Archivi tag: Paisley

Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie?

Leggi in italiano

From the tradition of “night visiting songs” the text is attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Tannahill and in fact various findings place the story in the woods of Paisley. ( in ‘The Poems and Songs of Robert Tannahill’ – 1874  assigned as a “Sleeping Maggie” melody.)
The heroine of this song was Margaret Pollock, a cousin of the Author by the mother’s side. She was the eldest daughter of Matthew Pollock (3rd) of Boghall, by his second marriage (mentioned in the Memoir of the Tannahills); and it is very probable the Poet beheld such an evening as he had described, in walking from Paisley over the high road to his uncle’s farm steading in Beith Parish. Margaret Pollock afterwards lived in family with William Lochhead, Ryveraes, and she and Mrs. Lochhead frequently sang that song together. Miss Pollock died unmarried (from here)

NIGHT VISITING IN DARK STYLE

The scene described is not really autobiographical (pheraps more in keeping with Robert Burns‘s temperament): the protagonist arrives at Maggy’s house in a dark and stormy night (the picture is rather gothic: an icy winter wind raging in the woods , a night of new moon without stars, the disturbing moaning of the owl, the iron gate that slams against the hinges) and he hopes that in the meantime the lover has not fallen asleep, letting come him in secret! And then no more worries or fears in the arms of Maggy every gloomy thought is dissolved!

http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/
http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/

I must mention the version collected by Hamish Henderson from the voice of Jeannie Robertson (see fragment of 1960) which shows a different melody from that later made famous by Tannahill Weavers.

The song was made known to the general public by the Tannahill Weavers, the good “weavers” of Robert Tannahill, also by Paisley,
At the moment you can find several live versions on you tube, but the best performances of the group are two: one in Mermaid’s Song 1992 (listen from Spotify) a faster version integrated with the reel “The Noose In The Ghillies” (with Roy Gullane , Phil Smillie, Iain MacInnes, Kenny Forsyth) and the first in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976 with Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Hudson Swan, and Dougie MacLean (fiddle). In this first version the melody is slower and full of atmosphere (with hunder, wind and the rain effect)

Tannahill Weavers from Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976

Dougie Maclean (who collaborated with Tannahill Weavers from 1974 and until 1977 and then toured with them in 1980) in Real Estate -1988 and also in Tribute 1995


I
Mirk and rainy is the nicht,
there’s no’ a starn in a’ the carry(1)
Lichtnin’s gleam athwart the lift,
and (cauld) winds dive wi’ winter’s fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
let me in, for loud the linn
is roarin'(2) o’er the Warlock Craigie(3).
II
Fearfu’ soughs the boortree(4) bank
The rifted wood roars wild an’ dreary.
Loud the iron yett(5) does clank,
An’ cry o’ howlets mak’s me eerie.
III
Aboon my breath I daurna’ speak
For fear I rouse your waukrif’ daddie;
Cauld’s the blast upon my cheek,
O rise, rise my bonnie ladie.
IV
She op’d the door, she let him in
I cuist aside my dreepin’ plaidie(6).
‘Blaw your warst, ye rain and win’
Since, Maggie, now I’m in aside ye.
V
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
What care I for howlet’s cry,
For boortree bank or warlock craigie?
English translation
I
Dark and rainy is the night
there’s no star in all the carry
lightning flashes gleam across the sky
and cold winds drive with winters fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are you sleeping Maggie
Oh, are you sleeping Maggie
let me in, for the loud the waterfall
is roaring over the warlock crag.
II
Fearful sighs on the elder tree bank
The rifted wood roars wild and dreary
Loud the iron gate does clank,
And cry of owls makes me fearful.
III
Above my breath I dare not speak
For fear I rouse your wakeful father
Cold is the blast upon my cheek
O rise, rise my pretty lady.
IV
She opened the door, she let him in
I cast aside my dripping cloak
“Blow your worst, you rain and wind
Since, Maggie, now I’m beside you.”
V
Now, since you’re woken, Maggie
Now, since you’re woken, Maggie
What care I for owl’s cry,
For elder tree bank or warlock crag?

NOTES
1) carry is for sky, “the direction in which clouds are carried by the wind”
2) howling
3) warlock crag is the name of a waterfall at Lochwinnoch that forms a large pool or a small pond
4) elder tree in which the fairies prefer to dwell
5) yett is gett according to the ancient custom of writing the two vowels interchangeably
6) plaidie  see more

Great horned owl and chicks. Image size 5.6 by 7.9 inches @ 300 dpi. Photo credit: © Scott Copeland

SLEEPY & DROWSY MAGGY REELS

“Sleepy Maggie” is a reel in two-part and is often paired with the “Drowsy Maggie” reel, sometimes the two melodies are, mistakenly, confused. In the version of Francis O’Neill and James O’Neill (in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland) it is in 3 parts.

Sleepy Maggie as reported by Fidder’s Companion is a traditional Scottish melody whose oldest transcribed source is in Duke of Perth Manuscript or Drummond Castle Manuscript (1734)

Sleepy Maggie is also known in Ireland under different names “Lough Isle Castle,” “Seán sa Cheo” or “Tullaghan Lassies” and is the model for “Jenny’s Chickens”.

Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)
Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)

“Drowsy Maggie” is instead a traditional Irish tune in 2, 3 or 4 parts, but much more popular at least at the recording level (it will be for its appearance in the movie “Titanic”!)

Gaelic Storm  (Titanic Set) – of course there is also the Scottish version: usually slow part and then it gets faster and faster so the title between in deception because there is nothing “sleepy” in the melody that comes to a final paroxysm .

SLEEPY MAGGIE

Sleepy Maggie Alasdair Fraser on fiddle
Sleepy Maggie
Gabriele Possenti  on a Mcilroy AS 65c (C)
Tullaghan Lassies Fidil Irish Fiddle trio
Jenny’s Chickens Shanon Corr on fiddle

DROWSY MAGGIE
John Simie Doherty Donegal fiddle master
Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann live

The Chieftains  

Driftwood (Joe Nunn on fiddle)
Jake Wise live

Rock versions
Dancing Willow an Irish folk band from Münster (Germany)
DNA Strings from Cape Town ( South Africa)
Lack of limits faster more and more

LINKS
http://archive.org/details/poemssongsofrobe00tannrich
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/64522/1;
jsessionid=B312B09442ED31BB18C4FDA5E2E2BB59

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59687
http://members.aol.com/tannahillweavers/
http://www.lochwinnoch.info/tales/warlock-craigie.php
http://thesession.org/tunes/787
http://thesession.org/tunes/27
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/SLA_SLE.htm#SLEEPY_MAGGY/MAGGIE

THE BRAES O GLENIFFER

L’autore del brano è Robert Tannahill di  Paisley, Scozia (1774 – 1810), denominato il poeta tessitore, un Giacomo Leopardi in versione scozzese (studi classici premettendo), dall’umore cupo e tenebroso. Il brano è datato al 1806 con la melodia composta da John Ross di Aberdeen, “Saw ye my wee thing” (anche se inizialmente il testo fu abbinato alla melodia “Bonnie Dundee“)

Una fanciulla si lamenta per essersi dovuta separare dal suo Johnny, partito come soldato, e ne attende il ritorno ricordando i tempi trascorsi a vagabondare per la collina di Gleniffer. Così la stagione invernale riflette il tormento nell’animo dell’innamorata.

foto di Alex Elliott a Glennifer Braes, Inverno

Oggi la collina è compresa in un parco,  Robertson Country Park, formato da zone boschive e dalla brughiera, sul crinale si gode la vista panoramica di Paisley e della valle del Clyde.

ASCOLTA The Tannahill Weavers in Epona 2006, un video che supporta testo e emozioni con immagini molto appropriate.


I
Keen blaws the win’
o’er the braes o’ Glennifer
The auld castle’s turrets(1)
are covered wi’ snaw
How changed frae the time
when I met wi’ my lover
Amang the brume bushes
by Stanley green shaw(2)
II
The wild flowers o’ simmer
were spread a’ sae bonnie
The Mavis sang sweet
frae the green birkin tree
But far to the camp they ha’e marched my dear Johnnie
And now it is winter
wi’ nature and me
III
Then ilk thing aroun’ us
was blythsome and cheery
Then ilk thing aroun’ us
was bonnie and braw
Now naething is heard
but the win’ whistlin’ dreary
And naething is seen
by the wide spreadin’ snaw
IV
The trees are a’ bare,
and the birds mute and dowie
They shake the cauld drift frae their wings as they flee
And chirp out their plaints, seeming wae for my Johnnie
‘Tis winter wi’ them
and ‘tis winter wi’ me
V
Yon caul sleety could skiffs
alang the bleak mountain
And shakes the dark firs
on the stey rocky brae
While doun the deep glen bawls the snaw-flooded fountain(3)
That murmur’d sae sweet
to my laddie an’ me
VI
‘Tis no’ its loud roar,
on the wintry win’ swellin’
‘Tis no’ the caul’ blast
brings the tear to my e’e
For, oh, gin I saw
my bonnie Scots callan
The dark days o’ winter
war simmer tae me
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Lamentoso soffia il vento
sulla collina di Gleniffer
e i torrioni del vecchio castello (1)
sono ricoperti di neve.
Com’è mutato dal tempo
in cui mi incontravo con il mio amore
tra i cespugli di ginestra
nel verde boschetto di Stanley (2).
II
I selvatici fiori dell’estate
erano tutti sbocciati così belli,
il tordo cantava dolcemente
tra la verde betulla
ma all’accampamento
hanno fatto marciare lontano il  mio caro Johnny e adesso è inverno nella natura e dentro di me.
III
Allora ogni cosa intorno a noi
era gioiosa e allegra,
allora ogni cosa intorno a noi
era bella e giusta,
ora si sente solo il vento
che soffia triste
e non si vede che neve sparsa dappertutto.
IV
Gli alberi sono tutti spogli
e gli uccelli muti e tristi,
scuotono l’aria fredda
dalle ali mentre fuggono
e cinguettano i loro lamenti forieri di guai per il mio Johnny.
Questo è l’Inverno per loro
e questo è l’inverno per me.
V
Quello richiama nevischio e vento freddo sulla montagna brulla
e scuote i cupi abeti
sulla ripida collina rocciosa,
mentre nella gola profonda crepita
la cascata coperta dalla neve (3)
che mormorava così dolcemente
al mio ragazzo e a me.
VI
Questo è ora il suo forte ruggito
sul vento invernale che si ingrossa,
questi sono ora i colpi del freddo
che mi fanno lacrimare gli occhi,
perchè, oh se potessi vedere
il mio bel  ragazzo scozzese
i bui giorni dell’inverno
sarebbero la mia estate!

Traduzione inglese di Cattia Salto
Keen blows the wind over the hillside of Glennifer
The old castle’s turrets are covered with snow
How changed from the time when I met with my lover
Among the broom bushes by Stanley green shaw

The wild flowers of summer were spread all so bonny
The song thrush sang sweet from the green birch tree
But far to the camp they have marched my dear Johnny
And now it is winter with nature and me
Then every thing around us was blithesome and cheery
Then every thing around us was bonnie and braw
Now nothing is heard but the wind whistling dreary
And nothing is seen by the wide spreading snow
The trees are all bare, and the birds mute and sad
They shake the cold drift from their wings as they flee
And chirp out their plaints, seeming woe for my Johnnie
This is winter with them and This is winter with me
that call sleety cold blow over along the bleak mountain
And shakes the dark firs on the steep rocky hill
While down the deep glen bawls the snow-flooded fountain
That murmured so sweet to my lad and me
This is now its loud roar, on the wintry wind swelling
This is now the cold blast brings the tear to my eye
For, oh, if I saw my bonnie Scots lad
The dark days of winter will be summer to me

NOTE
1) Stanley Castle, circondato dalle colline e in una polla d’acqua, oggi restano solo le vestigia di una torre. (vedi)
2) la foresta di Paisley inizialmente fu suddivisa in tre grandi aree chiamate Stanely, Thornly e Fereneze, il lato nord divenne poi Paisley Braes, ovvero Braes of Gleniffer, il lato sud Fereneze Braes. “The lands of Stanely, part of the ridge of Paisley Braes, were granted by King Robert III. to Sir Robert Danyelston in 1392. One of his two daughters and co-heiresses married Sir Robert Maxwell, laird of Calderwood, in the parish of East Kilbride, and these lands, along with others, were allocated to Lady Calderwood. In the middle of the 15th century, the Maxwell family built on the lands a strong baronial residence, a massive piece of masonry, 40 feet high, which became well known by the name of Stanely Castle. The Maxwells continued in possession of the estate for several generations, and John Maxwell, in 1629, with consent of his son John, sold the estate to Jean Hamilton, dowager of Robert, fourth Lord Ross. It has continued in the Ross-Boyle families till the present time. The roof was taken off in 1714, when the “auld castle’s turrets” and the inside of the building were exposed to the inclemency of the weather. Stanely Castle, so hoary and grey, is now surrounded with a fine sheet of water,—the Reservoir of the Paisley Water Works.” (tratto da qui)
3) la zona è ricca di ruscelli e spettacolari cascate
continua

FONTI
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1193lyr4.htm http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20SONGS%204.htm http://www.renfrewshire.gov.uk/wps/wcm/connect/6bb7b542-a62f-4bd7-93cb-b083ff493d25/pt-as-JohnstoneToPaisley.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CACHEID=6bb7b542-a62f-4bd7-93cb-b083ff493d25
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/10801/
2;jsessionid=137B387BD270A11CEA4498400668AC80

Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie?

Read the post in English

Dalla tradizione delle “night visiting songs” il testo è attribuito al poeta scozzese Robert Tannahill e in effetti vari riscontri collocano la storia nei boschi di Paisley. (‘The Poems and Songs of Robert Tannahill’ – 1874 con la melodia “Sleeping Maggie”.)
“L’eroina di questa canzone era Margaret Pollock, cugina dell’Autore dalla parte della madre. Era la figlia maggiore di Matthew Pollock (3 °) di Boghall, con il suo secondo matrimonio (menzionato nel Memoir of the Tannahills); ed è molto probabile che il Poeta abbia assistito a una serata simile a quella che aveva descritto, camminando da Paisley sulla strada maestra fino alla fattoria di suo zio che si trova a Beith Parish. Margaret Pollock in seguito visse in famiglia con William Lochhead, Ryveraes, e lei e la signora Lochhead cantarono spesso quella canzone insieme. La signorina Pollock morì non sposata” (tradotto da qui)

NIGHT VISITING IN STILE DARK

La scena descritta non è decisamente autobiografica (semmai più consona al temperamento di Robert Burns) ma più di genere: il protagonista giunge alla casa di Maggy in una notte buia e tempestosa (il quadretto è piuttosto gotico: un gelido vento invernale che infuria nel bosco, una notte di novilunio priva di stelle, l’inquietante lamento del gufo, il cancello di ferro chiuso in malo modo che sbatte contro i cardini) e spera che nel frattempo la sua bella sia ancora sveglia e lo faccia entrare di nascosto come promesso! E allora non più preoccupazioni o paure: nelle braccia di Maggy ogni cupo pensiero è dissolto!

http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/
http://www.jinua.com/movie/Sleepy-Hollow/

E’ doveroso citare la versione collezionata da Hamish Henderson dalla voce di Jeannie Robertson (vedi frammento del 1960) che riporta una melodia diversa da quella poi resa famosa dai Tannahill Weavers.

Il brano è stato fatto conoscere al grande pubblico dai Tannahill Weavers (la loro scheda qui), i bravi “tessitori” di Robert Tannahill anche loro di Paisley,
Al momento su you tube si trovano varie versioni live, ma le esecuzioni migliori del gruppo sono due: una in Mermaid’s Song 1992 (da ascoltare su Spotify)  una versione più veloce integrata con il reel “The Noose In The Ghillies” (formazione Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Iain MacInnes, Kenny Forsyth) e la prima in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976 con la formazione: Roy Gullane, Phil Smillie, Hudson Swan, e Dougie MacLean come violinista. In questa prima versione la melodia è più lenta e ricca di atmosfera (con tanto di tuoni, vento e l’effetto pioggia)

Tannahill Weavers  in Are Ye Sleeping Maggie 1976

Dougie Maclean (che ha collaborato con i Tannahill Weavers dal 1974 e fino al 1977 e poi ancora in tour con loro nel 1980) in Real Estate -1988 e anche in Tribute 1995


I
Mirk and rainy is the nicht,
there’s no’ a starn in a’ the carry(1)
Lichtnin’s gleam athwart the lift,
and (cauld) winds
drive wi’ winter’s fury.
CHORUS
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
Oh, are ye sleepin’ Maggie
let me in, for loud the linn
is roarin'(2)
o’er the Warlock Craigie(3).
II
Fearfu’ soughs the boortree(4) bank
The rifted wood roars wild an’ dreary.
Loud the iron yett(5) does clank,
An’ cry o’ howlets (6) mak’s me eerie.
III
Aboon my breath I daurna’ speak
For fear I rouse your waukrif’ daddie;
Cauld’s the blast upon my cheek,
O rise, rise my bonnie ladie.
IV
She op’d the door, she let him in
I cuist aside my dreepin’ plaidie(7).
‘Blaw your warst, ye rain and win’
Since, Maggie, now I’m in aside ye.
V
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
Now, since ye’re waukin’, Maggie,
What care I for howlet’s cry,
For boortree bank or warlock craigie?
Traduzione italiano
I
Buia e piovosa è la notte
non c’è una stella che mandi raggi di luce in tutto il cielo (1)
e i venti freddi si uniscono alla furia dell’inverno.
RITORNELLO
Stai dormendo Maggy?
Stai dormendo Maggy?
Fammi entrare che la cascata rimbomba (2)
e ruggisce sul Warlock Crag (3).
II
Timorosi fruscii sul pendio dei sambuchi (4), il bosco ruggisce selvaggio e triste, forte il cancello (5) di ferro sbatte con clamore,
e piange il gufo facendomi paura.
III
Non oso parlare più forte di un sospiro, per timore di svegliare tuo padre che è sempre vigile,
fredda è la raffica del vento sulla mia guancia, svegliati mia bella.
IV
Lei aprì la porta e lo fece entrare.
Posai il mantello (7) gocciolante di pioggia: “Spazza via il peggio, la pioggia e il vento dal momento che Maggy ora sono con te!”
V
Ora che ti sei svegliata Maggy
che m’importa del grido del gufo,
della collina dei sambuchi o del Warlock Crag?

NOTE
1) carry sta per cielo, “the direction in which clouds are carried by the wind”
2) howling
3) letteralmente dirupo del mago, è il nome di una cascata a Lochwinnoch che forma una grande pozza o un piccolo laghetto
4) elder tree, il sambuco, l’albero in cui dimorano le fate
5) yett diventa gett secondo l’antica consuetudine di scrivere le due vocali in modo intercambiabile. La lettera y più comunemente sostituiva anche la combinazione “th” per cui “the” era anche scritto “ye” (si tratta della lettera þ detta “thorn” che ha lo stesso suono di “th”)
6) letteralmente il lamento dei gufi: howlet è un termine dialettale  scozzese per owl, owlet
7) plaidie, una coperta o un mantello vedi

Great horned owl and chicks. Image size 5.6 by 7.9 inches @ 300 dpi. Photo credit: © Scott Copeland

SLEEPY & DROWSY MAGGY REELS

“Sleepy Maggie” è un reel in due parti e spesso è abbinato al reel “Drowsy Maggie”, a volte le due melodie sono, erroneamente, confuse. Nella versione di Francis O’Neill and James O’Neill (in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland) è in 3 parti.

Sleepy Maggie secondo quanto riportato da Fidder’s Companion è una melodia tradizionale scozzese la cui più antica fonte trascritta si trova in Duke of Perth Manuscript ovvero Drummond Castle Manuscript (1734)

Sleepy Maggie è conosciuta in Irlanda anche con differenti nomi “LoughIsleCastle,” “Seán sa Cheo” o “Tullaghan Lassies” ed è il modello per “Jenny’s Chickens”.

Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)
Samuel Melton Fisher, Asleep, (1902)

“Drowsy Maggie” è invece una melodia tradizionale irlandese in 2, 3 o 4 parti, però molto più popolare almeno a livello di registrazioni (sarà per la sua comparsa nel film “Titanic”!)

Gaelic Storm  (Titanic Set)- ovviamente c’è anche la versione scozzese: in genere parte lenta e poi diventa sempre più veloce così il titolo tra in inganno perché non c’è niente di “sonnolento” nella melodia che arriva ad una parossismo finale.

SLEEPY MAGGIE

ASCOLTA Sleepy Maggie Alasdair Fraser al violino

ASCOLTA Sleepy Maggie Gabriele Possenti alla chitarra
ASCOLTATullaghan Lassies Fidil
ASCOLTAJenny’s Chickens Shanon Corr

DROWSY MAGGIE della serie “fast & furious”
Le variazioni sono infinite su solo 2 parti di base

ASCOLTA John Simie Doherty
ASCOLTA Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann

The Chieftains  Versione studio

Driftwood (Joe Nunn al violino)
Jake Wise live

Versioni più rock
ASCOLTA Dancing Willow
ASCOLTA DNA Strings
ASCOLTA Lack of limits

FONTI
http://archive.org/details/poemssongsofrobe00tannrich
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/64522/1;
jsessionid=B312B09442ED31BB18C4FDA5E2E2BB59

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59687
http://members.aol.com/tannahillweavers/
http://www.lochwinnoch.info/tales/warlock-craigie.php
http://thesession.org/tunes/787
http://thesession.org/tunes/27
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/SLA_SLE.htm#SLEEPY_MAGGY/MAGGIE

GLOOMY WINTER’S NOW AWA’

L’autore del brano è Robert Tannahill (1774 – 1810), poeta e musicista contemporaneo di Robert Burns, che non divenne però altrettanto famoso rispetto al Bardo di Scozia, anche perché distrusse gran parte della sua produzione prima di suicidarsi, nel 1810.
Il brano è datato 1808, la melodia è un’aria scozzese molto antica, arrangiata dall’amico R.A. Smith e potrebbe proprio essere la melodia composta da Alexander Campbell nel 1783, detta Lord Balgonie’s Favorite più tardi rinominata anche Come My Bride, Haste, Haste Away.

ASCOLTA The Virginia Company



Il brano si trova talvolta nelle compilation celtiche di Natale, forse per quel “Gloomy winter” del titolo che richiama la stagione invernale, però il mese descritto non è quello di dicembre, siamo piuttosto al crepuscolo dell’Inverno, che sta per andarsene e far posto alla primavera e i suoi primi timidi segnali: i bulbi selvatici che fioriscono, le acque che scorrono per il disgelo, le belle giornate di sole. E il poeta nei versi finali conclude:
Joy to me they canna’ bring,
unless wi’ thee, my dearie, O.
(traduzione italiano: ma gioia non potranno portarmi,
a meno che io non sia con voi, mia cara)
La cara a cui la poesia s’ispira è Miss Elizabeth Wilson all’epoca diciottenne e il luogo descritto è l’attuale  Gleniffer Braes Country Park che non ha perso il suo fascino di natura selvaggia e incontaminata (una carrellata d’immagini scattate proprio in primavera qui)

La poesia descrive un paesaggio incantato che si dischiude sotto l’occhio del poeta, mentre la natura si risveglia sotto le carezze dorate di un sole rinvigorito.

Nel dipinto di Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema un tappeto di campanelle tingono di blu il sottobosco

ASCOLTA Tannahill Weavers, in  “The Old Woman’s Dance” 1978, versione melanconica, ipnotica, quasi sussurrata, un arrangiamento fatato con le basse e lamentose note del flauto traverso. Nelle note di copertina è scritto “Note dripping icicle noises and delicately coughing blackbirds” (=lo sgocciolare delle trine di ghiaccio e il delicato tossire dei merli.)
ASCOLTA versione live del 2011 dei Tannahill Weavers

ASCOLTA Dougie MacLean.

ASCOLTA The Birkin Tree

Katerina García


I
Gloomy winter’s now awa’,
Saft the westlan’ breezes blaw,
‘Mang the birks o’ Stanley shaw (1)
The mavis sings fu’ cheery, O;
II
Sweet the crawflower’s early bell(2)
Decks Gleniffer(3)’s dewy (4) dell,
Blooming like thy bonnie sel’,
My young, my artless deary, O
III
Come, my lassie, let us stray
O’er Glenkilloch’s(5) sunny brae,
Blithely spend the gowden day
‘Midst joys that never weary, O
IV
Towering o’er the Newton Woods(6),
Lav’rocks (7) fan the snaw-white clouds,
Siller saughs, wi’ downy buds,
Adorn the banks sae briery, O;
V
Round the sylvan fairy nooks,
Feathery breckans fringe the rocks,
‘Neath the brae the burnie (8) jouks,
And ilka thing is cheery, O;
VI
Trees may bud, and birds may sing
Flowers may bloom, and verdure spring,
Joy to me they canna’ bring,
Unless wi’ thee, my dearie, O.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’inverno tetro ora si allontana
leggeri soffiano i venti dell’ovest
tra le betulle del boschetto di Stanley (1) il tordo canta così allegramente O.
II
Soavi le prime campane dei giacinti(2) ricoprono la valle rigogliosa(4) di Gleniffer (3) fiorendo come la mia bella,  cara giovane e spensierata O.
III
Vieni, ragazza, camminiamo sulla soleggiata collina di Glenkilloch(5), allegramente trascorriamo il giorno dorato con rinnovata gioia O.
IV
In alto sopra i boschi di Newton(6)
le allodole (7) ammirano le nuvole bianco-neve, cespugli di salici con le gemme lanuginose, adornano le rive così spinose O.
V
Tra i nascondigli delle fate silvestri,
le felci piumate orlano le rocce,
dal pendio il ruscello (8) si tuffa
e tutto è allegria O.
VI
Gli alberi germoglieranno, gli uccelli canteranno, i fiori sbocceranno e i prati rinverdiranno
ma gioia non potranno portarmi a meno che io non sia con voi, mia cara O

NOTE
1) Stanley Castle circondato dalle colline e in una polla d’acqua, oggi restano solo le vestigia di una torre.
La foresta di Paisley inizialmente fu suddivisa in tre grandi aree chiamate Stanely, Thornly e Fereneze, il lato nord divenne poi Paisley Braes, ovvero Braes of Gleniffer, il lato sud Fereneze Braes. “The lands of Stanely, part of the ridge of Paisley Braes, were granted by King Robert III. to Sir Robert Danyelston in 1392. One of his two daughters and co-heiresses married Sir Robert Maxwell, laird of Calderwood, in the parish of East Kilbride, and these lands, along with others, were allocated to Lady Calderwood. In the middle of the 15th century, the Maxwell family built on the lands a strong baronial residence, a massive piece of masonry, 40 feet high, which became well known by the name of Stanely Castle. The Maxwells continued in possession of the estate for several generations, and John Maxwell, in 1629, with consent of his son John, sold the estate to Jean Hamilton, dowager of Robert, fourth Lord Ross. It has con¬tinued in the Ross-Boyle families till the present time. The roof was taken off in 1714, when the “auld castle’s turrets” and the inside of the building were exposed to the inclemency of the weather. Stanely Castle, so hoary and grey, is now surrounded with a fine sheet of water,—the Reservoir of the Paisley Water Works.” (tratto da qui)

2)  bluebell: il nome può indicare due diverse piante erbacee: il
Giacinto a campanelle o giacinto di Spagna ( Hyacinthus Non Scriptus) delle piccole campanelle di colore  blu-porpora simili ai mughetti che crescono nel sottobosco,  da non confondersi con il Ranunculus repens di colore giallo e sono fiori di campo aperto conosciuti con il nome di Buttercups. Ma anche la Campanula rotundifolia ovvero la campanula soldanella, pianta dai fiori blu a forma di campana, appartenente alla famiglia delle Campanulaceae. E’ comunemente detta Campanelle (Bluebell, o harebell) ed è il fiore nazionale ufficiale della Scozia; è il fiore per antonomasia delle fate o delle streghe, ma fiorisce in estate (da maggio) mentre il giacinto a campanelle fiorisce già ad aprile .
3) Oggi la collina di Glennifer è compresa in un parco, the Robertson Country Park, formato da zone boschive e dalla brughiera, sul crinale si gode la vista panoramica di Paisley e della valle del Clyde.
4) dew letteralmente rugiadosa, bagnata dalla rugiada, a tradurla con un termine di allora sarebbe “rorida”, ma preferisco l’immagine figurata che denota freschezza giovanile, quindi “florida, rigogliosa”
5) Killoch Glen: il lato sud dell’antica Foresta di Paisley, ovvero il Fereneze Braes, bellissima vallata ricca di ruscelli.  “This picturesque and romantic ravine is situated on the southern slope of the Capellie range of hills, nearly opposite the town of Neilston. Both its banks are finely wooded with well-grown trees, and it has been celebrated in song as the early home of the crawflower, anemone, and primrose. The glen is a comparatively short one, and consists of two parts, the upper and the lower glens. The trap formation at the top of the upper glen which separates it from the hollow meadow-land beyond and to the west of it, bears evidence of having been worn down by the overflow of water, probably from a lake formed there by the ponded-back water of the Capellie burn that now flows past the old mill and under the bridge on the Capellie road. The upper reach of the glen is short but picturesque, and the descent from the trap which separates it from the lower glen is rapidly made by a series of broken rocks, and as the water plunges over them a succession of foaming white falls is produced, which, when the burn is in flow, have a grand appearance, especially when viewed from below. Tannahill and his friend Scadlock have both sung the praises of this truly delightful glen.” (tratto da qui)
6) Le località menzionate si trovano nel Centro della Scozia nei dintorni di Paisley e sono ancora luoghi ricchi di fascino.  “The lands of Newton, situated at a short distance to the north-west of Stanely Castle, are bounded on the west by the Ald Patrick burn ; on the north, by the road to Beith ; and on the east, by the Fulbar road. The eastern portion was covered with plantations, and several hundreds of the trees are still growing, reminding the present generation of Tannahill’s Newton Woods. These lands were acquired by Robert Alexander in 1670, and he and his descendants were the respected landlords for upwards of a hundred years. He was the ancestor and founder of the present Southbar and Ballochmyle families of Alexander ” (tratto da qui)
7) l’allodola è l’araldo della primavera,  un passerotto dal canto melodioso che risuona nell’aria fin dai primi giorni del nuovo sole, e già alle prime luci dell’alba continua
8)  la zona è ricca di ruscelli e spettacolari cascate, nel Parco sono dedicati al poeta laTannahill Walkway e il Tannahill Well

continua: a corollario https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/the-braes-o-gleniffer/

FONTI
http://www.grianpress.com/Tannahill/TANNAHILL’S%20SONGS%205.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/gloomywintersnooawa.htm
http://bluebellstrilogy.com/blog/tag/fairies/
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/102lyr8.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/6271