Little Billee sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

A sea song with caustic humorism also entitled “Three Sailors from Bristol City” or “Little Boy Billee”, which deals with a disturbing subject for our civilization, but always around the corner: cannibalism!
The sea is a place of pitfalls and jokes of fate, a storm can take you off course, on a boat or raft, without food and water, it’s a subject also treated in great painting (Theodore Gericault, The raft of the Medusa see): human life poised between hope and despair.

The three sailors

The maritime songs can express the biggest fears with a good laugh! This song was born in 1863 with the title “The three sailors” written by William Makepeace Thackeray as a parody of “La Courte Paille” (= short straw) – that later became “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) as a nursery rhyme.(see first part): cases of cannibalism at sea as an extreme resource for survival were much debated by public opinion and the courts themselves were inclined to commute death sentences in detention.
The murder by necessity (or the sacrifice of one for the good of others) finds a justification in the terrible experience of death by starvation that pushes the human mind to despair and madness, but in 1884 the case of the sinking of Mignonette broke public opinion and the same home secretary Sir William Harcourt had to say “if these men are not condemned for the murder, we are giving carte blanche to the captain of any ship to eat the cabin boy every time the food is scarce “. (translated from here).
The ruling stands as a leading case and puts life as a supreme good by not admitting murder for necessity as self-defense

Little Billee
Bernard Partridge Cartoons

From notes of “Penguin Book” (1959):
The Portugese Ballad  A Nau Caterineta  and the French ballad  La Courte Paille  tell much the same story.  The ship has been long at sea, and food has given out.  Lots are drawn to see who shall be eaten, and the captain is left with the shortest straw.  The cabin boy offers to be sacrificed in his stead, but begs first to be allowed to keep lookout till the next day.  In the nick of time he sees land (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) and the men are saved.  Thackeray burlesqued this song in his  Little Billee.  It is likely that the French ballad gave rise to The Ship in Distress, which appeared on 19th. century broadsides.  George Butterworth obtained four versions in Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [issue 17] pp.320-2) and Sharp printed one from James Bishop of Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) with “in many respects the grandest air” which he had found in that county.  The text comes partly from Mr. Bishop’s version, and partly from a broadside.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Ralph Steadman from “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.(1)”

“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(2)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(3) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (4)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.

NOTES
Thackeray lyrics here
1) from french chemise
2) or top fore-gallant
2) his companions did not have to be very attached to the Bible (and probably Billy would have invented new ones to save time!)
4)  “Knight Commander of the Bath”, the chivalrous military order founded by George I in 1725

SEA SHANTY VERSION

According to Stan Hugill “Little Billee” was a sea shanty for pump work, a boring and monotonous job that could certainly be “cheered up” by this little song! Hugill only reports the text saying that the melody is like the French “The était a Petit Navire”, so the adaptation of Hulton Clint  has the performance of a lullaby.

I
There were three sailors of Bristol City;
They stole a boat and went to sea.
But first with beef and hardtack biscuits
And pickled pork they loaded she.
And pickled pork they loaded she
II
There was gorging Jack and guzzling Jimmy,
And likewise there was little Billee.
but when they got to the Equator
They’d only left but one split pea.
III
Then gorging Jack to guzzling Jimmy,
“I am confounded hungaree.”
Says guzzling Jimmy to gorging Jacky
“We’ve no wittles (1), so we must eat we.”
IV
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“Oh Guzzling Jim what a fool you be..
There’s little Billy, who’s young and tender,
We’re old and tough, so let’s eat he.”
V
“Make haste, make haste” then say Guzzling Jimmy
as he drew his snickher snee (2)
“O Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
undo the collar of your chemie.”
VI
When William heard this information
he drope down on bended knee
“O let me say my catechism
which my dear mom taught to me”
VII
So up he went to the maintop-gallant
and he drope down on his bended knee
and than he said  all his catechism
which his dear mamy once taught to he
VIII
He scarce had said his catechism
when up he jumps “There’s land I see
Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
IX
“Jerusalem and Madagascar,
And North and South Amerikee;
There’s the British fleet a-riding at anchor,
With Admiral Napier, K.C.B.”
X
When they bordered to Admiral’s vessel,
He hanged fat Jack (3) and flogged Jimmee;
as for little Bill they make him
The Captain of a Seventy-three (4).

NOTES
1)  It’s a mispronunciation of “vittles,” which is a corrupted form of “victuals,” which means “food.”
2) a particularly lethal big knife used as a weapon
3)in some versions the degree of guilt between the two sailors is distinguished, so only one is hanged
4) 73 cannon war vessel

And for corollary here is the French version “Un Petit Navire”

LINK
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

Don’t You Go A Rushing

Leggi in italiano

The “enigmas” or “riddles” are part of some popular songs in dealing with the supernatural, be it a magical or diabolical creature, and more generally they represent a weapon of defense to avert a danger or obtain a benefit, so in the fairy tales, young people of humble origins obtain advantageous marriages or kingdoms for having been able to solve the enigmas or to have accomplished impossible tasks. However, the risk was very high, even if sometimes they were helped by creatures or magical beings, because the counterpart in case of failure was death (often by beheading). In the ancient courtship ballads the riddles become the surrogate of impossible enterprises, or they are obstacles to overcome to get the bride’s hand, but in the Celtic world there are also many examples of the opposite, it is the girl who has to prove to be a good wife, above all in terms of unquestioned loyalty.

The echo of these ancient forms of courtship, turn into a romantic words to make a declaration of love.

I HAVE A YONG SUSTER

The first text dates back to around 1430 (British Museum – Sloane MS 2593, “I have a yong suster”) and is antecedent or at least contemporary to “The Devil’s Nine Questions” found always transcribed in a manuscript of about 1450.

The ballad is also found in many nineteenth-century Nursery Songs with the titles: “Perrie, Merrie, Dixie, Dominie”, “I have four sisters beyond the sea”, “I had Four Brothers Over the Sea”, “My true love lives far from me “, where the overseas sweetheart who sends” enigmatic” gifts is trasformed into the four sisters, the four brothers or the four cousins. In fact, the song lends itself to being a children song, both as a lullaby and as a game – riddle in which the children sing the answers together with their mother.

John Fleagle from Worlds Bliss – Medieval Songs of Love and Death, 2004 

I
I have a yong suster
Fer biyonde the see;
Peri meri dictum domine
Manye be the druries (1)
That she sente me.
Partum quartum pare dicentem,
Peri meri dictum domine (2)

II
She sente me the cherye
Withouten any stoon,
And so she dide the dove
Withouten any boon.
III
She sente me the brere
Withouten any rinde;
She bad me love my lemman (3)
Withoute longinge.
IV
How sholde any cherye
Ben withoute stoon?
And how sholde any dove
Ben withoute boon?
V
How sholde any brere
Ben withoute rinde?
How sholde I love my lemman
Withoute longinge?
VI
Whan the cherye was a flowr,
Thanne hadde it non stoon;
Whan the dove was an ey,
Thanne hadde it non boon.
VII
Whan the brere was unbred,(4)
Thanne hadde it non rinde;
Whan the maiden has that she loveth,
She’s withoute longinge.

NOTES
1) Druries: love-gifts
2) latin words non-sense like perry merry dixie or Pitrum, partrum, paradisi tempore or Piri-miri-dictum Domini
3) Leman: sweetheart
4) Unbred: unborn. in the nursery rhyme “I had four brothers over the sea” they carry: a goose without a bone, a cherry without a stone, a blanket without a thread, a book that no man could read, that is an egg, a cherry tree, a sheep to shear and a typographic matrix to be printed.

I GAVE MY LOVE A CHERRY -Riddle song

The most widespread version in the United States and Canada is a “modernization” of the medieval ballad “I have a yong suster” a romantic turn of words to make a declaration of love!

as a sweet lullady

Doc Watson 1966 (magical voice and amazing guitar)

I
I gave my love a cherry
that had no stone;
I gave my love a chicken
that had no bone;
I gave my love a baby
with no crying,
And told my love a story
that had no end.
II
How can there be a cherry
that has no stone?
How can there be a chicken
that has no bone?
How can there be a baby
with no crying?
How can you tell a story
that has no end?
III
A cherry when it’s blooming,
it has no stone(1);
A chicken when it’s pipping,
there is no bone(2);
A baby when it’s sleeping,
there’s no crying(3),
And when I say I love you,
it has no end(4).
NOTES
1) the cherry blossom is not yet a fruit
2) a freshly fertilized hen’s egg is a hen’s embryo
3) a child who is not yet born is sleeping and therefore can not cry
4) the most beautiful declaration of love ..

GO NO MORE A RUSHING

This song is contained in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book (called Queen Elizabeth’s Virginal Book, although in reality Queen Elizabeth never owned the manuscript) a collection of dance music dating back to the early 1600s. It is also found in the Brimington Mummers’ Play script. [Derbyshire, 1862] that the Mummers represented during the Christmas celebrations (see).
With the title “Go no More a-Rushing” the melody was probably already popular at the time of Queen Elizabeth I (composed or arranged by William Byrd) and it is found in various versions in some manuscripts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
The “Riddle song” is superimposed with a prelude (as a warning song) in which young girls are discouraged to go alone in the woods to collect rushes / ferns because they could lose their virginity.
Once ago the rushes were spread on the floors of the houses, they made roofs, beds, chairs, pots and fishing nets, cheese-sieves and much more, even today with the rushes they intertwine baskets, hats are made and Bride’s cross for Imbolc.

Reg Hall Archives Jim Wilson of Sussex 

I
Go no more a-rushing,
maids, in May
Go no more a-rushing,
maids, I pray
Go no more a-rushing,
or you’ll fall a-blushing(1)
Bundle up your rushes
and haste away.
II
You promised me a cherry
without any stone,
You promised me a chicken
without any bone,
You promised me ring
that has no rim at all,
And you promised me a bird
without a gall.
III
How can there be a cherry
without a stone?
How can there be a chicken
without a bone?
How can there be a ring
without a rim at all?
How can there be a bird
that hasn’t got a gall?
IV
When the cherry’s in the flower
it has no stone;
When the chicken’s in the egg
it hasn’t any bone;
When the ring it is a making
it has no rim at all;
And the dove it is a bird
without a gall(2)
NOTES
1) or “to get a brushing” going on the moor or in the woods to collect stalks and grasses could be very dangerous for the girls because they risked encounters with little recommendable elves see more
2) the dove symbol of peace and love was considered a very pure animal. When we speak of a good person we say that it is “without gall as the dove” because this animal is without a gall bladder.

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017
Conserved through the oral transmission up to the version collected by Cecil Sharp by Mrs. Eliza Ware in Over Stowey, Somerset on January 23, 1907

Don’t You Go A Rushing Maids In May
I
Don’t you go a-rushing, maids in May
Don’t you go a-rushing, maids I say
For if you go a-rushing
They’re sure to get you blushing
They’ll steal your rushes away
II
I went a-rushing it was in May
I went a-rushing maids I say
I went a-rushing
They caught me a-blushing
They stole my rushes away
III
He promised me a chicken without any bone
Promised me a cherry without any stone
He promised me a ring without any rim
He promised me a babe with no squalling
IV
How can there be a chicken without any bone?
How can there be a cherry without any stone?
How can there be a ring without any rim?
How can there be a babe with no squalling?
V
When the chicken’s in the egg it has no bone
When the cherry’s blooming it has no stone
When the ring is melting
It has no rim
When the babe is in the making
There’s no squalling

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/captain-wedderburn.html
http://www.presscom.co.uk/talesparts/tales5.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/597.html
http://www.8notes.com/scores/6048.asp?ftype=gif
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=hes&p=1545
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=6899
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9589
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=99125
http://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/iwillgivemyloveanapple.html

http://www.1st-stop-county-kerry.com/rushes-in-folklore.html
https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/straw-hay-and-rushes-in-irish-folk-tradition-by-anne-o-dowd-art-and-craft-1.2489692
http://www.fondazioneterradotranto.it/2012/10/19/larte-di-intrecciare-il-giunco-ad-acquarica-del-capo-ii-parte/
https://www.cdsconlus.it/index.php/2016/09/29/cultura-e-tradizioni-in-valle-di-comino-larte-del-costruir-fuscelle/
http://www.contemplator.com/england/rushing.html
http://www.folkplay.info/Texts/86sk47rs.htm
http://www.folktunefinder.com/tune/161727/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/dontyougoarushing.html

Ankou il dio della morte bretone

In Bretagna nelle notti d’Inverno l’Ankou   viaggia in cerca di anime, sul suo carretto cigolante tirato da due neri cavalli macilenti;  lui è l’Accompagnatore, colui che conduce le anime da un mondo  ad un altro. Nei racconti popolari ha l’aspetto di un carrettiere-contadino allampanato e con in testa un grosso cappellaccio che ne oscura il volto, talvolta è accompagnato da due aiutanti anch’essi nero vestiti.
A volte a cavallo a volte come conducente del carretto (le Carrier an Ankou) guida le anime (oppure le attende) alla porta dell’Inferno che in Bretagna si apre nella Yeun Ellez sui Monti d’Arrée (nel centro di Finistère), una depressione paludosa al centro dei Monti, sovrastata dal Mont Saint-Michel de Brasparts su cui è stata costruita (non a caso) la cappella di San Michele.
La torbiera sotto forma di campi lussureggianti nasconde le sue insidie agli incauti viaggiatori che abbandonano i sentieri e finiscono per affogare imprigionati dalla melma.

UNA CARRETTA INELUDIBILE

Nessuna forza riesce a fermare il carretto spesso vuoto oppure pieno di gente, alcuni dicono che sul carro ci stia pure una banda musicale che suona una  nenia soave. Quando il carro si ferma o quando lo si sente passare (e ben per questo le ruote cigolano) la morte, propria, di un congiunto o di un conoscente, è prossima.
E’ lungo sentieri particolari che si può incontrare questo lugubre equipaggio: si tratta solitamente di antiche vie abbandonate dal traffico abituale e tagliate fuori dalla vita quotidiana. Vengono chiamati in bretone henkou ar Maro, i sentieri della Morte; è sconveniente e pericoloso chiuderli, perché si può disturbare il passaggio di Ankou. Nelle zone che costeggiano il litorale, il Maestro, come anche viene chiamato, ama spostarsi per mare servendosi di una barca, la bag-noz o battello della notte. In barca o con il carro, chiunque lo incontri, ritorna a casa per coricarsi e sparire da questo mondo pochi giorni dopo.(tratto da qui)

Nelle raffigurazioni bretoni (per lo più sculture e bassorilievi ma anche dipinti parietali) Ankou è uno scheletro che tiene in mano una freccia, una vanga o una falce missoria, che non sono strumenti d’offesa quanto piuttosto dei simboli,  è infatti una figura pacifica, parte integrante della vita della comunità.
Ankou è assimilabile al Caronte greco e com’egli muto traghettatore delle Anime, ma è anche lo scheletro della Danza Macabra e come scrive Alessio Tanfoglio nel suo saggio “Ankou e la danza macabra di Clusone” (2016)  è “lo scheletro o la raffigurazione della realtà della morte nella sua forma oggettiva, senza inganni o mascherature“.
In alcuni racconti bretoni l’Ankou è di poche parole e fortunatamente le leggende sono tante trascritte da Anatole Le Braz che le raccolse a fine Ottocento dagli ultimi narratori viventi durante le veillées, le veglie notturne nelle isolate fattorie che andava visitando in bicicletta: ‘La leggenda della morte‘, ( ‘La Légende de la Mort chez les Bretons armoricains‘) oltre ad essere in assoluto la sua opera più famosa, è anche l’unica tradotta in italiano.

Marjanig

La figura dell’Ankou è così parte della comunità bretone che è il soggetto principale di una filastrocca per bambini dal titolo “O, lakait ho troadig” (in francese O, mettez votre petit pied) strutturata come una conta progressiva in cui il coro introduce la parola variata che diventa la prima della nuova serie
Christophe Kergourlay

, lakait ho troadig, ma dousig Marjanig
O, lakait ho troadig e-kichen va hini
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
O, lakait ho karig, ma dousig Marjanig
O, lakait ho karig e-kichen va hini
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
Ni vo dornig hon-daou,
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
Ni vo jodig hon-daou,
Ni vo dornig hon-daou,
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou

Ni vo begig hon-daou,
Ni vo jodig hon-daou,
Ni vo dornig hon-daou,
Ni vo klinig hon-daou
Ni vo karig hon-daou
Ni vo troadig hon-daou
Ken na teuy an Ankou
Da gerc’hat ac’hanomp hon-daou
Traduzione inglese
Chorus
O, put your little foot,
my sweet Mary Jane

O, put your little foot beside mine.
I
We’ll be foot to foot
Until Death
Comes to fetch us
II
We’ll be leg to leg
We’ll be foot to foot
Until Death
Comes to fetch us
We’ll be knee to knee…
We’ll be hand to hand …
We’ll be cheek to cheek …
We’ll be mouth to mouth …
Traduzione italiano
Coro
O metti il tuo piedino
mia dolce Maria Giovanna
O metti il tuo piedino accanto al mio
I
Andremo passo-passo
finchè la Morte
verrà a prenderci
II
Andremo gamba contro gamba
Andremo passo-passo
finchè la Morte
verrà a prenderci
andremo ginocchio contro ginocchio
andremo mano nella mano
andremo guancia a guancia
andremo bocca contro bocca

FONTI
Alessio Tanfoglio: “Quaderno 4. Lo spettacolo della Morte: il cadavere e lo scheletro”, “Ankou e la danza macabra di Clusone” (2016)
http://perstorie-eieten.blogspot.it/2010/09/la-leggenda-dell-ankou-il-rapporto-dei.html
http://per.kentel.pagesperso-orange.fr/o_lakait_ho_troadig1.htm
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=66
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=fs&p=66
http://stq4s52k.es-02.live-paas.net/items/show/42662
http://www.arcadia93.org/bretoni.html

THREE CRAWS

In the traditional ballad (by anonymous author, contended between British and Scots), three or two crows/ravens observe the corpse of a knight and decide that it could be their breakfast!
Both versions were translated in the nineteenth century (or more recently) between Scandinavia, Germany and Russia.
Nella ballata tradizionale di autore anonimo (contesa come paternità tra inglesi e scozzesi), tre o due corvi osservano il cadavere di un cavaliere e decidono che potrebbe essere la loro colazione!
Entrambe le versioni sono state tradotte nell’ottocento o più recentemente tra Scandinavia, Germania e Russia.

Twa Corbies (scottish version)
Three Craws (nursery rhyme)
Three Ravens (english version)

Among the nursery rhymes of the Scottish tradition this one on the three crows perched on the wall is what remains of the medieval ballad on the crows and the corpse of a knight.
Tra le nursery rhymes della tradizione scozzese la filastrocca sui tre corvi appollaiati sul muretto è ciò che resta della ballata medievale sui corvi e il cadavere di un cavaliere.

 


I
Three craws sat upon a wa’,
Sat upon a wa’, sat upon a wa’,
Three craws sat upon a wa’,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
II
The first craw was greetin’ for his maw,
Greetin’ for his maw, greetin’ for his maw,
The first craw was greetin’ for his maw,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
III
The second craw fell and broke his jaw,
Fell and broke his jaw, fell and broke his jaw,
The second craw fell and broke his jaw,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
IV
The third craw, couldnae caw at a’,
Couldnae caw at a’, couldnae caw at a’,
The third craw, couldnae caw at a’,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
V
An that’s a’, absolutely a’,
Absolutely a’, absolutely a’,
An that’s a’, absolutely a’,
On a cauld and frosty mornin’.
Traduzione italiano
I
Tre corvi in fila sul muro
in fila sul muro in fila sul muro
tre corvi in fila sul muro
in una fredda e gelida mattina
III
Il primo corvo si lamentava per la mamma, si lamentava per la mamma, per la mamma, Il primo corvo si lamentava per la mamma
in una fredda e gelida mattina
III
Il secondo corvo cadde e si ruppe la mascella(1), cadde e si ruppe la mascella,
e si ruppe la mascella, Il secondo corvo cadde e si ruppe la mascella,
in una fredda e gelida mattina
IV
Il terzo corvo non sapeva gracchiare affatto, non sapeva gracchiare,
Il terzo corvo non sapeva gracchiare affatto, in una fredda e gelida mattina
V
E questo è tutto assolutamente tutto
assolutamente tutto, assolutamente tutto, questo è tutto
in una fredda e gelida mattina

NOTE
1) ossia il becco


The text versions have some variations, for example 
[Le versioni testuali presentano alcune varianti, ad esempio la I strofa diventa]
I
The first crow couldn’t fly at all,
couldn’t fly at all, couldn’t fly at all,
The first crow couldn’t fly at all,
On a cold and frosty morning.
III
‘i second craw wiz greetin for is da
greetin for is da
greetin for is da-a-a-aa
‘i second craw wiz greetin for is da
on a cal an frosty mornin’
and of course, despite the fact that there are only three crows in the title, a quarter of it appears (even if it isn’t) [e ovviamente nonostante che nel titolo ci siano solo tre corvi ne spunta un quarto (anche se non c’è)]
The fourth craw he wisnae there at a’
Wisnae there at a’, wisnae there at a’
The fourth craw he wisnae there at a’
On a cold and frosty morning.

LINK
http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/ThreeCraws.html
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_craws.htm

Henry my son

A folk ballad that inaugurates a narrative genre collected in multiple variations called “The will of the poisoned man“: the story of a dying son, because he has been poisoned, who returns to his mother to die in his bed and make a will; in all likelihood the ballad starts from Italy, passes through Germany to get to Sweden and then spread to the British Isles (Lord Randal) until it lands in America.
[Una ballata popolare che inaugura un genere narrativo ripreso in molteplici varianti detto “il testamento dell’avvelenato”: la  storia di un figlio morenteperchè è stato avvelenato, che ritorna dalla madre per morire nel suo letto e lasciare il testamento; con tutta  probabilità la ballata parte dall’Italia, passa per la Germania per arrivare  in Svezia e poi diffondersi nelle isole britanniche (Lord Randal) fino a sbarcare in  America.]

IRISH VERSION: Green and yeller

In Ireland, it is released a children’s version of Lord Randal , which recalls Child # 12, G. According to Frank Harte, ‘the Dublin man could not accept the beautiful, sad, slow, classical version, but produced instead this inelegant version which is unique as being the only variant in which poisoned beans and not eels and eel broth kill the unfortunate youth.
The version is also very close to the Italian mood of the ballad in which the poisoned son is Henry (in dialect Irrico or Rico), in the version of Bianchino (1629) we read
[In Irlanda è diffusa una versione per bambini di Lord Randal, che richiama Child #12, G. Secondo Frank Harte, “il dublinese non ha potuto accettare la versione bella, triste, lenta e classica, ma ha prodotto invece questa inelegante versione che è unica essendo la sola variante in cui i fagioli avvelenati e non le anguille e il brodo di anguilla uccidono lo sfortunato giovane.” La versione peraltro è molto vicina al mood italiano della ballata in cui l’avvelenato è il figlio Enrico (in dialetto Irrico o Rico), nella versione del Bianchino (1629) leggiamo]

“Dov’andastù, jersera,
figliuol mio ricco, savio e gentil?” (see)

ricco” could be a name (Rico, Ricco, Irrico that is Enrico= in english Henry) or the adjective “rich”, in the italian novellistica it was not unusual to combine the terms “wise and rich”  to indicate a magnanimous man, in some Italian versions the poisoned in his will leaves houses and lands to the brothers and a rich dowry to the sisters.
And yet in the Irish version (also spread in England) the properties of Henry are relatively poor.
[ricco potrebbe essere un nome (Rico, Ricco, Irrico cioè Enrico) o l’aggettivo, nella novellistica non era inconsueto accostare i termini savio e ricco per indicare un uomo magnanimo, in alcune versioni italiane l’avvelenato nel suo testamento lascia infatti case e terre ai fratelli e una ricca dote alle sorelle.
E tuttavia nella versione irlandese (diffusa peraltro anche in Inghilterra) le proprietà di Enrico sono relativamente misere.]

Sons of Erin



I
Where have you been all day,
Henry my son?
Where have you been all day,
my beloved one?
Away in the meadow,
away in the meadow
Make my head I’ve a pain in my head
and I want to lie down
.
II
And what did you have to eat,
What did you have to eat?
Poison beans, poison beans
III
And what colour were them beans,
What colour were them beans,?
Green and yellow, green and yellow (1)
IV
And what will you leave your mother,
What will you leave your mother?
A woollen blanket, a woollen blanket
V
And what will you leave your children,
What will you leave your children?
The keys of heaven, the keys of heaven (2)
VI
And waht will you leave your sweetheart,
What will you leave your sweetheart?
A rope to hang her, a rope to hang her..
Traduzione italiano Giordano Dall’Armellina
I
“Dove sei stato tutto il giorno,
Enrico figlio mio?
Dove sei stato tutto il giorno,
mio amato?»
«Via nei prati,
via nei prati.
Fammi il letto, ho mal di testa
e voglio stendermi.»
II
«E che cosa avesti da mangiare?
che cosa avesti da mangiare?»
«Fagioli avvelenati.»
III
«E di che colore erano quelli fagioli?
di che colore erano quelli fagioli?»
«Verdi e gialli (1).»
IV
«Che cosa lascerai a tua madre
cosa lascerai a tua madre?»
«Una coperta di lana.»
V
«Che cosa lascerai ai tuoi figli
cosa lascerai ai tuoi figli?»
«Le chiavi del paradiso (2).»
VI
«Che cosa lascerai al tuo amore
cosa lascerai al tuo amore?»
«Una corda per impiccarla.»

NOTE
1) It is likely that the eels were not very well known in Ireland. The choice of coloring of these strange beans is significant: green and yellow are the colors of betrayal and this belief comes from medieval paintings. The gold in the thirteenth century was the color of the transcendent luminosity, ideal frame of the sacred figures, the yellow instead was the ugly imitation, devoid of the material and moral qualities of gold. So yellow was perceived as a negative color and the yellow / green color pair indicated madness. The traitors like Judas or, more generally, the Jews and the Muslims are painted in yellow (in many Italian cities during the Renaissance the prostitutes were obliged to wear yellow and in Venice the Jews had to sew a yellow circle on the dress)
[È probabile che le anguille non fossero molto conosciute in Irlanda. Così sono i fagioli ad essere velenosi [Dall’Armellina traduce beans come “palline”].
Significativa è la scelta della colorazione di questi strani fagioli: il verde e il giallo sono i colori del tradimento e questa credenza arriva dai dipinti del Medioevo. L’oro nel XIII secolo era il colore della luminosità trascendente, cornice ideale delle figure sacre, il giallo invece ne era la brutta imitazione, privo delle qualità materiali e morali dell’oro. Così il giallo era percepito come colore negativo e la coppia cromatica giallo/verde indicava la follia. Di giallo sono dipinti i traditori come Giuda o più in generale gli ebrei e i musulmani (in molte città italiane durante il rinascimento le prostitute erano obbligate a vestirsi di giallo e a Venezia gli ebrei dovevano cucire un cerchio giallo sul vestito)]
2) Henry’s legacy is poor thing to recall widespread poverty at the time when the ballad was sung.
[il lascito di Enrico è ben misero forse a rispecchiare una diffusa povertà all’epoca in cui la ballata era cantata.]

Pete Seeger live in Children’s Concert At Town Hall 1962, a children’s version in which the comic side of the story is accentuated.
[una versione per bambini in cui si accentua il lato comico della storia]

(spoken)
You know it may seem hard to imagine
But once upon a time people didn’t have
Any such thing as television, didn’t have any radios
And if you wanted to have any music
You just had to make it yourself
[Difficile da immaginare,
ma una volta la gente non aveva
cose come la televisione e la radio,
e se voleva un po’ di musica
doveva suonarsela da sè]
It was only the kings and queens
That could afford to have somebody else make music for them
And you might not think it would be very good music
Everybody making their own music
[C’erano solo re e regine
che potevano permettersi di avere qualcuno che suonasse per loro
e c’è da credere che fosse musica molto bella,
tutti suonavano la loro musica]
But you’d be surprised, in almost every family
It seemed like there’d be somebody who could sing a song
Or tell a story or tell a joke or something
And in the evening they’d crowd around the fire
May be so keep warm
[Sorprendentemente in quasi ogni famiglia
sembrava ci fosse qualcuno capace di suonare una canzone
o raccontare una storia o una barzelletta o cose del genere
e alla sera si radunavano attorno al fuoco
per tenersi al caldo]
One man told me he learned how to play the fiddle
Because he noticed the fiddler always got to stand nearest to the fire
So he decided that if he wants to stay warm
He better learn how to play the fiddle
And they’d sing these old ballads you know, like
[Uno mi disse che imparò a suonare il violino
perchè si era accorto che il violinista era quello sempre più vicino al fuoco
così decise che se voleva stare al caldo
doveva imparare a suonare il violino,
e cantavano le vecchie ballate, sapete, come]
Where have you been all the day, Randall my son?
Where have you been all the day, my pretty one?
I’ve been to my sweetheart, mother
I’ve been to my sweetheart, mother
Mother, make my bed soon, for I’m sick to my heart
And I fain would lie down
[Dove sei stato tutto il giorno, Randall figlio mio?
Dove sei stato tutto il giorno, mio ​​caro?
Sono stato dalla mia fidanzata, mamma
Sono stato dalla mia fidanzata, mamma
Mamma, preparami presto il letto, perché ho il cuore malato
E  preferirei sdraiarmi]
That’s an old old song, very sad one
But I met a fellow last November over in England
And he said he knew it a different way
Everybody knows these songs different ways it seems
He says, when he was a kid, all the, all the kids used to sing it
[È una canzone molto vecchia, molto triste
ma ho incontrato un collega lo scorso novembre in Inghilterra
e ha detto che la conosceva in un modo diverso,
sembra che tutti conoscano queste canzoni in modi diversi,
dice, quando era un bambino, tutti, tutti i bambini la cantavano]


I
Where have you been all day,
Henry my boy?
Where have you been all day,
my pride and joy?
In the woods,
dear mother
In the woods,
dear mother
Mother be quick, I got to be sick and lay me down to die
II
What did you do in the woods all day,
What did you do in the woods all day,
Ate, dear mother…
III
What did you eat  in the woods all day
What did you eat  in the woods all day
Eels, dear mother…
IV
What colour was those eels,
What colour was those eels,
Green and yeller…
V
Those eels were snakes,
Those eels were snakes,
Urgh, dear mother…
VI
What color flowers would you like,
What color flowers would you like,
Green and yeller
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
“Dove sei stato tutto il giorno,
Enrico ragazzo mio?
Dove sei stato tutto il giorno,
mio orgoglio e gioia?»
«Nei boschi,
cara mamma,
nei boschi,
cara mamma,
presto mamma, sono malato
e voglio stendermi per morire»
II
“Cosa hai fatto nei boschi tutto il giorno
Cosa hai fatto nei boschi tutto il giorno?”
“Ho mangiato cara mamma…
III
«Cosa hai mangiato nei boschi tutto il giorno?
Cosa hai mangiato nei boschi tutto il giorno?»
«Anguille cara mamma…»
IV
«Di che colore erano quelle anguille?
Di che colore erano quelle anguille?»
«Verdi e gialli  cara mamma…»
V
«Quelle anguille erano serpenti
Quelle anguille erano serpenti»
«Urgh (1) cara mamma…»
VI
“Di che colore preferisci i fiori,
Di che colore preferisci i fiori?”
“Verdi e gialli…”

NOTE
lyrics from https://www.streetdirectory.com/lyricadvisor/song/eejuow/henry_my_son/
1) origine onomatopeica, espressione tipica delle vignette fumettistiche, indica un conato di vomito

LINK
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/37.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d01207

Little Boy Billy

Read the post in English

Una canzone del mare umoristica (del tipo caustico)  intitolata anche “Three Sailors from Bristol City” o “Little Boy Billee”, che tratta un argomento inquietante per la nostra civiltà, ma sempre dietro l’angolo: il cannibalismo!
Il mare è un luogo d’insidie e di scherzi del fato, una tempesta ti può portare fuori rotta, su una barcaccia di fortuna o una zattera, senza cibo e acqua, un tema trattato anche nella grande pittura ( Theodore Gericault, La zattera della Medusa vedi): la vita umana in bilico tra speranza e disperazione.

The three sailors

Nelle canzoni marinaresche si finisce per esprimere le paure più grandi con una bella risata! Il brano nasce nel 1863 con il titolo “The three sailors” scritto da William Makepeace Thackeray come parodia di una canzone marinaresca francese dal titolo “La Courte Paille” (=la paglia corta)– diventata in seguito “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) e finita nelle canzoncine per bambini. (vedi prima parte): i casi di cannibalismo in mare come estrema risorsa per la sopravvivenza erano molto dibattiti dall’opinione pubblica e gli stessi tribunali erano inclini a commutare le sentenze di morte in detenzione.
L’omicidio per necessità (o il sacrificio di uno per il bene degli altri) trova una giustificazione nella terribile esperienza della morte per fame che spinge la mente umana alla disperazione e alla pazzia, ma nel 1884 il caso del naufragio del Mignonette  spaccò l’opinione pubblica e lo stesso ministro dell’interno dell’epoca Sir William Harcourt, ebbe a dire “se questi uomini non vengono condannati per l’omicidio, stiamo dando carta bianca al capitano di qualsiasi nave di mangiare il mozzo ogni volta che scarseggiano i viveri”. (tratto da qui).
La sentenza si pone come caso leader e mette la vita come bene supremo non ammettendo l’omicidio per necessità come autodifesa

Little Billee
Bernard Partridge Cartoons

Dalle note del “Penguin Book” (1959):
La ballata portoghese A Nau Caterineta e la ballata francese La Courte Paille raccontano la stessa storia. La nave è stata a lungo in mare e il cibo e vinito. Le pagliuzze sono pescate per vedere chi deve essere mangiato, e il capitano rimane con la cannuccia più corta. Il mozzo si offre per essere sacrificato al suo posto, ma chiede di poter restare di vedetta fino al giorno successivo. In breve tempo vede la terra (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) e gli uomini vengono salvati. Thackeray ha parodiato questa canzone nel suo Little Billee. È probabile che la ballata francese abbia dato origine a The Ship in Distress, apparsa nei fogli volanti dell’Ottocento. George Butterworth si è procurato quattro versioni nel Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [numero 17] pp.320-2) e Sharp ne ha stampato una da James Bishop di Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) con “per molti versi una melodia più grandiosa “che aveva trovato in quella contea. Il testo proviene in parte dalla versione di Bishop, e in parte da un foglio volante.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Ralph Steadman in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.(1)”
“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(2)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(3) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (4)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre uomini di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare.
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e anche il giovane Billy.
Rubarono una lattina di biscotti al capitano
e una grande bottiglia di whisky.
Ma quando raggiunsero il mare aperto
non era avanzato che un pisello
secco.
Disse Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Non abbiamo niente da mangiare così ti mangerò”
disse Jimmy il Trinca “Sono vecchio e rinsecchito,
è meglio mangiare il giovane Billy”
“Oh Giovane Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti
così sbottona il primo bottone della tua camiciola”
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti come la mia cara mamma mi ha raccomandato?”
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e poi si inginocchiò (sulla crocetta).
Ma quando arrivò all’11° comandamento
gridò “Yo Ho! Terra”.
“Vedo Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
Vedo la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B.”
Impiccarono Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
ma fecero ammiraglio il Giovane Billy.

NOTE
La versione di Thackeray qui
1) dal francese chemise
2) scritto anche come top fore-gallant
2) i suoi compagni non dovevano essere molto ferrati con la Bibbia (e probabilmente Billy ne avrebbe inventati di nuovi per guadagnare tempo!)
4) sigla di “Knight Commander of the Bath” = Cavaliere Commendatore del Bagno, l’ordine militare cavalleresco fondato da Giorgio I nel 1725

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Secondo Stan Hugill “Little Billee” era una sea shanty per il lavoro alle pompe, un lavoro noioso e monotono che poteva senz’altro essere “rallegrato” da questa canzoncina! Hugill riporta solo il testo dicendo che la melodia è come la francese “Il était un Petit Navire”, così l’adattamento di Hulton Clint ha l’andamento di una ninna-nanna.


I
There were three sailors of Bristol City;
They stole a boat and went to sea.
But first with beef and hardtack biscuits
And pickled pork they loaded she.
And pickled pork they loaded she
II
There was gorging Jack and guzzling Jimmy,
And likewise there was little Billee.
but when they got to the Equator
They’d only left but one split pea.
III
Then gorging Jack to guzzling Jimmy,
“I am confounded hungaree.”
Says guzzling Jimmy to gorging Jacky
“We’ve no wittles (1), so we must eat we.”
IV
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“Oh Guzzling Jim what a fool you be..
There’s little Billy, who’s young and tender,
We’re old and tough, so let’s eat he.”
V
“Make haste, make haste” then say Guzzling Jimmy
as he drew his snickher snee (2)
“O Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
undo the collar of your chemie.”
VI
When William heard this information
he drope down on bended knee
“O let me say my catechism
which my dear mom taught to me”
VII
So up he went to the maintop-gallant
and he drope down on his bended knee
and than he said  all his catechism
which his dear mamy once taught to he
VIII
He scarce had said his catechism
when up he jumps “There’s land I see
Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
IX
“Jerusalem and Madagascar,
And North and South Amerikee;
There’s the British fleet a-riding at anchor,
With Admiral Napier, K.C.B.”
X
When they bordered to Admiral’s vessel,
He hanged fat Jack (3) and flogged Jimmee;
as for little Bill they make him
The Captain of a Seventy-three (4).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre marinai della città di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare, ma prima la caricarono di manzo e gallette
e di maiale sotto sale
di maiale sotto sale
II
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e c’era anche il giovane Billy.
Ma quando raggiunsero l’Equatore
era avanzato solo un pisello.
III
Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Sono terribilmente affamato”
dice Jimmy il Trinca a  Jack il Gordo “Non abbiamo cibo, così ci mangeremo”
IV
Disse Jack il Gordo  a Jimmy il Trinca “Oh Jim il trinca, che sciocco sei,
c’è il piccolo Billy, che è giovane e tenero, noi siamo vecchi e duri, meglio mangiare lui”
V
“Sbrigati, sbrigati ” allora dice Jimmy il Trinca mentre estrae il suo snickher snee
“Oh  Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti,  disfa il nodo della camicia”
VI
Quando William udì questa notizia
si gettò in ginocchio
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti che la mia cara mamma mi ha insegnato?”
VII
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro e poi si inginocchiò per recitare i comandamenti che sua madre gli aveva un tempo insegnato
VII
Non aveva finito di dirli
quando si rizzò con un balzo ” Vedo terra, Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
IX
Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America
c’è la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B.”
X
Quando salirono a bordo del vascello dell’ammiraglio
Impiccarono il grasso Jack e
frustarono Jimmy
ma fecero il giovane Billy
capitano di un 73

NOTE
1)  storpiatura di “vittles,”che sta per “victuals,”= “food.”
2) un grande coltello particolarmente letale usato come arma, non c’è un equivalente italiano
3) in alcune versioni si distingue il grado di colpa tra i due marinai, così uno solo è impiccato
4) vascello da guerra di 73 cannoni

E per corollario ecco la versione francese “Un Petit Navire”
FONTI
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872

The twelve days of Christmas

“The twelve days of Christmas” is an English nursery rhyme, a tongue twister, built to accumulate on the model of the “count”, ie to count a series of “things” to grow and decrease; it is part of the Anglo-Saxon Christmas tradition becoming a sort of Victorian family game on Christmas Day.
[“I 12 giorni di Natale” è una filastrocca inglese, anche scioglilingua, costruita a cumulazione sul modello delle “conte”, ossia contare una serie di “cose” a crescere e a decrescere; fa parte della tradizione anglosassone natalizia diventando una sorta di gioco di famiglia vittoriano nel giorno di Natale.]
The text is a nursery rhyme published for the first time in the book Mirth without Mischief (Gioie Innocenti) in London in 1780. It had to be recited by some players in a circle during a memory game in which the players played one verse in turn. of the nursery rhyme, in sequence. Years later, play and nursery rhyme were revisited by a collector of popular songs, Lady Gomme, as “A great fun for the whole family before the twelfth night of Christmas.” (translated from here)
“Il testo è una filastrocca infantile pubblicata per la prima volta nel libro Mirth without Mischief (Gioie Innocenti) a Londra nel 1780. Doveva essere recitata da alcuni giocatori in circolo nel corso di un gioco di memoria in cui i giocatori recitavano a turno un verso della filastrocca, in sequenza. Anni dopo, gioco e filastrocca furono riproposti da una collezionista di canzoni popolari, Lady Gomme, come “Un bel divertimento per tutta la famiglia prima della cena della dodicesima notte di Natale.” (tratto da qui)

12days-1

It was Frederic Austin in 1909 to create the standard version arranging text and melody and changing the sequence of the nursery rhyme, the 12 days of which we speak are no longer those before Christmas (starting December 13), but those AFTER Christmas, with the twelfth day referred to the Epiphany.
[Fu Frederic Austin nel 1909 a creare la versione standard arrangiando testo e melodia e modificando la sequenza della filastrocca, i 12 giorni di cui si parla non sono più quelli prima di Natale (a partire dal 13 dicembre), ma quelli DOPO Natale, con il dodicesimo giorno riferito all’Epifania.]

And yet some scholars trace the song to the seventh century and believe that the nursery rhyme is a solstice song about birds rich in symbolism of the ancient religion. So John R. Henderson connects numbers and birds in the original sequence (see). In the songs of the ancient bards dedicated to the light season of the year there are always many images related to birds and their song: blackbirds, larks, nighters, nightingales and cuckoos are the most cited and in winter there is no shortage of robins and wrens.
[E tuttavia alcuni studiosi fanno risalire il canto al VII secolo e ritengono che la filastrocca sia un canto solstiziale sugli uccelli ricco di simbolismi dell’antica religione . Così John R. Henderson collega numeri e uccelli nella sequenza originaria (vedi)]
Nelle canzoni degli antichi bardi dedicate alla Stagione chiara dell’anno ci sono sempre molte immagini riferite agli uccelli e al loro canto: merli, allodole, fanelli, usignoli e cuculi sono quelli più citati e nella stagione invernale non mancano mai pettirossi e scriccioli.

HYPOTHESIS CELTIC CODE
[IPOTESI CODICE CELTICO]

A Partridge in a Pear Tree: The partridge in winter leaves the flock and forms monogamous couples (which remain together for life) perching on a tree: a partridge is therefore the couple become one
[la pernice sul pero. La pernice in inverno lascia lo stormo e forma coppie monogame (che restano unite per tutta la vita) appollaiandosi su un albero: una pernice è quindi la coppia diventata Uno]
Two Turtle Doves: Symbol of devout love and yet their lamentation is also cried for loss, so are the dual principle of opposites, male-female, day-night, summer-winter, life-death
[due colombe. Simbolo di amore devoto e tuttavia il loro lamento è anche pianto per la perdita, sono così il principio duale degli opposti, maschio-femmina, giorno-notte, estate-inverno, vita-morte]
Three French Hens: The hen is an animal sacred to the Goddess Mother triple goddess, representing the cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth (see)
[tre galline francesi. La gallina è animale sacro alla Dea Madre triplice dea, rappresentano il ciclo di nascita, vita, morte e rinascita (vedi)]
Four Colly Birds: The term colly comes from ancient English for “coal”. Black birds like  like crows (see) of the goddesses of the battle (see). Four is the number of the Earth, a dormant earth in the darkness but which holds the seed of life
[quattro uccelli neri. Il termine colly deriva dall’inglese antico per “coal” carbone. Uccelli neri come la notte come corvi e corvacci (vedi) delle dee della battaglia (vedi). Quattro è il numero della Terra, una terra dormiente nell’oscurità ma che serba il seme della vita]
Five Golden Rings: The male pheasant is sumptuously colored, with a green head and gold, blue and green feathers on the rest of the body. It has a characteristic white ring around the base of the neck. The male pheasant is a symbol of fire and sexuality
[cinque fagiani maschi. Il fagiano maschio è sontuosamente colorato , con una testa verde e piume d’oro , blu e verdi sul resto del corpo . Ha un anello bianco caratteristico intorno alla base del collo . Il fagiano maschio è simbolo del fuoco e della sessualità]
Six Geese A-Laying: six geese that make eggs. Still further references to life and the Great Mother
[sei oche che fanno le uova. Ancora ulteriori riferimenti alla vita e alla Grande Madre]
Seven Swans A-Swimming: For the swan symbolism here.
[sette cigni che nuotano.  Per il simbolismo del cigno qui.]
Eight Maids A-Milking: eight magpies, because they are birds that seem to wear a black livery with white bib just like the maids. The milking is also rich in symbolism see
[otto gazze, perchè sono uccelli che sembrano indossare una livrea nera con pettorina bianca proprio come le cameriere. La mungitura è peraltro ricca di simbolismi vedi]
Nine Drummers Drumming: nine snipes. Drumming is the sound produced by the male snipe during the courtship that does not come from the voice but is the sound of the tail feathers vibrating
[nove beccaccini. Drumming è il suono prodotto dal beccaccino maschio durante il corteggiamento che non viene dalla voce ma è il suono della vibrazione delle penne della coda]
Ten Pipers Piping: ten sandpiper, in some versions it is written Cocks A-Crowing
[dieci piro-pro (o tringa) in inglese . In alcune versioni è scritto Cocks A-Crowing]
Eleven Ladies Dancing: eleven lapwings in their courtship dance
[undici pavoncelle nella loro danza di corteggiamento]
Twelve Lords A-Leaping: twelve cuckoos. The song of the cuckoo is a harbinger of Spring, its alleged longevity (in the proverbs they say “Old as the cuckoo “) has transformed it into a seer. It is a bird that predicts the future in particular the questioning girls from husband to ask within how many years they will marry. keep it going
[dodici cuculi. Il canto del cuculo è foriero di Primavera, La sua presunta longevità (nei proverbi si dice “”Vecchio come il cucco”) lo ha trasformato in veggente. E’ un uccello che predice il futuro in particolare lo interrogano le ragazze da marito per chiedere entro quanti anni si sposeranno. continua]

THE MODERN VERSION
(LA VERSIONE MODERNA)

In the nursery rhyme the narrator describes the gifts received from his “true” love in the twelve days of Christmas. Each verse lists all the gifts of the previous strophes, adding one.
[Nella filastrocca il narratore descrive i doni ricevuti dal suo “vero” amore nei dodici giorni di Natale. Ogni strofa elenca tutti i doni delle strofe precedenti, aggiungendone uno.]
On the first day of Christmas,
my true love sent to me a partridge (1) in a pear tree.
On the second day of Christmas,
my true love sent to me two turtle doves, and a partridge in a pear tree.
On the third day of Christmas,
my true love sent to me three french hens, two turtle doves, and a partridge in a pear tree  etc
NOTE
1) the partridge was introduced in the English countryside only in the mid-1700s, but the music of the nursery rhyme is traced back to 1500.
[la pernice venne introdotta nella campagna inglese solo a metà del 1700, ma la musica della filastrocca viene fatta risalire al 1500.]

David Jones & Donald Duncan in The Victorian Revels 

Some silly versions…

A SECRET CATECHISM?
(UN CATECHISMO SEGRETO?)

Some believe that the nursery rhyme speaks for Christian symbols hidden in an age of anti-Catholic persecution (XVI-XVII century),
[Alcuni ritengono che la filastrocca parli per simboli cristiani celati in un’epoca di persecuzioni anti-cattoliche (XVI-XVII secolo)]
“True love” is Jesus born at Christmas.
And the gifts are:
… at Partridge in a Pear Tree
The partridge on a pear tree is Jesus, who pretends to be wounded in order to attract predators to himself and distract them from the undefended little children in the nest.
… Two Turtle Doves
The two doves are the Old and the New Testament.
… Three French Hens
The three French hens represent the three theological virtues: faith, hope and charity.
… Four Calling Birds
The four singing birds are the four Gospels, of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Originally the term was however colly birds (black birds)
… Five Gold Rings
The five golden rings represent the first five books of the Old Testament, known as the Pentateuch: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.
… Six Geese A-laying
The six geese are the six days of creation.
… Seven Swans A-swimming
The swans that swim are the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit: wisdom, intellect, counsel, fortitude, science, pity and fear of God.
… Eight Maids A-milking
The eight virgins carrying milk symbolize the eight Beatitudes (Matthew 5: 3-10)
… Nine Ladies Dancing
The nine dancing ladies are the fruits of the Holy Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faith, meekness, self-control. (Galatians 5: 22)
… Ten Lords A-leaping
The ten lords are the ten commandments
… Eleven Pipers Piping
The eleven flute players, the apostles (therefore excluding Judas)
… Twelve Drummers Drumming
Finally, the twelve drummers represent the twelve points of the apostolic creed

[Il “vero amore”  è Gesù che nasce a Natale.
E i doni sono:
…A Partridge in a Pear Tree
La pernice su un pero è Gesù, che si finge ferito per attirare i predatori a sé e distoglierli dai figlioletti indifesi nel nido.
… Two Turtle Doves
Le due tortore sono il Vecchio e il Nuovo Testamento.
… Three French Hens
Le tre galline francesi rappresentano le tre virtù teologiche: fede, speranza e carità.
… Four Calling Birds
I quattro uccelli da richiamo (oppure uccelli canterini) sono i quattro Vangeli, di Matteo, Marco, Luca e Giovanni. IN origine il termine era però colly birds (uccelli di colore nero)
… Five Gold Rings
I cinque anelli d’oro rappresentano i primi cinque libri del Vecchio Testamento, conosciuti come Pentateuco: Genesi, Esodo, Levitico, Numeri e Deuteronomio.
… Six Geese A-laying
Le sei oche sono i sei giorni della creazione.
… Seven Swans A-swimming
I cigni che nuotano sono i sette doni dello Spirito Santo: sapienza, intelletto, consiglio, fortezza, scienza, pietà e timore di Dio.
… Eight Maids A-milking
Le otto vergini che portano il latte simboleggiano le otto beatitudini (Matteo 5:3-10)
… Nine Ladies Dancing
Le nove signore danzanti sono i frutti dello Spirito Santo: amore, gioia, pace, pazienza, gentilezza, bontà, fede, mansuetudine, autocontrollo. (Galati 5: 22)
… Ten Lords A-leaping
I dieci signori sono i dieci comandamenti
… Eleven Pipers Piping
Gli undici suonatori di flauto, gli apostoli (escluso quindi Giuda)
… Twelve Drummers Drumming
I dodici suonatori di tamburo, infine, rappresentano i dodici punti del credo apostolico]

The Carol of the Birds (la carola degli Uccelli)

LINK
http://www.icyousee.org/twelvebirds.html
https://blogs.loc.gov/catbird/2016/12/is-it-four-calling-birds-or-four-colly-birds-a-twelve-days-of-christmas-debate/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/five-golden-rings-four-colly-birds–wait-colly-birds-whats-a-colly-bird/2016/12/21/e0c6b358-c797-11e6-8bee-54e800ef2a63_story.html?utm_term=.49b7592a5358
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve_Days_of_Christmas
http://www.revels.org/store/cds/victorian-christmas-revels-copy/

Over the hills and far away: Tom the piper

A beautiful melody collected by Thomas D’Urfey in his “Pills to Purge Melancholy” still very current has returned to popularity with the TV series Sharpe’s Rifles. Already at that time, what was a romantic melody for a love story, it had become a captivating melody pro-enlistment for the Napoleonic wars (Part one e part two)
[Un bellissima melodia riportata da Thomas D’Urfey nel suo “Pills to Purge Melancholy” ancora attualissima è ritornata alla popolarità con la serie tv Sharpe’s Rifles. Già all’epoca quella che era una melodia romantica per una storia d’amore, era diventata una melodia accattivante e pro arruolamento per le guerre napoleoniche. (vedi prima parte e seconda parte)]

Jocky met with Jenny fair

In Thomas D’Urfey it is a somewhat tormented courtship story; in truth all the song follows the topos of the lover keeped on edge, that is desperate and begs for mercy, to obtain the favors of his Lady
But our Jock should not have been so desperate if he finally concludes
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play
[In Thomas D’Urfey è una storia di corteggiamento un po’ tormentata; in verità tutto il canto segue il topos dell’amante tenuto sulle spine che si dispera e supplica mercede, per ottenere i favori della bella.
Ma il nostro  Jock non doveva essere poi così disperato se alla fine conclude
Poichè è falsa colei che adoro
non mi fiderò più di un’altra donna,
dalla loro seduzione fuggirò via
e sul mio piffero suonerò allegramente”
]

ENGLISH OR SCOTTISH VERSION?
[VERSIONE INGLESE O SCOZZESE?]

The question already debated in the eighteenth century, since the publication of this song in the “Scots Musical Museum” has not yet been solved
There was debate at the time of this song’s publication as to whether it was an English song composed about 1700 or whether it was an earlier Scots song which was adopted in England. Unfortunately, there is still no conclusive evidence to answer this question although Burns was very specific about only including Scots songs. There is an alternative melody for these verses which is called, ‘My plaid away’, composed about 1710.” (from here)
[La questione dibattuta già nel Settecento, fin dalla pubblicazione di questa canzone nello “Scots Musical Museum” non si è ancora risolta
Al momento della pubblicazione di questa canzone c’era un dibattito sul fatto che fosse una canzone inglese composta intorno al 1700 o se fosse una canzone scozzese precedente adottata in Inghilterra. Sfortunatamente, non ci sono ancora prove conclusive per rispondere a questa domanda, anche se Burns era molto specifico riguardo solo alle canzoni scozzesi. C’è una melodia alternativa per questi versi che s’intitola “My plaid away’ “(il vento ha soffiato) via la mia coperta”, composta intorno al 1710. ” (da qui)]

Jockey’s Lamentation or O’er the hills and far away
OWER THE HILLS AND FAUR AWA’

Connie Dover  in “Somebody 1991 takes up the ancient text (without modifying it too much) and writes her own melody. [riprende il testo antico stralciando un po’ di strofe, ma senza modificarlo troppo e scrive una melodia sua.]


Tannahill Weavers in Arnish Light 2006
 “Here’s an old poem, which has been set to this nifty little melody by the extremely talented Connie Dover. A song about a piper who can play but one tune, “ower the hills and faur awa, and probably has the cheek to wonder why the girl left him. It is amazing how many pipers are actually asked if they can play “ower the hills and faur awa’”, but it is even more amazing how many of them take it as a request for the melody and not the more obvious request for them to take a hike.
(from here)

[Esilarante come al solito il commento allegato nelle note: Ecco un vecchio poema, che è stato musicato su questa piccola e graziosa melodia dalla talentuosa Connie Dover. Una canzone che parla di un suonatore di cornamusa che riesca a suonare solo una melodia, “ower the hills and faur awa ‘”, e probabilmente ha la faccia tosta di chiedersi perché la ragazza lo abbia lasciato! E’ ancora oggi sorprendente che sia richiesto a molti zampognari di suonarla, ma è ancor più sorprendente il fatto che molti di loro lo considerino una richiesta per la melodia e non la richiesta più ovvia di andarsene a fare una passeggiata.”]

The tea-table miscellany (Allan Ramsay collection)
I
Jocky met with Jenny fair
Between the dawning and the day
But Jocky now is full of care
Since Jenny stole his heart away
II
Although she promised to be true
She proven has, alack, unkind
The which does make poor Jocky rue
That e’er he loved a fickle mind
III
Jocky was a bonny lad
That e’er was born in Scotland fair
But now poor lad he does run mad
Since Jenny causes his despair
IV
Young Jocky was a piper’s son
He fell in love when he was young
And all the tunes that he could play
Was O’er the Hills and Far Away
Chorus
And it’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far away
It’s o’er the hills and far
The wind has blown my plaid away
V
He sang “when my first my Jenny’s face
I saw she seemed so full of grace
With mickle joy my heart was filled
That’s now alas with sorrow killed
VI
Oh were she but as true as fair
‘T would put an end to my despair
Instead of that she is unkind
And wavers like the winter wind (3)
VII
Hard was my hap to fall in love
With one that does so faithless prove
Hard my fate to court a maid
Who has my constant heart betrayed
VIII
Since she is false whom I adore
I’ll never trust a woman more
From all their charms I’ll flee away
And on my pipes I’ll sweetly play”

Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Jock conobbe la bella Jenny
allo spuntar dell’alba
e ora Jock è preoccupato
da quanto Jenny gli ha rapito il cuore
II
Sebbene lei promise di essere sincera
si rivelò ahimè scortese
il che fece rimpiangere al povero Jock
di essersi innamorato di una mente volubile
III
Jock era il più bel ragazzo
che mai sia nato nella Scozia bella,
ma ora povero ragazzo è impazzito
da quando Jenny l’ha portato alla disperazione
IV
Il giovane Jocky era figlio di un pifferaio (1)
e si innamorò quando era giovane
e l’unica melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano sulle colline”
CORO
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
lontano oltre le colline
il vento ha soffiato via la mia coperta (2)
V
Cantava “Quando per la prima volta il viso della mia Jenny vidi, sembrava così piena di grazia,
di molta gioia il mio cuore si colmò
ma ora ahimè dal dolore è ucciso
VI
Oh se solo lei fosse fedele quanto è bella
potrebbe mettere fine alla mia disperazione
invece di essere scortese
e vacillante come il vento d’inverno
VII
Amara sorte innamorarmi
di una che così infedele si mostra,
amaro il mio fato di corteggiare una fanciulla
che ha tradito il mio cuore fedele
VIII
Poichè è falsa colei che adoro
non mi fiderò più di un’altra donna,
dalla loro seduzione fuggirò via
e sul mio piffero suonerò allegramente.”

NOTE
1) piper si traduce sia come pifferaio (colui che suona il piffero o flauto) ma anche come zampognaro (colui che suona la cornamusa)
The Tannies cite in the notes an old story widespread among the Scottish soldiers in World War I: “It reminds us of the old story about the regimental piper going over the top with his colleagues at the Battle of the Somme. It has for many years been the tradition that Scottish regiments are piped into battle; a tradition that is still honoured. Picture the scene, there he is blowing away furiously, right there in the thick of the battle. Bullets and shells are flashing past him and his fellow soldiers, bombs are exploding all around him, things are whizzing and whooshing all over the place. Suddenly out of the confusion of the battle the unmistakable loud voice of his sergeant major rings out. “For @#%$+* sake Angus, play something they like!”
[I Tannies citano nelle note una vecchia storia diffusa tra i soldati scozzesi nella I guerra mondiale: “Ci ricorda la vecchia storia del pifferaio del reggimento che ha superato il limite con i suoi colleghi nella battaglia della Somme. Per molti anni c’è stata la tradizione che i reggimenti scozzesi siano accompagnati in battaglia dalle cornamuse; una tradizione che è ancora onorata. Immagina la scena, eccolo che insuffla  furiosamente, proprio lì nel pieno della battaglia. Cannonate e proiettili stanno fischiando davanti a lui e ai suoi commilitoni, le bombe stanno esplodendo tutt’attorno a lui, cose che sfrecciano e sibilano dappertutto. All’improvviso, sulla confusione della battaglia, risuona l’inconfondibile voce del suo sergente maggiore. “Per l’amor di dio Angus, suona a qualcosa che gli piaccia!“]
2) the term is a euphemism, the blanket covers the modesty of the woman and is blown or thrown away = defloration [il termine è un eufemismo, la coperta copre il pudore della donna e viene soffiata o gettata via = deflorazione]

WERE I LAID ON GREENLAND’S COAST (JOHN GRAY)

The version reported by John Gay for “The Beggar’s Opera” is a duet between the protagonists (Air XVI, Macheath and Polly) with music adapted by Johann Christoph Pepusch (1728).
[La versione riportata da John Gay per “The Beggar’s Opera” è un duetto tra i due protagonisti (Air XVI,  Macheath e Polly) con musica adattata da Johann Christoph Pepusch (1728).]


Same Air in the film version of Gay’s work, directed by Peter Brook in 1953, starring by Laurence Olivier and Dorothy Tutin.
[Stessa aria interpretata da Laurence Olivier e Dorothy Tutin nella versione cinematografica del lavoro di Gay, diretta da Peter Brook nel 1953.]


I
Were I laid on Greenland’s Coast,
And in my Arms embrac’d my Lass;
Warm amidst eternal Frost,
Too soon the Half Year’s Night would pass.
II
Were I sold on Indian Soil,
Soon as the burning Day was clos’d,
I could mock the sultry Toil
When on my Charmer’s Breast repos’d.
III
And I would love you all the Day,
Every Night would kiss and play,
If with me you’d fondly stray
Over the Hills and far away
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I (lui)
Se fossi sulle coste delle Groenlandia
e abbracciassi la mia ragazza,
al caldo tra il ghiaccio eterno
troppo presto la notte polare(1) passerebbe
III (lei)
Se fossi sul suolo indiano (2)
appena il giorno cocente fosse finito
irriderei la fatica amara(3)
per riposare sul petto del mio innamorato
III (alternati)
Ti amerei tutto il giorno
ogni notte a baciarci e amarci
se con me appassionatamente vorresti girovagare
lontano oltre le colline

NOTE
1) letteralmente la notte del mezzo anno
2) americano
3) the sultry Toil  is the work of slaves (deportation) [si riferisce al lavoro di schiavitù dei deportati]

NURSERY RHYMES: Tom, the Piper’s Son

tom_10939_mdIn the nursery rhyme version Jock becomes Tom who knows only one melody “Over the hills and far away,” and it is precisely this version to become a popular song for children.
But Tom is the “Fool” in the Mummer playes, hence the idea that history is a medieval variant of the Pied Piper.

[Nella versione lullaby Jock diventa Tom il figlio del piper che conosce una sola melodia “Lontano oltre le colline” ed è per l’appunto in questa versione a diventare una popolare canzone per bambini.
Ma Tom è il Matto nelle commedie dei Mummer, da qui l’idea che la storia sia una variante medievale del pifferaio magico.]

If we really want to close the loop of this succession of versions, we can incidentally notice that the protagonist of the version of George Farquard was Tom, who left for the war to play the pipes in the British army.
[Ma se proprio vogliamo chiudere il cerchio di questo susseguirsi di versioni possiamo incidentalmente notare che il protagonista della versione di George Farquard si chiamava sempre Tom colui che è partito per la guerra a suonare il piffero (o la sua cornamusa) nell’esercito britannico.]

Hilary James & Simon Mayer in: “Lullabies with Mandolins
Tim Hart version that presents some variations with respect to the nursery rhyme for children.
[il testo è quello di Tim Hart e presenta alcune variazioni rispetto alla filastrocca per bambini.]


I
Tom, he was a piper’s son,
He learned to play when he was young,
the only tune that he could play
Was, “Over the hills and far away,”
CHORUS
Over the hills, and a long way off,
The wind shall blow my top-knot off.
II
Now Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That he pleased both the girls and boys,
And they did dance when he did play
“Over the hills and far away.”
III
Now Tom did play with such a skill
That those nearby could not stand still
And all who heard him they did dance
Down through England, Spain and France
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tom era il figlio del pifferaio
imparò a suonare quando era giovane
e la sola melodia che sapeva suonare
era “Lontano oltre le colline”
CORO
Oltre le colline e lontano
il vento scompiglierà il mio chignon (1)
II
Ora Tom con il suo piffero faceva un tale baccano
che piaceva sia alle ragazze che ai ragazzi
e danzavano quando lui suonava
“Lontano oltre le colline”
III
Ora Tom suonava con tale abilità, che coloro che gli erano vicini non potevano stare fermi
e tutti quelli che lo sentivano, danzavano
attraverso l’Inghilterra, la Spagna e la Francia

NOTE
1) più propriamente nastro annodato a fiocco come fermaglio sulla cima dei capelli delle signore nel XVII e XVIII secolo

LINK
http://www.contemplator.com/england/faraway.html
http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-062,-pages-62-and-63-oer-the-hills,-and-far-away.aspx
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiOVRHILL4;ttOVERHILL.html
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=95039
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1226lyr7.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom,_Tom,_the_Piper%27s_Son
https://clamarcap.com/tag/johann-christoph-pepusch/
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=1524
http://www.anonymousmorris.co.uk/dances/valiant.html
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/10900/10939/tom_10939.htm

CHÌ MI NA MÒRBHEANNA

“Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh” è una canzone in gaelico scozzese scritta da John Cameron di Ballachulish (Iain Camshroin) nel 1856.
Il titolo iniziale della canzone era” Duil ri Baile Chaolais Fhaicinn” (Hoping to see Ballachulish), la sua pubblicazione nella raccolta “The Gaelic Songster” (An t-Oranaiche) di Archibald Sinclair, -Glasgow 1879 (il formato digitale qui) ci permette di cogliere le differenze testuali con la versione “O, chì, chì mi na mòrbheanna” diventata poi standard. Ballachulish (Highlands Scozia nord-occidentale) è un paesino alla foce del Loch Leven con le montagne che offrono delle viste spettacolari.

Vista da Sgorr na Ciche verso Loch Leven

DUIL RI BAILE CHAOLAIS FHAICINN
Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh ;
Chi, chi mi na cor-bheannaibh ;
Chi, chi mi na coireachan(5) 

Chi mi na sgoraibh fo cheò.
I*
Chi mi gun dàil an t-àit’ ‘s d’ rugadh mi,
Cuirear orm fàilt’ ‘s a’ chainnt a thuigeas mi ;
Gheibh mi ann aoidh a’s gràdh ‘n uair ruigeam
Nach reicinn air tunnachan òir.
II
Chi mi a’ ghrian an liath nam flaitheanas,
Chi mi ‘s an iar a ciar ‘n uair luidheas i ;
Cha ‘n ionnan ‘s mar tha i ghnàth ‘s a’ bhaile so
N deatach a’ falach a glòir.
III
Gheibh mi ann ceòl bho eòin na Duthaige,
Ged a tha ‘n t-àm thar àm na cuthaige,
Tha smeoraichean ann is annsa guth leam
Na plob, no fiodhal mar cheòL
IV
Gheibh mi le lìontan iasgach sgadain ann,
Gheibh mi le iarraidh bric a’s bradain ann ;
Na’m faighinn mo mhiann ‘s ann ann a stadainn.
S ann ann is fhaid’ bhithinn beò.
V*
Chi mi ann coilltean, rhi ini ann doireachan,
Clii nii ann màghan bàn’ is torraiche.
Chi mi na fèidh air làr nan coireachan,
Falaicht’ an trusgan do cheò.

NOTE
* coro e strofe presenti nella versione standard

TRADUZIONE INGLESE J. Mark Sugars 1998
I
I shall see without delay the place where I was born,
I shall receive a welcome in the language that I understand;
I shall get there a smile and love when I arrive
That I would not trade for tons of gold(1).
II
I shall see the sun grow pale in the sky
I shall see the dusk in the west when it sets;
It won’t be like it always is in this town(2),
The smoke hiding its glory.
III
There I shall get music from the birds of my Homeland,
Although the time is after the time of the cuckoo,(3)
Mavises are there and their sound is dearer to me
Than pipe or fiddle for music.
IV
I shall get herring with fishing-nets there,
I shall get trout and salmon by asking there;
If I were to get my desire it’s there I would stay,
And it’s there I would live the longest.
V
There I shall see woods, there I shall see oak groves(4),
There I shall see fair and fertile fields,
I shall see the deer on the floor of the corries,
Veiled by a shroud of mist.
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Vedrò presto il luogo in cui sono nato
e sarò accolto nella lingua che capisco
riceverò al mio arrivo cortesie e affetto
che non cambierei per quintali d’oro(1)
II
Vedrò il sole diventare pallido nel cielo
e vedrò il tramonto ad ovest quando cala
non sarà sempre come in questa città(2)
con l’inquinamento che nasconde il suo splendore
III
Là sentirò la musica degli uccelli della mia terra
anche se è passata la stagione del cuculo(3)
ci sono i tordi e il loro canto mi è più caro
del suono del flauto o del violino
IV
Pescherò le aringhe con le reti là
prenderò trote e salmoni a volontà là
se dipendesse da me e là dove vorrei stare
e dove vorrei vivere a lungo
V
Vedrò i boschi, i boschi di querce(4)
vedrò la più fertile e bella terra
vedrò il cervo ai piedi delle conche
nascoste da una coltre di nebbia

NOTE
1) l’espressione idiomatica in italiano preferisce “quintali d’oro” anche se letteralmente in inglese si dice “una tonnellata”
2) Glasgow
3) la poesia è stata scritta agli inizi dell’autunno (del 1856), quando il cuculo è già emigrato verso le terre più calde
4) i boschetti di querce sono il greennwood, ovvero il  nemeton, il bosco sacro; doireachan è tradotto altrove come thickets
5) corrie (coire) è un anfiteatro morenico nel dizionario inglese si legge “is a circular dip or bowl-shaped geographical feature in a Scottish or Irish highland mountain or hillside formed by glaciation.” Le montagne vengono descritte non genericamente ma con preciso riferimento alla morfologia del territorio intorno a Ballachulish

Glen-coe Taken near Ballachulish null William Daniell 1769-1837 Presented by Tate Gallery Publications 1979 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02823
Glen-coe vista da Ballachulish (Tate Gallery Publications 1979)

Nel settimanale  della contea di Argyll “The Oban Times”  (8 Aprile 1882) vennero pubblicate anche le altre strofe della canzone intitolata questa volta “Chi, chi mi na mor-bheannaibh” 

VERSIONE IN GAELICO SCOZZESE

Il testo è stato scritto in gaelico scozzese ed è incentrato sulla nostalgia per le amate montagne, la melodia è lenta con l’andamento di una ninna-nanna.

ASCOLTA The Rankin Family 1989

ASCOLTA Solas

ASCOLTA Quadriga Consort live

CHÌ MI NA MÒRBHEANNA (versione standard)
O, chì, chì mi na mòrbheanna;
O, chì, chì mi na còrrbheanna;
O, chì, chì mi na coireachan,
Chì mi na sgoran fo cheò.
I
Chì mi gun dàil an t-àite ‘san d’ rugadh mi;
Cuirear orm fàilte ‘sa chànan a thuigeas mi;
Gheibh mi ann aoidh agus gràdh nuair ruigeam,
Nach reicinn air thunnachan òir.
II
Chì mi ann coilltean; chi mi ann doireachan;
Chì mi ann màghan bàna is toraiche;
Chì mi na fèidh air làr nan coireachan,
Falaicht’ an trusgan de cheò.
III
Beanntaichean àrda is àillidh leacainnean
Sluagh ann an còmhnuidh is còire cleachdainnean
‘S aotrom mo cheum a’ leum g’am faicinn
Is fanaidh mi tacan le deòin
IV
Fàilt’ air na gorm-mheallaibh, tholmach, thulachnach;
Fàilt air na còrr-bheannaibh mòra, mulanach;
Fàilt’ air na coilltean, is fàilt’ air na h-uile –
O! ‘s sona bhith fuireach ‘nan còir.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Chorus:
O, I will see, I will see the great mountains,
O, I will see, I will see the lofty mountains,
O, I will see, I will see the corries(5),
I’ll see the mist covered peaks.
I
I will soon see the place of my birth.
They’ll welcome me in a language I’ll understand.
I’ll receive attention and love when I get there,
which I wouldn’t sell for tons of gold(1).
II
There I’ll see forests, there I’ll see groves.
There I’ll see fair, fruitful meadows.
I’ll see deer at the foot of the corries,
hidden in the mantles of mist.
III
High mountains and beautiful ledges,
folk there always kind by custom,
light is my step as I go bounding to see them,
and I’ll willingly stay a long while.
IV
Hail to the blue-green, grassy, hilly,
hail to the hummocky, high-peaked mountains.
Hail to the forests, hail to all there;
o, contentedly would I live there forever.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Vedrò le grandi montagne
Oh vedrò le alte montagne
vedrò le conche (5)
vedrò le cime coperte dalla nebbia
I
Vedrò presto il luogo in cui sono nato
e sarò accolto nella lingua che capisco
riceverò al mio arrivo cortesie e affetto
che non cambierei per quintali d’oro(1)
II
Vedrò le foreste, vedrò il bosco antico (4)
vedrò la più fertile e bella terra
vedrò il cervo ai piedi delle conche
nascoste da una coltre di nebbia.
III
Alte montagne e splendidi pendii
genti che sono sempre di modi gentili
leggero il passo quando vado a trovarli
e volentieri resterei là per molto tempo.
IV
Salve alle colline d’erba verde scuro
salve ai monti corrugati in alti picchi
salve alle foreste, salve a tutto,
contento vorrei vivere là per sempre.

VERSIONE IN INGLESE:The Mist Covered Mountains

Il testo è stato adattato anche in inglese da Malcolm MacFarlane (secondo il gusto romantico di fine ottocento) e pubblicato in “The ministrelsy of the scottish highlands ” di Alfred Moffat, 1907 (vedi). Così è con questo titolo che il brano viene chiamato anche solo nella sua versione strumentale. Molti gli artisti di fama che lo hanno riprodotto.

ASCOLTA Ryan’s fancy 1979


CHORUS
Oh ho soon shall I see them,
Oh he ho see them, oh see them;
Oh ho ro soon shall I see them,
The mist covered mountains of home.
I
There I shall visit the place of my birth,
And they’ll give me a welcome
to the warmest on earth;
All so loving and kind, full of music and mirth,
In the sweet sounding language of home.
II
There I shall gaze on the mountains again,
On the fields and the woods
and the burns and the glens;
And away ‘mong the corries beyond human ken,
In the haunts of the deer I shall roam.
III
Hail to the mountains with summits of blue,
To the glens with their meadows
of sunshine and dew;
To the women and men ever constant and true,
Ever ready to welcome one home.
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
CORO
Oh presto le rivedrò
le rivedrò, le rivedrò
Oh presto le rivedrò
le montagne natie coperte dalla nebbia
I
Là visiterò i posti in cui sono nato
che mi daranno il benvenuto
il più caloroso della terra,
tutto è così amorevole e gentile, pieno di musica e allegria
nel dolce suono della lingua di casa.
II
Là guarderò di nuovo i monti
i campi e i boschi
i ruscelli e le valli
e lontano tra le conche al di sopra delle case degli uomini, dove si trovano i cervi andrò
III
Salve alle montagne dalle cime blu
alle valli con i loro prati
di sole e rugiada
alle donne e agli uomini sempre fedeli e sinceri
sempre pronti ad accogliere uno in casa.

LA MELODIA

Per gli scozzesi SAW YE JOHNNY COMIN, per gli inglesi JOHNNY BYDES LANG AT THE FAIR
La filastrocca “What Can the Matter Be?”(anche “Johnny’s So Long at the Fair.”) che a sua volta deriva dalla ballata Johnny bydes lang at the fair.. (qui)  nel The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes  viene datata tra il 1770 e il 1780.
In America ne venne fatta una parodia con il titolo  “Seven Old Ladies Locked in the Lavatory”,
“The Society for Creative Anachronism doesn’t feel it’s a valid Medieval song because the rendition we all know today comes from a collection of sheet music in the 1770’s or so. But truth is it dates farther back from that, coming from a really old ditty entitled “Saw Ye Johnny Comin’”. It’s English in origin, although there is at least one recorded Anglo-Scot rendition.” (tratto da qui)

In Mudcat Malcom Douglas scrive ” The tunes are fundamentally the same, though they have grown apart with the years.  According to  The Fiddler’s Companion, Oh Dear What Can the Matter Be (a.k.a. Johnny’s So Long at the Fair) was first published in the British Lyre for 1792, and “was sung as a famous duet between Samuel Harrison and his wife, the soprano Miss Cantelo, at Harrison’s Concerts, periodic events which he began in 1776”.  It became, as a consequence, widely-known, and turns up in England, Scotland and Ireland in various forms, and, as was mentioned above, the Scottish variant under discussion was used by Junior Crehan as the basis for his jig Misty Mountain.”(qui)

ASCOLTA Fuzzy Felt Folk 2006 la versione come poteva essere cantata all’epoca

Nell’adattamento di John Cameron diventa una melodia dolce ma malinconica a metà tra il lament e una slow march, e da allora che viene eseguita spesso nelle commemorazioni funebri.

ASCOLTA John Renbourn in The Black Ballon, 1979 con il titolo di The Mist Covered Mountains of Home (seguono The Orphan, Tarboulton)

ASCOLTA con le cornamuse

Qui suonata quasi come un walzer lento

e qui suonata come jig
ASCOLTA De Dannan 1980

FONTI
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02823
http://digital.nls.uk/early-gaelic-book-collections/pageturner.cfm?id=76643345&mode=transcription
http://ingeb.org/songs/mistcovd.html
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_mist.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mouthmusic/chi.htm
http://apocalypsewriters.com/blog/tag/saw-ye-him-coming/
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/gaelic/chimi.php
https://thesession.org/tunes/3411
https://thesession.org/tunes/470
https://thesession.org/tunes/256
http://ericdentinger.com/themistcoveredmountains_en.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/ohdearwhatcanthematterbe.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=1393