltre è allusivo all’”arrotolarsi” tra le lenzuola..
3) cambiare l’articolo fa subito la differenza “spendo i soldi su” Sally implica che la pago per la sua prestazione sessuale “spendo i soldi con” Sally è più blando..
4) tarry è un termine dispregiativo per contraddistinguere il tipico marinaio. Più in generale Jack Tar è il termine comunemente usato per indicare un marinaio delle navi mercantili o della Royal Navy. Probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro.
5) la lady per sbarazzarsi del marinaio (rimasto senza soldi) lo rimanda a lavorare, probabilmente su una baleniera

Free Women of Color with their Children and Servants in a Landscape, Agostino Brunias

Jim Horne


I shipped on board of a Liverpool liner,
Way, hey, roll and go
bunked long side the 49 ers
spend my money on Sally Brown.
O, Sally Brown, of New York City(1),
O, Sally Brown you’re very pretty
O, Sally Brown’s a bright mulatter,
She drinks rum and chews tobaccer.
O, Sally Brown’shes a Creole lady, (2)
She’s the mother of a yellow baby(3).
Sally’s teeth are white and pearly,
Her eyes are blue, her hair is curly.
Seven long years I courted Sally,
Sweetest girl in all the valley.
Seven long years she wouldn’t marry,
And I no longer cared to tarry.
So I courted her only daughter,
For her I sail upon the water.
Now my troubles are all over,
Sally’s married to a dirty soldier
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
Imbarcato su nave di linea per Liverpool/salpa e vai,
nella cuccetta 49
spendo i soldi su Sally Brown

Sally Brown della città di  New York
Sally Brown sei molto bella
Sally Brown è una mulatta chiara
che beve rum e mastica tabacco
Sally Brown  è una signora creola
la madre di un bambino giallo
i denti di Sally sono bianco perla
e gli occhi sono blu, i capelli ondulati
Per sette lunghi anni ho corteggiato Sally, la più dolce ragazza di tutta la valle, per sette lunghi anni lei non ha voluto sposarmi così non l’ho più sopportato e ho corteggiato la sua unica figlia, a causa sua sono salpato per il mare e ora i miei problemi sono finiti, Sally si è sposata con uno sporco soldato

NOTE
1) il canto è diffuso anche sui postali nelle tratte Liverpool-New York, così Sally vive nella città di New York
2) in questa descrizione la ragazza creola è una mulatta dalla pelle nella gradazione più chiara, con gli occhi blu e i capelli ondulati
3) ovvero dalla pelle con una sfumatura caramello

ARCHIVIO

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html