Celtic Music and Electronic Music: Clannad & Enya

Leggi in italiano

From Gweedore, a small town in Donegal which boasts the largest number of musicians per square meter, in the early 70’s three children of the Brennan family (Ciáran, Pól, Máire) and two uncles of the Duggan family (Noel and Padraig) founded the Clannad, an clann as Dobhar, “the original family of Dore”, a musical group linked by blood but also by the same passion for traditional Irish music (and the music of the Pentangle): harp, mandola, flute, guitar and electric bass and above all the voice of Máire (Moya).
The atmospheres are delicate, the songs are in Gaelic, but the turning point comes in 1982 with Fuaim (pronounced fùum “Sound”) when the group appears in sextet with the addition of the younger sister Eithne (Enya) – in the group from 1979.

An tull ‘(the apple) is a traditional piece in Irish Gaelic arranged by Ciarán Brennan & Pól Brennan

English translation
I
I have a new story to tell you
It’s good crack and chat over drink
A fine lovely apple I put in my pocket (1)
And all I found was a seed potato
Chorus:
Oh sadly my eyes cry
After that fine yellow apple
And the lovely young woman
who gave it to me
And I’d give a pound to taste it again
II
I walked Clare Island and Fastnet rock
The bays of of Béara Island were before me on the way
Puinte na nGréige and Dorsaí Maola
The raven and the calf outside of Bhaoi (2)
III
I walked through Cualach because I was sad
The northern parish and Eyeries
On the Island of Muarseadh a young man told me
That I wouldn’t get word of her until I’d tie the knot (3)
IV
I walked through Cobh and Ballinamoney
Cathar Tún Tóime and Sherkin Island
On the east coast someone told me
That it was the laughing stock of Kenmare
Irish Gaelic
I
Tá scéilín nua ‘gam le h-insint dóibhse
Cúrsaí spóirt agus comhrá dí
Úll breá gleoite do chuireas i mo phóca
‘S ni bhfuaras romham ach prátín síl
Curfá:
Ó mo thuirse mar shileann mo shúile
Indiadh an úll ud a bhí breá buí
An óig-bhean uasal bhí t’reis é thabhairt domh
‘S do thabhairfinn púnt ar é bhlaiseadh arís
II
Do shiúlais Cléire agus Carraig Aonair
Cuanta Béara bhí romham sa tslí
Puinte na nGréige ‘gus na nDorsaí Maola
An fhiach ‘s an lao taobh amuigh de Bhaoi
III
Do shiúlais Cualach mar a bhíos buartha
An pharoiste thuaidh a ‘s na hAdhraí
San oileán Muarseadh d’inis dom buachaill
Nach bhfáilghinn a thuairisc go dtéinn thar snaidhm
IV
So shiúlios Coíbh agus Baile na Móna
Cathair Tún Tóime ‘gus Inis Seircín
Soir ar a chósta sea d’inis domh stróinse
Go rabh sé ‘na sheo acu ar Sráid Néidin

NOTE
1) the apple is a metaphor for sex
2) probably the local name given to rocks due to their shape or shape
3) way of saying to get married

The song that climbs the charts bringing the group to the forefront is however “Theme from Harry’s Game” from the BBC television: it is the music that will distinguish them in the years to come, evocative sound carpets, solemn and majestic choirs, something of mystical in that fairy and magical Gaelic.

Moya Brennan vs Enya

Questa immagine ha l'attributo alt vuoto; il nome del file è enya.jpg“Enya” was Enya’s debut album in 1987 and was reprinted in 1992 with the title “The Celts” when the singer was now known internationally (an extraordinary success achieved without having practically ever done a live concert). Originally the musical project was born as a soundtrack to the BBC documentary on the Celts (broadcast in 1986) electronic music in post-production, composed in front of a synthesizer to which are added multiple overlaps and the “ethereal” effects that are the style of Enya.
That supernatural aura is a product of the most modern musical technology and the collaboration of three minds: Enya who composes the music (filtering his background of classical studies and traditional Irish music), plays (superbly) the keyboard and sings; Nicky Ryan, the producer and arranger (who had the genius to apply the technique of multivocals, the choirs with the overdub, to the voice of Enya) and Rome Shane Ryan who writes the lyrics in different languages ​​(English, Gaelic, Spanish, Latin and languages tolkeniane).
Not least important are the videos punctually produced for the launch of the albums, which to a good extent satisfy the need for artistic visibility for the audience of a musician who does not like performing live.

THE CELTS

THE PLOT

Between a flight of doves, the crown of sovereignty (the Celtic inheritance) is placed in a silver casket from two white-dressed girls, in a fade of light emerges a lady (Enya) riding a white steed and wearing on the long robes of medieval style with a red cloak edged and gold embroidery.
While the tolling of the bell rung by the Christian monks marks the beginning of the melody, the dame goes beyond the hall of the turreted castle (in whose courtyard the bell is found) and gallops past the long wooden bridge that joins the islet to the mainland.
On the fade it appares the image of the two girls wrapped in a supernatural light, they await the arrival of a knight, who kneels before them.
The scene takes place within the walls of a ruined castle, decked with red drapes and swept by the wind, in one corner a sword stuck in the rock (a tribute to the Arthurian myth); after delivering the treasure chest, the two ladies head towards a Magical Portal decorated along the edges with embossed friezes, beyond which opens the vision of the World of men: we understand that girls are two fairy creatures in the Other World gazing the world of men.
The face in the foreground of Enya connects the continuation of the story, even the knight is now in the real world (and the colors are more vivid) and is in search of the lady.
The lady, after having gone into the woods, reaches a gorge where she meets a sylvan creature, the guardian spirit of the place. Here Enya begins to sing and we see her following the guardian spirit on foot, who reveals a cave suffused with an unearthly light in which an old king with a white beard (king Arthur) is sleeping on a golden throne. The king holds in his hands a stick surmounted by an emblem depicting a rooster with a dragon’s tail (still a reference to the Celtic heritage): the fairy teases him with a feather and the king wakes up from sleep and beats the his stick on the ground; a crepuscular light darts among the leaves of a majestic oak in a swirl of leaves, the image of one of the two girls next to the sword in the rock that rises awakened by the thunder appears in fading: in the sky shrouded in clouds a lightning and as soon as the fog clears we see a floating boat carrying the lady (the tribute here goes to the lady of Shalott and to the painting by John William Waterhouse).
Here, finally, even the knight reaches the river and the shore on which the boat has landed and kneeling when the lady opens the fairy chest from which a very white light is released that dissolves everything.


Life of lives (1),
Beginning to the end.
We are alive
Forever.
Hi-ri, Hi-ro, Hi-ri.
Hoireann is O, ha hi, ra ha, ra ho ra.
Hoireann is O, ha hi, ra ha, ra ha ra.
Hi-ri, Hi-ra, Hi-ri.
Saol na saol,
Tus go deireadh.
Ta muid beo
Go deo.

NOTE
1) to say: “for ever” or “endless world”

OF THIS LAND

“Of this Land” in the “Landmarks” 1997 album (John McSherry, Ian Parker, Anto Drennan, Deirdre Brenna), summarizes the misty and melancholy atmospheres that characterized the Celtic music of those years, the instruments are traditional, but the keyboards and the synthesizers introduced at the time by Enya, who has now embarked on a dazzling solo career, are the characteristic sound carpet of the Clannad and their mysticism: in the Nineties the group returns to the celtic spirituality that had distinguished them before the pop drift, and recorded four “artistic maturity” albums: Anam, Banba, Lore and Landmarks.


I
How gentle was the breeze
that surrounded the way
How loud the sea’s roar on the four
winds everyday
Sharing love, wounded gifts (1) from
ancient long ago (2)
together they closed in
the circles we know
[CHORUS:]
Will we treasure all the secrets
with life’s changing scenes (4)
Where our hearts were warm with love
So much love
Will the flowers grow again
as I open out my hand
Precious time
Time for healing
The beauty of this land
[repeat Chorus]
II
How soulful those words
that confuses the way
How wild the mountains stare
as they guard our everyday
Take for granted noble hearts
in the golden age that’s flown
Between us recall on
a strong road
we’ve known
[Chorus]
“Of this land “is a tribute to Ireland and the text is obscure, patinated by legend.
NOTE
1) shared love (given and received) versus a wounded gift, offended in a broad sense betrayal, on the one hand the true love and from the other false love
2) I am reminded of the phrase coined by Robert Burns auld lang syne
3) “Through all the changing scenes of life” is a hymn

In 1995 Pól Brennan left the group for a solo career and Moya devoted herself to her solo musical projects starting from 1992 with the album Máire.
Formally the Clannad never broke up even though they took a good record break after the release of Landmarks, the last studio album is 2013 Nádúr (Nature)

Follow the reviews of Enya and Clannad on Terre Celtiche BLOG  with
tag Clannad
tag Enya
tag Moya Brennan

LINK

http://www.ondarock.it/popmuzik/clannad.htm
http://www.folkbulletin.com/clannad-christ-church-cathedral-arc-music-eucd-2441/
https://currerjames.wordpress.com/2008/10/21/il-disco-watermark-di-enya/
http://www.radioswisspop.ch/it/banca-dati-musicale/musicista/21538b32cbaf701a79012661b70c99d0460d6/biography
http://www.pathname.com/enya/celts.html

http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/antull.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/dervish/antull.htm
http://www.bearatourism.com/bweyeries.html
http://www.taramusic.com/sleevenotes/cd3008.htm

http://enya.sk/lyrics.php

What Child is this

“What Child is this” is a Christmas song written by the English poet William Chatterton Dix in 1865, adapted in 1871 by John Stainer to the traditional English melody “Greensleeves”, a melody so old to be attributed to Henry VIII and in any case documented as one of the favorite of Queen Elizabeth, also mentioned twice by Shakespeare.
The song entitled “What Child is this” appears in the Christmas Carols New and Old edition of 1871.
[“What Child is this” è un canto natalizio scritto dall’inglese William Chatterton Dix nel 1865, adattato nel 1871 da John Stainer alla melodia tradizionale inglese  “Greensleeves“, una melodia talmente antica da essere attribuita ad Enrico VIII e comunque documentata come una delle favorite della Regina Elisabetta, citata inoltre due volte da Shakespeare.
Così il brano con il titolo di “What Child is this” compare nell’edizione Christmas Carols New and Old del 1871.]

Don Francisco, Wendy Francisco,  Jerry Palmer in “Christmas Carols on Guitar”

Lindsey Stirling 2017

The text tells of the newborn Jesus as he sleeps in the arms of Mary and he is visited by the shepherds and the Wise Men.
[Il testo parla di Gesù neonato mentre dorme tra le braccia di Maria e viene visitato dai pastori e dai Magi.]

Moya Brennan in An Irish Christmas, 2006 (I, II, IV)


I
What child is this
who laid to rest
On Mary’s lap,
is sleeping?
Whom angels greet
with anthems sweet
While shepherds watch
are keeping?
Chorus:
This, this is Christ the King
Whom shepherds guard
and angels sing
Haste, haste to bring Him laud
The Babe, the Son of Mary
II
Why lies he
in such mean estate
Where ox and ass (1)
are feeding?
Good Christians, fear,
for sinners here
The silent Word (2) is pleading
III
Nails, spear
shall pierce Him through,
The cross be borne for me,
for you.
Hail, hail the Word made flesh,
The Babe, the Son of Mary.
IV
So bring Him incense,
gold and myrrh
Come, peasant, king, to own Him
The King of Kings salvation brings
Let loving hearts enthrone Him
V
Raise, raise a song on high,
The virgin sings her lullaby.
Joy, joy for Christ is born,
The Babe, the Son of Mary.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Chi è questo bambino,
che giace e riposa
tra le braccia di Maria
addormentato?
Che gli angeli annunciano
con inni di gioia
mentre i pastori
vegliano?
Coro:
Costui è Cristo il Re,
che i pastori vegliano
(mentre) gli angeli cantano,
affrettatevi a tributargli lode,
il Bambinello, figlio di Maria!

II
Perché si trova
in una così meschina dimora,
dove il bue e l’asino
mangiano?
Buoni Cristiani, temete,
per i peccatori qui
il Verbo silenzioso prega.
III
Chiodi e lancia
lo trafiggeranno,
la croce dovrà portare per me,
per te.
Ave al Verbo fattosi carne
il Bambinello, figlio di Maria
IV
Così portategli incenso
oro e mirra,
venite contadini e re a conoscerlo;
il Re dei Re la salvezza porta,
che i cuori amorosi lo incoronino!
V
S’innalza un canto al cielo
la vergine canta una ninnananna,
gioia per la nascita di Gesù
il Bambinello, figlio di Maria

NOTE
1) Moya says “ewe” [Moya dice “pecora”]
2) Word in the Bible is the Word that is God, made flesh to plead for the Salvation of Humanity. So “silent word” is the newborn Jesus who prays for sinners. So why should the good Christian be afraid? Only in the next verse we understand the reason for fear. Jesus will die crucified
Word nella Bibbia è il Verbo cioè Dio, fattosi carne per supplicare per la Salvezza dell’Umanità. Così “silent word” è il neonato Gesù che ancora imberbe prega per i peccatori. Ma allora perchè il buon Cristiano dovrebbe avere paura? Solo nel verso successivo capiamo il motivo del timore. Gesù morirà crocefisso

LINK
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/what_child_is_this_version_2.htm
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/what_child_is_this_version_1.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/whatchild.htm

Joy to the world! The Lord is come & Bradfield from Yorkshire

Joy to the world -Christmas carol
Word: Isaac Watts (1719)
Tune: Lowell Mason (1836-8)

The text of “Joy to the World” was written by Isaac Watts when he was a Protestant pastor in the Church of St. Mark’s Lane (Stoke Newingron, London); the intent was to create more current hymns, for reviving the psalms of the Old Testament, so the psalm 98 “Sing to the Lord a new song” (refrain: “The Lord has revealed his justice to the people “) has become the more poetic “Joy to the World” published in his collection “The Psalms of David, Imitated in the Language of the New Testament” (1719); originally it was not a Christmas carol, as it referred to the second coming of Jesus, so Watts reinterpreted the Old Testament psalm in the light of the New Testament.
[Il testo di “Joy to the World” è stato scritto da Isaac Watts quando era pastore protestante nella Chiesa di St. Mark’s Lane (Stoke Newingron, Londra); l’intento era quello di creare degli inni più attuali, rinverdendo i salmi del Vecchio Testamento,  ispirandosi ai Salmi di Davide, così il salmo 98Cantate al Signore un canto nuovo(ritornello: “Il Signore ha rivelato ai popoli la sua giustizia”) è diventato il molto più poetico “Joy to the World” pubblicato nella sua raccolta  The Psalms of David, Imitated in the Language of the New Testament (1719); in origine non era un canto natalizio, in quanto si riferiva alla seconda venuta di Gesù, così Watts reinterpretò il Salmo del Vecchio Testamento alla luce del Nuovo.]
The most popular melody, at least in the USA, derives from “Antioch” by the American Lowell Mason composed in 1836-8 making an arrangement of Handel’s “Messiah (1742)”.
[La melodia più popolare, perlomeno negli USA, deriva da “Antiochia” dell’americano Lowell Mason composta nel 1836-8 facendo un arrangiamento del “Messia” di Handel (1742).]

The Gothard Sisters in “Falling Snow” 2016 (I, II, I, IV)

Pentatonix 2015 (I, II, IV)

Celtic Woman 2013

Moya Brennan  in An Irish Christmas 2005 (I, II, IV)


I
Joy to the world (1)! the Lord is come;
Let earth receive her King;
Let every heart prepare him room,
And heaven and nature sing,
And heaven and nature sing,
And heaven, and heaven, and nature sing. (3)
II
Joy to the world (earth)! the Saviour reigns;
Your sweetest songs employ (4);
While fields and floods, rocks, hills, and plains
Repeat the sounding joy
III (6)
No more let sins and sorrows grow,
Nor thorns infest the ground;
He comes to make His blessingsflow
Far as the curse (7) is found
IV
He rules the world with truth and grace,
And makes the nations prove (8)
The glories of His righteousness,
And wonders of His love.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Gioia nel mondo (1)! il Signore è venuto;
la terra riceverà (2) il suo Re,
ogni cuore preparerà un posto per Lui,
e cielo e terra cantano
cielo e terra cantano
cielo, e cielo e terra cantano (3)
II
Gioia nel mondo! Regna il Salvatore;
le più dolci canzoni si ricorrono (4),
mentre terra e mare (5), rocce, colline e pianure, ripetono il suono gioioso.
III (6)
Non più peccati e affanni cresceranno,
né le spine infesteranno il terreno;
Egli viene a diffondere la Sua benedizione
fin dove si annida la maledizione (7).
IV
Egli governa il mondo con verità e grazia
e dimostra alle nazioni (8)
gli splendori della Sua rettitudine
e i prodigi del suo amore.

NOTE
1) the psalm describes the second coming of Jesus when he returns in triumph at the end of time. The birth of Jesus overlaps with his second coming when the Earth will be the renewed Earthly Paradise
[il salmo descrive la seconda venuta di Gesù quando ritornerà in trionfo alla fine dei tempi. La nascita di Gesù si sovrappone alla sua seconda venuta quando la Terra sarà il rinnovato Paradiso Terrestre]
2) In his first coming Jesus was not accepted by all men, indeed he was crucified
[ho preferito risolvere l’imperativo con il futuro. Nella sua prima venuta Gesù non è stato accettato da tutti gli uomini, anzi è stato crocefisso]
3) fuging tune  [tipico esempio di melodia fugata]
4) also written as
 [scritto anche come] “Let men their songs employ” ègli uomini canteranno le loro canzoni] they are the righteous men entered the kingdom of God to sing hymns to the Lord [sono i giusti gli uomini entrati nel regno di Dio a cantare inni al Signore]
5) letteralmente “campi e acque”
6) the verse is generally skipped because it is not part of psalm 98 [la strofa generalmente è saltata perchè non facente parte del salmo 98]
the Pentatonix sing a kind of refrain in its place [i Pentatonix cantano al suo posto una specie di ritornello]
Joy to the world, now we sing
Let the earth receive her king
Joy to the world, now we sing
Let the angel voices ring
Joy to the world, now we sing
Let men their songs employ
Joy to the world, now we sing
Repeat the sounding joy
7) the curse thrown by God to Adam after the original sin “Cursed is the ground because of you” [la maledizione è quella lanciata da Dio ad Adamo dopo il peccato originale “Maledetto è il suolo per causa tua”]
8) only with the kingdom of God on earth there will be the peace in the world [solo con il regno di Dio sulla Terra si troverà la pace nel mondo]; letteralmente “fa sì che i popoli provino”

Bradfield

The version of “Joy to the World” according to the tradition of South Yorkshire (Berkshire village) when the singers gathered in the pub to sing Christmas with traditional songs considered too “popular” by the Church.
[La versione di “Joy to the World” secondo la tradizione del South Yorkshire (Berkshire village) quando i cantori si riunivano nel pub per cantare il Natale con canti tradizionali ritenuti troppo “popolari” dalla Chiesa.]
Kate Rusby in “The Frost is All Over” 2015


I
Hark to the bells on Christmas Day
From the church on the hill above
Telling the birth of our Saviour dear
With His message of truth and love
chorus:
Oh the merry bells of Christmas
Ring their sound (message)* so sweet and gay
May you know true joy and gladness

On every Christmas Day
II
Born in a stable cold and bare
With a manger for His bed
Mary and shepherds on holy ground
In that lowly cattle shed
III
Carols and choirs fill the air
With this joyfull (wonderful) * song of peace
And there is joy on earth today
With this song (our praise)* that that will never cease
IV
Peace to the world (Glory to God)* and peace to men
Is the sound (news)* our dear bells bring
Nations will worship on earth below
With this carol that Angels sing
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Ascolta le campane il giorno di Natale
dalla chiesa in cima alla collina
che annunciano la nascita del nostro amato Salvatore, con il suo messaggio di verità e amore
Coro
Le allegre campane di Natale
cantano il loro canto (messaggio) dolce e gaio

per farvi conoscere la vera gioia e felicità
a ogni Natale
II
Nato in una stalla al freddo e nudo
con una mangiatoia come culla
Maria e i pastori sulla terra santa
in quell’umile ricovero per il bestiame
III
Inni e cori riempiono l’aria
con questo gioioso (meraviglioso) canto di pace
e c’è gioia in terra oggi
con questo canto (la nostra preghiera) che non finirà mai
IV
“Pace alla terra (Gloria a Dio) e pace agli uomini”
è il canto (la novella) che le nostre amate campane portano,
le nazioni ti adoreranno giù sulla terra
con questo inno che gli angeli cantano

NOTE
*alcune variazioni testuali

LINK
https://www.christianitytoday.com/history/people/poets/isaac-watts.html

http://www.parrocchiatresanti.bz.it/images/lectio/salmi/lectio-salmi-10ott.pdf
https://www.umcdiscipleship.org/resources/history-of-hymns-joy-to-the-world

http://www.americanmusicpreservation.com/joytotheworldmason.htm
http://globalworship.tumblr.com/post/135746033350/bradfield-uk-pub-christmas-carol-by-kate-rusby

She Moved through the Fair like the swan in the evening moves over the lake

Leggi in italiano

The original text of “She Moved trough the Fair” dates back to an ancient Irish ballad from Donegal, while the melody could be from the Middle Ages (for the musical scale used that recalls the Arab one). The standard version comes from the pen of Padraic Colum (1881-1972) which rewrote it in 1909. There are many versions of the text (additional verses, rewriting of the verses), also in Gaelic, reflecting the great popularity of the song, the song was published in the Herbert Hughes collection “Irish Country Songs” (1909), and in the collection of Sam Henry “Songs of the People” (1979).
In its essence, the story tells of a girl promised in marriage who appears in a dream to her lover. But the verses are cryptic, perhaps because they lack those that would have clarified its meaning; this is what happens to the oral tradition (who sings does not remember the verses or changes them at will) and the ballad lends itself to at least two possible interpretations.

In the first few strophes, the woman, full of hope, reassures her lover that her family, although he is not rich, will approve his marriage proposal, and they will soon be married; they met on the market day, and he looks at her as she walks away and, in a twilight image, compares her to a swan that moves on the placid waters of a lake.

cigno in volo

The third stanza is often omitted, and it is not easy to interpret: the unexpressed pain could be the girl’s illness (which will cause her death) – probably the consumption- for this reason people were convinced that their marriage would not be celebrated.
And we arrive at the last stanza, the rarefied and dreamy one in which the ghost of her appears at night: an evanescent figure that moves slowly to call him soon to death .

The other interpretation of the text (shared by most) supposes she escaped with another one (or more likely her family has combined a more advantageous marriage, not being the suitor loved by her quite rich). But the love he feels for her is so great and even if he continues his life by marrying another, he will continue to miss her.
The verses related to an unexpressed pain are therefore interpreted as the lack of confidence in the new wife because he will be still, and forever, in love with his first girlfriend.
The final stanza becomes the epilogue of his life, when he is old and dying, he sees his first love appear beside to console him.

As we can see both the reconstructions are adaptable to the verses, admirable and fascinating of the song, precisely because of their meager essentiality (an ante-litteram hermeticism): no self-pity, no sorrow shown, but the simplicity of a great love, that few memories passed together can be enough to fill a life.

A single, strong, elegiac image of a candid swan in the twilight, anticipation of her fleeting passage on earth. The song is a lament and there are many musicians who have interpreted it, recreating the rarefied atmosphere of the words, often with the delicate sound of the harp.

Loreena McKennitt  from Elemental  ( I, II, III, IV)
Nights from the Alhambra 2007

Moya Brennan & Cormac De Barra from Against the wind

Cara Dillon live

Sinead O’Connor  (Sinead has recorded many versions of this song )


I
My (young) love said to me,
“My mother(1) won’t mind
And my father won’t slight you
for your lack of kind(2)”
she stepped away from me (3)
and this she did say:
“It will not be long, love,
till our wedding day”
II
She stepped away from me (4)
and she moved through the fair (5)
And fondly I watched her
move here and move there
And then she turned homeward (6)
with one star awake(7)
like the swan (8) in the evening(9)
moves over the lake
III
The people were saying
“No two e’er were wed”
for one has the sorrow
that never was said(10)
And she smiled as she passed me
with her goods and her gear
And that was the last
that I saw of my dear.
IV (11)
Last night she came to me,
my dead(12) love came
so softly she came
that her feet made no din
and she laid her hand on me (13)
and this she did say
“It will not be long, love,
‘til our wedding day”
NOTES
1) Padraic Colum wrote
“My brothers won’t mind,
And my parents.. ”
2) kind – kine: “wealth” or “property”. Others interpret the word as “relatives” so the protagonist is an orphan or by obscure origins
3) or she laid a hand on me (cwhich is a more intimate and direct gesture to greet with one last contact)
4) or She went away from me
5) the days of the fair were the time of love when the young men had the opportunity to meet with the girls of marriageable age
6) Loreena McKennitt sings
And she went her way homeward
7) the evening star that appears before all the others is the planet Venus
8) The swan is one of the most represented animals in the Celtic culture, portrayed on different objects and protagonist of numerous mythological tales. see more
9) in the evening it refers to the moment when they separate
10) the sorrow that never was said: obscure meaning
11) Loreena McKennitt sings
I dreamed it last night
That my true love came in
So softly she entered
Her feet made no din
She came close beside me
12) some interpreters omit the word “death” by proposing for the dream version, or they say “my dear love” or “my own love” but also “my young love
13) or “She put her arms round me

Chieftains&Van Morrison

Chieftains&Sinead O’Connor
Fairport Convention

Alan Stivell from “Chemíns De Terre” 1973
Andreas Scholl

A version entitled “The Wedding Song” has been handed down, which develops the theme of abandonment, and which is to be considered a variant even if with a different title
second part

LINK
http://thesession.org/tunes/4735
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-meaning-and-interpretation-part-1/
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-modern-lyrics-and-variations/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/shemovesthroughthefair.html

Musica celtica ed elettronica: Clannad & Enya

Read the post in English

Da un piccolo paese del Donegal Gweedore che vanta il maggior numero di musicisti per metroquadro,  agli inizi degli anni 70 tre figli della famiglia Brennan (Ciáran, Pól, Máire) e due zii della famiglia Duggan (Noel e Padraig) fondano i Clannad, an clann as Dobhar, ossia “la famiglia originaria di Dore”, un gruppo musicale legato dal sangue ma anche dalla stessa passione per la musica tradizionale irlandese, (e la musica dei Pentangle): arpa, mandola, flauto, chitarra e basso elettrico e soprattutto la voce di Máire (nome gaelico cambiato in Moya ossia come si pronuncia in gaelico ).
Le atmosfere sono delicate, i brani sono in gaelico, ma la svolta arriva nel 1982 con Fuaim (“suono”  pronunciato fùum) quando il gruppo si presenta in sestetto con l’aggiunta della sorellina più piccola Eithne – entrata nel gruppo nel 1979 e che diventerà Enya.

An tull‘ (la mela) è un brano tradizionale in gaelico irlandese arrangiato da Ciarán Brennan & Pól Brennan

I
Tá scéilín nua ‘gam le h-insint dóibhse
Cúrsaí spóirt agus comhrá dí
Úll breá gleoite do chuireas i mo phóca
‘S ni bhfuaras romham ach prátín síl
Ó mo thuirse mar shileann mo shúile
Indiadh an úll ud a bhí breá buí
An óig-bhean uasal bhí t’reis é thabhairt domh
‘S do thabhairfinn púnt ar é bhlaiseadh arís
II
Do shiúlais Cléire agus Carraig Aonair
Cuanta Béara bhí romham sa tslí
Puinte na nGréige ‘gus na nDorsaí Maola
An fhiach ‘s an lao taobh amuigh de Bhaoi
III
Do shiúlais Cualach mar a bhíos buartha
An pharoiste thuaidh a ‘s na hAdhraí
San oileán Muarseadh d’inis dom buachaill
Nach bhfáilghinn a thuairisc go dtéinn thar snaidhm
IV
So shiúlios Coíbh agus Baile na Móna
Cathair Tún Tóime ‘gus Inis Seircín
Soir ar a chósta sea d’inis domh stróinse
Go rabh sé ‘na sheo acu ar Sráid Néidin


I
I have a new story to tell you
It’s good crack and chat over drink
A fine lovely apple I put in my pocket (1)
And all I found was a seed potato
Chorus:
Oh sadly my eyes cry
After that fine yellow apple
And the lovely young woman
who gave it to me
And I’d give a pound to taste it again
II
I walked Clare Island and Fastnet rock
The bays of of Béara Island were before me on the way
Puinte na nGréige and Dorsaí Maola
The raven and the calf outside of Bhaoi (2)
III
I walked through Cualach because I was sad
The northern parish and Eyeries
On the Island of Muarseadh a young man told me
That I wouldn’t get word of her until I’d tie the knot (3)
IV
I walked through Cobh and Ballinamoney
Cathar Tún Tóime and Sherkin Island
On the east coast someone told me
That it was the laughing stock of Kenmare
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ho una nuova storia da raccontare
tra musica e chiacchiere davanti a un bicchiere, una mela bella e buona mi misi in tasca (1),/e tutto quello che trovai era una patata germogliata
Coro
Oh tristemente i miei occhi piangono
dietro a quella bella mela gialla e alla bella ragazza che me la diede e avrei dato una sterlina per assaggiarla di nuovo
II
Camminai per Clare Island e Fastnet rock
le insenature di Béara Island erano davanti a me sulla strada
Puinte na nGréige e Dorsaí Maola
il corvo e il vitello fuori da Bhaoi (2)
III
Superai Cualach perchè ero triste
a Cork e Eyeries
sull’isola di Muarseadh un giovane mi disse
che non riuscirò a conoscerla finchè non la sposerò (3)
IV
Attraversai per Cobh e Ballinamoney
Cathar Tún Tóime e l’sola di Sherkin
sulla costa est qualcuno mi disse
che era lo zimbello di Kenmare

NOTE
1) con “cogli (o mordi) la prima mela” s’intende in ogni paese praticamente la stessa cosa (o almeno così è in Irlanda e in Italia)
2) probabilmente il nome locale dato a degli scogli per la loro forma o sagoma
3) modo di dire per sposarsi

Il brano che scala le classifiche portando il gruppo alla ribalta è però  “Theme from Harry’s Game” dall’omonimo sceneggiato televisivo della BBC: è la musica che li contraddistinguerà negli anni a venire, tappeti sonori evocativi, cori solenni e maestosi, un che di mistico in quel gaelico fiabesco e magico.

Due sorelle a confonto Enya e Moya Brennan

“Enya” fu l’album di debutto di Enya nel 1987 e venne ristampato nel 1992 con il titolo “The Celts” quando la cantante godeva ormai di una fama internazionale (un successo straordinario ottenuto senza praticamente aver mai fatto  un concerto dal vivo). All’origine il progetto musicale era nato come colonna sonora al documentario sui Celti della BBC (trasmesso nel 1986) musica elettronica in post-produzione, composta davanti ad un sintetizzatore a cui si aggiungono le sovrapposizioni multiple e gli effetti “eterei” che  sono la cifra stilistica di Enya.
Quell’aura sovrannaturale è un prodotto della tecnologia musicale più moderna e la collaborazione di tre menti: Enya che compone le musiche (filtrando il suo background di studi classici e la musica tradizionale irlandese), suona (superbamente) la tastiera e canta, Nicky Ryan produttore e arrangiatore (che ha avuto la genialata di applicare la tecnica delle multivocals, i coretti con l’overdub, alla voce di Enya) e Roma Shane Ryan che scrive i testi in lingue diverse (inglese, gaelico, spagnolo, latino e le lingue tolkeniane).
Non da meno importanti i video puntualmente prodotti per il lancio degli album, che in buona misura soddisfano quella necessità di visibilità artistica per il pubblico di una musicista che non ama esibirsi dal vivo.

THE CELTS

IL PLOT

Tra un volo di colombe, la corona della sovranità (l’eredità celtica) è riposta in uno scrigno d’argento da due fanciulle biancovestite, in una dissolvenza di luce emerge una dama (Enya) a cavallo di un bianco destriero che indossa sulle lunghe vesti di foggia medievale, un mantello rosso bordato da ricami d’oro.
Mentre il rintocco della campana suonata a battente dai monaci cristiani segna l’avvio alla melodia, la dama oltrepassa l’androne del turrito castello (nel cui cortile si trova la campana) e galoppa superando il lungo ponte di legno che unisce l’isolotto su cui è costruito il castello, alla terra ferma.
Sulla dissolvenza ritorna l’immagine delle due fanciulle  avvolte in una luce soprannaturale, attendono l’arrivo di un cavaliere, il quale s’inginocchia innanzi a loro.
La scena si svolge tra le mura di un castello diroccato, pavesato con drappi rossi e spazzato dal vento, in un angolo una spada ficcata nella roccia (omaggio al mito arturiano); dopo aver consegnato lo scrigno le due dame si dirigono verso un Portale Magico decorato lungo i bordi con fregi scolpiti in rilevo, oltre al quale si apre la visione del Mondo degli uomini: comprendiamo così che le fanciulle sono due creature fatate e che il mondo da cui guardano il mondo degli uomini è l‘AltroMondo.
Il volto in primo piano di Enya raccorda il seguito della storia, anche il cavaliere si trova ora nel mondo reale (e i colori sono più vividi) ed è in cerca della dama.
La dama dopo essersi inoltrata nel bosco raggiunge una forra dove le viene incontro una creatura silvana, lo spirito guardiano del luogo. Qui Enya inizia a cantare e la vediamo seguire a piedi lo spirito guardiano che le svela una grotta soffusa da una luce ultraterrena in cui su un trono dorato è assiso dormiente un vecchio re dalla barba bianca (Artù). Il re tiene tra le mani un bastone sormontato da un emblema raffigurante un gallo con la coda di drago (ancora un riferimento al retaggio celtico): il folletto lo stuzzica in volto con una piuma e il re si desta dal sonno e batte con forza il suo bastone a terra; una luce crepuscolare dardeggia tra le foglie di una maestosa quercia in un turbinio di foglie, compare in dissolvenza l’immagine di una delle due fanciulle accanto alla spada nella roccia che si alza ridestata dal tuono: nel cielo avvolto dalle nubi lo squarcio di un fulmine e non appena la nebbia si dirada vediamo una barchetta con a bordo la dama che si muove trasportata dalla corrente (l’omaggio qui va alla dama di Shalott e al dipinto di John William Waterhouse. )

Ecco che finalmente anche il cavaliere raggiunge la distesa d’acqua e la riva su cui è approdata la barca e inginocchiandosi davanti alla dama apre lo scrigno che aveva ricevuto in dono dalle fate da cui si sprigiona una luce bianchissima che tutto dissolve.

Hi-ri, Hi-ro, Hi-ri.
Hoireann is O, ha hi, ra ha, ra ho ra.
Hoireann is O, ha hi, ra ha, ra ha ra.
Hi-ri, Hi-ra, Hi-ri.
Saol na saol,
Tus go deireadh.
Ta muid beo
Go deo.

Life of lives (1),
Beginning to the end.
We are alive
Forever.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Nei secoli dei secoli
Dal Principio alla Fine
Noi siamo vivi
Per sempre.

NOTE
1) letteralmente “vita dei vivi” per dire “per sempre” o “mondo senza fine”

OF THIS LAND

“Of this Land” nell’album  “Landmarks” 1997 (John McSherry, Ian Parker, Anto Drennan, Deirdre Brenna),  riassume le atmosfere brumose e malinconiche che hanno contraddistinto la musica celtica di quegli anni, gli strumenti sono tradizionali, ma le tastiere e i sintetizzatori introdotti a suo tempo da Enya, che ormai si è lanciata nella sfolgorante carriera solista, sono il tappeto sonoro caratteristico dei Clannad e del loro misticismo: il gruppo dopo aver occhieggiato al pop britannico e al folk-rock ritorna negli anni Novanta alla spiritualità celtica che li aveva contraddistinti prima della deriva pop, e sfornano quattro album cosiddetti “della maturità artistica”: Anam, Banba, Lore e Landmarks.

Of this land” è un omaggio all’Irlanda e il testo è oscuro, patinato dalla leggenda.


I
How gentle was the breeze
that surrounded the way
How loud the sea’s roar on the four
winds everyday
Sharing love, wounded gifts from
ancient long ago
together they closed in
the circles we know
[CHORUS:]
Will we treasure all the secrets
with life’s changing scenes
Where our hearts were warm with love
So much love
Will the flowers grow again
as I open out my hand
Precious time
Time for healing
The beauty of this land
[repeat Chorus]
II
How soulful those words
that confuses the way
How wild the mountains stare
as they guard our everyday
Take for granted noble hearts
in the golden age that’s flown
Between us recall on
a strong road
we’ve known
[Chorus]
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Com’era leggera la brezza
che circondava il cammino!
Com’era forte il clamore quotidiano
del mare ai quattro venti!
Amore condiviso, doni traditi (1)
dai bei tempi andati (2)
insieme (ci) riportavano
agli inizi (3) che conosciamo
CORO
Faremo tesoro di tutti i segreti
con i cambiamenti della vita (4)?
Dove i nostri cuori erano riscaldati dall’amore
così tanto amore.
I fiori spunteranno di nuovo
appena apro la mano?
Tempo prezioso
tempo per essere guariti,
(dalla) bellezza di quest’isola
(ripete coro)
II
Quanto appassionate quelle parole
che il cammino confonde,
quanto aspre le montagne che ci guardano, mentre ci proteggono ogni giorno.
Tieni per certo i nobili cuori
nell’età dell’oro che è volata,
ricordano in mezzo a noi
la strada maestra
che abbiamo conosciuto
(Coro)

NOTE
1) si accosta amore condiviso (dato e ricevuto ) con dono ferito, offeso quindi in senso lato il tradimento, da una parte il true love e dall’altra il false love
2) mi viene in mente la frase coniata da Robert Burns auld lang syne
3) ho provato con una traduzione meno letterale basandomi sul significato dell’espressione “closing the circle”
4) Through all the changing scenes of life è un inno

Nel 1995  Pól Brennan lascia il gruppo per la carriera solista e anche Moya si dedica ai suoi progetti musicali da solista a partire dal 1992 con l’album  Máire.
Formalmente i Clannad non si sono mai sciolti anche se hanno preso una bella pausa discografica dopo l’uscita di Landmarks , l’ultimo album in studio è del 2013  Nádúr (Natura)

Segui le recensioni di Enya e dei Clannad sul sito Terre Celtiche con
il tag Clannad
il tag Enya
il tag Moya Brennan

FONTI
http://www.ondarock.it/popmuzik/clannad.htm
http://www.folkbulletin.com/clannad-christ-church-cathedral-arc-music-eucd-2441/
https://currerjames.wordpress.com/2008/10/21/il-disco-watermark-di-enya/
http://www.radioswisspop.ch/it/banca-dati-musicale/musicista/21538b32cbaf701a79012661b70c99d0460d6/biography
http://www.pathname.com/enya/celts.html

http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/antull.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/dervish/antull.htm
http://www.bearatourism.com/bweyeries.html
http://www.taramusic.com/sleevenotes/cd3008.htm

Don Oíche Úd I MBeithil o Do You Hear What I Hear?

Il canto di natale in gaelico irlandese dal titolo ” Don Oíche Úd I MBeithil”  (That Night in Bethlehem = quella notte a Betlemme) è una poesia scritta da Aodh Mac Cathmhaoil (1571-1626); la melodia è considerata tradizionale anche se talvolta viene attribuita a Sean Óg Ó Tuama il quale la pubblicò negli anni 1950 in un raccolta di canti in irlandese dal titolo “An Cóisir Cheoil”

Hugh MacCaghwell o dal latino Ugo Cavellus era un teologo francescano nonchè arcivescovo di Armagh al cui patronimico venne aggiunto il nome di “Mac Aingil” (figlio di un Angelo) per le sue opere maggiori sulla dottrina cristiana particolarmente ispirate. Scrisse anche quattro Carol natalizi in gaelico, tra cui ” Don Oíche Úd I MBeithil”

ASCOLTA The Chieftains

ASCOLTA Altan live
ASCOLTA Celtic Woman

Gaelico irlandese
I
Don oíche úd i mBeithil
beidh tagairt faoi ghréin go brách,
Don oíche úd i mBeithil
gur tháinig an Briathar slán;
Tá gríosghrua ar spéartha
‘s an talamh ‘na chlúdach bán;
Féach Íosagán sa chléibhín,
‘s an Mhaighdean ‘Á dhiúl le grá (1)
II
Ar leacain lom an tsléibhe
go nglacann na haoirí scáth
Nuair in oscailt gheal na spéire
tá teachtaire Dé ar fáil;
Céad glóir anois don Athair
sa bhFlaitheasa thuas go hard!
Is feasta fós ar sa thalamh
d’fheara dea-mhéin’ siocháin!

Traduzione inglese *
I
I sing of a night in Bethlehem
A night as bright as dawn
I sing of that night in Bethlehem
The night the Word was born
The skies are glowing gaily
The earth in white is dressed
See Jesus in the cradle
Drink deep in His mother’s breast (1)
II
And there on a lonely hillside
The shepherds bow down in fear
When the heavens open brightly
And God’s message rings out so clear
“Glory now to the Father
In all the heavens high
And peace to His friends on earth below (2) ” Is all the angels cry
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Canto di quella notte a Betlemme,
notte luminosa come l’alba,
canto di quella notte a Betlemme
la notte in cui il Verbo è nato;
i cieli risplendevano di gioia
la terra di bianco era ricoperta
per vedere Gesù nella culla, mentre succhiava dal seno della mamma
II
E c’erano sulla collina brulla
i pastori che si accasciarono dalla paura, quando i Cieli s’illuminarono
e il messaggio di Dio risuonò forte
“Gloria al Padre
nell’alto dei Cieli
e pace agli uomini di buona volontà”
gridarono gli angeli

NOTE
* tratta da qui
1) And the Virgin nursing him with love
2) citazione dal vangelo di Luca

 

Natività, Giotto, Basilica di Assisi

Do You Hear What I Hear?

La canzone natalizia fu scritta nel 1962 da Gloria Shayne Baker (per la musica) e Noël Regney (per il testo) come un inno alla pace durante la crisi missilistica cubana. Una lunga lista d’interpreti l’hanno resa celebre  in tutto il mondo. Unisco i due brani perchè così ha fatto Moya Brennan nel suo album “An Irish Christmas”
ASCOLTA Moya Brennan in “An Irish Christmas” 2005 unisce due canti Do You Hear e Don Oíche Úd I MBeithil (Do you hear what I hear strofe II, III + Don oíche úd i mBeithil strofa I + Do you hear what I hear  strofa IV)

ASCOLTA Orla Fallon in “Celtic Christmas” 2010


I
Said the night wind
to the little lamb,
“Do you see what I see?
Way up in the sky,
little lamb,
Do you see what I see?
A star, a star, dancing in the night
With a tail as big as a kite.”
II
“Do you hear what I hear?”
Said the little lamb
to the shepherd boy
“Do you hear what I hear?
Ringing through the sky,
shepherd boy?
Do you hear what I hear?
A song, a song high above the trees
With a voice as big as the sea”
III
Said the shepherd boy
to the mighty king
“Do you know what I know
In your palace warm,
mighty king?
Do you know what I know?
A Child, a Child shivers in the cold
Let us bring Him silver and gold”
IV
Said the king
to the people everywhere
“Listen to what I say
Pray for peace,
people everywhere
Listen to what I say
The Child, the Child sleeping in the night
He will bring us goodness and light”
(1)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Disse la notte
all’angellino
“Vedi quello che vedo?
In alto nel cielo
o angellino, vedi quello che vedo?
Una stella, una stella che danza nella notte, con una coda lunga come un aquilone”
II
“Senti quello che sento?”
Disse l’agnellino
al pastorello
“Senti quello che sento?
Che risuna in cielo
o pastorello? Senti quello che sento?
Un canto, un canto che si leva alto tra gli alberi,
con una voce profonda come il mare”
III
Disse il pastorello
al  Re magnifico
“Sai quello che so
(tu che stai) nel tuo palazzo al caldo,
o magnifico Re?
Sai quello che so? Un bambino, un bambino rabbrividisce al freddo,
gli porteremo argento e oro”
IV
Disse il re
alla gente di tutto il mondo
“Ascoltate quello che dico
pregate per la pace,
o gente di tutto il mondo.
Ascoltate quello che dico
il Bambino, il Bambino che dorme nella notte
ci porterà la bontà e la luce”

NOTE
1) Moya conclude con
Listen to what I say
Do you know what I know?
Do you hear what I hear?”

FONTI
http://anglandicus.blogspot.it/2013/12/when-word-safely-came.html
http://songsinirish.com/don-oiche-ud-i-mbeithil-lyrics/
https://thegatheringfire.wordpress.com/2014/12/29/that-night-in-bethlehem-an-irish-christmas-carol/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/brennan/doyou.htm

Silent night, holy night

Il nostro canto natalizio “Astro del ciel” è una delle tantissime traduzione di un brano famosissimo in tutto il mondo cristiano scritto originariamente in tedesco con il titolo di “Stille Nacht” da Joseph Mohr sacerdote della chiesa di San Niccolò a Oberndorf nei pressi di Salisburgo (Austria) e messo in musica il 24 dicembre del 1818 (o meglio nel 1816) da Franz Xaver Gruber.

Lo straordinario successo ottenuto davanti al povero pubblico di Oberndorf, però, non può spiegare, da solo, una fortuna musicale immutata da ben due secoli, repertorio di grandissimi autori e musicisti, del passato e del presente. Da quanto tramandato, sembra che fu un fabbricante di organi, tale Mauraher, dopo aver ascoltato la canzone, a portarla in Tirolo nel 1819, avviandone di fatto la diffusione sul continente. Nel 1822 fu suonata a Salisburgo, davanti al sovrano austriaco, Francesco II, e allo zar Alessandro di Russia. Successivamente, nel 1839, una versione fu intonata dai fratelli Rainer a New York, mentre la notizia della prima traduzione in inglese, dal titolo “Silent night” e operata dal prete John Freeman Young, si attesta al 1859. In appena venti anni la canzone natalizia, scritta dal parroco di uno sperduto villaggio austriaco, aveva già oltrepassato l’Oceano Atlantico. (tratto da qui)

SILENT NIGHT

Nel 1859 John Freeman Young pubblicò la traduzione in inglese con il titolo di “Silent Night”, ma fu solo una delle prime tra le tante versificazioni di fine Ottocento -primi Novecento

ASCOLTA Sinead O’Connor


I
Silent night, holy night,
all is calm, we see, all is bright
round young virgin mother and child,
holy infant so tender and mild
“Sleep in heavenly peace,
sleep in heavenly peace.”
II
Silent night, holy night,
shepherds first saw the sight
Glorious streaming from heaven afar,
heav’nly host sing Allelluia
Christ the savior is born,
Christ the savior is born.

I
Notte silenziosa, notte santa!
tutto è calmo, tutto è luminoso
intorno alla Vergine madre e al bimbo
bambinello santo così tenero e mite.
dormi nella pace divina
dormi nella pace divina
II
Notte silenziosa, notte santa!
i pastori per primi videro il segno!
La gloria scende dal lontano Paradiso
le schiere celesti cantano “Alleluia.
è nato Cristo il Salvatore
è nato Cristo il Salvatore”

Enya la canta invece in gaelico irlandese con il titolo Oíche Chiúin (strofe I, II, I) già registrato in Only if.. (1997) e riproposto anche in uno stilosissimo Christmas album: And Winter Came (2008)Moya Brennan in An Irish Christmas 2006


I
Oíche chiúin, oíche Mhic Dé
Cách ‘na suan, dís araon
Dís is dílse ‘faire le spéis
Naíon beag, leanbh ceansa ‘gus caomh
Críost, ‘na chodhladh go sámh
Críost, ‘na chodhladh go sámh
II
Oíche chiúin, oíche Mhic Dé
Aoirí ar dtús chuala ‘n scéal
Allelúia aingeal ag glaoch
Cantain suairc i ngar is i gcéin
Críost an Slánaitheoir Féin
Críost an Slánaitheoir Féin
Traduzione italiano
I
Notte silenziosa, notte santa!
Tutti dormono tranne la coppia,
la coppia devota che guarda con speranza al Bambinello dai  ricci capelli
Christo che dorme quieto
Christo che dorme quieto
II
Notte silenziosa, notte santa!
I pastori furono i primi ad ascoltare la storia, gli angeli cantano Alleluia!
risuona ovunque, vicino e lontano
“Cristo il salvatore è qui!
Cristo il salvatore è qui!”

ASTRO DEL CIEL

la versione in italiano pur mantenendo la stessa melodia non ne è tuttavia la traduzione seppur poetica, quanto un testo originale scritto dal prete bergamasco Angelo Meli e pubblicata solo nel 1937.
Andrea Bocelli

Astro del ciel, Pargol divin, mite Agnello Redentor!
Tu che i Vati da lungi sognar, tu che angeliche voci nunziar,
luce dona alle genti, pace infondi nei cuor!
luce dona alle genti, pace infondi nei cuor!
Astro del ciel, Pargol divin, mite Agnello Redentor!
Tu di stirpe regale decor, Tu virgineo, mistico fior,
luce dona alle genti, pace infondi nei cuor!
Luce dona alle genti, pace infondi nei cuor!Astro del ciel, Pargol divin, mite Agnello Redentor!
Tu disceso a scontare l’error, Tu sol nato a parlare d’amor,
luce dona alle genti, pace infondi nei cuor!
Luce dona alle genti, pace infondi nei cuor!

FONTI
http://www.silentnight.web.za/translate/eng.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/enya/oiche.htm

SEAN DUINE DÓITE

Una canzone in gaelico irlandese che tocca un tema umoristico con un fondo amaro, quello dei matrimoni male assortiti tra una giovane ragazza e un vecchio. Scrive Donal O’Sullivan nel suo ‘Songs of the Irish’ This song, part tragic, part grimly amusing, with a surprise in its last line, has sometimes been attributed to Andrew Magrath, the County Limerick poet … It is reasonably certain, however, that the attribution is erroneous. It is an eighteenth century folk song of Munster origin, which has doubtless been subjected to many alterations and accretions, and versions of which have been noted as far away as County Mayo. At the period of its composition Scottish airs were very popular in Ireland, particularly with the Munster poets, and this song is said to have been written to the tune of “The Campbells are Coming”. It is interesting to note the profound modifications which the tune has undergone at the hands of the Irish folk singers.

La melodia è probabilmente nata in Scozia e la ritroviamo con il titolo di “The Campbells are Coming” su un testo attribuito a Robert Burns, diventata assai popolare in America durante la Guerra di Secessione come marcetta militare. (vedi prima parte)

LA VERSIONE IN GAELICO IRLANDESE

Nella versione in gaelico scozzese Baile Ionaraora (in italiano la città di Inveraray) il bardo si lamenta di un matrimonio male assortito in cui si mangia solo molluschi, nella versione irlandese il matrimonio è stato combinato tra una ragazza giovane e un vecchio e già nel titolo si maligna sulle scarse prestazioni sessuali del vecchietto “dóite” cioè che ha consumato tutto il suo stoppino!
Del testo si trovano peraltro molte versioni ma il brano è anche una popolare jig dal titolo “The Burnt Old Man”

ASCOLTA  Seamus Beagley per la serie Anam An Amhráin  di Cartoon Saloon

ASCOLTA Aoife – An Seanduine Dóite (Burnt Out Old Man)

ASCOLTA Moya Brennan & Cormac de Barra

Óró ‘sheanduine, ‘sheanduine dóite,
Óró ‘sheanduine, ‘sheanduine dóite,
Luigh ar do leaba agus codlaigh do dhóthain
Óró ‘sheanduine is mairg a phós thú,

( in inglese
Oh burnt old man, old man
Oh burnt old man, old man
Lie on your bed and sleep plenty
I wish I had never married you)

FONTI
http://slowplayers.org/2014/05/06/burnt-old-man-d/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/danu/odheara.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/relativity/anseanduine.htm
http://www.cathieryan.com/lyrics/an-seanduine-doite/
http://www.omniglot.com/songs/irish/anseanduinedoite.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/an_seanduine_doite_mrussell.htm
https://soundcloud.com/ceol-lios-na-n-g/4-an-seanduine-seanduine-d-ite

https://thesession.org/tunes/5647
https://thesession.org/tunes/1029

AN MHAIGHDEAN MHARA

The Land Baby, John Collier - 1899
The Land Baby, John Collier – 1899

In Irlanda la sirena è detta merrow e può essere sia femmina che maschio. A volte queste creature scelgono volontariamente di restare accanto ad un uomo, assumendo la forma umana, ma sono condannate a non poter toccare l’acqua salata, perchè altrimenti saranno costrette a ritornare in mare e a non potranno mai più camminare sulla terra. continua

LA MELODIA

Una slow air dolce-amara più propriamente un lament che esprime tutto il dolore della mutaforma costretta a lasciare per sempre i suoi figli e il marito umano. Anche in questo contesto come in quello delle Isole Ebridi (vedi prima parte) la fanciulla del mare potrebbe essere sia una sirena che una foca.

ASCOLTA The Chieftains in set con Tie the Bonnet, O’Rourke’s

LA FIGLIA DELLA SIRENA

Il canto in gaelico proviene dal Donegal, nella canzone la figlia della sirena è caduta in mare e la madre per salvarla dalla maledizione, prende il suo posto e ritorna per sempre nell’oceano.

La versione nel film “The Secret of Roan Inish” (In italiano “Il Segreto dell’Isola di Roan“) 1995

e due grandi voci a confronto: Mairéad Ní Mhaonaigh e Moya Brennan
ASCOLTA Altan in “Island Angel”  1993

ASCOLTA Aoife Ní Fhearraigh

GAELICO IRLANDESE
I
Is cosúil gur mheath tú nó gur threig tú an greann;
Tá an sneachta go frasach fá bhéal na n-áitheann,
Do chúl buí daite ‘s do bhéilín sámh,
Siúd chugaibh Máirí Chinidh
‘s í ‘ndiaidh ‘n Éirne ‘shnámh.
II
A Máithrín mhilis dúirt Máire Bhán.
Fá bhruach a’ chladaigh ‘s fá bhéal na trá,
‘S maighdean mhara mo mháithrín ard
Siúd chugaibh Máirí Chinidh
‘s í ‘ndiaidh ‘n Éirne ‘shnámh.
III
Tá mise tuirseach agus beidh go lá
Mo Mháire bhruinngheal ‘s mo Phádraig bán,
Ar bharr na dtonna ‘s fá bhéal na trá,
Siúd chugaibh Máirí Chinidh
‘s í in dhiaidh an Éirne a shnámh
IV
Tá an oíche seo dorcha is tá an ghaoth i ndroch aird.
Tá an tSeisreach ‘na seasamh ins na spéarthaí go hard.
Ach ar bharr na dtonnta is fá bhéal na trá
Siúd chugaibh Máire Chinidh is í i ndiaidh an Éirne snámh.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
I
It seems that you have faded away and abandoned the love of life
The snow is spread about at the mouth of the sea (fords)
Your yellow-speckled back(1) and your gentle little mouth,
We give you Mary Kenny,
to swim forever in the Éirne
II
My dear mother, said fair Mary
By the edge of the shore and the mouth of the sea
A mermaid is my noble mother,
We give you Mary Kenny,
to swim forever in the Éirne
III
I am tired and will be forever
My bright-breasted Mary and my fair Patrick
On top of the waves and by the mouth of the sea
We give you Mary Kenny,
to swim forever in the Éirne
IV
The night is dark and the wind is high
The Plough can be seen high in the sky
But on top of the waves and by the mouth of the sea
We give you Mary Kenny, to swim forever in the Éirne
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Pare che tu sia caduta
e abbia perso il buon umore.
La neve si accumula
sull’imboccatura del mare (dei guadi),
sulla tua schiena maculata di giallo (1) e sulla tua dolce piccola bocca
vi diamo Mary Kenny a nuotare per sempre nell’oceano (2)
II
“Mia cara madre- disse la bionda Mary
dal bordo della spiaggia sul bagnasciuga-
una sirena è la mia nobile madre”
vi diamo Mary Kenny a nuotare per sempre nell’oceano
III
Sono stanca e lo sarò per sempre
la mia Mary dal petto luminoso e il mio biondo Patrick
sulla cresta delle onde e sul bagnasciuga
vi diamo Mary Kenny a nuotare per sempre nell’oceano
IV
La notte è buia e il vento è forte
il Gran Carro (3) si scorge alto nel cielo
ma sulla cresta delle onde e sul bagnasciuga

vi diamo Mary Kenny a nuotare per sempre nell’oceano

NOTE
1) altri traducono con “Your yellow flowing hair” (i tuoi lunghi capelli biondi)
2) Eirne può riferirsi sia ad un lago (Loch Erne) che essere una vecchia parola per l’Atlantico
3) in inglese è il Carro (The Plough) dell’Orsa Maggiore

FONTI
https://thesession.org/tunes/4087
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/altan/anmhaighdean.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/anmhaighdean.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7950
http://www.irishpage.com/songs/roaninis.htm
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic109070-20.html
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic1036.html

CRUISCIN LAN (MY FULL JUG)

The Cruiskeen Lawn (o Crooskeen Lawn) o Cruiscin Lan (“la brocca piena” di whiskey, possibilmente prodotto illegalmente) è la cosa preferita in assoluto del protagonista di questa canzone.
Ci sono due versioni con lo stesso titolo, una in gaelico irlandese l’altra in inglese con ritornello in gaelico, il tema però è sempre lo stesso: il bere, “fill us up the crooskeen and keep it full!”

Non a caso An cruiscin lan è il nome di pubs disseminati in tutta l’Irlanda.

whisky-jug

A JUG OR A JAR?

Non è automatico tradurre in italiano il temine jug: in fiorentino si direbbe boccia, che richiama l’immagine delle bottiglie di vino da 5 litri (una bottiglia piuttosto grande con il collo stretto). Ma può essere anche una caraffa con tanto di manico e collo più svasato che assomiglia a una brocca. Potrebbe anche essere un vaso di vetro per conservare marmellate o ortaggi o il barattolo del miele. Un termine quanto mai generico che a me richiama l’orcio toscano, il recipiente di terracotta, panciuto e di forma allungata con il collo ristretto, spesso a due manici in cui si conservavano o trasportavano i liquidi. In antico era una unità di misura equivalente a circa 38 litri, ma rimpicciolito ecco che l’orcio era usato come una brocca.

Jug o jar possono indicare la stessa cosa, ma a voler sottilizzare jar indica più precisamente un contenitore cilindrico più alto che largo munito o meno di coperchio, mentre jug è un contenitore un po’ panciuto che si restringe e allunga verso l’apertura e in genere è dotato di uno o due manici. Quindi jar= vaso, vasetto, bicchiere; jug= boccia, brocca, caraffa, bottiglia.
In modo colloquiale dire “I’ll have a jar” si traduce con “berrò una pinta di birra“. In generale però sia jug che jar non indicano una specifica unità di misura, essendo stati modellati nelle più svariate dimensioni dettate dall’uso. Quando il jug è in forma di grossa bottiglia potrebbe equivalere a un gallone ovvero a quasi 4 litri se gallone americano, o a quasi 5 litri se gallone inglese; se il jug è una brocca potrebbe equivalere al quarto di gallone ovvero a poco meno o poco più di 1 litro.

WHISKEY JUG

C’è un modo  tipico di servire il whiskey, ossia in un bicchiere (un tumbler alto) pieno solo per un quinto affiancato da una piccola brocca d’acqua pura a temperatura ambiente (e ognuno ci mette la quantità d’acqua che vuole). Non per niente il noto proverbio irlandese recita “non rubare la moglie di un altro e non mettergli l’acqua nel whiskey“; così la caraffa per l’acqua è detta whiskey jug. Queste caraffe sono state prodotte a partire dalla fine dell’Ottocento dalle grandi e piccole distillerie di whisky a scopo promozionale e ancora oggi sono oggetto da collezione. Ma la jug di questa canzone non è certo la caraffa dell’acqua bensì quella piena di whisky!

whisky-jugs
“WhiskyJugs”. Con licenza CC BY-SA 3.0 tramite Wikipedia.

LA VERSIONE IN GAELICO IRLANDESE

ASCOLTA Tommy Makem & Liam Clancy in “Two For The Early Dew“, 2006 Liam Clancy dice di averla sentita da un vecchio pescatore di Ring, contea di Waterford


Curfa:
Fagham aris mo cruiscin
Slainte geal mo mhuirnin
Is cuma liom a cuilin dubh no ban
Is fagham aris mo cruiscin is biodh se lan
I
Chuaidh an da Shean is mo Shean-sa ‘dti an aonach
D’adhnadar sparainn is ba dheacair I a reidheach
Bhriseadar a cinn agus ploisc a cheile
Is go b’i bean a’ tabhairne do chosain mo phlaitin feinig
‘Gus fagham aris mo cruiscin is biodh se lan.
II
Chuirid-sa mo bhean-sa go Caiseal ag diol ubhla
An da dhiabhal leathpinge thug si cumh-sa
Nach mise an truagh Mhuire ag siubhal an duithche
Ar lorg an tseanasgibe ‘gus an baile ro-chumhang di
‘Gus fagham aris mo cruiscin is biodh se lan
III
Fagaim-se mo bheannacht ag muinntir an tigh-seo
Do reir mar ata said og agus criona
Mar ni bheinn-se cortha de na gcuideachtain choidhche
Go bhfasa’ an cuileann tri mhullach an tseana thighe-seo
‘Gus fagham aris mo cruiscin is biodh se lan.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE ( da qui)
Chorus
I’ll take my jug again,
Here’s health my little love again,
It minds me not though her sweet head/be fair or dark or curled(1),
I will take again my little jug
and that ‘ll be grand.
I
The two Johns and this John(2),
went over to the fair,
they started up a row there
that was difficult to repair,
They broke each other’s heads
and the woman of the Tavern
was the one who minded my bald pate as shiny as a sovereign
And I’ll find my little jug again and that ‘ll be grand.
II
My wife I sent to Cashel,
selling apples there you see,
Two sales of half a penny
was all she brought back to me,
Aren’t I a pity to Mary now,
walking the country,
Searching for that same ould flirt
for whom her home’s too poor(3)
But, I’ll take my little jug again
and that’ll be grand.
III
My blessings now I’m leaving
to the people of this house,
For here they be both young and old, (with them I have no grouse)
And never will I tire of them
and their company so jolly
‘Till through the roof of this old place will grow a bush of holly.
And I’ll take my little jug again and that ‘ll be grand.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
Coro
Alzerò ancora la mia bottiglia,
alla salute del mio piccolo amore,
non importa se la sua testolina
sia bionda o nera o rossa(1),
prenderò di nuovo la mia bottiglia
e sarò un signore.
I
I due John e il questo John(2)
andarono alla fiera,
iniziarono là una lite
di difficile conciliazione,
si ruppero le teste l’uno con l’altro
e la donna della Taverna
fu la sola che fece caso alla mia pelata brillante come una sovrana,
prenderò di nuovo la mia bottiglia
e sarò un signore.

II
Mandai mia moglie a Cashel,
a vendere mele come vedi,
due pezzi di mezzo penny
fu tutto quello che mi riportò indietro, peccato per Mary ora,
che viaggia per il paese
cercando lo stesso vecchio amore per cui la sua casa è troppo povera(3)
prenderò di nuovo la mia bottiglia
e sarò un signore.
III
La mia benedizione lascio
alla gente di questa taverna
sia giovani che vecchi,
di loro non mi lamento,
e della loro compagnia così allegra, finchè sul tetto di questo vecchio posto crescerà un cespuglio di agrifoglio
prenderò di nuovo la mia bottiglia
e sarò un signore.

NOTE
1) letteralmente “capello ondulato” ma nel contesto della frase sta per capelli rossi
2) nel senso di il John che canta
3) la traduzione è letterale vuole significare che la condizione sociale della ragazza è inferiore rispetto all’uomo di cui si è innamorata e che l’ha respinta? Ora il protagonista si pente di aver sposato un’altra e ripensa a Mary

LÍONTAR DÚINN AN CRÚISCÍN

in Liam Ó Conchubair & Derek Bell, Traditional Songs of the North of Ireland, Dublin: Wolfhound Press, 1999.

ASCOLTA Róise Nic Chorraidh (Belfast)
ASCOLTA Máire Ní Choilm (Donegal)

ASCOLTA Clannad in Crann Úll 1980

ASCOLTA Moya Brennan & Cormac De Barra in Affinity 2013


I
A bhuachaillí, a bhuachaillí, ,olaim sibh go síorruí
Sibh ‘ thógfadh croí na gcailín’s chuirfeadh gnaoí ar chruinniú daoine.
Nuair a smaoitím ar na scafairí ‘s iad cruinn’ ar Ard an Aonaigh;
A’ caochadh ar na streabhógaí ‘s a’ cogarnaigh go síodúil.
Is líontar dúinn an crúiscín is bíodh sé lán.
II
Isteach go tigh a’ leanna libh a chailíní na díse;
Braon de shú na bráich a chuirfeas mothá in bhur gcroí istigh.
Ólfaimid is ceolfaimid is beimid seal go síamsach;
Beimid súgach meanmach is pleoid ar bhuaireamh ‘n tsaoil seo.
Is líontar dúinn an crúiscín is bíodh sé lán.
III
B’ann a bhiodh a’ chuideachta a’ teacht ‘na bhaile ón aonach.
A’ gealghairí ‘s a priollaireacht ‘s a’ feitheamh ‘e ‘ar mian fháil.
Fá dheireadh théadh gach scafaire ‘r ghreim sciatháin le na chaoimhbheart.
Síos a’ mhalaí Raithní ‘s iad a’ portaíocht go croíúil,
Is líontar dúinn an crúiscín is bíodh sé lán.

Tradotto da L. Ó Conchubhair
I
Boys, O boys, O boys, I always admired you
You surely amused the lasies
and put heart in any gathering.
When I recall the gallants,
all gathered on the Fair Hill,
Winking at the bonny ones
and whispering so smoothly.
So fill us up the crooskeen
and keep it full!
II
All ye lovely maidens, all into the alehouse;
Have a sup of the malt juice(1)
to put life in heart’s core(2).
We’ll drink and we’ll sing
and we’ll have heigho time.
We’ll be merry, mettlesome;
to hell with life’s cares.
So fill us up the crooskeen
and keep it full!
III
All the merry company,
homing from the fair,
Joking and blithering,
seeking out our chance(3).
At length every buck
goes off arm in arm
with his sweetheart,
Down the hearher brae,
whistling free and easy.
So fill us up the crooskeen
and keep it full!
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Ragazzi, o ragazzi da sempre vi ammiro,
di sicuro sapete far divertire le ragazze e ci mettete cuore in ogni incontro. Quando ricordo i giovanotti,
tutti radunati a Fair Hill che strizzavano l’occhio a quelle belle
e sussurravano piano,
quindi riempici la boccia
e tienila sempre piena.

II
Tutte voi giovani fanciulle della birreria,
prendete una zuppa di succo d’orzo
per mettere la vita nel cuore.
Berremo e canteremo
e ce la spasseremo,
saremo allegri e combattivi
e al diavolo le preoccupazioni della vita,  quindi riempici la boccia
e tienila sempre piena.

III
Tutta l’allegra brigata
diretta a casa dalla fiera
scherza e blatera,
cerca di trovare l’occasione(3);
alla fine ogni maschio
va a braccetto
con la sua fidanzata
giù per le valli d’erica
fischiettando libero e senza pensieri,
quindi riempici la boccia
e tienila sempre piena.

NOTE
1) la birra scura irlandese è spesso definita come una zuppa d’orzo
2) letteralmente “al centro del cuore”
3) le fiere erano dei grandi raduni in cui i ragazzi andava per trovare la ragazza con cui divertirsi

VERSIONE IRLANDESE: CRUISCIN LAN

“Cruiscin lan” (Full little jug) è la versione  scritta da Dion Boucicault l’attore-commediografo irlandese molto popolare nella seconda parte dell’Ottocento, che la inserì nella commedia “The Colleen Bawn” (1860) arrangiata per l’accompagnamento al piano. E’ diventata una tipica canzone dei circoli conviviali dublinesi.

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem in Come Fill Your Glass With Us 1959

ASCOLTA The Dustbunnies 


I
Let the farmer praise his grounds
Let the huntsman praise his hounds
Let the shepherd praise his dewy-scented lambs
But I, more wise then they,
spend each happy night and day
With me darling little cruiscín
lán, lán, lán,
With me darling little cruiscín lán.
Chorus (1)
Oh, gradh mo chroide mo cruiscín
Slainte geal mauver-neen,
Gradh mo chroide mo cruiscín
lán, lán, lán,
Oh gradh mo chroide mo cruiscín lán.
II
Immortal and divine,
great Bacchus, god of wine
Create me by adoption, your own son
In the hope that you’ll comply,
that my glass shall ne’er run dry
Nor me darlin’ little cruiscín
lán, lán, lán,
Nor me darlin’ little cruiscín lán.
III
And when grim death appears
In a few but happy years
He’ll say,”Oh, won’t you come along with me?
I’ll say, “Begone ye knave(2),
for King Bacchus gave me leave
For to fill another cruiscín lán, lán, lán,
For to fill another cruiscín lán.”
IV
So fill your glasses high
Let’s not part so dry(3)
Though the lark proclaims it is the dawn
And since we can’t remain
May we shortly meet again
To share another cruiscín
lán, lán, lán,

To share another cruiscín lán.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Che il contadino lodi la sua terra
e il cacciatore i suoi cani,
che il pastore lodi i suoi agnelli odorosi di rugiada,
ma io ben più saggio di loro,
trascorro ogni notte felice e ogni giorno, con la mia amata boccia piena,
piena, piena, piena

con la mia amata boccia piena,
CORO
Amore mio, mia boccia
che porti salute alla mia colombella,
mia amata boccia piena
piena, piena, piena
mia amata boccia piena
II
Immortale e divino,
grande Bacco, dio del vino
prendimi in adozione, come tuo figlio proprio con la speranza che tu mi accontenti, che il mio bicchiere non resti mai a secco,
e mia amata boccia piena
piena, piena, piena
mia amata boccia piena
III
E quando la morte triste apparirà
tra pochi ma felici anni
dirà “Non vuoi venire con me?”
io dirò”Vattene cavaliere(2),
perchè re Bacco mi ha dato il permesso di riempire un’altra boccia piena, piena, piena, di riempire un’altra boccia piena”
IV
Così riempi il tuo bicchiere
per non lasciarci così a secco,
anche se l’allodola annuncia il giorno; ma dal momento che non possiamo restare che ci possiamo rivedere ancora brevemente
per condividere un’altra boccia piena
piena, piena, piena
per condividere
un’altra boccia piena

NOTE
1) in iglese: “Love of my heart, my little jug, Bring health to my own dove, little jug my own heart’s love”
2) la morte per gli inglesi è al maschile
3) oppure “Let’s not part when lips are dry”

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/jug-punch.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30244
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=149904 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5630 http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic89414.html http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/OCon054A.html http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic89414.html