Archivi tag: Martin Hayes

Corn Rigs are bonnie

Leggi in italiano

Corn Rigs  (Rigs o’Barley) was written entirely by Robert Burns in 1782 adapting it to an old Scottish dance air entitled “Corn Rigs are bonnie“. It seems to be particularly dear to the poet: it tells of the night of love with a beautiful girl among the sheaves of wheat, a magical full moon night…

The Annie of the song has been identified in Anne Rankie, the youngest daughter of a tenant farmer, John Rankine of Adamhill, of the farm that was a short distance from the Burns in Lochlea. In 1782, in September, the woman married a innkeeper, John Merry of Cumnock, so some doubt that in August she was among the sheaves of barley with the handsome Robert; others, however, point out that after 4 years (and once again in August) the poet, being in the neighborhood, was staying right at the inn of the two!
Burns gave Anne Rankie a lock of his hair and his portrait, which she kept together with the song.
Very bravely Burns, however, is silent on the identity of the beautiful Annie.

William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865
William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865

LAMMAS NIGHT

rigsThe analysis of the text unravels the dynamics of the relationship between the two lovers (according to my point of view): the night of Lammas, as usual in the Celtic tradition, is the night of August 1, a day of celebration for the farmers of the Scotland, day of rest and party before the beginning of the harvest.
Among the young it was customary to spend the night in the fields of wheat (or barley) but our Robert at first keeps away from such custom, the beautiful Annie is promised to another …
However, the youthful ardor finally wins and even the girl (without even being asked too much, reveals the bard) consents: the two meet in the fields of barley, at dusk, on a warm summer evening with the moon full to illuminate the night, and what a “happy night”!
The final verse takes up a concept dear to the poet: the best time is spent to love! And on that magical night it seems that the young Robert did it three times!

Ossian from Seal Song 1981 with the traditional Corn Rigs Are Bonnie melody, the video is very well done with the scrolling text, movies and vintage photos as well as “portraits” of the bard, all well structured in the evocation for images of the text

Paul Giovanni from The Wicker Man but with another melody

I
It was upon a Lammas(1) night,
When the corn rigs(2) were bonnie,
Beneath the moon’s unclouded light,
I held awa’ to Annie;
The time flew by wi’ tentless heed,
‘Til ‘tween the late and early,
Wi’ small persuasion she agreed
To see me thro’ the barley.
chorus
Corn Rigs and barley rigs,
Corn rigs are bonny:
I’ll ne’eer forget that happy night,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.
II
The sky was blue (3), the wind was still,
The moon was shining clearly;
I set her down wi’ right good will,
Amang the rigs o’ barley:
I ken’t(4) her heart, was a’ my ain(5);
I loved her most sincerely;
I kissed her o’er and o’er again,
Amang the rigs o’ barley.
III
I locked her in my fond embrace;
Her heart was beatin’ rarely:
My blessing on that happy place,
Amang the rigs o’ barley!
But by the moon and stars so bright,
That shone that hour so clearly!
She aye shall bless that happy night
Amang the rigs of barley.
IV
I hae been blythe(6) wi’ comrades dear;
I hae been merry drinking;
I hae been joyful gath’rin’ gear(7);
I hae been happy thinking:
But a’ the pleasures e’er I saw,
Tho’ three times doubled fairly,
That happy night was worth them a’,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.

NOTES
1) Lammas is the harvest festival that is celebrated on the first of August, whose origins date back to the Celtic festival of Lugnasad, a festival that marks the beginning of the first harvest (wheat and barley). In the Scottish country tradition it is like our day in San Martino, when the land is rented and the contracts are renewed.(see more)
2) The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows.
3) the indicated hour is that of twilight
4) knew
5) own
6) joyous
7) earning money

MELODY

Alasdair Fraser · Paul Machlis · Barry Phillips · Martin Hayes

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE

This song is best known with the title of Corn Rigs or Corn Rigs Are Bonnie and it is also a scottish country dance (see more) taken from the old traditions. During the harvest it was customary to dance among the sheaves of wheat, as shown in this vintage movie by the Royal Scottish Country Dance Society.
VIDEO

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://giulsass.wordpress.com/istruzione/esperienza-antica/gest_terra_p_s/

LIMERICK LAMENTATION OR LOCHABER NO MORE?

Un lamento irlandese o scozzese?
La paternità della slow air è contesa tra Irlanda e Scozia,  secondo Bunting (Ancient Music of Ireland, 1840)  fu composta dal bardo irlandese-arpista Myles O’Reilly  (c. 1635) per commemorare la partenza dei giovani irlandesi dopo il trattato di Limerick (1691); secondo O’Neill (Irish Minstrels and Musicians, 1913) il compositore fu Thomas Connellan (c.1640-45 – 1698) Cloonmahon, contea di Sligo che la intitolò “The Breach of Aughrim”.
La melodia è toccante, da far sgorgar le lacrime per la sua mestizia..

MARBHNA (CAOINEADH) LUIMNI

It is sad and lone I am today, far from dear Erin’s shore
I may never, never, never see her again; I may never see her more.
In Irlanda oggi il brano è eseguito in versione strumentale occasionalmente suonato ai funerali o come emigration song.
ASCOLTA The Chieftains in “The Chieftains live” 1977

ASCOLTA Sharon Shannon & Liam O Maoinli

ASCOLTA Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill

ASCOLTA Na Casaidigh

LOCHABER NO MORE

In Scozia già popolare lament per cornamusa, la slow air venne versificata da Allan Ramsay  nel 1723, come il lamento di un highlander in partenza per  combattere tra le fila dei ribelli (la ribellione giacobita del 1715 vedi)

(c) The Fleming Collection; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

ASCOLTA Breabach

ASCOLTA  The Rankin Family


I
Farewell to Lochaber (1), farewell to my Jean,
Where heartsome wi’ her (thee) I ha’e mony day been,
For Lochaber no more, Lochaber no more,
We’ll maybe return to Lochaber no more.
These tears that I shed they are all for my dear,
And no’ for the dangers attending on weir (2);
Tho’ borne on rough seas to a far distant (bloody) shore.
Maybe to return to Lochaber no more.
II
Though hurricanes rise, though rise ev’ry wind,
No tempest can equal the storm in my mind;
Tho loudest of thunders or louder waves roar,
There’s nothing like leavin’ my love on the shore.
To leave thee behind me, my heart is sair pain’d,
But by ease that’s inglorious no fame can be gain’d;
And beauty and love’s the reward of the brave,
And I maun deserve it before I can crave.
III
Then glory, my Jeanie, maun plead my excuse,
Since honour commands me, how can I refuse?
Without it I ne’er can have merrit for thee;
And losing thy favour, I’d better not be.
I go then, my lass, to win honour and fame;
And if I should chance to come gloriously hame,
I’ll bring a heart to thee, with love running o’er,
And then I’ll leave thee an’ Lochaber no more.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Addio Lochaber, e addio
mia Jean
dove ho trascorso con te molti giorni felici
perchè lascio  Lochaber, lascio Lochaber
e forse non ritornerò mai più a Lochaber.
Queste lacrime che verso, sono tutte per la mia cara
e non per i pericoli che mi attendono in guerra
trasportato dal mare ribelle in una spiaggia lontana (di sangue)
forse non ritornerò mai più a Lochaber.
II
Anche se gli uragani si levano, anche se si solleva il vento
nessuna tempesta può eguagliare la bufera nella mia anima,
più rumorosa dei tuoni o del ruggito delle onde più alte,
non c’è niente di come lasciare il mio amore sulla spiaggia.
Lasciarti indietro, il mio cuore è pieno di dolore,
ma con la cautela del senza gloria nessuna fama si può ottenere;
e la beltà e l’amore sono la ricompensa per il coraggio
e li devo meritare prima di poterli desiderare.
III
Allora la gloria, mia Jean dovrà perorare la mia spiegazione,
finchè  l’onore mi comanda, come posso io rifiutare?
Senza non potrò mai meritarti
e senza il tuo favore preferisco non vivere!
Vado dunque ragazza, per vincere onore e fama
e se avessi la possibilità di ritornare gloriosamente a casa
porterò il cuore a te, traboccante d’amore
e poi non lascerò te e Lochaber mai più.

NOTE
1) Lochaber è il cuore delle Highlands, nella parte meridionale della contea di Inverness: in questa regione l’acqua è una delle protagoniste assolute, ed una delle principali ragioni della sua bellezza; fiumi, laghi, cascate, mare … è un tripudio della natura che si incontra con magia, storia e l’amore dell’uomo per la terra  che abita. (continua)
FONTI
http://www.capeirish.com/guitar-book/pdf/lim4-g.pdf
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Dictionary_of_Music_and_Musicians/Lochaber_no_more
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/14886
https://thesession.org/tunes/8973
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/lochaber.htm

http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-095,-page-96-lochaber.aspx
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_lochaber.htm

PORT NA BPUCAÍ

“Port na bpúcaí” (The Fairies’ Tune) in italiano “La melodia -lamento delle fate”, è una slow air proveniente dalle isole Blaskets, un arcipelago di isolette al largo della penisola di Dingle, nel sud-ovest del Kerry, Irlanda.

pookaIL PUCA

La parola bpúcaí si traduce come pooka o puca, il folletto irlandese popolare anche nella parte Ovest della Scozia e in Galles: è uno spirito animale solitario che predilige le terre d’altura e assume diverse forme a seconda delle leggende locali; così è descritto di volta in volta come un grande coniglio, un caprone o un cane o più spesso un cavallo. Le sue sembianze hanno però sempre qualcosa d’inquietante, sia nel colore scuro del manto che nel bagliore degli occhi.
Si ritiene che la credenza del pooka derivi da un antico culto della divinità in forma di cavallo, al quale il mondo contadino ha continuato a tributare il suo rispetto se non più la venerazione.

Come cavallo è spesso una furia che galoppa selvaggiamente di notte abbattendo recinti, calpestando i raccolti e spaventando il bestiame. Così è lo spirito selvaggio che contrasta l’avanzare della campagna antropizzata e la contiene. E tuttavia anche il pooka può essere domato dall’uomo: per ottenere ciò che si desidera bisogna utilizzare una briglia speciale intrecciata con i lunghi crini del pooka e restare in sella alla fata fino all’estremo.
Solo Brian Boru re supremo d’Irlanda riuscì nell’impresa e pooka gli promise che mai più avrebbe fatto del male ad un irlandese, ma a tre condizioni: che non fosse ubriaco, che si trovasse sul suolo irlandese e che si comportasse con rettitudine!
Eppure si sa che le fate sono creature capricciose e bugiarde e così gli irlandesi, per non rischiare di finire malamente in un burrone, preferiscono evitare di salire in groppa ad un cavallo nero nel cuore della notte..

Nelle campagne della contea di Down il pooka prende la forma di un folletto deforme e spigoloso, che pretende dai contadini la sua parte del raccolto, ma si può manifestare anche in forma umana sia maschile che femminile ai viandanti dispersi nelle lande montuose, per condurli con l’inganno fuori strada e verso la morte!

La melodia è stata composta con il violino nel 1873 da Muiris O’Dalaigh un pescatore di Blasket Island ed è nota con vari titoli: Caoineadh Na HInise, The Lament Of The Island, The Music Of The Fairies, Poirt Na BPucai, Poirt Na BPúcaí, Port Na Bpúcaí, Port Na BPucai, Port Na Bpúcai, Port Na BPucaí, Port Na BPuchai, Song Of The Pookas.

In merito all’inquietante melodia sono sorte delle leggende: in una si racconta che una coppia di Inis Mhic Uibhleáin (Inishvickillane una delle piccole isole delle Blasket) in una notte d’inverno fu svegliata da un suono insolito proveniente dal mare; all’inizio pensarono si trattasse di qualche richiamo d’uccelli, ma poi percepirono questa melodia che da allora venne chiamata  ‘The Fairies’ Lament’; altri invece raccontano che furono tre pescatori a sentire degli strani rumori che provenivano da sotto la loro barca. Uno di essi, lasciò i remi e prese il suo violino per suonare insieme alla fata.

Così il poeta irlandese premio Nobel per la letteratura nel 1995, Seamus Heaney descrive nella sua poesia “The Given Note” (1969) come la musica sia nell’aria e il musicista un tramite tra il mondo ultrasensibile e quello terreno. Egli si è ispirato proprio al racconto fatto da Sean O’ Riada nel presentare il brano “Port na bpúcaí”


The Given Note
On the most westerly Blasket
In a dry-stone hut
He got this air out of the night.
Strange noises were heard
By others who followed, bits of a tune
Coming in on loud weather
Though nothing like melody.
He blamed their fingers and ear
As unpractised, their fiddling easy
For he had gone alone into the island
And brought back the whole thing.
The house throbbed like his full violin.
So whether he calls it spirit music
Or not, I don’t care. He took it
Out of wind off mid-Atlantic.
Still he maintains, from nowhere.
It comes off the bow gravely,
Rephrases itself into the air.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
La melodia donata
Sulla più occidentale delle Blasket
in un trullo
egli prese quest’aria dalla notte.
Strani suoni furono sentiti
con gli altri compagni, pezzi di accordi
che arrivavano dal tempo impetuoso
nient’altro che una melodia.
Egli maledì le loro dita e l’udito
di inesperti e principianti,
poi se ne andò solo verso l’isola
e portò indietro tutto.
La casa vibrava come l’intero violino.
Che egli chiamasse lo spirito della musica
oppure no, non importa. La prese
dal vento del medio atlantico.
Saldo la tenne, dal nulla.
Venne via con fatica dall’archetto,
e si rapprese nell’aria.

ASCOLTA Ashley & Daniel Horn (violino e cornamusa) le bellissime immagini mostrano le isole Blaskets

ASCOLTA Cillian Vallely, uilleann pipes

ASCOLTA arrangiamento per violino con Martin Hayes  & Dennis Cahill

ASCOLTA Cormac Breatnach low whistle

ASCOLTA Aoife O’Dowd arpa celtica

Il lamento del pooka di questa canzone richiama però il canto delle megattere. “Un canto misterioso percorre gli abissi marini, si propaga scivolando lungo canali invisibili, e va lontano, molto lontano.
Lo si sente, sott’acqua, a chilometri di distanza, ma anche i marinai che riposano nelle stive possono udirlo, con sorpresa ed angoscia. Lo hanno sempre temuto come un triste presagio, associandolo alle misteriose creature marine che popolano la memoria collettiva. Mostri, piovre e serpenti giganti…
Forse il canto delle sirene, che Ulisse volle ascoltare legato all’albero maestro, non era altro che il richiamo delle balene.
Negli ultimi anni, i ricercatori si stanno interessando a questi canti, che possono fornire preziose informazioni sulla vita dei cetacei.”(tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Meav in “Silver Sea”

Is bean ón slua sí mé
Do tháinig thar toinn
Is do goideadh san oíche mé
Tamall thar lear
Is go bhfuilim as riocht so
Fé gheasa mná sí
Is ní bheidh ar an saol so
Go nglaofaidh an coileach
Is caitheadsa féin
Tabhairt fén lios isteach
Ní taithneamh liom é
Ach caithfead tabhairt fé
Is a bhfuil ar an saol so
Caithfidh imeacht as
Ach béadsa ag caoineadh’n
Fhaid a bheidh uisce sa toinn
Is ná deinig aon ní
Leis an ndream thíos sa leas…


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I am a woman from the Sí(1)
Who has come over the waves
And I was taken at night
For a while abroad
And I am in this state
Under geasa(2) of the fairy woman
And I will not be in this world
Until the cock crows(3)
And I must go
Into the lios(4)
It is no pleasure for me
But I must do it
And all that is in this life
Must leave it
But I will be keening
As long as water remains in the wave
And have no dealings
With the crowd that is down in the lios…
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
Sono una donna fatata
che è arrivata dal mare
e sono stata catturata di notte
tratta a bordo
e sono in questo stato
sotto il geis(2) di una donna fatata
e starò in questo mondo
fino al canto del gallo(3)
poi dovrò andare
verso la collina delle fate(4).
Non mi diverto
ma devo farlo
e tutto ciò che c’è in questa vita
lo devo lasciare
ma sarò rimpianta
finchè ci sarà acqua nell’onda
e avrò contatti
con la gente che vive sotto il tumulo

NOTE
1) Altrove
2) una sorta di tabù=  uno speciale obbligo o una proibizione, che mette una persona sotto una specie di incantesimo, o che comunque la lega come ad un voto. Un geis si può paragonare ad una maledizione, ma anche – paradossalmente – ad un “dono”. Chi infrange il proprio geis è destinato ad essere “punito”, disonorato, a volte perfino a morire. D’altra parte il rispetto dei propri geas asi pensava portasse potere e fortuna. In genere sono le donne che pongono i geasa sugli uomini, a volte poi rivelandosi dee o figure soprannaturali. (tratto da wikipedia)
3) il canto del gallo ha il potere di far svanire i fantasmi e gli incubi notturni
4) leas ‎(“the space about a dwelling-house or houses enclosed by a bank or rampart”) è un hillfort ovvero un luogo fortificato e per estensione un tumulo fatato, il luogo in cui dimorano i folletti

ASCOLTA Noirin Ni Riain in una rielaborazione new-age della melodia

FONTI
http://mystsofeyr.com/index.php/races/non-native-races/mystfolk/pooka
http://irelandofthewelcomes.com/tales-of-the-pooka/
https://julianpeterscomics.com/2015/07/02/the-given-note-by-seamus-heaney/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/meav/port.htm
https://thesession.org/tunes/1811
https://thesession.org/discussions/1669
https://harptoharp.com/product/song-of-the-pooka-port-na-bpucai/

THE EWE WITH THE CROOKED HORN

la piccola pecora (yowie) dal lungo corno

Il soggetto di questa canzone tradizionale scozzese -Yowie (Ewe) wi’ the crookit horn- è apparentemente una pecora rubata e il pastore si lamenta per la sua perdita; leggendo tra le righe la nostra “pecora” è invece un “pot still“,  con cui il moonshiner  produce il whisky illegale (=illicit still): l’alambicco  assomiglia ad una specie di tinozza portatile chiusa con un  un lungo “corno storto” (il distillatore) .

The Highland Whisky Still, 1826-9 Sir Edwin Henry Landseer

Il testo è del reverendo John Skinner (1721-1807) su un vecchio reel  e nella sua versione (trascritta nello Scots Musical Museum, vol III) la “ewie” è decisamente solo una pecora, ma le versioni più antiche come quelle preservate nelle comunità dei Travellers contengono strofe ben più esplicite (ASCOLTA Lucy Stewart  oppure  Jeannie Robertson -per il testo qui ).

ASCOLTA Gordeanna McCulloch in Sheath & Knife 1997 (strofe I, IV, V, VI, IX, X, XII)

ASCOLTA TheTannahill Weavers in Arnish Light, 2006 (su Spotify qui) (strofe I, II, III,  VII, VIII, IX, XIin un’arrangiamento molto cadenzato


I
Were I (but) able tae rehearse
my ewie’s praise in proper verse,
I’d sound it oot as loud and fierce
as ever piper’s drone(1) could blaw.
Ewie wi’ the crookit horn (2),
and a’ that kent her might hae sworn,
Sic a ewie ne’er was born,
here aboots nor far awa’.
(II
I neither needed tar nor keel,
to mark upon her hip or heel,
Her crooked horn it did as weel
tae ken her by amang them a’.
III
She never threatened scab nor rot,
but keepit aye her ane jog trot,
Baith tae the fauld and tae the cot
was never sweir tae lead nor ca’.)
IV
A better or a thriftier beast,
Nae honest man could weel hae wist,
For, silly thing(3), she never mist
To hae ilk’ year a lamb or twa’
V
The first she had I gae to Jock,
To be to him a kind o’ stock
And now the laddie has a flock
O’ mair nor thirty head ava’
VI
The neist I gae to Jean an noo
The bairn’s sae braw, wi faulds so fu’
That lads sae thick come her tae woo,
They’re fain tae sleep on haw or straw.
(VII
When ither ewies lap the dyke,
and ate the kail for a’ the tyke,
My ewie never played the like but stayed ahint the barnie wa’.
VIII
I lookit aye at even for her,
lest mishanter should come ower her,
Or the foumart(4) should devour her,
gin the beastie bade awa’.)
IX
But last week(5), for a’ my keeping(6),
-Wha can speak it without greeting (7)
A villain cam when I was sleeping,
Sta’ my ewie, horn and a’
X
I never met wi sic a turn,
At e’en I had baith yow and horn,
Safe steekit up, but gain the morn,
Baith yow and horn were flown awa.
(XI
I socht her sair upon the morn,
and doon aneath a buss o’ thorn,
I got my ewie’s crooked horn,
but my ewie was awa’.)
XII
O! a’ ye bards benorth Kinghorn(8),
Call your muses up and mourn,
Our Ewie wi’ the crookit horn
Stown frae ‘s, and fell’d and a’!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Oh se fossi capace di lodare
la mia pecora con versi appropriati, li canterei forte e con fierezza, come mai bordone potrebbe suonare.
La pecora con il corno storto,
e tutti coloro che la conoscevano avrebbero giurato che una pecora così non si era mai vista da nessuna parte
II
Non c’era bisogno di catrame o ocra
per marchiarle il fianco o il tallone
il suo corno storto faceva del suo meglio per distinguerla tra tutte
III
Non ha mai preso la scabbia o il marciume, ma tenuta al passo
sia nell’ovile che nel rifugio
non era mai pigra da comandare o chiamare)
IV
Una bestia migliore o più frugale
nessun brav’uomo avrebbe rifiutato perchè non ha mai fatto mistero, di avere ogni anno, un agnello o due
V
Il primo che ebbe lo diedi a Jack
perchè si facesse una scorta
e ora il ragazzo ha un gregge
di più di trenta capi
VI
Il successivo lo diedi a Jean e ora la balia è così brava, gli ovili pieni, quei ragazzoni la vogliono corteggiare e si divertono a dormire nel fieno o nella paglia
(VII
Le altre pecore scavalcavano gli argini e mangiavano il cavolo nonostante il cane, la mia pecora non si è mai comportata così, ma restava nel recinto.
VIII
La tenevo sempre d’occhio, per paura che il diavolo se la prendesse o la faina la divorasse se la bestia si allontanava)
IX
La settimana scorsa ero nel capanno-chi ne parlerebbe senza un lamento?- un furfante venne mentre dormivo e rubò la mia pecora con il corno.
X
Non mi è mai capitato un tale colpo
alla sera avevo sia pecora che corno, al sicuro e al chiuso, ma arrivato il mattino, sia pecora che corno erano scomparsi
(XI
La cercai al mattino presto
e sotto a un cespuglio di rovi
trovai il corno storto della pecora
ma la mia pecora era svanita)
XII
Voi tutti bardi a nord di Kinghorn
chiamate le vostre muse e piangete
la nostra pecora con il corno  storto
che ci hanno rubato e abbattuto.

NOTE
1) il bordone è una canna collegata alla sacca della cornamusa, nelle Great Highland Bagpipe ci sono tre drones che emettono un suono continuo (il suono di bordone)
2) il pot still
3) cosa stupida, da considerarsi come una esclamazione con il senso di “che sciocchezza”
4) fumart o fourmart è un termine usato sia per indicare un animale selvatico di piccola taglia (puzzola, molfetta) che un uomo cattivo e pericoloso
5) i Tannies dicono “Yet Monday last”
6) Keeping in generale è un deposito, e si può intendere come riparo di fortuna, rifugio indicando sia un capanno che un ovile
7) oppure I canna speak o’t without greeting
8) Kinghorn, è una città del Fife, Scozia, si trova 3 km a sud di Kirkcaldy, sulla sponda nord del Firth of Forth di fronte a Edimburgo.

LA MELODIA

La melodia è uno strathspey con un testo in dialetto scozzese dal titolo “The Yowie (ewie) wi the Crookit Horn”, mentre la versione irlandese s’intitola più comunemente “Ewe reel” anche se è suonata come un hornpipe

TITOLI: Ewe Reel, The / Ríl na Fóisce / Ewe Reel / The Ewe / Ewe / The Yew Reel / The Ewe with the Crooked Horn / The Ram with the Crooked Horn / Bob with the One Horn / The Foe Reel / Green Blanket / The Green Blanket / The Red Blanket / Miss Huntly’s / Marquis of Huntley / Go See the Fun / Sweet Roslea and the Sky over it / The Pretty Girl in Danger / My Love Is Far Away / The Kerry Lasses / The Merry Lasses / The Lowlands of Scotland / Peter Street.

Deaf Shepherd

Mary MacNamara & Martin Hayes

ASCOLTA qui

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/theyowiewithecrookithorn.html
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/gd/fullrecord/75864/1;jsessionid=4F413B0C523F525C48BDA06EFAAA3898
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/76690/9;jsessionid=329AE05551069D3B82A96C4304979E41
http://www.ramshornstudio.com/crookit_horn.htm
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=57117
https://thesession.org/tunes/5610
https://thesession.org/tunes/3438
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/39053/
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/1226lyr4.htm
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Ewie_Wi’_the_Crooked_Horn_(1)_(The)
http://svenax.net/files/sheetmusic/strathspeys/ewe_with_the_crooked_horn.pdf
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Ewie_wi%27_the_Crookit_Horn
http://www.spiersfamilygroup.co.uk/Yowie%20wi%20the%20crookit%20horn.pdf
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/K271.html
http://www.bagpipe-tutorials.com/crooked-horn.html
http://www.bdot-inc.com/crooked-horn.pdf
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah03/ah03_16.htm

Rigs o’Barley: Corn Rigs Are Bonnie

Read the post in English

Questa canzone è stata scritta interamente da Robert Burns nel 1782 adattandola ad una vecchia aria scozzese da danza dal titolo “Corn Rigs are bonnie“. Pare fosse particolarmente cara al poeta: si racconta della notte d’amore con una bella fanciulla tra i covoni di grano, una magica notte di luna piena…

L’Annie della canzone è stata identificata in Anne Rankie, la più giovane figlia di un fittavolo, John Rankine di Adamhill, della fattoria che si trovava a poca distanza da quella dei Burns a Lochlea. Nel 1782, nel mese di settembre, la donna sposò un oste, John Merry di Cumnock, per cui alcuni dubitano che ad agosto si trovasse tra i covoni d’orzo con il bel Robert; altri però fanno notare che dopo 4 anni (e ancora una volta ad agosto) il poeta, trovatosi nei paraggi, alloggiasse proprio presso la locanda dei due! Possiamo quindi essere certi che Annie e Robert si fossero frequentati, tant’è  che Burns le regalò una ciocca di capelli e un suo ritratto, che lei conservò insieme alla canzone.
Molto cavallerescamente Burns tace però sull’identità della bella Annie.

William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865
William Adolphe Bouguereau 1865

LA NOTTE DI LAMMAS

rigsL’analisi del testo dipana la dinamica della relazione tra i due amanti (secondo il mio punto di vista): la notte di Lammas, come consuetudine della tradizione celtica, è la notte della vigilia del 1 agosto, giorno di festa per i contadini della Scozia, giorno di riposo e festa prima dell’inizio del raccolto.
Tra i giovani era consuetudine passare la notte nei campi di grano (o di orzo) ma il nostro Robert in un primo momento si tiene alla larga da tale usanza, la bella Annie è promessa ad un altro…
Tuttavia l’ardore giovanile alla fine vince e anche la fanciulla (senza neanche farsi pregare troppo, ci rivela il bardo) acconsente: i due si incontrano tra i campi d’orzo, al crepuscolo, in una calda sera d’estate con la luna piena a rischiarare la notte, e che “happy night”!
La strofa finale riprende un concetto caro al poeta: il tempo migliore è quello speso ad amare! E in quella magica notte sembra che il giovane Robert lo abbia fatto per tre volte!

Ossian in Seal Song 1981 con la melodia tradizionale Corn Rigs Are Bonnie, il video è molto ben fatto con il testo che scorre, filmati e foto d’epoca nonchè “ritratti” del bardo, tutto ben strutturato nell’evocazione per immagini del testo

Paul Giovanni per il film The Wicker Man (in italiano Il prescelto) con un’altra melodia


I
It was upon a Lammas(1) night,
When the corn rigs(2) were bonnie,
Beneath the moon’s unclouded light,
I held awa’ to Annie;
The time flew by wi’ tentless heed,
‘Til ‘tween the late and early,
Wi’ small persuasion she agreed
To see me thro’ the barley.
chorus
Corn Rigs and barley rigs,
Corn rigs are bonny:
I’ll ne’eer forget that happy night,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.
II
The sky was blue (3), the wind was still,
The moon was shining clearly;
I set her down wi’ right good will,
Amang the rigs o’ barley:
I ken’t(4) her heart, was a’ my ain(5);
I loved her most sincerely;
I kissed her o’er and o’er again,
Amang the rigs o’ barley.
III
I locked her in my fond embrace;
Her heart was beatin’ rarely:
My blessing on that happy place,
Amang the rigs o’ barley!
But by the moon and stars so bright,
That shone that hour so clearly!
She aye shall bless that happy night
Amang the rigs of barley.
IV
I hae been blythe(6) wi’ comrades dear;
I hae been merry drinking;
I hae been joyful gath’rin’ gear(7);
I hae been happy thinking:
But a’ the pleasures e’er I saw,
Tho’ three times doubled fairly,
That happy night was worth them a’,
Amang the rigs wi’ Annie.
traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Era la notte di Lammas(1)
quando le porche(2) del grano erano belle, sotto la piena luce della luna,
me ne andai da Annie;
il tempo scorreva senza pensieri
finchè da un momento all’altro,
senza farsi pregare troppo, acconsentì
a vedermi in mezzo all’orzo
RITORNELLO
Porche di grano e d’orzo,
le porche di grano sono belle:
mai dimenticherò quella notte felice
tra le porche con Annie
II
Il cielo era azzurro(3), il vento tranquillo,
chiara la luna splendeva;
la stesi di buona voglia
tra le porche dell’orzo:
sapevo che il suo cuore era tutto mio,
l’amai nel modo più sincero;
la baciai ancora e ancora di nuovo,
tra le porche dell’orzo
III
La imprigionai nel mio appassionato abbraccio, il cuore le batteva appena:
benedetto quel luogo propizio
in mezzo alle porche dell’orzo!
E anche la luna e le stelle così luminose
che in quell’ora brillavano così chiaramente!
Si, lei benedirà quella notte felice
in mezzo alle porche dell’orzo
IV
Sono stato bene con i miei cari amici,
sono stato a bere in allegria
e con gioia i soldi ho guadagnato
e sono stato felice a pensare:
ma tutti i piaceri che abbia mai provato,
sebbene raddoppiati tre volte,
quella notte allegra tutti li valeva
in mezzo alle porche con Annie

NOTE
1) Lammas è la festa del raccolto che si celebra il primo agosto le cui origini risalgono alla festa celtica di Lugnasad, una festa che segna l’inizio del primo raccolto (grano e orzo). Nella tradizione contadina scozzese è come il nostro giorno di San Martino, quando vengono pagati i terreni in affitto e si rinnovano i contratti. (vedi scheda)
2) Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche” una tecnica colturale che prevedeva la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate, ed era il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale del tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare, il mugellese, che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto dimensione opportuna.
3) l’ora indicata è quella del crepuscolo
4) knew
5) own
6) joyous
7) earning money= guadagnare soldi

LA MELODIA

Alasdair Fraser · Paul Machlis · Barry Phillips · Martin Hayes

LA SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE

Il brano è più conosciuto con il titolo di Corn Rigs o Corn Rigs Are Bonnie ed è anche una danza, una scottish country dance (vedi scheda danza) presa dalle vecchie tradizioni o dalla vita quotidiana della società di una volta dedita alla pastorizia e all’agricoltura. Durante il raccolto era consuetudine danzare tra i covoni di grano, come mostrato in questo filmato d’epoca dalla Royal Scottish Country Dance Society.
VIDEO

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lugnasad.html
https://giulsass.wordpress.com/istruzione/esperienza-antica/gest_terra_p_s/

MORNING DEW

Con questo titolo generico “My Morning Dew”, “The May Morning Dew” o anche solo “Morning Dew” si indicano diverse canzoni e anche brani strumentali della tradizione celtica

Morning_Dew_III_by_Nitrok

Inizio come sempre dalla melodia

MAY MORNING DEW: SLOW AIR O REEL?

“The May Morning Dew” è il titolo di una slow air (vedi)

ASCOLTA Davy Spillane in “The Storm”, 1985

ASCOLTA Patrick Ball e la sua magica arpa dalle corde di metallo (la seconda melodia è The Butterfly jig)

ASCOLTA Mick O’Brien all’uilleann pipes

“Morning Dew” è anche un popolarissimo reel, generalmente in tre parti conosciuto anche con il nome di Giorria Sa BhFraoch, Hare Among The Heather o Hare In The Heather “Morning Dew [1]” has been one of the more popular reels in recent decades, although the title seems a relatively modern appellation. It was printed by James Kerr in Scotland as “Hare Among the Heather (The)” in the 1880’s, and it was recorded under that title by Margret Barry and County Sligo fiddler Michael Gorman in 1956. A portion of the tune was used by Chieftains piper Paddy Moloney for his first film score, Ireland Moving. Accordion player Luke O’Malley’s version starts with the part that usually appears as the 3rd part in most other versions (Kerr’s version also starts on another part). (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA il violino di Martin Hayes & Dennis Cahill

The Chieftains, live

MAY MORNING DEW AIR

La May Morning Dew (air) è una melodia tradizionale irlandese dalla tristezza infinita, che accompagna il canto di una persona molto anziana la quale, alla vista della vallata natia, richiama i ricordi dei tempi passati: e con essi la tristezza per il vuoto lasciato dalla perdita degli affetti.
La stagione della primavera è ricordata con rimpianto come la stagione della giovinezza ormai sfiorita e le lacrime cadono come rugiada del mattino.

La melodia è molto popolare nella zona Ovest della contea di Clare (Munster, costa occidentale) raccolta in “Around the Hills of Clare” , 2004 (vedi): This song, evoking old age and the passing of time, while being very popular in West Clare, does not seem to have been recorded from traditional singers very often elsewhere; the only other two versions listed by Roud being from Ann Jane Kelly of Keady, Armagh in 1952 and Paddy Tunney of Beleek, Fermanagh in 1965. (tratto da qui)

The Chieftains in “Water from the Well“, 2000


I
How pleasant in winter
To sit by the hob(1)
Just listening to the barks
And the howls of the dog
Or to walk through the green fields
Where wild daisies grew
To pluck the wild flowers
In the may morning dew
II
When summer is coming
When summer is near
With the trees oh so green
And the sky bright and clear
And the wee birds all singing
Their loved ones to woo
And young flowers all springing
In the may morning dew(2)
III
I remember the old folk
All now dead and gone
And likewise my two brothers
Young Dennis and John
How we ran o’er the heather
The wild hare to pursue
And the proud deer we hunted
In the may morning dew
IV
Of the house I was born in
There’s but a stone on the stone
And now all ‘round the garden
Wild thistles have grown
And gone are the neighbours(3)
That I once knew
No more will we wander
Through the may morning dew
tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Com’è piacevole in Inverno
sedersi al focolare
e ascoltare il cane
che abbia e ulula
o camminare per i verdi campi
dove crescono le margherite selvatiche, a raccogliere i fiori
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
II
Quando l’estate è in arrivo
quando l’estate è vicina
con gli alberi così verdi
e il cielo luminoso e chiaro
e tutti gli uccellini cantano
per corteggiare le innamorate
e tutti i fiori sbocciano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
III
Mi ricordo i vecchi
che sono morti e andati
così come i miei due fratelli,
il giovane Dennis e John
come correvamo sull’erica
per catturare la lepre
e cacciare il cervo fiero
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
IV
La casa dove sono nato
non è che pietra su pietra
e in tutto il giardino
sono cresciuti i cardi selvatici
e se ne sono andati tutti i vicini
che conoscevo un tempo
non potremo più andare in giro
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio

NOTE
1) hob piano di cottura dei camini di un tempo
2) tutta la strofa è tipica dei canti del Maggio, quando le allegre brigate dei giovani andavano nei boschi a raccogliere fiori e ramoscelli da portare in paese per far entrare il Maggio nelle case. continua
3) qui si accenna allo spopolamento del paese e il senso di abbandono del luogo si riverbera sulla condizione della vecchiaia

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane


I
How pleasant in winter
to sit by the hearth
Listening to the barks
and the howls of the dog
Or in summer to wander
the wide valleys through
And to pluck the wild flowers
in the May morning dew.
II
Summer is coming,
oh summer is here
With leaves on the trees
and the sky blue and clear
And the birds they are singing
their fond notes so true
And the flowers they are springing
in the May morning dew(2)
III
The house I was reared in
is but a stone on a stone
And all round the garden
the weeds they have grown
And all the kind neighbours
that ever I knew
Like the red rose they’ve withered
in the May morning dew
IV
God be with the old folks
who are now dead and gone
And likewise my brothers,
young Dennis and John
As they tripped through the heather
the wild hare to pursue
As their joys they were mingled
in the May morning dew
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Com’è piacevole in Inverno
sedersi al focolare
e ascoltare il cane
che abbia e ulula
o in Estate camminare
per le ampie valli
a raccogliere i fiori
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
II
L’estate è in arrivo
l’estate è qui
con le foglie sugli alberi
e il cielo luminoso e chiaro
e tutti gli uccelli cantano
le loro melodie appassionate e sincere
e tutti i fiori sbocciano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
III
Ma la casa dove sono cresciuto
non è che pietra su pietra
e in tutto il giardino
sono cresciute le erbacce
e tutti i vicini cordiali
che ho mai conosciuto
come la rosa rossa sono appassiti
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio
IV
Dio sia con i vecchi
che sono morti e andati
così come i miei fratelli,
il giovane Dennis e John
mentre corrono sull’erica
per catturare la lepre
quando le loro gioie si univano
nella rugiada del mattino di Maggio

FONTI
https://thesession.org/tunes/8547
https://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/songs/themaymorningdew.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31905
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Morning_Dew_(1)_(The)
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_oconway.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_khayes.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_jlyons.htm
http://www.clarelibrary.ie/eolas/coclare/songs/cmc/may_morning_dew_pegmcmahon.htm

Il Maggio in Irlanda: il canto di Beltane

Read the post in English

Il canto ha molti titoli: Amhran Na Bealtaine, Samhradh, Summertime, Thugamur Fein An Samhradh Linn (We Brought The Summer With Us, We Have Brought The Summer In). Oggi viene comunemente chiamata Beltane Song

Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905
Charles Daniel Ward: Processing of Spring -1905

AMHRAN NA BEALTAINE

Il brano potrebbe risalire al tardo Medioevo e la sua prima traccia si trova nei festeggiamenti  popolari per lo sbarco di James Butler Duca di Ormonde nel 1662, nominato Lord Luogotenente d’Irlanda. E’ un canto tradizionale nella parte sud-est dell’Ulster (Irlanda del Nord) ed era cantato da gruppi di giovani che andavano di casa in casa a portare il ramo di Maggio (mummers, mayers- vedi).
Molto probabilmente questo era un canto di questua per ottenere   del cibo o bevande in cambio del ramo di biancospino o del prugnolo  da lasciare davanti alla porta . Con questo gesto benaugurale si proteggono gli abitanti dalle fate. Era convinzione che le fate non potessero superare tali barriere fiorite. continua

Il brano è ancora molto popolare in Irlanda  in particolare nella regione di Oriel (che include parti delle contee di Louth, Monaghan e Armagh) ed è eseguito sia in versione strumentale che cantato.
Edward Bunting afferma che il brano era suonata nell’area di Dublino fin dal 1633.
MELODIA TRASCRITTA DA EDWARD BUNTING


The Chieftains , questa versione strumentale è un inno alla gioia, un canto di uccelli che si risvegliano al richiamo della primavera: inizia il flauto irlandese appoggiandosi all’arpa, che trilla nel crescendo (a imitazione del canto dell’allodola) ripreso in canone dai vari strumenti a fiato (il flauto irlandese, il whistle e la uillean pipes) e dal violino, grandioso!

ASCOLTA  Gloaming  2012 con il titolo di Samhradh Samhradh (al violino Martin Hayes)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin in A Stór Is A Stóirín 1994 

Gelico irlandese
I
Bábóg na Bealtaine, maighdean an tSamhraidh,
Suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann,
Cailíní maiseacha bán-gheala gléasta,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Sèist
Samhradh, samhradh, bainne na ngamhna,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí na nóinín glégeal,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.

II
Thugamar linn é ón gcoill chraobhaigh,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Samhradh buí ó luí na gréine,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
III
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm ‘sag luascadh sna spéartha,
Áthas do lá is bláth ar chrann.
Tá an chuach is an fhuiseog ag seinm le pléisiúr,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Traduzione inglese*
I
Mayday doll(1),
maiden of Summer (2)
Up every hill
and down every glen,
Beautiful girls,
radiant and shining,
We have brought the Summer in.
CHORUS
Summer, Summer,
milk of the calves(3),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(4) summer
of clear bright daisies,
We have brought the Summer in.
II
We brought it in
from the leafy woods(5),
We have brought the Summer in.
Yellow(6) Summer
from the time of the sunset(7),
We have brought the Summer in.
III
The lark(8) is singing
and swinging around in the skies,
Joy for the day
and the flower on the trees.
The cuckoo and the lark
are singing with pleasure,
We have brought the Summer in.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
La Fanciulla del Maggio
fanciulla dell’Estate
su per ogni collina
e giù per ogni valle
(noi) Belle Ragazze,
solari e splendenti
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
CORO
Estate, estate,
il latte dei vitelli
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate.
Gialla estate
di chiare e luminose margherite
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
II
L’abbiamo portata
dai boschi frondosi,
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate.
Gialla estate
a partire dal tramonto
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
III
L’allodola canta
e sfreccia nel cielo
Gioia per il giorno
e gli alberi in fiore
Il cuculo e l’allodola
cantano con gioia
Abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

NOTE
* da qui
garlan-may-day1) la Bábóg è la bambola (fanciulla) di Primavera. Brídeóg era la “piccola Bride“, (Brigit, o Brigantia in Britannia, una dea trina -Vergine, Madre, Crona) tra le più importanti del pantheon celtico, la fanciulla del grano confezionata dalle donne a Imbolc (il primo febbraio) con il grano avanzato dall’ultimo covone della mietitura dell’anno passato, ossia la giovane Dea della Primavera, un forte simbolo di rinascita nel ciclo di morte-vita in cui si perpetua la Natura: nella bambolina si era trasferito lo spirito del grano che non moriva con la mietitura. Le bamboline di Brigid venivano anche vestite con un abito bianco o decorate con pietre, nastri e fiori e portate in processione per tutto il paese affinchè ciascuno lasciasse un dono alla piccola Bride.
La bambolina ricomparirà nelle celebrazioni vittoriane del Maggio, questa volta come vera a propria bambola biancovestita posta tra una corona di fiori e nastri appesa ad un asta e portata in giro per il paese dai Mayers (i maggiolanti). continua
2) samhradh nel contesto è il nome dato alla ghirlanda fiorita portata di casa in casa con l’effige della Bábóg
3)  il latte delle mucche per i vitellini. Il giorno del Maggio è chiamato  na Beal tina ossia il giorno del fuoco di Beal, consacrato quindi al dio Bel o Belenos. Alla vigilia si accendevano grandi fuochi e si faceva passare il bestiame tra di essi – come era l’antica usanza dei Celti – usanza conservata ancora nelle campagne irlandesi con la convinzione che ciò impedisse al Piccolo Popolo- in particolare ai folletti molto ghiotti di latte – di fare brutti scherzi come intrecciare le code delle mucche o rubare il latte
4) i fiori che venivano raccolti erano per lo più gialli per richiamare il colore e il calore del sole. Fiori e rami fioriti erano posti sulla soglia di casa e ai davanzali delle finestre per proteggere gli abitanti dalle fate e come auspicio di buona sorte. Era convinzione che le fate non potessero superare tali barriere fiorite. Tale tradizione era tipica dell’Irlanda del Nord. I bambini soprattutto andavano a raccogliere i fiori selvatici per preparare delle ghirlande, specialmente con fiori dal colore giallo.
5) il greenwood, il bosco più inviolato e sacro sede degli antichi rituali celtici dal quale le ragazze hanno tagliato i rami del Maggio (in altre versioni testuali indicati come branches of the forest) ossia i rami di biancospino o di prugnolo

Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson
Bringing Home the May, 1862, Henry Peach Robinson

6) i giovani si recano nel bosco nella notte della vigilia del 1 Maggio al tramonto del sole e quindi sul far del giorno iniziano la loro questua processionale per far entrare il Maggio nel paese (continua)
7) l’allodola è un uccello sacro dal simbolismo solare (vedi simbolismo)
8) il canto del cuculo è foriero di Primavera, anche perchè una volta terminata la stagione dell’amore (fine maggio), il cuculo (maschio) non canta più (continua)

In un’altra versione testuale (vedi)

Cuileann is coll is trom is cárthain,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn
Is fuinseog ghléigeal Bhéal an Átha,
Thugamar féin an samhradh linn.
Traduziopne inglese
Holly and hazel
and elder and rowan,(1)
We have brought the Summer in.
And brightly shining ash
from Bhéal an Átha,(2)
We have brought the Summer in
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
L’agrifoglio, il nocciolo,
il sambuco e il sorbo

abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
e il bianco frassino
dalla Bocca del Guado,

abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

1) Il biancospino è una pianta delle fate come l’agrifoglio, il nocciolo, il sambuco e il sorbo, protettiva e benaugurale (probabilmente a causa delle spine molto acuminate). La tradizione del Maggio vuole in particolare che il ramo  di biancospino sia posto fuori dalla casa (appeso alle finestre e accanto all’ingresso) perché se portato in casa, soprattutto quando è fiorito, porta sfortuna. Questa accezione negativa risale al Medioevo quando i rami di biancospino erano usati come amuleti contro il malocchio, le streghe e i demoni e forse si può far risalire al vago odore putrescente dei rami, ma sicuramente è legata al tentativo della Chiesa di assimilare i riti precristiani a pratiche sataniche.  vedi
2) Bhéal an Átha letteralmente la bocca del guado è anche una località oggi nota come Ballina una città sul fiume Moy nella conta di Mayo. L’insediamento è però relativamente recente (fine XV secolo)
Na Bealtaine è più probabile che si riferisca a un toponimo Beulteine così come era chiamato il luogo della festa di Beltane al confine tra la contea di Armagh e quella di Louth, a Kilcurry, oggi ci sono solo un piccolo tumulo con le rovine di una vecchia chiesa. Tutte le versioni raccolte nell’area descrivono un raggio intorno a questa località di circa venti miglia

Bábóg na Bealtaine, altre melodie

La Lugh (Eithne Ní Uallacháin & Gerry O’Connor) in Brighid’s Kiss 1995. Questa versione con il titolo Bábóg na Bealtaine mantiene il testo originale, ma la melodia è composta da Eithne Ní Uallacháin
(strofe I, III,IV, V, VI)

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin ha reinterpraetato la canzone, già precedentemte pubblicata sulla melodia trascritta da Edward Bunting,  sulla melodia e testo come trascritti da Séamus Ennis dalla testimonianza di Mick McKeown, Lough Ross registrato su cilindo a cera (I, II, III, IV, V, VII)


I
Samhradh buí na nóiníní gléigeal,
thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn,
Ó bhaile go baile is chun ár mbaile ’na dhiaidh sin,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
(Mick McKeown version
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins na léanaí,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Samhradh buí, earrach is geimhreadh
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.)
II
Cailíní óga, mómhar sciamhach,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Buachaillí glice, teann is lúfar,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
III
Bábóg na Bealtaine, maighdean an tsamhraidh
suas gach cnoc is síos gach gleann
cailíní maiseacha, bángheala gléasta,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
IV
Tá an fhuiseog ag seinm is ag luasadh sna spéartha,
beacha is cuileoga is bláth ar na crainn,
tá’n chuach’s na héanlaith ag seinm le pléisiúr,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn
V
Tá nead ag an ghiorria ar imeall na haille,
is nead ag an chorr éisc i ngéaga an chrainn,
tá mil ar na cuiseoga is na coilm ag béiceadh,
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VI
Tá an ghrian ag loinnriú`s ag lasadh na dtabhartas,
tá an fharraige mar scathán ag gháirí don ghlinn,
tá na madaí ag peithreadh is an t-eallach ag géimni
’s thugamar fhéin an samhradh linn.
VII
Samhradh buí ’na luí ins a’ léana,
thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn;
Ó bhaile go baile is go Lios Dúnáin a’ phléisiúir,
is thugamar féin a’ samhradh linn.
Traduzione inglese*
CHORUS
Golden Summer of the white daisies,
we bring the Summer with us,
from village to village
and home again,
and we bring the Summer with us.
I Mick McKeown version
Golden summer, lying in the meadows,
we brought the summer with us;
Golden summer, spring and winter,
and we brought the summer with us.
II
Young maidens, gentle and lovely,
we brought the summer with us;
Lads who are clever, sturdy and agile,
and we brought the summer with us.
III
Beltaine dolls,
Summer maidens
Up hill and down glens
Girls adorned in pure white,
and we bring the Summer with us.
IV
The lark making music
and sky dancing
the blossomed trees laden with bees
the cuckoo and the birds
singing with joy
and we bring the Summer with us.
V
The hare nests on the edge of the cliff
the heron nests in the branches
the doves are cooing, honey on stems
and we bring the Summer with us.
VI
The shining sun is lighting the darkness
the silvery sea shines like a mirror
the dogs are barking, the cattle lowing
and we bring the Summer with us.
VII
Golden summer, lying in the meadow,
we brought the summer with us;
From home to home and to Lisdoonan of pleasure,
and we brought the summer with us.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Estate dorata delle bianche margherite
 portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
di villaggio in villaggio
e in ogni casa
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
I Versione Mick McKeown
Estate dorata tra i prati
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
estate dorata, primavera e inverno
e abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate
II
Giovani fanciulle, gentili e amabili
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
con giovani svegli, robusti  agili,
per portare l’arrivo dell’estate
III
Le Fanciulle di Beltane,
fanciulle dell’Estate
su per ogni collina e giù per ogni valle
ragazze vestite di candido bianco,
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
IV
L’allodola canta
e sfreccia nel cielo
gli alberi in fiore carichi di api
Il cuculo e gli uccelli
cantano con gioia
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
V
La lepre fa il nido sul limitare della scogliera, l’airone nei cespugli
le colombe tubano, miele sui rami
portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
VI
Il sole splendente illumina l’oscurità
il mare argentato brilla come specchio, i cani abbaiano, il bestiame muggisce portiamo l’arrivo dell’estate
VII
Estate dorata nel prato
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate;
do casa in casa alla Lisdoonan  del piacere
abbiamo portato l’arrivo dell’estate

NOTE
* tratta da qui e qui

APPROFONDIMENTO
Amhrán na Craoibhe (The Garland Song)
LA TRADIZIONE DEL MAGGIO IN IRLANDA

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/beltane-la-festa-celtica-del-maggio.html
http://songsinirish.com/samhradh-samhradh-lyrics/
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Irish/ThugamarFeinAnSamhradhLinn.html

https://thesession.org/tunes/10447

https://www.orielarts.com/songs/thugamar-fein-an-samhradh-linn/