Farewell Lovely Nancy by Cecil Sharp

Leggi in italiano

“Farewell Lovely Nancy” or “Lovely Nancy” is a traditional ballad collected in 1905 by Cecil Sharp from Mrs. Susan Williams, Somerset (England), where the handsome sailor leaving for the South Seas, dissuades his sweetheart who would like to follow him disguising herself as a cabin boy, telling her that working aboard ships is not for females!

AL Lloyd writes in the notes to the LP “A Sailor’s Garland”: To dress in sailor’s clothes and smuggle oneself aboard ship was a pretty notion that often occurred to young girls a century or two ago, if the folk songs are to be believed. This song has been widely found in the south of England, also in Ireland.”

CROSS-DRESSING BALLADS

In the sea songs we find sometimes the theme of the girl disguised as a sailor who faces the hard life of the sea for loving and adventure.
The cross-dressing ballads are in fact mostly inherent in women who go to play a male job, such as the sailor or the soldier.

Ed Harcourt in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys ANTI 2006, a very romantic, almost crepuscular version

Ian Campbell & Dave Swarbrick 1964

 John Molineaux  (live)


I.
“Fare you well me lovely Nancy
for it’s now I must leave you,
All along the Southern(1) sea
I am bound for to go.
Don’t let my long absence be
no trouble to you,
For I shall return in the spring
as you know.”
II.
“Like some pretty little seaboy
I’ll dress and go with you,
In the deepest of dangers
I shall stand your friend.(2)
In the cold stormy weather
when the winds are a-blowing,
My dear I’ll be willing
to wait for you then”

III.
“Well, your pretty little hands
they can’t handle our tackle,
And dour dainty little feet
to our topmast can’t go.
And the cold stormy weather love
you can’t well endure,
I would have you ashore
when the (raging) winds they do blow.
IV.(3)
So fare you well me lovely Nancy
for it’s now I must leave you,
All along the Southern sea
I am bound for to go.
As you must be safe
I’ll be loyal and constant
For I shall return in the spring
as you know.”

NOTES
1) in Sharp is “salt seas” but becomes “western ocean” in the version of A. L. Lloyd
2) in A. L. Lloyd becomes “My love, I’ll be ready to reef your topsail”.
3) the closing stanza in an Irish version written in Ancient Irish Music (1873 and 1888) by Patrick Weston Joyce says:
So farewell, my dearest Nancy, since I must now leave you;
Unto the salt seas I am bound for to go,
Where the winds do blow high and the seas loud do roar;
So may yourself contented be kind and stay on shore.

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
english version: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
english version: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
american/irish version: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/fnancy.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/FAREWELL.html

Lovely On The Water

Leggi in italiano  

Lover’s separation is a theme widespread in the english balladry and that of a sailor and a young maid it’s probably originated in the eighteenth century, as we find it in the illustrations of the time.

LOVELY ON THE WATER

The ballad “Lovely on the water”, collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in the early 1900s, come from a broadside titled “Henry and Nancy, or the Lover’s Separation“. The story begins in the idyll of spring with two lovers walking, but that’s their farewell, the sailor has enlisted in the Royal Navy and wants her to stay home waiting for him. Although he professed to face the war for his country, the need for a wage is certainly the primary cause of his patriotism.

The Sailor’s Farewell, Charles Mosley (mid-eighteenth century) in National Maritime Museum .

Steeleye Span recorded Lovely on the Water in 1971 for their second album, “Please to See the King” and the sleeve notes commented”Certain folk songs had great popularity, and have been reported over and again, from end to end of the country. Others—including some masterpieces—seem to have had but tiny circulation. So Lovely on the Water, with a gorgeous melody and significant words, has been found only once, by Vaughan Williams at South Walsham, a few miles from Norwich. The song starts idyllically and ends ominously, like a sunny day that clouds over. The singer, a Mr Hilton, had fourteen verses, but Vaughan Williams, often a bit careless about texts, mislaid some. Missing verses probably concerned the familiar situation in which the girl volunteers to disguise herself as a seaman, in order to sail with her lover, but is hurriedly dissuaded.” (from here)
We find those missing verses in the text of the broadside “Henry and Nancy” (here)
Steeleye Span in “Please to See the King” 1971

Ken Wilson in “Not Before Time

Dhalia`s Lane in Hollymount 2005

Martha Tilston & Maggie Boyle in The Sea 2014 in  

LOVELY ON THE WATER *
I
As I walked out one morning
in the springtime of the year
I overheard a sailor boy
likewise a lady fair
They sang a song together
made the valleys for to ring
While the birds on the spray in the meadows gay
Proclaimed the lovely spring
II
Said Willy unto Nancy
“Oh we soon must sail away
For its lovely on the water
to hear the music play.
For our Queen she do want seamen
so I will not stay on shore
I will brave the wars for my country
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
III
Poor Nancy fell and fainted,
but soon he brought her to,
For it’s there they kissed and they embraced
and took a fond adieu.
“Come change your ring (1) with me my love
For we may meet once more;
but there’s One above that will guard you, love,
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
IV
Four pounds it is our bounty
and that must do for thee
For to help the aged parents
while I am on the sea
For Tower Hill[2] is crowded
with mothers weeping sore (3)
For their sons are gone to face the foe
Where the blundering cannons roar” 

Notes
1) the ring will be the proof of identity of the lovers who will sometimes remain separated for long years
2) Tower Hill in in London,London Borough of Tower Hamlets
3) while the men go to fight the enemy, the women greet them weeping because they know that many of them will never return home

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
english version: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
english version: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
american/irish version: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lovely-water.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/lovelyonthewater.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/187.html
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/16873

http://www.britishtars.com/2014/03/the-sailors-farewell-date-unknown.html

MAID THAT’S DEEP IN LOVE

donna-marinaioC’è un discreto filone tra i canti del mare, che narrano di fanciulle innamorate che si travestono da marinaio, pur di attraversare l’Oceano per andare alla ricerca del loro fidanzato, che le ha lasciate per emigrare in America. (vedi)

Tutte raccontano la stessa storia: la fanciulla (tra)vestita da uomo si imbarca come mozzo e viene notata dal capitano, il quale resta turbato dal nuovo marinaio al punto di innamorarsi; solo giunti a riva però la fanciulla rivela la sua vera identità e il capitano ammirato dal suo coraggio, le giura amore eterno e le chiede di sposarlo.
In questa ballata dal titolo ” Maid that’s deep in love”, “Maid in sorrow”, “The short jacket”, “Blue Jacket and White Trousers” il capitano resta colpito dalle fattezze del giovane bel marinaio e “ci prova” ma lei tiene nascosta la sua sessualità e lo respinge, ben determinata a trovare il suo innamorato.

LA VERSIONE AMERICANA: MAID THAT’S DEEP IN LOVE

La canzone è molto rara in Irlanda, mentre si trova più diffusamente nell’America Nord-Est. Potrebbe risalire al XVIII secolo o più probabilmente ai tempi della massiccia emigrazione irlandese verso l’America del secolo successivo.

“To the best of my knowledge, the only vestige of the song recovered on this side of the Atlantic is the single stanza entitled The Mermaid in Joyce’s Old Irish Folk Music (and even there, the story of the song seems to be different from the American versions). The various Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and Maine versions seem to be very much alike, and may relate to a broadsheet print. This present version is very fragmentary, of course, and is quite lacking in the central theme of the story (The Broomfield Hill theme, one might call it) of the girl outwitting the amorous captain. But it does contain what the north-eastern American versions usually miss, which is the motive of search for a lost lover. A Missouri version of the song begins: “There was a fair damsel all crossed in love, and deeply sunk in despair, O”. Mrs Costello’s melody is more familiar as one of the Lowlands of Holland sets – A. L. L. (Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, Dec 1953 tratto da qui)

Sono stati i Pentangle a farne la versione standard nel loro album “Cruel Sister” del 1970

I
I am a maid that’s deep in love
But yes I can complain
I have in this world but one true love
And Jimmy is his name
And if I do not find my love
I’ll mourn most constantly
And I’ll find and follow Jimmy thro’
The lands of liberty(1)
II
Then I’ll cut off my yellow hair
Men’s clothing I’ll wear on
I’ll sign to a bold sea captain
My passage I’ll work free
And I’ll find and follow Jimmy thro’
The lands of liberty
III
One night upon the raging sea
As we were going to bed(2)
The captain cried “Farewell my boy,
I wish you were a maid
Your rosy cheeks, your ruby lips
They are enticing me
And I wish dear God with all my heart
A maid you were to me”
IV
“Then hold your tongue, dear captain
Such talk is all in vain
And if the sailors find it out
They’ll laugh and make much game
For when we reach Columbia(3) shore
Some prettier girls you’ll find
And you’ll laugh and sing you’ll court with them
For courting you are inclined”
V
It was no three days after
Our ship it reached the shore
“Adieu(4) my loving captain
Adieu for evermore
For once I was a sailor on sea
But now I am a maid on the shore
So adieu to you and all your crew
With you I’ll sail no more”
VI
“Come back, come back, my own pretty maid
Come back and marry me
I have ten thousand pounds in gold
And that I’ll give to thee
So come back, come back, my own pretty maid
Come back and marry me”
Tradotto da Alberto Musica &Memoria (da qui)
I
Sono una fanciulla perdutamente innamorata, ma ho qualcosa che mi fa soffrire. Ho in questo mondo, nient’altro che un unico vero amore
e Jimmy è il suo nome e se non trovo il modo (di avere) il mio amore
non smetterò di piangere
E io cercherò e inseguirò Jimmy
Nella terra della libertà(1)
II
Allora ho tagliato i miei biondi capelli
Ho indossato abiti da uomo
Ho firmato con un brillante capitano
Per il mio passaggio lavorerò senza stipendio
E io cercherò e inseguirò Jimmy
Nella terra della libertà
III
Una notte sul mare in tempesta
mentre stavamo andando a fondo (2)
il capitano gridò: “Addio ragazzo mio
vorrei che tu fossi una fanciulla
le tue gote rosse, le tue labbra color rubino
mi attirano verso di te
Ed io vorrei, mio Dio, con tutto il mio cuore
che tu fossi una ragazza per me.”
IV
“Frena la tua lingua, caro capitano
questo discorso è completamente vano
che se i marinai lo scoprono
Riderebbero e ci scherzerebbero sopra molto
Perché quando raggiungeremo la costa della Columbia (3)
tu troverai molte ragazze più belle
E tu riderai e canterai e farai loro la corte
Perché sei portato a fare la corte”.
V
Solo tre giorni dopo
La nostra nave ha raggiunto la costa
“Addio(4) mio capitano innamorato
Addio per sempre
Perché un tempo sul mare, ero un marinaio
Ma ora a terra sono una ragazza
Quindi, addio a te e tutta la ciurma
Con te non navigherò più”
VI
“Torna, torna, mia graziosa ragazza
Torna indietro e sposami
Ho dieci mila sterline d’oro
E questo è ciò che darò a te
Quindi torna indietro, torna indietro, mia graziosa ragazza
Torna indietro e sposami”

NOTE
1) L’America
2) andare a dormire (per sempre)
3) La Columbia Britannica, dove si trovano le città di Victoria e Vancouver, la più occidentale delle province canadesi.
4) Addio è pronunciato in francese, probabilmente in coerenza con la terra di destinazione, abitata anche da persone di lingua francese.

I AM A MAID THAT SLEEPS IN LOVE

Si tratta di una variante della precedente canzone proposta dal gruppo americano-irlandese Solas. Colgo l’occasione di rimandarvi alla scheda segnalata nel blog di  Phillip Kay (qui) che così scrive “Séamus Egan, who founded the group, is a virtuoso on flute, banjo, mandolin and guitar. ..The Words That Remain, Solas’ third album released in 1998, preserves the equal balance of dance tunes and songs seen in the previous CD. The album blends Woody Guthrie (surely one of the most influential writers who ever lived), reels that open like a morna from Cesária Évora, a traditional song from the Orkneys, music from Brittany, traditional Irish jigs and reels, and a song from Peggy Seegar. Solas knows just how flexible Irish traditional music is, and was, jigs mutating into barn dances in America, the banjo coming back to Britain to add to the musical texture of Irish bands. But there seems just a trace of losing identity, of opening up to influences too widely. The album features the singing of Karan Casey, superb on both contemporary and traditional material, and the guitar of John Doyle, by now producing sounds reminiscent of Django Reinhardt. ” Non posso che concordare con lui il gruppo dopo il quarto album: “Unfortunately they seem to have abandoned Irish music in favour of more self penned material. Good as this is, it makes the group’s music far from unique.”

ASCOLTA Solas in “The words that remain” 1998


I am a maid that sleeps in love
and cannot feel my pain(1)
For once I had a sweetheart,
and Johnny was his name
And if I cannot find him,
I’ll wander night and day
For it’s for the sake of Johnny,
I’ll cross the stormy seas
I’ll cut off my yellow locks,
men’s clothing I’ll wear on
And like a gallant soldier boy
this road I’ll gang along
Enquiring for a captain a passage to engage free
For to be his chief companion on the banks of liberty
The very first night the captain lay down on his bed to sleep
These very words he said to me,
“I wish you were a maid
Your cherry cheeks and ruby lips, they’ve often enticed me
I wish to the gods, unto my heart, a maid you were to me”
In three days after that we did land on shore
“Adieu, adieu, dear captain, adieu forever more
A sailor boy I was on ship,
but a maid I am on shore
Adieu, adieu, dear captain, adieu forever more”
“Come back, come back, my blooming girl, come back and marry me
For I have a good fortune,
I’ll give it all to thee”
“To marry you, dear captain,
is more than I can say
For it’s for the sake of Johnny,
I’ll wander night and day”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Sono una fanciulla che è molto innamorata e mi lamento(1)
perchè una volta avevo un fidanzato che si chiamava Johnny,
e se non riesco a trovarlo,
vagherò notte e giorno,
è per il bene di Johnny
che attraverserò l’oceano in tempesta.
Mi taglierò i riccioli biondi
e indosserò abiti maschili,
e come un bel soldatino
percorrerò questa strada,
e domanderò a un capitano  un passaggio in cambio di lavoro,
per essere il suo attendente, verso le rive della libertà.
La prima notte il capitano si stese nel letto per dormire
e mi disse queste parole:
” Vorrei che tu fossi una fanciulla,
le tue guance rosee, le tue labbra di rubino mi hanno spesso attirato,
vorrei perdio con tutto il cuore, che tu fossi per me una fanciulla”.
Appena tre giorni dopo giungemmo a riva “Addio mio caro capitano, addio per sempre,
sul mare ero un marinaio, ma a terra sono una fanciulla.
Addio mio caro capitano, addio per sempre”
“Torna indietro, torna indietro,
mia splendida fanciulla, ritorna e sposami, perchè sono ricco
e darò tutto a te”
“Di sposarti, caro capitano,
è più di quanto possa dire,
perchè è per il bene di Johnny
che vagherò notte e giorno”

NOTE
1) si tratta chiaramente di un mondegreen di” I am a maid that’s deep in love I can complain”

continua seconda parte

FONTI
https://phillipkay.wordpress.com/2013/01/09/explorations-in-irish-music/
http://www.musicaememoria.com/pentangle_cruel_sister.htm https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/shortjacketandwhitetrousers.html http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=13503&lang=it http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/solas/iam.htm http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/435.html

Addio Bella Nancy

Read the post in English  

“Farewell Lovely Nancy” oppure “Lovely Nancy” è una ballata tradizionale raccolta nel 1905 da Cecil Sharp dalla signora Susan Williams, Somerset (Inghilterra), nell’addio il bel marinaio in partenza per i mari del Sud, dissuade la fidanzata che vorrebbe seguirlo travestendosi da mozzo, dicendole che il lavoro sulla nave non è cosa per femmine!

Così scrive AL Lloyd nelle note all’LP “A Sailor’s Garland”: Indossare abiti da marinaio e imbarcarsi clandestinamente era un’idea balzana che passava per la testa delle ragazze di uno o due secoli fa, volendo credere alle canzoni tradizionali. Questa canzone è stata ampiamente trovata nel Sud dell’Inghilterra e anche in Irlanda.” 

CROSS-DRESSING BALLADS

Nei canti del mare troviamo (anche se non frequentemente) il tema della ragazza travestita da marinaio che affronta la dura vita del mare per desiderio d’amore e avventura.
Le cross-dressing ballads sono in effetti per lo più inerenti a donne che vanno a svolgere un’attività maschile per eccellenza, come quella del marinaio o del soldato.

Ed Harcourt in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys ANTI 2006 in una versione molto romantica, quasi crepuscolare

Ian Campbell & Dave Swarbrick 1964

 John Molineaux voce e appalachian dulcimer (live)


I.
“Fare you well me lovely Nancy
for it’s now I must leave you,
All along the Southern(1) sea
I am bound for to go.
Don’t let my long absence be
no trouble to you,
For I shall return in the spring
as you know.”
II.
“Like some pretty little seaboy
I’ll dress and go with you,
In the deepest of dangers
I shall stand your friend.(2)
In the cold stormy weather
when the winds are a-blowing,
My dear I’ll be willing
to wait for you then”
III.
“Well, your pretty little hands
they can’t handle our tackle,
And dour dainty little feet
to our topmast can’t go.
And the cold stormy weather love
you can’t well endure,
I would have you ashore
when the (raging) winds they do blow.
IV.(4)
So fare you well me lovely Nancy
for it’s now I must leave you,
All along the Southern sea
I am bound for to go.
As you must be safe
I’ll be loyal and constant
For I shall return in the spring
as you know.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LUI
“Addio mia bella Nancy
perchè ti devo lasciare
per i mari del Sud(1),
sto per salpare
e non permettere che la mia lunga assenza t’affanni,
perchè io ritornerò in primavera,
come d’accordo”
II LEI
“Come un giovane mozzo
mi vestirò e verrò con te,
in mezzo ai grandi pericoli
ti sarò compagna.(2)
Nella fredda tempesta
mentre i venti soffiano,
mio caro, sarò disposta
ad aspettarti”
III LUI
“Ma le tue belle manine
non possono maneggiare il nostro equipaggiamento, e nemmeno i tuoi piedini delicati, posso andare sul sartiame delle vele, e il freddo vento di tempesta amore mio non sei in grado di sopportare, ti preferisco a terra, quando i venti soffiano.
IV(4)
Così addio mia bella Nancy
che è l’ora di andare
per i mari del Sud
sto per salpare
mentre tu starai al sicuro
io ti sarò fedele
perchè tornerò in primavera
come d’accordo.”

NOTE
1) in Sharp è “salt seas” ma diventa “western ocean” nella versione di A. L. Lloyd
2) in A. L. Lloyd diventa “My love, I’ll be ready to reef your topsail“.
3) nel senso di membro della ciurma
4) la strofa di chiusura in una versione irlandese scritta in Ancient Irish Music (1873 e 1888) di Patrick Weston Joyce dice
So farewell, my dearest Nancy, since I must now leave you;
Unto the salt seas I am bound for to go,
Where the winds do blow high and the seas loud do roar;
So may yourself contented be kind and stay on shore.
(Così addio mia adorata Nancy che ti devo lasciare
per il vasto mare sto per salpare
dove i venti soffiano  e i mari ruggiscono forte
così accontentati fa la brava e resta a terra”)

000brgcf
la versione di Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
la versione di Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
versione sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://www.contemplator.com/england/fnancy.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/farewellnancy.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27483
http://www.goldenhindmusic.com/lyrics/FAREWELL.html

Its Lovely On The Water To Hear The Music Play

Read the post in English  

Il tema della separazione tra i due innamorati è molto diffuso tra le ballate popolari e quella tra marinaio e giovane fidanzatina si è originato probabilmente nel Settecento, così almento lo ritroviamo nelle illustrazioni dell’epoca.

LOVELY ON THE WATER

La ballata “Lovely on the water”, raccolta da Ralph Vaughan Williams agli inizi del 1900, proviene da un foglio volante (broadside) dal titolo “Henry and Nancy, or the Lover’s Separation” la cui pubblicazione è fatta risalire tra il 1860 a il 1880 (vedi) . La storia inizia nell’idillio della primavera con due innamorati che passeggiano, ma quello è il loro addio, l’uomo si è arruolato nella Royal Navy e vuole che lei resti a casa ad aspettarlo.
Sebbene il giovane professi di voler affrontare la guerra per il bene del paese, il bisogno di un salario è certamente la causa prima del suo patriottismo.

The Sailor’s Farewell, Charles Mosley (metà XVIII secolo) in National Maritime Museum .

Nelle note di copertina dell’Album “Please to See the King” 1971 è così riportato “Alcune canzoni tradizionali hanno avuto una grande popolarità, e sono state diffuse in un lungo e in largo per il paese.  Altre —compresi dei capolavori—sembra abbiano avuto una minima diffusione. Così Lovely on the Water, con una melodia splendida e parole eloquenti, è stata trovata solo una volta, da Vaughan Williams a South Walsham, a pochi kilometri da Norwich. Il canto inizia in modo idilliaco e finisce minacciosamente come un giorno di sole che si rannuvola. Il cantante Mr Hilton, aveva quattordici versi, ma Vaughan Williams, spesso un po’ incurante dei testi, ne ha tralasciati alcuni. I versi mancanti probabilmente riguardavano la situazione consueta in cui la ragazza vuole travestirsi da marinaio, per salpare con il suo amante, ma viene subito dissuasa”
Steeleye Span in “Please to See the King” 1971

Ken Wilson in “Not Before Time” (la versione testuale differisce in parte da quella riportata)

Dhalia`s Lane in Hollymount 2005

Martha Tilston & Maggie Boyle in The Sea 2014 in  


I
As I walked out one morning
In the springtime of the year
I overheard a sailor boy
Likewise a lady fair
They sang a song together
Made the valleys for to ring
While the birds on the spray in the meadows gay
Proclaimed the lovely spring
II
Said Willy unto Nancy
“Oh we soon must sail away
For its lovely on the water
To hear the music play
For our Queen she do want seamen
So I will not stay on shore
I will brave the wars for my country
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
III
Poor Nancy fell and fainted
But soon he brought her to
For it’s there they kissed and they embraced
And took a fond adieu
“Come change your ring(1) with me my love
For we may meet once more
But there’s One above that will guard you love
Where the blund’ring cannons roar
IV
Four pounds it is our bounty
And that must do for thee
For to help the aged parents
While I am on the sea”
For Tower Hill(2) is crowded
With mothers weeping sore (3)
For their sons are gone to face the foe
Where the blundering cannons roar
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino,
agli inizi di primavera,
ho sentito un giovane marinaio
e la sua bella donna
cantare una canzone insieme:
risuonava tra le valli,
mentre gli uccelli tra i prati verdeggianti di rugiada,
proclamavano la bella primavera.
II
Disse Willy a Nancy
“Oh, presto dobbiamo salpare,
perchè è bello sul mare
ascoltare cantare la musica.
La nostra regina ha bisogno di marinai,
quindi non voglio restare a terra.
Affronterò le battaglie per il mio paese
dove i cannoni ad alta voce tuonano”.
III
La povera Nancy cadde e svenne
ma subito lui la sostenne,
e lì si baciarono
e si abbracciarono
e si diedero un addio affettuoso.
“Vieni a scambiare il tuo anello con il mio, amore mio,
perchè noi ci rincontreremo ancora,
se ci sarà un Dio in alto che veglierà su di te amore,
dove i cannoni ad alta voce tuonano.
IV
Quattro sterline, è la nostra paga,
che ti farà comodo,
per aiutare i genitori anziani
mentre io sono per mare “.
Perché Tower Hill è affollata
dalle madri addolorate e piangenti,
per i loro figli che sono andati ad affrontare il nemico,
dove i cannoni ad alta voce tuonano.

NOTE
1) lo scambio degli anelli o di qualche altro regalo è un elemento caratteristico delle ballate tradizionali, in cui tale oggetto costituirà la prova d’identità di colui che è partito (e resterà a volte assente per lunghi anni)
2) Tower Hill è un punto elevato della città di Londra a nord-ovest della Torre di Londra, presso London Borough of Tower Hamlets
3) mentre gli uomini vanno a combattere il nemico, le donne li salutano piangenti perchè sanno che molti di loro non ritorneranno più a casa

000brgcf
Ralph Vaughan Williams: LOVELY ON THE WATER
Cecil Sharp: LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: FARE YE WELL/ADIEU, LOVELY NANCY
versione inglese: ADIEU SWEET LOVELY NANCY
versione americana/irlandese: ADIEU MY LOVELY NANCY
versione sea shanty: HOLY GROUND

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/lovely-water.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/lovelyonthewater.html
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/187.html
http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/broadside.cfm/id/16873

http://www.britishtars.com/2014/03/the-sailors-farewell-date-unknown.html

Willy Taylor : a murder ballad with an happy end

“Willy Taylor” è una murder ballad di cui esistono numerose varianti, essendo diventata molto popolare sia in Inghilterra che in America. La sua prima stampa risale al 1817 anche se la ballata è probabilmente settecentesca. Il tema è quello della “fanciulla marinaio” che affronta la dura vita del mare per desiderio d’amore (o di vendetta come in questa versione in “giallo”)

LA TRAMA

anne-bonnyLa storia inizia con una donna abbandonata all’altare (Sarah o Polly) mentre il bel Willy prende il mare (in alcune versioni perché arruolato – forzatamente- come soldato o come marinaio).
Lei non si da per vinta e decide di seguirlo travestendosi da marinaio: il suo travestimento tuttavia viene scoperto dal capitano della nave (durante una zuffa sul ponte parte un bottone e le si scopre un seno..). Alla richiesta di spiegazioni lei racconta la sua avventura: è alla ricerca dell’amato Willy (il cui vero nome è Fitzgerald) e ha accetto la dura vita da marinaio pur di ritrovarlo. Commosso il capitano le rivela il posto dove Willy e la sua nuova sposa (che in alcune versioni è dichiarata come ricca) sono soliti andare a passeggio: così l’amante abbandonata aspetta Willy con due pistole cariche e li uccide entrambi.

Qui la storia finisce ma in alcune versioni la donna si annega, in altre viene nominata comandante supremo dal capitano, ammirato dal suo sangue freddo, oppure si sposa con il capitano stesso che si innamora del suo spirito coraggioso.
La storia potrebbe essere letta come una raccomandazione: alle mamme di non dare il nome Willy ai figli, se non si vuole che facciano una brutta fine, e alle donne, se proprio non posso evitare di uscire con uno che si chiama Willy, di tenere una pistola a portata di mano per ogni evenienza; il nome Willy infatti è un topico per indicare il furfante, il bulletto del quartiere che piace alle donne, ma piuttosto opportunista e mascalzone.

willy-taylor
Illustrazione tratta da “Billy Taylor” broadside” The Tragedy of the Press-Gang: A True and Lamentable Ballad call’d Billy Taylor, shewing the fatal effects of Inconstancy.”

ADéanta con la voce di Mary Dillon.


I
Willy Taylor and his youthful lover
Full of mirth and loyalty
They were going to the church to be married
He was pressed(1) and sent to sea
II
She dressed herself up like a sailor
On her breast she wore a star(2)
Her beautiful fingers long and slender
She gave them all just a smear of tar
III
On this ship there being a skirmish(3)
She being one amongst the rest
A silver button flew  off her jacket
There appeared her snow white breast
IV
Says the captain to this fair maid
“What misfortune took you here?”
“I’m in search of my true lover
Whom you pressed on the other year”
V
“If you’re in search of your true lover
Pray, come tell to me his name”
“Willie Taylor they do call him
But Fitzgerald is his name”
VI
“Let you get up tomorrow morning
Early as the break of day
There you’ll find your Willie Taylor
Walking along with his lady gay”
VII
She got up the very next morning
Early as the break of day
There she spied her Willie Taylor
Walking along with his lady gay
VIII
She drew out a brace of pistols
That she had at her command
There she shot her Willie Taylor
With his bride at his right hand
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Willy Taylor e la sua giovane amante
colma di giovialità e di fedeltà
stavano per andare a sposarsi in Chiesa
ma lui fu arruolato(1) e mandato per mare.
II
Lei si vestì come un marinaio
e sul petto indossò una stelletta(2)
e sulle sue belle dita lunghe e affusolate
si spalmò una striscia di catrame.
III
Quando sulla nave si accese una zuffa(3),
essendoci anche lei in mezzo,
un bottone d’argento volò via dalla giacca, 
così si rivelò il suo candido seno.
IV
Dice il capitano a questa bella fanciulla
“Che disgrazia vi ha portata qui?”
“Sono alla ricerca del mio innamorato
che voi imbarcaste l’anno scorso “
V
“Se siete in ricerca del vostro vero amore 
vi prego, ditemi il suo nome “
“Willy Taylor si fa chiamare,
ma Fitzgerald è il suo nome”
VI
“Alzatevi domani mattina presto
al sorgere dell’alba
e troverete Willy Taylor,
a passeggio con la sua donnina “
VII
Lei si alzò il giorno dopo presto
al sorgere dell’alba,
si mise a spiare il suo Willy Taylor
a passeggio con la sua donnina
VIII
Lei tirò fuori un paio di pistole
che aveva a portata di mano
e sparò al suo Willy Taylor
con la sua sposa sottobraccio.

NOTE
1) la ballata non specifica l’antefatto, un tempo l’arruolamento era volontario, ma non erano infrequenti i casi di “impressment” ossia l’arruolamento forzato ad opera delle “press-gang” (continua)
2) le stellette sulle divise degli ufficiali di marina diventano regola dal 1873
3) in altre versioni più che una lite tra marinai si tratta di una battaglia

Patrick Street

Eitre


I
William Taylor
was a brisk young sailor
Full of heart and full of play,
Until his mind he did uncover
To a youthful lady gay.
Four and twenty British sailors
Met him on the King’s highway,
As he went for to be married
Pressed he was and sent away.
chorus
Fall dereedle dum, a dare eye dither oh Fall dereedle dum, dum a dare eye day.
II
Sailor’s clothing she put on
And she went on board a man of war
Her pretty little fingers long and slender
They were smeared with pitch and tar.
On that ship there was a battle
She amongst the rest did fight
The wind blew off her silver buttons
Breasts were bared all snowy white.
III
When the captain did discover
He says, “Fair maid
what brought you here?”
“Sir, I’m seeking William Taylor,
Pressed he was by you last year.”
“If you rise up in the morning,
Early at the break of day,
There you’ll spy young William Taylor
Walking with his lady gay.”
IV
She rose early in the morning,
Early at the break day,
There she spied young William Taylor
Walking with his lady gay.
She procured a pair of pistols,
On the ground where she did stand
There she shot poor William Taylor
And the lady at his right hand.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
William Taylor
era un giovane marinaio sveglio,
coraggioso e divertente
finchè si innamorò di
una giovane donnina.
Ventiquattro soldati inglesi
lo incontrarono sulla strada del Re
mentre andava a sposarsi
fu arruolato e allontanato.
Coro
Fall dereedle dum, a dare eye dither oh Fall dereedle dum, dum a dare eye day.
II
Lei si vestì come un marinaio
e salì a bordo di una nave da guerra
le belle dita lunghe e affusolate
erano spalmate di pece e catrame.
Su quella nave ci fu una battaglia,
lei tra gli altri dovette combattere,
il vento strappò i suoi bottoni d’argento
il seno si mostrò tutto bianco-neve
III
Quando il capitano la scoprì
dice “Gentile signora,
che  disgrazia vi ha portata qui?”
“Signore, cerco William Taylor
che fu arruolato da voi l’anno scorso”
“Se vi alzerete presto al mattino
di buonora
troverete William Taylor
a passeggio con la sua donnina “
IV
Lei si alzò presto al mattino
di buonora
si mise a spiare il giovane William Taylor
a passeggio con la sua donnina.
Lei tirò fuori un paio di pistole
sul posto dove stava
là sparò al povero William Taylor
e alla sua dama sottobraccio.

 

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/maidens-the-sea/
http://mbmonday.blogspot.it/2012/09/bold-william-taylor.html
http://www.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/~zierke/joseph.taylor/songs/boldwilliamtaylor.html
http://supersearch.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7920