Helston Flora Day (Cornwall)

Leggi in italiano

 

In Helston, Cornwall it takes place every year on 8 May the Furry Dance (Flora or Floral dance) in the Feast of St. Michael. The meaning of Furry is found in the root of the gaelic  fer = fair. Inside the program of the tipical dance there is a sacred representation with historical and mythical theme, which unfolds in a procession that starts from the church: the characters are Robin Hood and his brigade, Saint George and Saint Michael, which announce the arrival of Spring.
1834733

SEE MORE 

THE FURRY DANCE

The dance is a very long promenade of young couples (and not really young) parading behind the band: they are for the most part walking (or hopping step) alternating a couple of turns with their partner. There are two shows, one in the morning and the second in the midday with more formal dresses (long dress and elaborate hat for ladies, tight and top hat for gentlemen: of British origin, the tight or taitè also called morning dress because worn during the day, it is the male dress in public ceremonies and for all occasions concerning the English royal family.)


THE GAMES OF ROBIN HOOD

In the late Middle Ages the “Robin Hood Games” were practiced during the May Day. It began with a parade of the various characters of the legendary Robin Hood, the masks of the horse and the dragon and the May pole brought by the oxen. The May pole was then raised and a dance took place around it. After the buffoon performances of the horse and dragon masks the competition began: the challenge of archery.
At the end people dancing around the May pole until late. Tradition has lasted until the end of the nineteenth century

img013

LINK
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

More commonly known under the title “Hal an tow” is the main song in the representation of mummers at Flora Day in Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band from ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband from Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arranged in rock version has become very popular among the groups of the genre celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o

NOTES
1)  The translation of Hal an tow could be “May day garland” (halan = calende) and the same name was attributed to the groups of youths who, early in the morning, went into the woods to cut the branches of the May and brought them to the village dancing and singing for the arrival of Spring.
But many scholars tend to refer to the meaning of “heel and toe,” referring to the dance step of the Morris dancing.
Another interpretation translates it as “pulling the rope” (from the Dutch “Haal aan het Touw” derived from the Saxon) referred to the work of the sailors on the ships but also to the game of tug of war, one of the few survivors from the May Games by Robin Hood. Some interpret all the stanzas in a seafaring key, as if the song were a sea-shanty and explain the term “rumbelow” as the rum in the vessel at the time of the pirates!
What shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.How do you deny the reference to the deer god and, more generally, to the symbolism of the deer as a sacred animal, the bearer of fertility? see more
3) Shirley Collins:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: the image is ironic about the Spaniards who eat goose feathers by english arrows to whom the roast goose is mockingly due as the winners
5)  Shirley Collins:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) St George day in many populations of the Mediterranean rural world, represents the rebirth of nature and the arrival of Spring, the Saint has inherited the functions of a more ancient pagan deity associated with solar cults: St. George defeating the Dragon became the solar god who defeats the darkness. see more
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Our Lady  Originally, therefore, the invocation was a prayer referring to the goddess of spring. In other versions the sentence becomes”The Lord and Lady bless you” 

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html

WHEN I WAS NOO BUT SWEET SIXTEEN / THE BOTHY LADS

donna-culla-WILLIAM-ADOLPHE-BOUGUEREAUAncora una canzone sui cavallanti (vedi bothy ballads), proveniente dal Nord-Est della Scozia, ma questa storia finisce con una gravidanza e senza matrimonio riparatore. L’altro titolo con cui è conosciuta è “Hishie Ba” una variante in versione ninna –nanna che ci viene dal canto di Jean Redpath. La stessa storia è narrata con una melodia simile anche nella ballata “Peggy on the Banks of Spey” (che Hamish Henderson raccolse nel 1956 dalla signora Elsie Morrison di Spey Bay) Nella tradizione scozzese non sono insolite le ninne-nanne dai contenuti amari e dolorosi (vedi).

La melodia è intitolata “Jockey’s gray Breeches” già in “Caledonian Pocket Companion” di James Oswald (1745) (vedi)

WHEN I WAS NOO BUT SWEET SIXTEEN/

ASCOLTA June Tabor & Oysterband (testo qui)

ASCOLTA Colcannon con il titolo The Ploughboy lads
ASCOLTA Claire Hastings in ‘Between River and Railway‘ 2016 con il titolo The Bothy Lads che unisce il coro della versione di Hishie ba


I
Ah well I was no’ but sweet sixteen
With beauty charme a-blooming oh
It’s little little did I think
At nineteen I’d be grieving oh
Well the ploughboy lads they’re all braw  lads /But they’re false and they’re deceiving oh/They’ll take your all and 
they’ll gang away
And leave the lassies grievin’ oh
II
Ah well I was fond of company
And I gave the ploughboys freedom oh
To kiss and clap me in the dark
When all me friends were sleeping oh
III
Well if I did know what I know now
And I took me mothers biddin’ oh
I wouldn’t be sittin’ by our fireside
Crying “hush a ba my baby oh”
IV
Well it’s hush a ba  for I’m your ma/But the Lord knows who’s your daddy oh
And I’ll take care and I’ll beware
Of the ploughboys in the gloaming oh
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non avevo che 16 anni
con le grazie della giovinezza in fiore
e mai avrei pensato
che a 19 sarei stata inguaiata (1)
Beh i Cavallanti sono tutti bei (2) ragazzi
ma sono insinceri e sono traditori
ti prendono tutto
e poi vanno via

e lasciano le ragazze nei guai
II
Beh, amavo la compagnia
e ho dato ai cavallanti la libertà
di baciarmi e afferrarmi (3) nel buio
mentre tutti  i miei amici dormivano
III
Se avessi saputo quello che so ora,
e avessi dato retta a mia madre,
non starei seduta accanto al focolare
a piangere “Dormi bambino (4) mio”
IV
Fai la ninna (5) per la tua mamma,
solo il Signore sa chi è tuo padre (6)
farò attenzione e starò alla larga (7)
dai cavallanti nel crepuscolo (8).”

NOTE
1) oppure Greetin: weeping
2) gey braw: very fine, handsome
3) clap: touch
4) bairnie
5) Hishie ba: soothing sound to a baby, lullaby
6) la donna ha concesso i suoi favori a diversi giovanotti (all’epoca non c’era ancora il test del dna)
7) June Tabor dice “so it’s girls beware and you take care ”  “le ragazze stanno alla larga e tu fai attenzione ” è l’avvertimento della madre alla neonata di guardarsi dai cavallanti! Spesso le ninnananne erano delle warning songs.
8) Gloamin: twilight, dusk

HISHIE BA

ASCOLTA Lucy Stewart
ASCOLTA Jean Redpath (strofe I e III)

ASCOLTA Arthur Argo (strofe I, II, III)


I
When I was noo but sweet sixteen
and beauty aye an bloomin’ o
it’s little, little did I think
that at seventeen I’d be greetin’ o
Hishie ba, noo I’m yer ma
Oh, hishie ba, ma bairnie o
Hishie ba, noo I’m yer ma
but the guid kens fa’s yer faither o
II
If I had been a guilte lass
An taen ma mither’s biddin o
I widna be sittin at your fireside
singing hush a ba my baby oh
III
It’s keep it me frae lowpin’ dykes
Frae balls and frae waddin’s o
It’s gi’en me balance tae my stays
and that’s in the latest fashion o
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non avevo che 16 anni (1)
con la mia bellezza in fiore
e mai avrei pensato
che a 17 sarei stata inguaiata
Fai la ninna per la tua mamma
dormi bambino mio
Fai la ninna per la tua mamma,
solo il Signore sa chi è tuo padre
II
Se fossi stata una ragazza saggia
e dato retta agli avvertimenti di mia madre, non starei seduta accanto al focolare a cantare “dormi bambino mio”
III
Mi tengo lontana dai saltafossi (2),
dai balli e dai matrimoni(3)
e mi strizzo nel corsetto (4)
che è all’ultima moda

NOTE
1) Argo dice When I was a maid but sweet sixteen
2) leaping, jumping over stone walls. Ma louppar (lowpar), looper  (louper) nel Dizionario Scozzese è sinonimo di vagabondo. dyke-louper, -leaper, (a) an animal that leaps the dyke surrounding its pasture (b)fig.: a person of immoral habits, also in n.Eng. dial.; hence dyke-loupin’, ppl.adj. and vbl.n., used lit. and fig. (qui)
3) weddings
4) Stays: (a pair of) C17th and c18th term for the boned underbodice previously known as a “pair of bodies.” The term persisted into the c19th but was more usually replaced by its French equivalent, the “corset.” The term was also applied to the stiff inserts of whalebone or steel which shaped this garment. A corset made of two pieces laced together and stiffened by strips of whalebone. Il verso è da intendersi come “darsi una regolata” ovvero comportarsi da ragazza perbene oppure vuole nascondere il suo stato di partoriente ?

FONTI
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Jocky%27s_Gray_Breeches
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/85072/6
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/fullrecord/98115/1
http://www.black-brothers.com/songs/8.htm
https://mainlynorfolk.info/june.tabor/songs/wheniwasnoobutsweetsixteen.html
http://www.oysterband.co.uk/lyrics/songs/(When_I_was_no_but)_sweet_sixteen.html
http://mysongbook.de/mtb/r_clarke/songs/nobut16.htm
http://sangstories.webs.com/hishieba.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=88570
http://sangstories.webs.com/hishieba.htm
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/16915/2
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah03/ah03_02.htm

NEW YORK GIRLS: CAN’T YOU DANCE THE POLKA?

Una canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) nota anche con il titolo di “The New York gals” e “Can’t You Dance the Polka?” si suddivide in due versioni testuali con un’univoca melodia.

Si raccontano le avventure amorose di “Jack Tar”, ovvero il marinaio tipo, una volta sbarcato a New York: queste avventure con le donnine sono un topico delle sea shanties e il marinaio finisce spesso lungo disteso a terra (dal bere o dal colpo ben assestato del “compare” di lei).
Il risveglio è amaro, perchè il malcapitato si trova imbarcato a forza su una nave (a volte più genericamente un Yankee clipper o un packet, ma anche un clipper della famigerata linea Black Ball).

CAN’T YOU DANCE THE POLKA?

E’ interessante notare come la polka prese piede nei locali di New York verso il 1850 e diventò popolare proprio con questa canzone: era un ballo vivace che richiedeva un certo “contatto” fisico particolarmente osè per i tempi!

New York five point

VERSIONE A

In questa versione il marinaio dopo essere salito nell’appartamento di una ragazza di New York, e bevuto un bel po’ di drinks, si sveglia il mattino dopo, nudo nel letto e derubato di ogni suo avere.

ASCOLTA Finbar Furey dal film Gangs of New York: una versione da music hall

ovvero l’ambientazione nel film

ASCOLTA Oysterband 1989: una versione più energica, con un bello stacchetto strumentale (la versione testuale differisce di poco dalla precedente)

ASCOLTA Steeleye Span 1975 in un arrangiamento tipico per quegli anni al tempo del folk revival in chiave rock di cui il gruppo fu precursore


I
As I walked down through Chatham Street(1)
a fair maid I did meet,
She asked me to see her home–
she lived in Bleecker Street.(2)
Chorus:
To me a-weigh, you Santy,
My dear Annie(3)

Oh, you New York girls,
Can’t you dance the polka?(4)

II
And when we got to Bleecker Street,
We stopped at forty-four,(5)
Her mother and her sister there,
to meet her (to greet us) at the door.
III
And when I got inside the house,
The drinks were passed around,
The liquor was so awful strong,
My head went round and round.
IV
And then we had another drink,
before we sat to eat,
The liquor was so awful strong,
I quickly fell asleep.
V
When I awoke next morning
I had an aching head,
There was I, Jack all alone,
Stark naked in me bed.
VI
My gold watch and my pocketbook (money)
And lady friend were gone;
And there was I, Jack all alone,
Stark naked in the room(6)
VII
STROFE Finbar Furey
On looking round this little room,
There’s nothing I could see,
But a woman’s shift and apron
That were no use to me.
VIII
With a flour barrel for a suit of clothes,
Down Cherry Street forlorn,
There Martin Churchill took me in,
And sent me ‘round Cape Horn.
IX
STROFE Oysterband
So look out all young sailors
watch your step on shore
you’ll have to be up early to be
smarter than a whore
X
Your hard-earned cash will disappear
your hat and boots as well
for New York Girls are tougher than
the other side of hell!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo per Chatman street (1)
incontrai una bella ragazza
che mi invitò a vedere casa sua – lei viveva in Bleecker Street(2).
Coro
A me via, tu Santy,
mia cara Annie (3)

o voi ragazze di New York
non volete danzare la polka? (4)

II
E quando arrivammo a Bleecker Street ci fermammo al quarto piano, (5)
c’erano la madre e le sorelle
ad incontrarla sulla porta.
III
E quando sono entrato in casa
ci si fece un giro di bevute,
il liquore era così dannatamente forte che la mia testa si mise a girare.
IV
E poi abbiamo bevuto un altro drink, prima di sederci per mangiare,
il liquore era così dannatamente forte che mi sono subito addormentato.
V
Quando mi svegliai la mattina dopo avevo mal di testa
e c’ero io, Jack tutto solo, completamente nudo nel letto!
VI
L’orologio d’oro, il portafoglio
(i soldi)
e l’amica erano spariti
e c’ero io, Jack tutto solo, completamente nudo nella stanza. (6)
VII
STROFE Finbar Furey
Nel cercare in quella stanzetta
non c’era altro da vedere
che una camiciola e un grembiule da donna che non mi andavano bene.
VIII
Con un barile di farina indosso al posto dei vestiti
giù per Cherry Street (scesi) desolato, là Martin Churchill mi ha preso
e mandato per Capo Horn.
IX
(Strofe Oysterband:
Così attenti voi giovani marinai,
badate ai vostri passi a terra,
dovete alzarvi presto, per essere più furbi di una puttana.
X
I vostri sudati guadagni scompariranno e anche il vostro capello e gli stivali
perchè le ragazze di New York sono più toste dell’inferno!

NOTE
1) anche “south street”
2) Bleecker Street è oggi rinomato come il quartiere del Greenwich Village, ma all’epoca era una “paradise street” per marinai
3) Santiana vedi. Ma forse in origine la parola era Honey oppure Cynthia (“Cinthy/ Cinty/ Cindy,”)
4) La polka e’ stata veloce fin dal suo nascere: col metodo Cellarius i ballerini avevano un contatto permanente, tecnicamente funzionale all’equilibrio della coppia. I seguaci di questo metodo aumentarono sempre di piu’, sia fra i maestri sia fra i giovani danzatori. All’occhio dei benpensanti la polka ballata in tale modo apparve scandalosa. Non mancarono le polemiche e le condanne nei confronti di quanti se ne facevano promotori e assertori. Molti proprietari di locali cercarono di impedire lo svolgimento di questo ballo, in quanto lo stesso, eseguito in modo caotico e violento dalle coppie in preda a una vera e propria trance, causava danni materiali (volavano tavoli e sedie, piatti e bottiglie) e allontanava irrimediabilmente la clientela piu’ tranquilla e moderata. Ma l’ondata di simpatia per questa nuova forma di divertimento cresceva a dismisura: in realta’ si sentiva il bisogno di evadere dalla monotonia delle danze a coppia aperta, dalla cultura delle quadriglie che erano diventate dei riti veri e propri con tutta una serie di rigidita’ e nei comportamenti e negli abbigliamenti. La polka era percepita dalle masse come simbolo di allegria e di spontaneita’. Con queste caratteristiche si sviluppo’ anche in Inghilterra e negli Stati Uniti, dove non mancarono i censori. Verso la fine del 1800 la moda della polka fini’. (tratto da qui)
5) deve trattarsi di un refuso probabilmente si riferisce al piano dell’appartamento e visto il quartiere e l’epoca si trattava probabilmente del quarto piano non del quarantesimo! Nella versione della Oysterband dicono: we stopped at No 4
6)
The Oysterband dicono“there was I without a stitch or cent to call my own”

VERSIONE B

Stesso marinaio, qui chiamato però Johnny, e stesso quartiere malfamato, altra avventura finita male!

ASCOLTA The Irish Rovers

ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm che la suonano con un ritmo saltellante


I
As I walked down the Broadway
One evening(morning) in July
I met a maid who asked me trade
And a sailor John (lad) says I
CORO
And away, you Santee(3)
My Dear Annie
Oh, you New York girls
can’t you dance the polka?
II
To Tiffany’s I took her
I did not mind expense
I bought her two gold earrings
And they cost me fifteen cents
III
Says she, ‘You Limejuice(7) sailor
Now see me home you may’
But when we reached her cottage door
She this to me did say
IV
My flash man(8) he’s a Yankee
With his hair cut short behind(9)
He wears a pair of long sea-boots
And he sails in the Blackball Line(10)
V
He’s homeward bound this evening
And with me he will stay
So get a move on, sailor-boy
Get cracking on your way(11)
VI
So I kissed her hard and proper
Afore her flash man came
And fare ye well, me Bowery(12) gal(girl)
I know your little game
VII
I wrapped me glad rags round me
And to the docks did steer
I’ll never court another maid(girl)
I’ll stick to rum and beer
VIII
I joined a Yankee blood-boat(13)
And sailed away next morn
Don’t ever fool around with gals(14)
You’re safer off Cape Horn
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo per Broadway una sera di luglio, incontrai una ragazza che mi propose uno scambio e “John un marinaio” dico io
CORO
“E andiamo Santa (3)
mia cara Anna,
voi ragazze di New York
non volete ballare la polka?”

II
La portai da Tiffany,
non badavo a spese,
le comprai due orecchini d’oro che mi costarono 15 centesimi.
III
Dice lei” Tu limoncino(7) ora puoi vedere la mia casa”
Ma quando arrivammo alla porta di casa ecco cosa mi disse
IV
“Il mio fidanzato (8) è un americano con i capelli tagliati corti sulla nuca(9), porta un paio di lunghi stivali per il mare e naviga nella Blackball Line(10).
V
E’ di ritorno a casa questa sera e starà con me, così datti una mossa marinaio, datti da fare(11)”
VI
Così la baciai forte e deciso,
prima dell’arrivo del suo fidanzato “addio mia ragazza di
Bowery(12),
conosco il tuo trucco”
VII
Mi avvolsi negli stracci
e al porto dritto andai
non corteggerò più un’altra fanciulla
e continuerò a bere rum e birra.
VIII
Mi imbarcai su un clipper americano(13) in partenza il giorno dopo; non bisogna mai scherzare con le ragazze (14) o ti  ritrovi al largo di Capo Horn.

NOTE
7) “lime-juicer” è un termine coniato nel 1850 poi abbreviato in “limey” per indicare un marinaio della Royal Navy o più genericamente un inglese It was originally used as a derogatory word for sailors in the Royal Navy, because of the Royal Navy’s practice since the beginning of the 19th century of adding lemon juice or lime juice to the sailors’ daily ration of watered-downrum (known as grog), in order to make stored, stagnant, water more palatable. Doctors thought that lime juice would work better because it has more acid than lemon juice, so they substituted lime juice for lemon juice on the British Royal Navy ships. This ration of grog helped make these sailors some of the healthiest at the time due to the ascorbic acid’s ability to prevent scurvy. Eventually the term lost its naval connection and was used to denote British people in general. In the 1880s, it was used to refer to British immigrants in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa (tratto da Wikipedia). A me fa pensare all’abitudine inglese di prendere il tè con la fetta di limone!
8) FLASH-MAN: a favourite or fancy-man; but this term is generally applied to those dissolute characters upon the town, who subsist upon the liberality of unfortunate women; and who, in return, are generally at hand during their nocturnal perambulations, to protect them should any brawl occur, or should they be detected in robbing those whom they have picked up. (tratto da qui)
9) i marinai della Black Baller line portavano tutti i capelli tagliati corti
10) vedi BLACK BALL LINE 
11) Get cracking on your way: to start doing something. Non capisco bene il senso della frase la ragazza lo sta invitando a darsi da fare alla svelta (prima che arrivi il protettore) o gli dice di andarsene se non vuole vedersela con il protettore? Il marinaio capisce al volo la situazione e le da un bacio: possiamo supporre che ci sia stato anche qualcos’altro tra i due dato che poi il marinaio si ritrova vestito in modo approssimativo!
12) La Bowery Street, più comunemente detta “the Bowery”, è una celebre via della “circoscrizione” (borough) di Manhattan, a New York. Approssimativamente delimita i quartieri di Chinatown e Little Italy su un lato, mentre dall’altro il Lower East Side.The Bowery fu uno dei primi insediamenti della città; sorse ai margini del porto ed era il quartiere dei marinai e degli immigrati appena arrivati negli Stati Uniti; man mano che questi facevano fortuna, si trasferivano sempre più a nord, lasciando spazio a nuovi arrivi. Nella seconda metà dell’Ottocento, con “the Bowery” veniva indicata una vasta zona compresa tra Broadway e i docks dell’East Side; era considerata il regno delle gang, della povertà, della prostituzione, del gioco d’azzardo, delle fumerie di oppio, della corruzione della polizia e dei politici. Ciò nonostante, vi sorsero e prosperarono teatri che diedero vita, in concorrenza con Broadway che era sinonimo di classicismo e di raffinatezza, ad un genere di rappresentazioni popolari che contribuì ad avvicinare vasti strati della popolazione al teatro, a lanciare negli Stati Uniti la moda del varietà e del musical, a creare uno stile originale, che più tardi avrebbe trionfato anche a Broadway, scalzandone gli spettacoli europei. Alla fine dell’Ottocento, con l’avvento di una prima ondata moralizzatrice nell’amministrazione della città, the Bowery fu parzialmente ripulita, iniziò il recupero edilizio e cominciò ad insediarvisi anche la piccola borghesia. La via divenne il simbolo della depressione economica e la zona s’impoverì negli anni venti e trenta. Negli anni quaranta il quartiere guadagnò la reputazione d’essere mal frequentato, specialmente da ubriachi e senzatetto. Tra il 1960 e il 1980 lungo la Bowery e dintorni vi era il tasso di criminalità più alto di tutta la parte meridionale di Manhattan, insieme agli affitti più bassi. (tratto da Wikipedia)
13) blood-boat: i clipper erano famosi per la ferrea disciplina e le brutali punizioni da qui l’appellativo di “bloodboat
14) oppure “Don’t mess around with women boys

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/blow-the-man-down/
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/the-black-ball-line-and-sea-shanty

http://www.emmedance.altervista.org/Balli/PolcaST.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/nygirls.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/nygirls2.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/newyorkgirls.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/new-york-girls.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/new-york-girls–2-.html

HAL AN TOW in Helston (Cornovaglia)

Read the post in English

MayDay_MarshallMAY DAY SONG  (May Day Carol) IN INGHILTERRA
(suddivisione in contee)
Introduzione (preface)
inghilterraBedforshide
Cambridgshire, Cheshire  
Lancashire, Yorkshire
Flag_of_Cornwall_svgObby Oss Festival
Padstow mayday songs 
Furry Dance di Helston

1834733

A Helston in Cornovaglia si  celebra la Furry Dance (Flora o Floral  dance) che si svolge durante l’arco della giornata dell’8 Maggio. Il significato di Furry si trova  nella radice del gaelico cornico fer = fiera, festa che nel contesto di Helston è dedicata a San Michele. All’interno del nutrito programma delle danze si svolge  una specie di sacra rappresentazione a tema storico e mitico, che si snoda in una processione che parte dalla  chiesa di San Giovanni: i personaggi sono Robin Hood e la sua brigata, San  Giorgio e San Michele, che annunciano l’arrivo della Primavera.


VEDI altre riprese della festa

THE FURRY DANCE

E’ molto semplicemente una lunghissima promenade di giovani (e non proprio giovani) coppie che sfilano dietro alla banda per lo più camminando ( o con passo saltellato) alternando un paio di giri di volta con il proprio partner . Si tratta di due sfilate la prima del mattino e  la seconda di mezzogiorno con abiti più formali (abito lungo e elaborato cappellino per le signore,  tight e cilindro per i signori, very british: di origine britannica, il tight o taitè un capo dell’abbigliamento formale maschile di notevole eleganza, detto anche morning dress (“abito da giorno”) poiché indossato di giorno, è l’abito di rigore nelle cerimonie pubbliche e per tutte le occasioni che riguardano la famiglia reale inglese.)
LA DANZA DEL MATTINO
LA DANZA DI MEZZOGIORNO

I GIOCHI DI ROBIN HOOD

Di moda nel tardo Medioevo i “Giochi di Robin Hood” erano praticati durante la festa del Maggio. Si iniziava con un corteggio in  costume dei vari personaggi del leggendario Robin Hood, chiuso dal palo di  maggio portato al traino dei buoi, e dalle maschere del cavallo e del drago. Il palo del Maggio era quindi innalzato  tra il tripudio generale e si svolgeva una danza intorno ad esso. Quindi  seguivano le esibizioni buffonesche delle maschere del cavallo e del drago.
Aveva inizio quindi la gara vera e  propria: la sfida del tiro con l’arco.
Al termine la lizza era presa d’assalto  dal popolino che proseguivano fino a tardi danzando intorno al palo di  maggio. La tradizione è perdurata fino a tutto l’Ottocento

img013

APPROFONDIMENTO
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/may/1.htm
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm http://www.boldoutlaw.com/robages/robages3.html http://www.roccadellecaminate.it/archi/encicopedia.html

THE HELSTONE FURRY-DAY SONG

Conosciuta più comunemente con il titolo di “Hal an tow” è la canzone principale nella rappresentazione dei mummers al Flora Day di Helston.
The Watersons live (I, II, VII)

Shirley Collins & The Albion Country Band in ‘No Roses’ 1971( (III, IV IV, V)
Oysterband in Trawler 1994 (II, III, IV, VII) arrangiata in versione rock è diventata molto popolare tra i gruppi del  genere celtic-rock


CHORUS

Hal-an-Tow(1), jolly rumble-O
We were up long before the day-o
To welcome in the summertime
To welcome in the May-o
For summer is coming in
And winter’s gone away
I
Since man was first created
His works have been debated
We have celebrated
The coming of the Spring
II
Take the scorn and wear the horns(2)
It was the crest when you were born
Your father’s father wore it
And your father wore it too
III
Robin Hood and Little John
Have both gone to the fair-o
We shall to the merry green wood
To hunt the buck and hare-o (3)
IV
What happened to the Spaniards(4)
That made so great a boast-o?
They shall eat the feathered goose
And we shall eat the roast-o (5)
V
As for Saint George(6), O!
Saint George he was a knight, O!
Of all the knights in Christendom,
Saint George is the right, O!
In every land, O!
The land where’er we go.
VI
But for a greater than St. George
Our Helston has the right-O
St. Michael with his wings outspread
The archangel so bright-O
Who fought the fiend-O
Of all mankind the foe
VII
God bless Aunt Mary Moses(7)
With all her power and might-o
Send us peace in England
Send us peace by day and night-o
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
(Coro:
Hal-an-Tow, una bella festa 
ci siamo alzati presto  prima del giorno, per salutare l’estate,
per salutare il Maggio,
perché l’estate è arrivata
e l’inverno se né andato).
I
Da quando l’uomo è stato creato
le sue opere sono state dibattute
si è celebrato
l’arrivo della Primavera
II
Prendi lo scorno e  indossa le corna, era lo stemma quando  sei nato,
il padre di tuo padre lo portava,
e anche tuo padre.
III
Robin Hood e Little John
sono andati entrambi  alla fiera
e andremo nel bosco per cacciare il cervo e la lepre.
IV
Dove sono gli Spagnoli
che si sono vantati  così grandemente? Mangeranno le piume  d’oca e noi mangeremo l’arrosto.
V
Prendiamo San Giorgio o
San Giorgio era un cavaliere o
Di tutti i cavalieri della Cristianità
San Giorgio è il protettore o
in ogni terra
in ogni terra dove andiamo
VI
Ma prendiamo uno ancora più grande di San Giorgio, chi di Helston ha preso le parti, San Michele con le ali spiegate
l’arcangelo così luminoso
che ha combattuto il diavolo
nemico di tutti gli uomini
VII
Dio benedica Santa  Maria (e Mosè)
e tutta la sua  potenza e la forza,
che ci mandi la pace  in Inghilterra,
che ci mandi la pace  notte e giorno

NOTE
1)  La traduzione di Hal an tow potrebbe essere “la ghirlanda del Calendimaggio”  (halan=calende) e lo stesso nome veniva attribuito  ai gruppi di giovinetti che fin dal mattino presto andavano nei boschi a  tagliare i rami del Maggio e li portavano in paese danzando e cantando  l’arrivo della Primavera.
Ma molti studiosi propendono per il significato di “heel and toe,”   del tipo “dagli di tacco, dagli di punta” riferito al passo di  danza proprio delle Morris dancing.
Un’altra interpretazione la traduce come “tirare la corda” (dall’olandese “Haal aan het   Touw” derivato dal sassone) riferito al lavoro  dei marinai sulle navi ma anche al gioco del tiro alla fune, uno dei pochi  sopravvissuti dai Giochi di Maggio di Robin Hood. Alcuni interpretano tutte le  strofe in chiave marinaresca, come se la canzone fosse un sea-shanty  e spiegano il termine “rumbelow” come una storpiatura  di rumbowling – rumbullion  come veniva chiamato il rum e successivamente il grog all’epoca dei pirati!
2) Take the scorn and wear the horns: la prima strofa si ritrova quasi identica nella  commedia di Shakespeare As You Like  scritta nel 1599, Atto IV, Scena II, la scena di caccia nella foresta alla  richiesta di chi abbia ucciso il cervo Jaques risponde “portiamo  quest’uomo al duca, come un trionfale conquistatore romano, che metta le  corna del cervo sulla testa, come la corona della vittoria” e alla  domanda se il guardiacaccia conosca una canzone per l’occasione ecco di  seguito il testoWhat shall he have that kill’d the deer? His leather skin and horns to wear. Then sing him home; Take thou no scorn to wear the  horn; It was a crest ere thou wast  born: Thy father’s father wore it, And thy father bore it: The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.(Traduzione italiano: Cosa dobbiamo dare all’uomo che ha  ucciso questo cervo? Dategli la pelle e le corna da  indossare. Poi cantate questa canzone andando a casa: non vergognatevi di indossare le corna, sono state portate da prima che voi  nasceste, il padre di vostro padre le portava e anche vostro padre. Il corno, il corno vigoroso non è da deridere o da disprezzare). Come si fa a negare il riferimento al  dio cervo e più in generale al simbolismo del cervo come animale sacro  portatore di fertilità? vedi
3) Shirley Collins canta invece:
To see what they do there-O
And for to chase-O
To chase the buck and doe
4) What happened to the Spaniards: l’immagine ironizza sugli Spagnoli che  mangiano le piume d’oca sconfitti dalla muraglia di frecce degli Inglesi ai  quali beffardamente spetta l’arrosto d’oca poichè  vincitori
5)  Shirley Collins canta invece:
And we shall eat the roast-O
In every land-O
The land where’er we go
6) San Giorgio nacque in Palestina e morì decapitato nel 287. La sua festa presso molte popolazioni del mondo rurale mediterraneo, rappresenta la rinascita della natura e l’arrivo della Primavera, il Santo ha ereditato le funzioni di una più antica divinità pagana connessa con i culti solari: San Giorgio che sconfigge il Drago è diventato il dio solare che sconfigge le tenebre. continua
7) Aunt Mary Moses: Santa Maria  o la Madonna. Nel tentativo attuato dalla Chiesa di portare nell’alveo della  venerazione dei Santi i rituali praticati dal popolo verso le divinità pagane  più radicate nella tradizione. In origine quindi l’invocazione era una  preghiera riferita alla dea della primavera. In altre versioni la frase  diventa “The Lord and Lady bless you” con una connotazione più pagana “Il Dio e la Dea vi benedicano”

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40451
http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=160194
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/halantow.html