Joan to the Maypole

Leggi in italiano

The song “John (Joan) to the Maypole” dates back at least to 1600, we know several text versions with the same title but also with different titles, (to “May-day Country Mirth”, “The Young Lads and Lasses”, ” Innocent Recreation “,” The Disappointment “) the first printed version dates back to 1630 when the melody is attributed to Felix White, and we find it in the collection” The Pills to Purge Melancholy “by Thomas D’Urfey c. 1720.

17th-century woodblock from the ballad sheet ‘The May Day Country Mirth’

The song describes a typical May Day on the lawn: couples dance around the May Pole to contend for the coveted award, the May garland. The winning couple will become King and Queen of May.
To organize May Day feast we need just a green, that is an open space outside the village, a well planted pole in the middle of the lawn, decorated with flower garlands, some “summer houses” where to sit in the shade and refresh with drinks.
In the painting by Charles Robert Leslie we see a scene celebrating the May with Queen Elizabeth depicted on the right in the foreground while being entertained by a jester. On the expanse of the second floor stands the May pole decorated with green garlands; around the pole the dances are taking place and the characters dressed by Robin Hood, Lady Marian, Fra Tack, but also a seahorse, a dragon and a buffoon (the classic characters of mummers and Morris) are well distinguishable.

MayDay_Leslie
Charles Robert Leslie – May Day in the reign of Queen Elizabeth

In the Victorian painting by William Powell Frith we find again the same situation described in the late medieval period: in the distance on the left stands out the profile of a church, not by chance: it was in fact the church that financed the May celebrations; with the beer sold, the parish church was maintained or the alms were distributed to the poor.

William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration Oil on canvas 40 x 56 inches (101.6 x 142.3 cm) Private collection
William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration

It is not even so strange that Beltane feast has merged under the control of the Catholic Church, but the Puritans were horrified by all May customs, thus May Pole and related celebrations see moments of obscurantism alternated with moments of tolerance (see more)

The tune is from “Margaret Board Lute Book” (here) the manuscript in the private collection of Robert Spencer, has been dated c1620 up to 1636 (it seems that lady Margaret took lessons from John Dowland).

Toronto Consort  from O Lusty May 1996 
in “The new standard song book”- (J.E.Carpenter) – 1866 with the title: “very popular at the time of Charles I”. A version of nine verses is featured in the broadside titled “The May-Day Country Mirth Or, The Young Lads and Lasses’ Innocent Recreation, Which is to be priz’d before Courtly Pomp and Pastime.” Bodleian collection, Douce Ballads 2 (152a ) and The Roxburghe Ballads: Illustrating the Last Years of the Stuarts Vol. 7, Part 1, edited by J. Woodfall Ebsworth (Hertford: Ballad Society, 1890) (see)

JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE
Chorus
Joan to the Maypole away, let us on,
The time is swift and will be gone;
There go the lasses away to the green,
Where their beauties may be seen
I
Bess, Moll, Kate, Doll,
All the gay lasses
have lads to attend them,
Hodge, Nick, Tom, Dick,
Jolly brave dancers,
and who can mend them?
[Chorus]
II
Did you not see the Lord of the May
Walk along in his rich array?
There goes the lass that is only his,
See how they meet and how they kiss.
Come Will, run Gill,
Or dost thou list to lose thy labour(1);
Kit Crowd scrape loud,
Tickle her, Tom, with a pipe and tabor!(2).
[Chorus]
III
There is not any that shall out-vie
My little pretty Joan and I,
For I’m sure I can dance as well
As Robin, Jenny, Tom, or Nell.
Last year, we were here,
When Ruff Ralph he played us a bourée,
And we, merrily
Thumped it about and gained the glory.
IV
Now, if we hold out
as we do begin,
Joan and I the prize shall win(3);
Nay, if we live till another day (4),
I’ll make thee lady of the May.
Dance round, skip, bound,
Turn and kiss, and then for a greeting.
Now, Joan, we’ve done,
Fare thee well
till the next merry meeting.
[Chorus]

NOTES
1) the exhortation refers to the musicians who are not yet ready with their instruments to kick off the dance.
2) Pipe and tabor or tabor-pipe is the three-hole flute associated with the tambourine, the flute is played with one hand and with the other one it is accompanied by a tambourine  (see more)
3) the May garland at stake
4) it is not clear whether the election dethroned the previous couple immediately or is the title valid for the following year.

second part

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html
http://www.maymorning.co.uk/426023492
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Joan_to_the_Maypole
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Board.htm

http://cbladey.com/mayjack/maysong.html#JOAN%20TO%20THE%20MAYPOLE

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

Joan al Palo del Maggio

Read the post in English

Il brano “John (Joan) to the Maypole” risale quantomeno al 1600, si conoscono varie versioni testuali con lo stesso titolo ma anche con titoli diversi, (a “May-day Country Mirth”, “The Young Lads and Lasses”, “Innocent Recreation”, “The Disappointment”)  la prima versione stampata risale al 1630 in cui si attribuisce la melodia a Felix White, e lo ritroviamo nella raccolta “The Pills to Purge Melancholy” di Thomas D’Urfey c. 1720.

Xilografia del XVII secolo tratta dalla ballata “The May Day Country Mirth”

Nella canzone si descrive una tipica Festa del Maggio sul prato: le coppie danzano intorno al Palo del Maggio per contendersi l’ambito premio, la ghirlanda del Maggio. La coppia vincente diventerà Re e Regina del Maggio.
Per organizzare la festa del Maggio basta un green, cioè uno spiazzo all’aperto appena fuori dal paese, un palo ben piantato al centro del prato e decorato con ghirlande fiorite, qualche pergolato o “summer houses” dove sedersi all’ombra e rifocillarsi con bevande fresche.
Nel dipinto di Charles Robert Leslie vediamo proprio una scena celebrativa del Maggio con la Regina Elisabetta raffigurata sulla destra in primo piano nel mentre è intrattenuta da un giullare. Sulla distesa in secondo piano si staglia il palo del maggio impavesato e decorato con ghirlande verdi; attorno al palo si stanno svolgendo le danze e sono ben distinguibili i personaggi vestiti da Robin Hood, Lady Marian, Fra Tack, ma anche un cavalluccio, un drago e un buffone ( i personaggi classici dei mummers e dei Morris).

MayDay_Leslie
Charles Robert Leslie – May Day in the reign of Queen Elizabeth

Nel dipinto vittoriano di William Powell Frith ritroviamo praticamente descritta la stessa situazione tardo-medievale: in lontananza sulla sinistra si staglia il profilo di una chiesa, non a caso: era infatti la chiesa a finanziare il divertimento del Maggio; con la birra venduta si provvedeva al mantenimento della chiesa parrocchiale o si distribuivano le elemosine ai poveri.

William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration Oil on canvas 40 x 56 inches (101.6 x 142.3 cm) Private collection
William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration

Non è poi nemmeno tanto strano che l’usanza prescristiana della festa di Beltane sia confluita sotto il controllo della chiesa cattolica, sono piuttosto i puritani ad accanirsi contro il clima festaiolo di certe ricorrenze religiose. Così Pali del Maggio e festeggiamenti relativi vedono momenti di oscurantismo alternati a momenti di tolleranza (continua)

ASCOLTA la melodia con il liuto tratta dal “Margaret Board Lute Book” (qui) il manoscritto nella collezione  privata di Robert Spencer, è stato datato  c1620 fino a 1636 (pare che la signora prendesse lezioni da John Dowland).

Toronto Consort  in O Lusty May 1996 
Testo in “The new standard song book”- (J.E.Carpenter) – 1866. Sotto il titolo è classificato come “Molto popolare all’epoca di Carlo I”. Una versione di nove strofe è roportata nella broadside dal titolo “The May-Day Country Mirth Or, The Young Lads and Lasses’ Innocent Recreation, Which is to be priz’d before Courtly Pomp and Pastime. Bodleian collection, Douce Ballads 2(152a) e The Roxburghe Ballads: Illustrating the Last Years of the Stuarts Vol. 7, Part 1, edited by J. Woodfall Ebsworth (Hertford: Ballad Society, 1890) (vedi)


Chorus
Joan to the Maypole away,
let us on,
The time is swift and will be gone;
There go the lasses
away to the green,
Where their beauties
may be seen
I
Bess, Moll, Kate, Doll,
All the gay lasses
have lads to attend them,
Hodge, Nick, Tom, Dick,
Jolly brave dancers,
and who can mend them?
[Chorus]
II
Did you not see the Lord of the May
Walk along in his rich array?
There goes the lass that is only his,
See how they meet
and how they kiss.
Come Will, run Gill,
Or dost thou list to lose thy labour(1);
Kit Crowd scrape loud,
Tickle her, Tom, with a pipe and tabor! (2).
[Chorus]
III
There is not any that shall out-vie
My little pretty Joan and I,
For I’m sure I can dance as well
As Robin, Jenny, Tom, or Nell.
Last year, we were here,
When Ruff Ralph he played us a bourée,
And we, merrily
Thumped it about and gained the glory.
IV
Now, if we hold out
as we do begin,
Joan and I the prize shall win(3);
Nay, if we live till another day (4),
I’ll make thee lady of the May.
Dance round, skip, bound,
Turn and kiss, and then for a greeting.
Now, Joan, we’ve done,
Fare thee well
till the next merry meeting.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Joan se ne va al Palo di Maggio,
andiamo anche noi,
che il tempo fugge veloce;
là le fanciulle vanno
nel prato,
dove le loro grazie
si possano ammirare.
I
Bess, Moll, Kate, Doll
ogni fanciulla allegra
ha il suo ragazzo ad attenderla
Hodge, Nick, Tom, Dick,
bravi e allegri ballerini,
chi potrebbe fare di meglio?
Coro
II
Non vedete come il re del Maggio
passeggia in pompa magna?
Lo raggiunge la sua ragazza,
vedete come si salutano
e si baciano!
Forza Will, corri Gill,
o rischiate di perdere il lavoro
Kit Crowd sfrega forte,
stuzzicala Tom con il flauto e
il tamburo.
Coro
III
Non c’è nessuno che possa superare
la mia piccola Joan e me, perchè sono certo di poter ballare altrettanto bene di Robin, Jenny, Tom, o Nell.
L’anno scorso, eravamo qui,
quando Ruff Ralph ha suonato una bourée,
e noi allegramente
battevamo (il tempo) e abbiamo guadagnato la gloria
IV
Ora se continuiamo
come abbiamo cominciato,
Joan ed io vinceremo il premio;
anzi se viviamo ancora un altro giorno
ti farò regina del Maggio.
Gira, saltella e zompa
voltati e bacia, e poi saluta.
Ora Joan è finito,
addio
fino alla prossima festa.

NOTE
1) l’esortazione si riferisce ai musicisti che non sono ancora pronti con i loro strumenti per dare il via al ballo.
2) Pipe and tabor o anche Tabor-pipe è il flauto a tre buchi associato al tamburino, il flauto si suona con una mano sola e con l’altra ci si accompagna con un tamburino a tracolla (vedi)
3) la ghirlanda del maggio in palio
4) l’aver vinto la ghirlanda del Maggio li incorona a nuovo re e regina del Maggio del relativo prato; non è chiaro se l’elezione detronizzi la precedente coppia fin da subito o sia il titolo valido per l’anno successivo.

continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html
http://www.maymorning.co.uk/426023492
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Joan_to_the_Maypole
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Board.htm

L’albero in mezzo al prato

Read the post in English

Come il gioco della campana conosciuto dai bambini di tutti i continenti, anche la “canzone del ciclo eterno” è una goccia di antica sapienza sopravvissuta ai nostri giorni: oltre che gioco mnemonico è anche scioglilingua che diventa sempre più difficile articolare all’aumentare della velocità.

Alcuni dicono sia irlandese, altri che sia una melodia irlandese su di un testo scozzese, (o viceversa), altri ancora dicono che sia del Sud dell’Inghilterra o del Galles, o di origini bretoni, ma la canzoncina è talmente popolare che a nessuno importa discutere sulla paternità delle origini. Più probabilmente è una filastrocca collettiva e archetipa di quelle che si ritrovano nei vari paesi europei, proveniente da una antichissima preghiera-canto, di quelle che si praticavano nelle celebrazioni rituali primaverili, ovvero quanto è sopravvissuto dell’insegnamento antico, per metafore, del ciclo vita-morte-vita.

albero celtaL’ALBERO COSMICO

Non si può non pensare all’albero cosmico come simbolo universale, ossia il punto di inizio assoluto della vita. Nel linguaggio simbolico, questo punto è l’ombelico del mondo, inizio e fine di tutte le cose, ma viene spesso immaginato come un asse verticale che, situato al centro dell’universo, attraversa il cielo, la terra e il mondo sotterraneo.

Come sintetizza con chiarezza Greta Fogliani nel suo “Alle radici dell’Albero cosmico” “Di per sé, l’albero non è propriamente un motivo cosmologico, perché è innanzi tutto un elemento naturale che, per i suoi attributi, ha assunto una funzione simbolica. L’albero, in quanto tale, si rigenera sempre con il passare delle stagioni: perde le foglie, secca, sembra morire, ma poi ogni volta rinasce e recupera il suo splendore.
Per queste sue caratteristiche, esso diventa non solo un elemento sacro, ma addirittura un microcosmo, perché nel suo processo di evoluzione rappresenta e ripete la creazione dell’universo. Inoltre, proprio per la sua estensione sia verso il basso sia verso l’alto, questo elemento ha finito inevitabilmente per assumere una valenza cosmologica, andando a costituire il perno dell’universo che attraversa cielo, terra e oltretomba e che funge da collegamento tra le zone cosmiche.”

Gustav Klimt: L’albero della vita, 1905

Dalle molteplici declinazioni pur mantenendo la stessa struttura, le melodie variano a seconda della provenienza, una polka in Irlanda, una strathspey in Scozia e una morris dance in Inghilterra.. Gli irlandesi non potevano non trasformarla in una drinking song come gioco-pretesto per abbondanti bevute (chi sbaglia beve).
Insomma paese che vai verso che trovi, ognuno ci ha aggiunto del suo.

RATTLIN’ BOG

MELODIA “STANDARD”: è quella irlandese che è una polka più o meno veloce

The Corries (molto comunicativi con il pubblico)

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula sempre più demenziale


CHORUS
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Buona palude,
la palude giù nella valle
speciale palude, la bella palude,
la palude giù nella valle
I
Nella palude c’è un buco
un buco speciale, un bel buco
il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
II
Nel buco c’è un albero
un albero speciale, un bell’albero,
l’albero nel buco, e il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
III
sull’albero c’è un ramo
sul ramo un rametto
sul rametto c’è un nido
nel nido c’è un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
sulla piuma un verme
sul verme un capello
sul capello un pidocchio
sul pidocchio una zecca
sulla zecca un eczema

NOTE
1) rattling si traduce genericamente come “fine” cioè “molto buono/bello”
2)  gli Irish Descendants dicono “limb” con lo stesso significato d i ramo
3) nella versione che circola a Dublino (anche se non unica, ad esempio si trova anche in Cornovaglia) diventa a flea (una pulce)

PREN AR Y BRYN

La versione gallese ha due percorsi associativi che hanno come centro l’albero, viene da pensare all’albero cosmico, l’albero della vita: l’albero che sta sulla collina che è nella valle accanto al mare. Così dice il refrain, mentre la seconda catena parte dall’albero e va al ramo, al nido, all’uovo, all’uccello alle piume, e al letto. E qui si ferma a volte aggiungendo una pulce per poi ritornare indietro all’albero.

Le versioni meno fanciullesche della canzone una volta arrivate al letto proseguono con considerazioni molto più carnali (la donna e l’uomo e poi il bambino che cresce e diventa adulto e dal braccio alla sua mano pianta il seme, dal quale cresce l’albero). Ancora viene in mente un modo divertente per insegnare le parole delle cose ai bambini, sempre però trasmettendo il messaggio che tutto è interconnesso e noi facciamo parte del tutto.

I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc, o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth, o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy, o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw, o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu, o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely, o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
Traduzione inglese
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea
The flea from the bed,
The bed from the feathers,
the feathers on the bird,
The bird from the egg,
The egg from the nest,
The nest on the bough,
The bough on the tree,
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
And the valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Che grande vecchio albero,
oh un bell’albero
l’albero sulla collina,
la collina nella valle,
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva
II
Dall’alvero venne un ramo
Oh bel ramo!
III
Dall’albero venne un nido,
Oh bel nido!
IV
Dal nido venneun uovo,
Oh bell’uovo!
V
Dall’uovo venne un uccello
Oh bell’uccello
VI
Dall’uovo vennero le piume;
oh belle piume
VII
dalle piume venne il letto
oh bel letto
VIII
Dal letto venne una pulce
una pulce dal letto
il letto dalle piume
le piume sull’uccello
l’uccello dall’uovo
l’uovo dal nido
il nido dal ramo
il ramo sull’albero
l’albero sulla collina
la collina nella valle
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni dal film Wicker Man


In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Nei boschi cresceva un albero
un bel bell’albero c’era
sull’abero c’era un ramo
e sul ramo c’era un rametto
sul rametto c’era un nido
nel nido c’era un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
e dalla piuma un
letto
sul letto c’era una ragazza
sulla ragazza c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo c’era un seme
e da quel seme c’era un ragazzo
e dal ragazzo c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo la tomba
dalla tomba cresceva
un albero
a Summerisle
Summerisle, Summerisle il bosco di Summerisle,
il bosco di Summerisle

NOTE
1) Summerisle è l’isola immaginaria dove si svolge il film

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

E’ la versione regionale italiana collezionata anche da Alan Lomax nel suo giro per l’Italia nel 1954. Di origine italiane Lomax era il nome dei Lomazzi emigrati in America nell’Ottocento.
Nel luglio del 1954 Alan arriva in Italia con l’intento di fissare su nastro magnetico la straordinaria varietà delle musiche della tradizione popolare italiana. Un viaggio di scoperta, dal nord al sud della penisola, a fianco del grande collega italiano Diego Carpitella che ha prodotto oltre duemila registrazioni in circa sei mesi di lavoro sul campo..

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn questa versione dall’albero si passa dai rami al nido e all’uovo e quindi all’uccellino. Il contesto è fresco, molto primaverile e pasquale.. per spiegare l’origine della vita e rispondere alle prime curiosità dei bambini sul sesso..
La canzoncina è finita nel repertorio degli scouts e nelle canzoni da oratorio e raduni giovani cattolici, ma anche tra le canzoncine dei centri-estivi e scuole dell’infanzia.

Un video trovato in rete proveniente dalla tradizione lombardo-emiliana.


In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in   mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
in mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
cʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in mezzo al prato, il prato intorno allʼalbero
e l
ʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera, allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano i brocchi, (1)i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e l’albero piantato in mezzo al prato
Attaccato ai brocchi indovina cosa c’era, cʼerano i rami, i rami attaccati ai  brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato ai rami indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano le foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
cʼera il nido, il nido in mezzo alle  foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro al nido indovina cosa cʼera,
cʼerano gli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro al nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano gli uccellini, gli uccellini dentro agli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro a nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami,
i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato

NOTE
1) è l’equivalente italiano del branch inglese: anche se in disuso il termine italiano “brocco” indica un ramo irto di spine e quindi per estensione un troncone di ramo, insomma i grossi rami che si dipartono dal tronco centrale dell’albero!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

Ovvero “The tree in the wood”, c’è un che di grembo, di riposo tombale in quel “e l’erba verde cresce tutt’intorno” ..

Luis Jordan

una versione per bambini


There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
C’era un albero
nei boschi
l’albero più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sull’albero
c’era un ramo
il ramo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sul ramo
c’era un nido
il nido più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nel nido
c’era un uvoo
l’uovo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nell’uovo
c’era un uccello
l’uccello più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
e sull’uccello
c’ara un ala
l’ala più graziosa
che si sia mai vista
e l’ala sull’uccello
l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.

FONTI
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf