The Ship in Distress sea ballad

Leggi in italiano

“You Seamen Bold” or “The Ship in Distress” is a sea song that tries to describe the horrors suffered on a ship adrift in the ocean and without more food on board. Probably the origin begins with a Portuguese ballad of the sixteenth century (in the golden age of the Portuguese vessels), taken from the French tradition with the title La Corte Paille.

This further version was very popular in the south of England
A. L. Lloyd writes ‘The story of the ship adrift, with its crew reduced to cannibalism but rescued in the nick of time, has a fascination for makers of sea legends. Cecil Sharp, who collected more than a thousand songs from Somerset, considered The Ship in Distress to be the grandest tune he had found in that country.’ (from here)
Louis Killen

Martin Carhty & Dave Swarbrick from But Two Came By 1968Marc Almond from Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

I
You seamen bold who plough the ocean
See dangers landsmen never know.
It’s not for honour and promotion;
No tongue can tell what they undergo.
In the blusterous wind and the great dark water
Our ship went drifting on the sea,
Her rigging (1) gone, and her rudder broken,
Which brought us to extremity (2).
II
For fourteen days, heartsore and hungry,
Seeing but wild water and bitter sky,
Poor fellows, they stood in a totter,
A-casting lots as to which should die.
The lot (3) it fell on Robert Jackson,
Whose family was so very great.
‘I’m free to die, but oh, my comrades,
Let me keep look-out till the break of day.’
III
A full-dressed ship like the sun a-glittering(4)
Came bearing down to their relief.
As soon as this glad news was shouted,
It banished all their care and grief.
The ship brought to, no longer drifting,
Safe in Saint Vincent, Cape Verde, she gained.
You seamen all, who hear my story,
Pray you’ll never suffer the like again (5).

NOTES
1) Marc say  headgear
2) extremity: bring to the extremes to be intended also in a moral sense
3 )the one who pulled the shorter straw was the “winner”, and sacrificed himself for the benefit of the survivors, this practice was called  ”the custom of the sea”: to leave the choice of the sacrificial victim to fate, it excluded the murder by necessity from being a premeditated murder
4) the juxtaposition between the two verses with the man ready for the sacrifice and sighting at dawn of the ship that will rescue them, it wants to mitigate the harsh reality of cannibalism, a horrible practice to say but that is always lurking in the moments of desperation and as an extreme resource for survival. In reality we do not know if the ship was only dreamed of by the sacrificial victim.
5) surviving sailors rarely resume the sea after the cases of cannibalism (see for example the Essex whaling story). In 1884 an English court condemned two of the three sailors of the “Mignonette” yacht who had killed Richard Parker, the 17-year-old cabin boy (the third had immunity because he agreed to testify); the death sentence was commuted at a later time in six months in prison. A curious case is that Edgar Allan Poe in 1838 in “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket ” tells of four survivors forced into a lifeboat who decide to rely on the “law of the sea”, the cabin boy that pulled the shorter straw was called Richard Parker!

Little Boy Billy
The Banks of Newfoundland

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theshipindistress.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/sea_bold.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/05/04/the-ship-in-distress/
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/anche-i-cannibali-hanno-un-cuoree-se-lo-mangiano-luca-luca-nave
http://www.canestrinilex.com/risorse/dudley-and-stephens-case-1884-mignonette/

Heave away, my Johnny sea shanty

Leggi in Italiano

The second sea shanty sung by A.L. Lloyd in the film Moby Dick, shot by John Huston in 1956, is a windlass shanty or a capstan shanty. As we can clearly see in the sequence, crew action the old anchor winch.
Kenneth S. Goldstein commented on the cover notes of the album “Thar She Blows” by Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd (1957)”A favourite shanty for windlass work, when the ship was being warped out of harbour at the start of a trip. A log rope would be made fast to a ring at the quayside and run round a bollard at the pierhead and back to the ship’s windlass. The shantyman would sit on the windlass head and sing while the spokesters strained to turn the windlass. As they turned, the rope would round the drum and the ship nosed seaward amid the tears of the women and the cheers of the men. This version was sung by the Indian Ocean whalers of the 1840s“.

The song starts at 1:50, when the catwalk is pulled off and the old spike windlass is activated, model replaced by the brake windlass around 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) the curse of every sailor at the time of sailing ships: Cape Horn

This sea shanty presents a great variety of texts even with different stories, so sometimes it is a song of the whaleship other times a song of emigration. (a collection of various text versions here).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Dubbing Cape Horn was a feared affair by sailors, being a stretch of sea almost perpetually upset by storms, a cemetery of numerous unlucky ships.
The wind dominated the bow, so the ship was pushed back for days with the crew exhausted by effort and icy water that was breaking on all sides.

Louis Killen from Farewell Nancy 1964  “capstan stands upright and is pushed round by trudging men. A windlass, serving much the same function, lies horizontally and is revolved by means of bars pulled from up to down. So windlass songs are generally more rhythmical than capstan shanties. Heave Away is usually considered a windlass song. Originally, it had words concerning a voyage of Irish migrants to America. Later, this text fell away. The version sung here was “devised” by A. L. Lloyd for the film of Mody Dick

Assassin’s Creed Rogue

I
There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.
II
The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls, we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
III
Farewell to you, my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
IV
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.

NOTES
1) Kingston upon Hull (or, more simply, Hull) is a renowned fishing port from which flotillas for fishing in the North Sea started from the Middle Ages. In the song, the departing ships also head for the Indian Ocean (see routes )

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  from Just Another Day 2014, from the repertoire of the seafaring songs of Minehead (Somerset) collected by Cecil Sharp from only two sources – the retired captains Lewis and Vickery.

trad and Tom Brown verses
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.

NEWFOUNDLAND VERSION

Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook # 49) was released by Pius Power, Southeast Bight,  in 1979 Genevieve Lehr writes “this is a song which was often used to establish a rhythm for hauling up the anchors aboard the fishing schooners. Many of these ‘heave-up shanties’ were old ballads or contemporary ones, and very often topical verses were made up on the spur of the moment and added to the song to make the song last as long as the task itself.”

The Fables from Tear The House Down, 1998 a cheerful version with a decidedly country arrangement

I
Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
III
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
IV
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”

NOTES
1) duds in this context means “clothes” but more generally the large canvas bag containing the sailor’s baggage
2) Saint John’s, known in Italian as San Giovanni di Terranova for the Marconi experiment, is a city in Canada, capital of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, located in the peninsula of Avalon, which is part of the Newfoundland island
3) clearly a “flying” verse taken from the many farewells here is Nancy answering

 

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
 emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott

LINK
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html
http://www.umbermusic.co.uk/default.htm

Cannibalismo in mare: You Seamen Bold

Read the post in English

“You Seamen Bold” oppure “The Ship in Distress” è una canzone del mare che cerca di descrivere gli orrori patiti su di una nave alla deriva nell’oceano e senza più viveri a bordo. Probabilmente l’origine prende l’avvio da una ballata portoghese del XVI secolo (nell’era d’oro dei vascelli portoghesi) ripresa alla tradizione francese con il titolo La Corte Paille.

Quest’ulteriore versione era molto popolare nel sud dell’Inghilterra
A. L. Lloyd scrive ‘La storia della nave alla deriva, con il suo equipaggio ridotto al cannibalismo ma salvato all’ultimo minuto, ha un fascino per i creatori di leggende marinare. Cecil Sharp, che raccolse oltre un migliaio di canzoni dal Somerset, considerò The Ship in Distress come la più grande melodia che avesse trovato in quel paese.’ (tratto da qui)
Louis Killen
Martin Carhty & Dave Swarbrick  in But Two Came By 1968Marc Almond in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
You seamen bold who plough the ocean
See dangers landsmen never know.
It’s not for honour and promotion;
No tongue can tell what they undergo.
In the blusterous wind and the great dark water
Our ship went drifting on the sea,
Her rigging (1) gone, and her rudder broken,
Which brought us to extremity (2).
II
For fourteen days, heartsore and hungry,
Seeing but wild water and bitter sky,
Poor fellows, they stood in a totter,
A-casting lots as to which should die.
The lot (3) it fell on Robert Jackson,
Whose family was so very great.
‘I’m free to die, but oh, my comrades,
Let me keep look-out till the break of day.’
III
A full-dressed ship like the sun a-glittering(4)
Came bearing down to their relief.
As soon as this glad news was shouted,
It banished all their care and grief.
The ship brought to, no longer drifting,
Safe in Saint Vincent, Cape Verde, she gained.
You seamen all, who hear my story,
Pray you’ll never suffer the like again (5).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Voi lupi di mare che solcate l’oceano
vedete pericoli che i terricoli mai conosceranno.
Non è per l’onore o la carriera
nessuna lingua può raccontare cosa ebbero a patire: nel vento di burrasca e nelle vaste acque oscure,
la nostra nave andò alla deriva
con il sartiame andato e il timone
rotto
il che ci portò fuori rotta
II
Per quattordici giorni, disperati e affamati,
non vedendo che acqua e cielo scuro, poveri compagni, in piedi a stento.
Si tirò a sorte chi doveva morire.
La sorte cadde su Robert Jackson,
la cui famiglia era di valore.
“Sono pronto a morire, ma oh, miei compagni, lasciatemi guardare fino allo spuntar del giorno”
III
Una nave a vele spiegate scintillante come il sole
venne a portare loro soccorso.
non appena la lieta notizia fu gridata
bandirono tutte le loro preoccupazioni e il dolore. La nave li portò, non più alla deriva, al sicuro a Saint Vincente, Capo Verde.
Voi marinai tutti che ascoltare la mia storia, pregate di non soffrire mai  lo stesso.

NOTE
1) Marc dice  headgear (motore)
2) extremity: portare agli estremi da intendesi anche in senso morale
3) quello che tirava la paglia più corta era il “vincitore”, e si sacrificava per il bene dei sopravvissuti, questa pratica era definita “legge del mare“: lasciare alla sorte la scelta della vittima sacrificale  escludeva l’omicidio per necessità dall’omicidio premeditato, assolvendo di fatto i sopravvissuti
4) la giustapposizione tra le due strofe con l’uomo pronto per il sacrificio e l’avvistamento all’alba della nave che li soccorrerà, vuole mitigare la cruda realtà del cannibalismo, una pratica orribile a dirsi ma che è sempre in agguato nei momenti di disperazione e come risorsa estrema per la sopravvivenza. In realtà non sappiamo se la nave sia solo stata sognata dalla vittima sacrificale e la vera nave giunta chissà quanti giorni dopo a trarre in salvo i sopravvissuti.
5) raramente i marinai sopravvissuti riprendono il mare dopo i casi di cannibalismo (vedasi ad esempio la vicenda della baleniera Essex). Nel 1884 un tribunale inglese condannò due dei tre marinai dello yacht “Mignonette” che avevano ucciso Richard Parker, il mozzo diciassettenne per sfamarsi, (il terzo ebbe l’immunità perché accettò di testimoniare); la condanna a morte venne commutata in un secondo tempo in sei mesi di carcere. Caso curioso è che Edgar Allan Poe nel 1838 nelle “Le avventure di Arthur Gordon Pym” racconta di quattro naufraghi  costretti in una scialuppa di salvataggio che decidono di affidarsi alla “legge del mare”, il mozzo che tirò la pagliuzza più corta si chiamava  Richard Parker!

continua: Little Boy Billy
continua: The Banks of Newfoundland

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/theshipindistress.html
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/sea_bold.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/05/04/the-ship-in-distress/
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/anche-i-cannibali-hanno-un-cuoree-se-lo-mangiano-luca-luca-nave
http://www.canestrinilex.com/risorse/dudley-and-stephens-case-1884-mignonette/

The Twelfth Day Carol

Wassail_BowlThe ancient tradition of wassailing during the Christmas revel: the toast is accompanied by the verses sung in chorus or sung by a soloist and with a chorus refrain; from the first pagan rituals to stimulate the fertility of the trees, you go to the visits from door to door in the villages, in which they repeated the old verses and added others new, to the health of the owners and their prosperity.
[L’antica tradizione del wassailing cioè delle bevute benaugurali durante le festività natalizie: al brindisi si accompagnano delle strofe cantate in coro o intonate da un solista e con un ritornello corale, così dai primi riti pagani per stimolare la fertilità degli alberi si passa alle visite di porta in porta nei villaggi, che ripetevano le antiche strofe ed altre ne aggiungevano, alla salute dei padroni di casa e alla loro prosperità.]

THE TWELFTH DAY CAROL

[“Carol For The Twelfth Day” è stato registrato da Louis Killen in Old Songs, Old Friends LP nel 77, il testo proviene da un manoscritto di “Cornish Carols” redatto da Davies Gilbert per John Hutchens nel 1826 (pubblicato successivamente dalla Oxford University Press).]

The text is a bit bombastic though substantially follows the typical structure of the wassail songs: the request to open the door to let the beggars in and to bring a lot of good foods; in return they toast to the health of the family; here is added a certain wistfulness for the dear old times, those in which the gentry gave a banquet for the servants, food and drink for the poor: the time has come for the rich to divide the table with the poor people, to avoid “riots”
[Il testo è un po’ ampolloso anche se sostanzialmente segue la tipica struttura delle wassail songs: la richiesta di aprire la porta per far entrare i questuanti per far portare tanto buon cibo; in cambio si brinda alla salute della famiglia; qui si aggiunge una buona dose di nostalgia per i cari vecchi tempi, quelli in cui la gentry terriera elargiva un banchetto per i servitori, cibo e bevande per i poveri, si insiste infatti sul concetto che è arrivato il momento per i ricchi di spartire la tavola con la povera gente, per evitare “disordini” o “malcontenti”]
Julaftonen_av_Carl_Larsson_1904John Boden, 2010 


I
Sweet master of this habitation
with our mistress be so kind,
As to grant an invitation
that we may this favour find;
To be now invited in
and in joy and mirth begin,
Happy, sweet and pleasant songs
which unto this time belong.
CHORUS:
Let every loyal, honest soul
contribute to our wassail bowl.

II
So now may you enjoy
the blessings of a loving, virtuous wife,
Riches, honour now possessing
and a long and happy life;
Living in prosperity,
endless generosity
Always be maintained, I pray,
don’t forget the good old way.
III
So now before the season is departed
in your presence we appear,
Therefore then be noble-hearted
and afford some dainty cheer;
Pray let us have it now
what the season doth allow,
What the house may now afford
should be placed upon the board.
Whether it be roast-beef or fowl
and liquor well our wassail bowl.
IV
For now it is the season of leisure
then to those who kindness show,
May they have wealth and peace and pleasure
and the spring of bounty flow,
To enrich them while they live
that they may afford to give,
To maintain the good old way,
many a long and happy day.
V
Therefore you are to be commended
if in this you will not fail,
Now our song is almost ended
fill our bowl with nappy ale;
And we’ll drink a full carouse
to the master of this house,
Aye and to our mistress dear,
wishing both a happy year
With peace and love without control
who liquored well our wassail bowl.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Caro padrone di questa abitazione
con la nostra padrona siate così gentile
e concedeteci un invito
che ci sia favorevole;
di essere subito fatti entrare
e  in gioia e allegria iniziare
felici canzoni dolci e piacevoli,
che sono di consuetudine in questo periodo.
CORO
Che ogni anima di fede e onestà
contribuisca alla nostra ciotola del brindisi!

II
Così ora che voi possiate godere
le benedizioni di un amorevole moglie virtuosa, oneste ricchezze
e una vita lunga e felice;
vivendo sostenuto dalla prosperità
e dalla generosità infinita,
vi prego di non dimenticare
le buone e vecchie usanze.
III
Così ora prima che la stagione finisca
veniamo alla vostra presenza,
pertanto e quindi siate di cuore nobile
e offrite qualche buona grazia;
vi preghiamo di darci ora
ciò che la stagione offre,
ciò che la casa può ora permettersi
che sia messo in tavola,
che si tratti di roast-beef o uccellagione
o liquori buoni per la nostra coppa del brindisi.
IV
Perchè ora è la stagione del tempo libero
quando coloro che mostrano la bontà,
possono avere la prosperità e la pace e la gioia
e il rinnovarsi dei benefici,
affinchè si arricchiscano per poter elargire
quanto possono dare,
per mantenere le buone e vecchie usanze,
in una molto lunga e felice giornata.
V
Pertanto, sarete degno di lode
se in questo non mancherete,
ora che la nostra canzone è quasi finita,
di riempire la nostra coppa con birra schiumosa (1) e leveremo un brindisi
per il padrone di questa casa
e alla nostra cara padrona,
augurando a entrambi un felice anno
in pace e amore senza fare caso
a chi si ubriaca con la nostra coppa del brindisi.

NOTE
1) nappy ale: una birra forte con molta schiuma

LINK
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah09/ah09_14.html
http://roy25booth.blogspot.it/2011/12/dont-forget-good-old-way-nappy-ale-both.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/carolfortwelfthday.html

Edwin&Emma, in the Lowlands Low

The ballad, spread under many titles in the new and old continent, is a murder ballad and it was published in England in many broadsides of the 1800s; the topic was exhaustively dealt with in Patrick Blackman’s blog “Sing Out! Murder Ballad Monday” and therefore I will limit myself to the Italian translations and some personal observations.
La ballata, diffusa sotto molti titoli  nel nuovo e vecchio continente, è una murder ballad ed è stata pubblicata in Inghilterra in molti broadsides del 1800; l’argomento è stato trattato in modo esaustivo nel blog di Patrick Blackman “Sing Out! Murder Ballad Monday” e quindi mi limiterò alle traduzioni in italiano e a qualche osservazione personale.
American versions
English version
Irish version
Scottish version

Young Edwin

The English versions are all quite similar (homologated by the version printed in the “Penguin Book of English Folk Songs” 1959 and refer to the version collected in 1907 in the south coast of England – George Gardiner and Charles Gamblin collected it up in 1907 by Mrs. Hopkins of Axford, Basingstoke, Hampshire, and Vaughan Williams in 1909).
Le versioni inglesi sono tutte abbastanza simili (omologate in una certa misura dalla versione stampata nel  “Penguin Book of English Folk Songs” 1959 e si rifanno alla versione raccolta nel 1907 nella costa sud dell’Inghilterra – George Gardiner e Charles Gamblin la raccolsero nel 1907 dalla signora Hopkins di Axford, Basingstoke, Hampshire, e Vaughan Williams nel 1909).

sailor-picThe protagonists are Edwin and Emma. Edwin returns after seven years from serving in the British Navy to finally marry his girlfriend, but he is stabbed by Emma’s parents, while he sleeps half drunk; his body is thrown into the sea to hide the evidence, the young Emma goes mad with pain and ends up in the Bedlam asylum.
I due protagonisti sono chiamati Edwin ed Emma. Edwin ritorna dopo sette anni di ferma nella British Navy  per sposare finalmente la sua fidanzata, ma viene pugnalato dai genitori di Emma, mentre dorme mezzo ubriaco; il suo corpo è gettato in mare per nascondere le prove, la giovane Emma impazzisce dal dolore e finisce nel manicomio di Bedlam.

Louis Killen in Ballads and Broadsides 1965.
The melody is so nice to captivate the audience into the story, so Louis Killen sings it by cracking the voice in the crucial points and brings it back almost entirely.
La melodia è così bella che basta da sola ad avvincere il pubblico nel racconto, così Louis Killen la canta facendo incrinare la voce nei punti cruciali e ce la riporta quasi per intero.

Luis Killen version
I
Come all you wild young people
and listen to my song:
Concerning gold which I’ve been
told does lead so many wrong.
Young Emma was a servant girl (1),
her love a soldier bold (2)
Who ploughed the main much gold to gain
for his love, so I’ve been told.
II
Young Emma she did daily mourn
when first Young Edwin roamed.
But seven long years being passed and gone Young Edwin hailed his home.
He went to Young Emma’s house,
his store of gold to show
That he had won upon the main
above the lowlands low (3).
III
Her parents kept a public house
that stood down by the sea.
Said Emma, “You may enter in
and there the night may be.
I’ll meet you in the morning,
don’t let my parents know (4)
That your name is Edwin
who ploughed the lowlands low.”
IV
As Emma lay a-sleeping,
she dreamed a dreadful dream,
She dreamed her love lay weeping,
his blood flowed in a stream.
She got up in the morning
and to her home did go,
Because she loved him dearly
who ploughed the lowlands low.
V
“Oh mother, where’s the sailor boy
who come the night to stay?”
“He is dead, no tales to tell”
her father then did say.
“Oh father, cruel father,
you will die a public show 
For murdering my Edwin
who ploughed the lowlands low.”
VI
The fishes of the ocean swim
o’er my lover’s grave,
His body rocks in motion,
pray God his soul to save.
How cruel were my parents
for to murder Edwin so
To steal the gold from one so bold
to plough the lowlands low
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi ragazzacci
ed ascoltate la mia canzone:
riguarda l’oro che si dice
porti così tanti alla rovina.
La giovane Emma era una cameriera (1)
e il suo amore un prode soldato (2)
che solcava i mari per guadagnarsi abbastanza oro per il suo amore, così mi è stato detto
II
La giovane Emma piangeva ogni giorno
i primi tempi che il giovane Edwin ramingo se ne andò, ma sette lunghi anni trascorsero
e il  giovane Edwin fece ritorno.
Andò alla casa della giovane Emma
per mostrarle l’oro accumulato
che aveva guadagnato in mare
oltre e terre basse (3).
III
“Mio padre gestisce una locanda
giù in riva al mare
vacci e restaci per la notte
e là aspettami.
Ci vediamo al mattino
non far sapere ai miei genitori (4)
che sei Edwin
colui che navigava nelle terre basse”
IV
Appena Emma andò a letto,
fece un sogno spaventoso,
sognò il suo amore prostrato e piangente
e il suo sangue che scorreva copioso.
Alzatasi al mattino,
andò a casa sua,
perchè lei lo amava teneramente,
colui che navigava nelle terre basse
V
“Oh madre, dov’è il marinaio
che è venuto per passare la notte? “
“E’ morto e non può parlare”
disse il padre
“Oh padre, crudele padre
morirai sulla pubblica piazza 
per l’omicidio del giovane Edwin
colui che navigava nelle terre basse “
VI
I pesci dell’oceano nuotano
sulla tomba del mio amore
il suo corpo è cullato dalle onde
prego Dio di salvare la sua anima.
Quanto crudeli furono i miei genitori
per aver ucciso Edwin così,
per rubare l’oro ad uno tanto coraggioso,
che navigava nelle terre basse

NOTE
1) in the English versions Emma is not just a maiden in the age of husband but a maid serving with a wealthy family, so she lived at their home and not in her parents’ inn
nelle versioni inglesi Emma non è una semplice fanciulla in età di marito (maiden) ma una fanciulla a servizio presso una famiglia benestante (maid), viveva perciò presso la loro casa e non nella locanda dei genitori
2) Edwin was jointed to the British Army as a soldier or in the Royal Navy and he was embarking on a warship
Edwin si è arruolato come soldato o come marinaio e si è imbarcato su una nave da guerra
3) in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries this term was used to refer to the Dutch colonies, and more generally to many lands and islands in the West Indies. Moreover we must not forget that the seventeenth century was a century of wars between England and Holland due to the predominance of the seas and the division of the colonies
nel Settecento-Ottocento con questo termine generico si indicavano le colonie olandesi, e più in generale molte terre e isole nelle Indie Occidentali. D’altra parte a voler retrodatare la ballata non dobbiamo dimenticare che il Seicento fu un secolo di guerre tra Inghilterra e Olanda per il predominio dei mari e per la spartizione delle colonie.
4) why does Emily not want to let the family know about her boyfriend’s return? Maybe a family feud, a personal disagreement, but it could be a turbid, incestuous father-daughter or sister-brother relationship and therefore not the greed, but the jealousy would be at the origin of the crime: a reading in depth not unusual in popular ballads where psycho-physical discomfort was just around the corner.
perchè Emily non vuole far sapere ai famigliari del ritorno del fidanzato? Adesso sarebbe probabilmente un buon partito, supposto che prima invece fosse stato allontanato dalla famiglia a causa della sua inferiore condizione sociale. C’è da presumere un qualche dissapore personale tipo faida famigliare, ma viene anche da pensare ad un rapporto torbido, e quindi non l’avidità, ma la gelosia sarebbe all’origine del delitto: una lettura in profondità non insolita nelle ballate popolari in cui il disagio psico-fisico era appena dietro l’angolo. Potrebbe anche trattarsi di una forma di prevaricazione-controllo totale del padre sulla vita della figlia considerata come sua proprietà: la ragazza si è impuntata nel respingere i pretendenti imposti dal padre e il padre vuole spezzare la sua volontà-indipendenza uccidendole l’amore..

Steeleye Span in Now we are six, 1974  (I, II, IV – V e VI – VII, VIII)

Black Flag (Assassin’s Creed) (from I to VI) male version
versione maschile 

Penguin Book version
I
Come all ye wild young people
and listen to my song,
I will unfold concerning gold
that guides so many wrong.
Young Emma was a servant maid
who loved a sailor bold
Who ploughed the main much gold to gain
for his love so we’ve been told.
II
He ploughed the main for seven years
and then returned home,
As soon as he set foot on shore
unto his love did go.
He went unto Young Emma’s house
his gold all for the show,
That he has gained upon the main
all in the lowlands low.
III
‘My father keeps a public house
down by the side of the sea,
And you go there and stay the night,
and there you wait for me.
I’ll meet you in the morning,
but don’t let my parents know
Your name it is Young Edwin
that ploughed the Lowlands low.’
IV
Young Edwin he sat drinking
till time to go to bed,
He little thought a sword that night
would part his body and head.
And Edwin he got into bed
and scarcely was asleep
When Emily’s cruel parents
soft into his room did creep.
V
They stabbed him, dragged him out of bed,
and to the sea did go,
They sent his body floating
down to the lowlands low.
As Emily she lay sleeping,
she had a dreadful dream;
She dreamed she saw Young Edwin’s blood
a-flowing like the stream.
VI
“Oh father, where’s the stranger
came here last night to lay?”
“Oh, he is dead, no tales can tell,”
the father he did say.
‘Then father, cruel father,
you’ll die a public show,
For the murdering of Young Edwin
that ploughed the Lowlands low
VII
“The fishes of the ocean swim
o’er my lover’s breast,
His body rolls in motion
I hope his soul’s at rest.
The shells upon the sea shore,
rolling to and fro,
Remind me of Young Edwin
that ploughed the lowlands low.”
VIII
So many a day she passed away
and tried to ease her mind,
Crying, “Oh my friends, my love is gone
and I am left behind.”
And Emma, broken hearted,
was to Bedlam forced to go,
Her shrieks were for Young Edwin
that ploughed the lowlands low.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Venite voi ragazzacci
ad ascoltare la mia canzone:
riguarda l’oro che conduce così
tanti alla rovina.
La giovane Emma era una cameriera (1)
e il suo amore un prode marinaio (2)
che solcava i mari per guadagnarsi abbastanza oro per il suo amore, così mi è stato detto
II
Navigò in mare per sette anni
e poi fece fece ritorno a casa.
e non appena mise piede sulla spiaggia
dal suo amore andò.
Andò alla casa della giovane Emma
per mostrarle tutto l’oro
che aveva guadagnato in mare
nelle terre basse (3).
III
“Mio padre gestisce una locanda
giù in riva al mare
vacci e restaci per la notte
e là aspettami.
Ci vediamo al mattino
non far sapere ai miei (4)
che ti chiami Edwin
che navigava nelle terre basse”
IV
Il giovane Edwin si mise a bere
fino all’ora di andare a letto
ignaro della spada che quella notte
gli avrebbe staccato la testa.
e Edwin andò a letto
e si era appena messo a dormire
che i crudeli genitori di Emily
piano nella sua stanza entrarono
V
Lo pugnalarono e lo trascinarono fuori dal letto e verso il mare andarono
e gettarono il suo corpo a galleggiare
giù negli abissi.
Appena Emma andò a letto
fece un sogno spaventoso
sognò di vedere il sangue del giovane Edwin
che scorreva come un torrente.
VI
“Oh padre, dov’è quello straniero
che è venuto qui a trascorrere la notte? “
“E’ morto e non può parlare”
disse il padre
“Oh padre, crudele padre
morirai sulla pubblica piazza
per l’omicidio del giovane Edwin
che navigava nelle terre basse “
VII
I pesci dell’oceano nuotano
sul petto del mio amore
il suo corpo è cullato dalle onde
spero che la sua anima trovi la pace.
Le conchiglie sulla spiaggia
rotolano su e giù (7)
e mi ricordano del giovane Edwin
che navigava nelle terre basse
VIII
Così molti giorni trascorsero
e lei cercava di dimenticare
lamentandosi “Amici, il mio amore è morto
e io sono rimasta indietro”
E Emma con il cuore spezzato
fu costretta ad andare a Bedlam (8),
le sue grida erano per il giovane Edwin
che navigava nelle terre basse

NOTE
7) this poetic image is variously transformed according to the locality and the activity carried out by Edwin  quest’immagine poetica è variamente trasformata a seconda delle località e dell’attività svolta dal giovane Edwin
8) the notorious London mental hospital, the Bethlem Royal Hospital was built in the Middle Ages in the area now occupied by the Liverpool station
famigerato manicomio di Londra, il Bethlem Royal Hospital fu costruito nel Medioevo nell’area oggi occupata dalla stazione di Liverpool

LINK
http://singout.org/2012/10/16/oh-father-cruel-father-you-will-die-a-public-show/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22884
http://www.contemplator.com/england/edwin.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/youngedwininthelowlandslow.html

Wild goose shanty

A.L. Lloyd writes “”One of the great halyard shanties, seemingly better-known in English ships than American ones, though some versions of it have become crossed with the American song called Huckleberry Hunting. From the graceful movement of its melody it is possible that this is an older shanty than most. Perhaps it evolved out of some long-lost lyrical song.” (from here)
Così  scrive A.L. Lloyd Così  scrive A.L. Lloyd “Una delle grandi halyard shanties, apparentemente più conosciuta nelle navi inglesi rispetto a quelle americane, anche se alcune versioni sono state incrociate con la canzone americana chiamata Huckleberry Hunting. Dal movimento aggraziato della melodia è possibile che questa sia una shanty più antica  delle altre. Forse si è evoluta da una canzone lirica perduta da tempo

This version is characterized by the description of a flock of wild geese flying over the sea .. and sometimes starts with “I’m the shanty man of the Wild Goose nation“. The melody was collected by W. Roy Mackenzie as he heard it from a sailor stationed in Nova Scotia (Canada)
Questa versione si caratterizza per la descrizione di uno stormo di oche selvatiche che sorvolano il mare.. e talvolta inizia con “I’m the shanty man of the Wild Goose nation”. La melodia è stata raccolta da W. Roy Mackenzie come la ascoltò da un marinaio di stanza in Nuova Scozia (Canada)

Louis Killen

in Black Flag (Assassin’s Creed)

Steeleye Span – Ranzo

Broken Social Scene in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


Did you ever see a wild goose (1)
Sailing o’er the ocean?
Ranzo, Ranzo, weigh heigh(hey)!
They’re just like them pretty girls,
When they gets the notion (2).
(I was out) The other morning
I was walking (went down) by the river.
When I saw a young girl walking
With her topsails all a-quiver. (3)
I said, “Pretty fair maid
And how are you this morning?”
She said “none the better
for the seeing of you”
Did you ever see a wild goose
Sailing o’er the ocean?
They’re just like them pretty girls,
When they gets the notion.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Hai mai visto un’oca selvatica navigare sull’oceano?
Ranzo, Ranzo, weigh heigh!
Sono proprio come le ragazzine
quando ricevono un regalino
L’altra mattina
stavo camminando lungo il fiume
quando vidi una giovane ragazza passeggiare con le sue vele di gabbia strette al vento.
Dissi ” Bella fanciulla
come va questa mattina?”
Lei disse “Non male
perchè ti ho incontrato”
Hai mai visto un’oca selvatica navigare sull’oceano?
Sono proprio come le ragazzine
quando ricevono un regalino.

NOTE
1) double sense the bird that rises from the water is a male anatomical part
doppio senso l’uccello che si alza dal pelo dell’acqua è una parte anatomica mschile
2) notions=oggetti di merceria, specchietti e perline di vetro; quindi sta per cose frivole, chincaglieria
2) un’espressione equivalente in italiano a mio avviso potrebbe essere “poppe al vento” Italo Ottonello precisa “with her topsails all a-quiver“= in italiano “con sue le vele di gabbia strette al vento” (ben tesate) – nel senso che aveva un seno prorompente.

FOLK VERSION

The story takes on an Irish connotation in the farewell meeting before he leaves for the sea: he consoles herlover by telling her that he is going to fight as a mercenary soldier against the English .. or that he is going to seek fortune overseas in the land of Freedom called America ..
La storia assume una connotazione più marcatamente irlandese e si configura come l’incontro d’addio tra due innamorati prima che lui parta per il mare: lui la consola dicendole che sta andando a combattere come soldato mercenario contro gli inglesi.. oppure che sta andando a cercare  fortuna oltreoceano nella terra della Libertà chiamata America..

Kate Rusby in Sleepless 1999


Did you see the Wild Goose
sailing on the ocean
Ranzo me boys oh Ranzo Ray
They’re just like them pretty girls
when they get the notion
Ranzo me boys oh Ranzo Ray
Chorus
Ranzo you’ll rue the day
As the Wild Goose sails away
As I was walking one evening by the river
I met with a pretty girl
my heart it was a quiver
I said “how are you doing this morning”
She said “none the better
for the seeing of you”
“You broke my heart oh you broke it full sore o
If I sail like the Wild Goose
you’ll break it no more o”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Avete visto l’Oca Selvatica
navigare sull’oceano
Ranzo ragazzi, Ranzo Ray
Sono proprio come le ragazzine
quando ricevono un regalino
Ranzo ragazzi, Ranzo Ray
Coro
Ranzo vincerai il giorno 
mentre l’Oca Selvatica naviga lontano
Mentre camminavo una sera lungo il fiume
mi incontrai con una bella ragazza,
il mio cuore era in fibrillazione
Dissi “come va questa mattina?”
Lei disse “non male
perchè ti ho incontrato.
Tu mi spezzi il cuore e lo lasci pieno di dolore
se salpo come Oca selvatica,
non lo spezzerai più”

LINK
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/wildgoose
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/wildgooseshanty.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8009
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#The_Wild_Goose_Shanty
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46147
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151478
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45241

WHISKEY JOHNNY

maglione guernseySottotitolato “Whiskey is the life of man”, Whiskey Johhny è una sea shanty  diventata popolare anche nel circuito folk. Dato il tema non poteva diventare che una favorita drinking song irlandese!

A.L. Lloyd commenta nelle note “This halyard shanty was most often sung when the men were working aft near the skipper’s quarters, in the enduring hope that his heart might melt, and he would order a tot for all hands.” (Blow Boys Blow 1957).
Per alare la cima all’unisono i marinai si distendono lungo la drizza trascinano all’unisono la parola Whisky! fino a Whiski-i-i-i. alla successiva, John-ny! Enfatizzata come un segnale, la squadra ala con tutte le forze riunite, iniziando a sollevare il pennone lungo l’albero, trascinando con sè la vela.” (da Italo Ottonello)

ALTRI TITOLI: Whisky Johnny, Whisky for my Johnny, Whiskey O, Whiskey oh and Johnny oh, John, Rise Her Up, Rise’r Up, Rise Me Up From Down Below

ASCOLTA da Assassin’s Creed


Whiskey(1) is the life of man,
Whiskey, Johnny(2)!
O, whiskey is the life of man,
Whiskey for my Johnny O!
O, I drink whiskey when I can(3)
Whiskey from an old tin can(4),
Whiskey gave me a broken nose!
Whiskey made me pawn my clothes,
Whiskey drove me around Cape Horn(5),
It was many a month when I was gone,
I thought I heard the old man say:
“I’ll treat my crew in a decent way(6)
A glass of grog(7) for every man!
And a bottle for the Chantey Man”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whiskey(1) è la vita dell’uomo,
Whiskey, marinaio!(2)
Whiskey è la vita dell’uomo,
Whiskey, per il mio marinaio!
Oh bevo whiskey a più non posso(3)
Whiskey da una vecchia lattina(4)
per il Whiskey mi sono rotto il naso
per il Whiskey ho impegnato i vestiti
il Whiskey mi ha portato a Capo Horn(5)
e sono molti mesi che sono partito.
Credo di aver sentito il capitano dire:
“Tratterò bene l’equipaggio(6)
Un bicchiere di grog(7) per ogni uomo
e una bottiglia per il cantante”

NOTE
1) Gli Irlandesi si attribuiscono l’invenzione del whiskey partendo nientemeno che da San Patrizio che, nel V sec, avrebbe portato dal suo viaggio in Terra Santa l’alambicco, all’epoca utilizzato per distillare solo i profumi, e convertito dai monaci irlandesi in divina macchina per produrre l’Uisce Beathe (in gaelico) ossia “l’acqua di vita”, dal latino “aquavitae” pronunciata come “Iish-kee” e inglesizzato a partire del XII secolo in whisky. Fu sempre un monaco, San Colombano, a insegnare i segreti della distillazione agli Scozzesi. Tuttavia gli Scozzesi si ostinano a dire che loro distillavano già tre secoli prima della nascita di Cristo! Così whiskey è il termine più appropriato per indicare il whisky irlandese. (vedere le differenze)
2) Il marinaio per antonomasia è  Johnny una nota in contemplator.com che dice “The name John was used from the time of Packet Ships for merchant seamen and particularly for mariners from Liverpool.”
3) Joanna Colcord in Songs of American Sailormen, scrive “I’ll drink whiskey while I can,”
4) si riferisce all’alambicco rudimentale con cui si  distilla whisky illegale. Al poitin (come dicono gli irlandesi) si attribuiscono poteri di guarigione da tutti i mali (utilizzato più comunemente come digestivo o per la cura del raffreddore), è considerato più genericamente un elisir  contro l’invecchiamento, ma il suo scopo principale è quello di “deliziare il cuore” o più   poeticamente “bring a shock of joy  to the blood” ( in italiano: “dare una scossa di gioia al sangue”).
5) il marinaio si è ubriacato ed è stato arruolato a forza oppure ha finito i suoi soldi e ha ripreso il mare. Un vero peccato per un così appassionato amante di whisky perchè sulle navi si beveva rum (diluito con acqua)!
6) capitano e ufficiali facevano rispettare una dura disciplina a bordo delle navi, ma da loro dipendevano i premi consistenti soprattutto in razioni extra di grog!
7) grog
: colloquiale termine usato in Irlanda come sinonimo di drinking; è un termine molto antico e ha il significato di “liquore” o “bevanda alcolica”, ma nello specifico è una bevanda introdotta nella Royal Navy nel 1740, dopo la conquista britannica della Giamaica: ai marinai venivano date varie razioni giornaliere di rum diluito con l’acqua. continua

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


Whisky—Johnny

O whisky is the life of man
Whisky for me Johnny
Oh I wish I had some whisky now
Whisky—Johnny
Oh I wish I had some whisky now
Whisky for me Johnny
whisky gave my this red nose
whisky made me pawn my clothes.
O if whisky comes here me now
it’s something that comes and goes
O whisky killed my mam and dad
And whisky drove my brother mad
whisky killed my sister Sue
whisky killed the all ship crew
I whish I was in London town
Till make that girl fly high
A girl for every sailor man
and Whisky in an old tin can
Whisky here whiskey there
whisky whisky everywhere
Oh whisky made the old man say
“One more pull and than belay”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whisky, marinaio!
Whisky è la vita dell’uomo,
Whisky per il mio marinaio!
vorrei avere del whisky,
Whisky, marinaio!
vorrei avere del whisky
Whisky per il mio marinaio!
il whisky mi ha dato questo naso rosso
per whisky ho impegnato i vestiti
se il whisky venisse da me
è qualcosa che va e viene
il whisky ha ucciso mamma e babbo
e ha fatto impazzire mio fratello
il whisky ha ucciso mia sorella Sue
il whisky ha ucciso tutta la ciurma della nave, vorrei essere a Londra
per far volare in alto quella ragazza
una donna per ogni marinaio
eil  whisky in una vecchia lattina
whisky su e whisky giù
whisky dappertutto
whisky fece dire al vecchio
“Ancora un tiro e poi lasciare”

WHISKEY, O (JOHN, RISE HER UP)

Una seconda versione ha un coro che si sviluppa su più versi e viene ripetuto dopo ogni due frasi dello shantyman; la versione, resa popolare da Louis Killen e i Clancy Brothers, si presenta in un’infinità di varianti

ASCOLTA The Clancy brothers & Tommy Makem

Whiskey is the life of man
Always was since the world began
Whiskey, O, Johnny, O
Rise her up from down below.
Whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, O
Up aloft this yard must go,
John rise her up from down below.
Now whiskey made me pawn me clothes
And whiskey gave me a broken nose
Now whiskey is the life of man
Whiskey from an old tin can
I thought I heard the first mate say
I treats me crew in a decent way
A glass of whiskey all around
And a bottle full for the shanty man
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il Whiskey è la vita dell’uomo,
da che mondo è mondo
Whiskey, marinaio!
Issala in alto.
Whiskey, whiskey, whiskey
in alto questo pennone (8) deve andare
John portala (9) su dal basso.
per il Whiskey ho impegnato i vestiti
per il Whiskey mi sono rotto il naso
Il Whiskey è la vita di un uomo,
Whiskey da una vecchia lattina
Credo di aver sentito il primo ufficiale dire:
“Tratterò bene l’equipaggio
Un bicchiere di whisky per tutti
e una bottiglia piena per il cantante”

NOTE
8) yard= pennone; è l’asta orizzontale messa in croce con l’albero che regge le vele e prende il nome dalla relativa vela.
9) si riferisce alla vela trascinata in alto con il pennone

LA VERSIONE FOLK

e così diventa una canzone d’intrattenimento ..

ASCOLTA Bob Roberts in Sea song and shanties 1950

ASCOLTA Michael Gira in “Son of Rogues Gallery – Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys” ANTI 2013


O whisky is the life of man
Whisky—Johnny
O I’ll get whisky where I can
Whisky for me Johnny
O whisky here and whisky there,
Whisky—Johnny
O I’ll get whisky everywhere
Whisky for me Johnny
O whisky made me pawn my clothes
And whisky gave my this red nose
O whisky killed my poor old dad
And whisky drove my mother mad
O whisky hot and whisky cold
O whisky new and whisky old
O whisky up and whisky down
O whisky all around the town
O champagne’s good and rum is free
But whisky’s good enough for me
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il whisky è la vita dell’uomo
Whisky – marinaio
e avrò whisky a go-go
whisky per me marinaio
whisky qui e whisky là
Whisky — marinaio

ci sarà whisky ovunque
whisky per me, marinaio
per whisky ho impegnato i vestiti
e il whisky mi ha dato questo naso rosso
il whisky ha ucciso il mio povero babbo
e ha fatto impazzire mia madre
whisky caldo e whisky freddo
whisky giovane e whisky invecchiato
whisky su e whisky giù
whisky per tutta la città.
Lo champagne è buono e il rum è gratis, ma il whisky è il meglio!

…e una irish song
ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm – Whiskey Johnny in The Boathouse che riprende in gran parte la versione dei Clancy Brothers (1973)


Whiskey-o, Johnny-o
Rise her up from down below
I
Oh whiskey is the life of man
Always was since the world began
O whiskey made me pawn me clothes
And whiskey gave me a broken nose
Chorus
Whiskey-o, Johnny-o
Rise her up from down below
Whiskey, whiskey, whiskey-o
Up aloft this yard must go
John rise her up from down below
II
O whisky killed my poor old dad
And whisky drove my mother mad
III
Whiskey from an old tin can(4)
Oh whiskey for the celtic man
Whiskey here whiskey there
whiskey almost everywhere
IV
I thought I heard the first mate say
I treats me crew in a decent way(6)
whisky up and whisky down
A glass of whiskey all around
V
Oh whiskey is the life of man
Always was since the world began
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Whiskey, marinaio
issala su
I
Oh Whiskey è la vita dell’uomo,
da quando il mondo ha avuto inizio
per il Whiskey ho impegnato i vestiti
per il Whiskey mi sono rotto il naso
CORO
Whiskey, marinaio!
issala su
Whiskey, Whiskey, Whiskey,
in alto questo pennone deve andare
John portala su.

II
Il whisky ha ucciso il mio povero babbo
e ha fatto impazzire mia madre
III
Whiskey da una vecchia lattina(4)
whiskey per il celtico
whisky qui e whisky là
whisky dappertutto
IV
Credo di aver sentito il primo ufficiale dire:
“Tratterò bene l’equipaggio”(6)
Whisky su e whisky giù
un bicchiere di whisky per tutti
V
Whisky è la vita dell’uomo
così è da che mondo è mondo

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/whiskeyjohnny.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/WhiskeyJohnny/colcord.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/whiskey2
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/330-whiskey-is-the-life-of-man
http://anitra.net/chanteys/whiskey.html

Heave away, my Johnny

Read the post in English

Il secondo sea shanty cantato da A.L. Lloyd nel film Moby Dick, girato da John Huston nel 1956 , è un windlass shanty o un capstan shanty. Come si vede bene nella sequenza è intonato dallo shantyman al verricello dell’ancora quando non era ancora in adozione il modello brake windlass . (vedi parte prima)
Kenneth S. Goldstein ha commentato nelle note di copertina dell’album “Thar She Blows” di Ewan MacColl e A.L. Lloyd (1957) “La sea shanty preferita per il lavoro ai verricelli, quando la nave veniva portata fuori dal porto all’inizio di un viaggio. Una cima robusta si agganciava  ad anello sulla banchina e girava intorno a una bitta del molo e di nuovo al verricello della nave. Lo shantyman si sedeva sulla testa del verricello e cantava mentre i marinai che rispondevano nel coro si sforzavano di girare il verricello. Come manovravano, la corda si avvolgeva attorno al tamburo e la nave avanzava piano verso il mare in mezzo alle lacrime delle donne e agli applausi degli uomini. Questa versione fu cantata dai balenieri dell’Oceano Indiano negli anni ’40 dell’Ottocento“.

Il brano inizia a 1:50, quando viene tirata via la passerella e viene azionato il vecchio spike windlass, modello sostituito dal brake windlass verso il 1840



There’s some that’s bound for New York Town
and other’s is bound for France,
Heave away, my Johnnies, heave away,
And some is bound for the Bengal Bay
to teach them whales a dance,
and away my Johnny boys, we’re all bound to go.
Come all you hard workin’ sailors,
Who round the cape of storm (1);
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never been born.
1) la maledizione di ogni marinaio all’epoca dei velieri, Capo Horn

E tuttavia il brano presenta una grande varietà di testi anche con storie diverse, così a volte è una canzone delle baleniere altre volte un canto d’emigrazione. (una raccolta di varie versioni testuali qui).

WHALING SHANTY: HEAVE AWAY MY JOHNNY (JOHNNIES) – WE’RE ALL BOUND TO GO

Doppiare Capo Horn era un’impresa temuta dai marinai, essendo un tratto di mare quasi perennemente sconvolto dalle tempeste, cimitero di numerose navi sfortunate.
Il vento dominava di prua, così la nave veniva spinta indietro per giorni e giorni con l’equipaggio stremato dallo sforzo e dall’acqua gelida che rompeva da tutte le parti.

Louis Killen in Farewell Nancy 1964 che scrive nelle note: “l’argano per salpare (capstan) è in posizione verticale e viene spinto da uomini che arrancano in tondo. Un verricello, che serve più o meno alla stessa funzione, è in orizzontale ed è ruotato con delle barre spinte su e giù. Quindi le canzoni dei verricelli (windlass shanty) sono generalmente più ritmiche di quelle all’argano (capstan shanty). Solitamente Heave Away è considerato una windlass song. Originariamente aveva le parole riguardanti un viaggio di emigranti irlandesi in America. Più tardi, questo testo è venuto meno. La versione cantata qui è stata “ideata” da A.L Lloyd per il film di Mody Dick
Assassin’s Creed Rogue


There’s some that’s bound for New York town,
And some that’s bound for France;
Heave away, my Johnny heave away.
And some that’s bound for the Bengal Bay,
To teach them whales a dance;
Heave away, my Johnny boy
we’re all bound to go.

The pilot he is awaiting for,
The turnin’ of the tide;
And then, me girls,
we’ll be gone again,
With a good and a westerly wind.
And farewell to you,
my Kingston girls (1),
Farewell, St. Andrews dock;
If ever we return again,
We’ll make your cradles rock.
Come all you hard workin’ sailor men,
Who round the cape of storm;
Be sure you’ve boots and oilskins,
Or you’ll wish you never was born.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ecco che alcuni partono per la città di New York
e altri per la Francia
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny, vira a lasciare
E altri partono per
il Golfo del Bengala
ad insegnare la danza alle balene
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny,
siamo in partenza.
Il pilota è in attesa
che cambi la marea
e poi mie ragazze, la faremo
andare ancora
con una buona brezza da ovest.
E addio a voi,
ragazze di Kingston (1)
addio moli di St Andrews
se mai ritorneremo ancora,
faremo dondolare le vostre culle.
Venite tutti marinai, uomini che
che lavorano sodo
che doppiano il capo delle tempeste
accertatevi di avere stivali e cerate
o non vorrete essere mai nati

NOTE
1) Kingston upon Hull (o, più semplicemente, Hull) è un rinomato porto di pescatori da cui fin dal medioevo partivano le flottiglie per la pesca nel Mare del Nord. Nella canzone le navi in partenza si dirigono anche nell’oceano indiano (vedi rotte)

Barbara Brown & Tom Brown  in Just Another Day 2014  dal repertorio dei canti marinareschi di Minehead (Somerset) raccolti da Cecil Sharp da due sole fonti – i capitani in pensione Lewis e Vickery.

trad e versi di Tom Brown
I
As I walked out one morning all in the month of May,
Heave away, me Johnny, heave away,
I thought upon the ships and trade that sailed out of our bay,
Heave away, me jolly boys, we’re all bound away.
II
Sometimes we’re bound for Wexford town and sometimes for St. John,
And sometimes to the Med we go, just to get the sun.
III
We’re running to St. Austell Bay, with coal we’re loaded down;
A storm came down upon us before we reached Charlestown.
IV
There’s dried and pickled herring we’ve shipped around the world,
Two hundred years of fishing, until they disappeared.
V
It’s green oak (1) bound for Swansea town, it’s salt we bring from France,
But it’s down into the Indies to lead those girls a dance.
VI
With a cargo now of kelp, me boys, for Bristol now we’re bound,
To help them make the glass, you know, all in that famous town.
VII
Flour and malt and bark and grain are on the Bristol run;
The Jane and Susan beat them all in eighteen-sixty-one.
VIII
We’ve sailed the world in ships of fame that came from Minehead hard,
And Unanimity she was the last from Manson’s Yard.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Mentre passeggiavo un mattino nel mese di Maggio
vira mio Johnny, vira a lasciare
pensavo alle navi commerciali che salpavano dalla nostra baia,
vira a lasciare, mio Johnny,
siamo in partenza.
II
A volte si parte per la città di Wexford e a volte per  St. John
e a volte nel Mediterraneo andiamo,
solo per prendere il sole
III
Stavamo correndo verso la Baia di San Austell, con il carbone da scaricare e una tempesta ci colpì prima di raggiungere Charlestown.
IV
Ci sono aringhe affumicate e sotto sale che abbiamo spedito in tutto il mondo,
duecento anni di pescato finchè è scomparso
V
E’ un giovane legno in partenza per la città di Swansea, è il sale che portiamo dalla Francia, ma è nelle Indie che insegniamo la danza a quelle ragazze
VI
Con un carico di alghe, ragazzi, siamo in partenza per Bristol,
ad aiutarli a fare il vetro, si sa, in quella città famosa.
VII
Farina e malto, pelli e grano sono sulla rotta di Bristol;
la Jane e la Susan li batterono tutti a diciotto e sessantuno.
VIII
Abbiamo navigato il mondo in navi di fama che provenivano da Minehead,
e l’Unanimity era l’ultima da Manson’s Yard.

NOTE
* prima stesura, da rivedere, alcune frasi sono tradotte in senso letterale, ma non ne ho compreso il significato
1) letteralmente  quercia verde, è modo marinaresco per dire vascello, essendo il legno di quercia ampiamente usato un tempo per la costruzione dello scafo

LA VERSIONE DI TERRANOVA

La variante pubblicata da Genevieve Lehr (Come And I Will Sing You: A Newfoundland Songbook #49) è stata raccolta da Pius Power, Southeast Bight, (Terranova) nel 1979 Genevieve Lehr scrive “questa è una canzone che è stata spesso usata per stabilire un ritmo per tirare su le ancore a bordo delle golette di pesca. Molte di queste ‘heave-up shanties’ erano vecchie ballate o contemporanee, e molto spesso versi d’attualità erano inventati al momento e aggiunti alla canzone per renderla lunga quanto il compito stesso”

The Fables in Tear The House Down, 1998 un’allegra versione con un arrangiamento decisamente country


Come get your duds(1) in order ‘cause we’re bound to cross the water.
Heave away, me jollies,
heave away.
Come get your duds in order ‘cause we’re bound to leave tomorrow.
Heave away me jolly boys,
we’re all bound away
.
Sometimes we’re bound for Liverpool,
sometimes we’re bound for Spain.
But now we’re bound for old St. John’s (2) where all the girls are dancing.
I wrote me love a letter,
I was on the Jenny Lind.
I wrote me love a letter and I signed it with a ring.
Now it’s farewell Nancy darling, ‘cause it’s now I’m going to leave you.
“You promised that me you’d marry me, but how you did deceive me.(3)”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Venite a preparare la vostra sacca, perchè stiamo per attraversare il mare
virate a lasciare, compagni,
virate a lasciare
Venite a preparare la vostra sacca,  perchè partiremo domani
virate a lasciare, allegri compagni,
siamo in partenza.
a volte partiamo per Liverpool
a volte partiamo per la Spagna
ma ora siamo in partenza per il vecchio St. John, dove tutte le ragazze ballano.
Ho scritto al mio amore una lettera, mentre ero sulla Jenny Lind.
Ho scritto al mio amore una lettera e l’ho firmata con un anello
e ora addio mia cara Nancy
perchè ti devo lasciare adesso
“mi hai promesso che mi avresti sposato, ma ora mi lasci”

NOTE
1) duds  in questo contesto significa “vestiti” ma più genericamente la grossa sacca di tela contenente il bagaglio del marinaio
2) Saint John’s, conosciuta in italiano come San Giovanni di Terranova per l’esperimento di Marconi, è una città del Canada, capitale della provincia di Terranova e Labrador, situata nella penisola di Avalon, che fa parte dell’isola di Terranova.
3) chiaramente un verso “volante” preso dai tanti farewell qui è Nancy che risponde

broadside ballad: The Banks of the Sweet Dundee ( Short Sharp Shanties)
emigration song: The Irish girl or Mr Tapscott (Heave away my Johnnies)

FONTI
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/heave-away,-my-johnnies—kingston.html
http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/722-heave-away-my-johnny
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/heaveawaymyjohnny.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/36/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/24/heave.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/02/heave.htm http://aliverpoolfolksongaweek.blogspot.it/2011/07/13-were-all-bound-to-go.html

ROLLING DOWN TO OLD MAUI (MOHEE): THE LOST PARADISE

Una whaling sea song che esprime la felicità della ciurma, provata dal clima polare, ansiosa di lasciare il mare artico per far ritorno a Maui (isole Hawaii). Si tratta di una “forebitter” song per le ore di riposo e svago dei marinai che appare trascritta in varie versioni testuali verso la metà del 1800. La varietà di versioni testuali giunte fino a noi ci testimoniano la popolarità della canzone sulle baleniere.

Le isole Hawaii incorporate negli U.S.A. solo alle soglie del 1960 sono state “scoperte” da James Cook nel 1778 e battezzate isole Sandwich dal nome di uno dei principali suoi finanziatori (John Montagu Lord di Sandwich, si proprio quello del tramezzino!)
A mezza via tra Asia e America diventarono presto un passaggio obbligato per le navi mercantili e le baleniere. Sebbene più in generale le isole della Polinesia non diventino “colonie” di fatto sono state ridotte a pedine al servizio delle potenze colonialistiche del tempo. Un reportage sull’isola ci viene da Herman Melville nel suo primo romanzo Typee (in italiano Taipi) 1846 dove in appendice mostra tutta l’illusorietà del paradiso hawaiano. (continua)

All’epoca della canzone il lavoro di baleniere era molto pericoloso e praticato da uomini duri e incuranti del pericolo, che dovevano spingersi nel Mare Artico dove il ghiaccio ricopre terra e oceano, perchè le balene erano diventate sempre più rare negli altri mari; uomini che stavano fuori per almeno quattro o cinque mesi prima di rientrare a casa e che finirono per considerare “casa” i caldi e “accoglienti” litorali delle isolette polinesiane.

La versione che conosciamo è quella riportata da Stan Hugill negli anni 70 che dice di aver imparato da Paddy Griffith intorno al 1920 e tuttavia si trovano diverse versioni testuali collezionate in varie raccolte del XX secolo. La melodia risale al XVIII secolo ed è conosciuta anche con il nome di “The Miller of Dee” (anche usata per “Lowlands, Lowlands, Low.”). Ma nelle collezioni date in stampa la canzone è stata abbinata anche ad altre melodie (Frederick P. Harlow, Gale Huntington). Gale Huntington nel suo libro “Songs the Whalemen Sang” (1970) ci dice che il testo arriva dalla trascrizione sul diario di bordo del vascello Atkins Adams (1858), mentre la melodia viene dalla raccolta “Chanteying Aboard American Ships” (1962) di Frederick P. Harlow. Harlow il quale ha trascritto la melodia dalla voce di R. W. Nye capitano del C. Goss (1947). La differente grafia con cui è scritta la parola Maui deriva dalla trascrizione così come viene pronunciata “Mo-hee”.

Secondo Hugill “…(it) is probably the work of some Bowhead whaleman who had experienced the rigors of the Kamchatka Sea and warmth of the Ship Girls’ welcome. .. This song I would place at an earlier date than the booklet (A. L. Lloyd’s LEVIATHAN recording) gives (1850). Maui was the Hawaiian island where Lahaina, the greatest ‘homeport’ of the Bowhead whalers was situated and whalemen were rolling down from the Arctic to this excellent sheltered haven as early as 1820.”

Whaling-hawaii

Louis Killen in Steady as She Goes 1977 Nelle note scrive: “Stan Hugill of Liverpool says that as early as 1820 Maui, one of the Hawaiian Islands (then the Sandwich Islands), was considered “home” by the Yankee sailors who hunted the northern grounds of the Behring Straits for right and bowhead whales. This is an off-watch song, as distinct from a working song, of whalermen longing for the women and weather of better latitudes.”

E tuttavia è stato il musicista canadese Stan Roger a rendere popolare la canzone e a farne una sorta di standard interpretativo
ASCOLTA Stan Roger in Between the Breaks… Live! 1979

ASCOLTA The Dreadnoughts in Uncle Touchy Goes To College 2011

ASCOLTA Ernesto Villarreal & TJ Hull bella la voce, notevole l’arrangiamento del violino

Una versione decisamente danzerina in stile “california” dei Gaelic Storm

ASCOLTA Todd Rundgren in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013

su Spotify


I
It’s a damn tough life,
full of toil and strife,
we whalermen undergo,
And we won’t give a damn
when the gales are done
how hard the winds did blow,
For we’re homeward bound
from the Arctic grounds
with a good ship taut and free,
And we won’t give a damn
when we drink our rum
with the girls from old Maui.
CHORUS:
Rolling down to old Maui(1),
me boys,
rolling down to old Maui,
We’re homeward bound
from the Arctic grounds,

rolling down to old Maui.
II
Once more we sail
with the northerly gales
through the ice and wind and rain,
Them coconut fronds,
them tropical shores,
we soon shall see again;
Six hellish months we’ve passed away
on the cold Kamchatka sea(2),
But now we’re bound
from the Arctic grounds,
rolling down to old Maui.
III
Once more we sail
with the Northerly gales,
towards our island home(3),
Our whaling done,
our mainmast sprung,
and we ain’t got far to roam;
Our stuns’l’s bones(4) is carried away,
what care we for that sound,
A living gale is after us,
thank God we’re homeward bound.
IV
How soft the breeze
through the island trees,
now the ice is far astern,
Them native maids,
them tropical glades,
is awaiting our return;
Even now their big brown
eyes look out,
hoping some fine day to see,
Our baggy sails, running ‘fore the gales,
rolling down to old Maui.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
E ‘una fottuta vita,
piena di fatiche e lotte,
che noi cacciatori di balene subiamo
e non ci frega niente delle tempeste
e di come i venti soffino forte,
perchè siamo di ritorno
dalla terra artica
con una buona nave disciplinata e indipendente
e non ci frega di niente
quando beviamo il rum
con le ragazze della vecchia Maui.
CORO
Ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui,
ragazzi,

ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui,
siamo di ritorno dalla terra artica,
ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui
II
Ancora una volta si naviga
con il vento fortissimo da nord
attraverso ghiaccio e vento e pioggia,
e quelle fronde di cocco,
quelle terre tropicali,
presto vedremo di nuovo;
Sei mesi infernali abbiamo passato lontano sul freddo mare Kamchatka,(2)
ma ora siamo di ritorno
dalla terra artica,
ci muoviamo verso la vecchia Maui
III
Ancora una volta si naviga
con il vento fortissimo da nord,
in direzione della nostra isola(3),
finita la caccia alle balene
alzato il nostro albero maestro,
e non c’è da andare ancora lontano;
le vele addizionali(4) sono spazzate via,
non ci preoccupiamo per quel suono,
una tempesta infernale ci viene dietro,
ma grazie a Dio siamo di ritorno a casa!
IV
Come dolce è la brezza
tra gli alberi dell’isola,
ora il ghiaccio è lontana dalla poppa
quelle fanciulle native,
quelle radure tropicali,
attendono il nostro ritorno;
anche ora i loro grandi
occhi castani scrutano,
sperando di vedere un bel giorno,
le nostre ampie vele,
arrivare prima della tempesta,
muovendosi verso la vecchia Maui

hawaii-maidenNOTE
1) I primi sbarchi dei balenieri nelle isole Hawaii risalgono al 1819 proprio a Lahaina l’allora capitale delle Hawaii. “According to Starbuck’s History of the American Whale Fishery (1877 [1989]), whalers began working the northwest coast of N. America 1835, got up around Kamchatka to begin the bowhead fishery in 1843, and in 1848, Captain Royce of the bark Superior, out of Sag Harbor, N.Y., was the first to work a season North of the Bering Straits. Royce wrote that since they were the first to whales on those grounds, the whales were comparatively tame and easy to strike” stralciato da Mudcat (qui) Il porto di Lahaina non era l’unico nelle isole Hawaii (c’erano Hilo e Honolulu) ma era indubbiamente molto frequentato dalle baleniere americane e dal punto di vista urbanistico venne via via assumendo l’aspetto di una cittadina del New England.

Balenieri e missionari arrivarono a Lahaina all’inizio degli anni ’20 del XIX secolo, ma presto entrarono in conflitto. Poco dopo essere giunto nell’isola, dove era sbarcato nel 1823, William Richards, primo missionario protestante di Lahaina, convertì al cristianesimo il governatore di Maui, Hoapili. Grazie all’influenza di Richards, Hoapili promulgò delle leggi che punivano l’ubriachezza e i facili costumi, per cui i balenieri dovettero rivolgersi altrove per trovare alcolici e donne dopo aver trascorso mesi in mare e non gradirono affatto l’ingerenza puritana dei missionari. Nel 1826 il capitano inglese William Buckle fece scalo a Maui e scoprì che a Lahaina era stato introdotto un nuovo ‘tabù dei missionari’ contro gli uomini che correvano dietro alle gonnelle. L’equipaggio, infuriato, scese a terra per vendicarsi di Richards, a fianco del quale però si schierò un gruppo di hawaiani cristianizzati che costrinsero i balenieri ad andarsene. Nel 1827 il governatore Hoapili fece arrestare il capitano della nave John Palmer per aver fatto salire a bordo delle donne, e come rappresaglia l’equipaggio prese a cannonate la casa di Richards. Il capitano fu rilasciato, ma le leggi – e le tensioni – rimasero. Dopo la morte del governatore Hoapili le leggi contro gli alcolici e la prostituzione furono fatte rispettare con minore severità e i balenieri tornarono a frequentare Lahaina. Verso la metà del XIX secolo i due terzi dei balenieri che arrivavano alle Hawaii sbarcavano a Lahaina, che prese il posto di Honolulu come porto più importante dell’arcipelago. La caccia alle balene cominciò a dare segni di crisi intorno al 1860, in conseguenza dell’impoverimento delle ultime riserve dell’Artico, e ricevette infine il colpo di grazia dall’emergere dell’industria petrolifera. Con la scomparsa dei balenieri, Lahaina divenne una sorta di città fantasma. (tratto da qui)
2) alcuni propendono stia per indicare il mare di Bering (che nelle mappe ottocentesche era più genericamente indicato come Artic Sea) scritto su alcune mappe sempre ottocentesche come Kamchatka sea , che delimitano più strettamente la zona polare
3) l’isola è oramai diventata casa loro
4) Stuns’l  = studding sail o studsail si prunincia stuns’l, sono le vele addizionali poste lateralmente rispetto alle vele quadre che in italiano si dicono (partendo dall’alto) coltellaccino, coltellaccio e scopamare con le relative aste di sostegno (booms). Bones o è termine gergale marinaresco o è un refuso e sta per boom. Le vele addizionali sono dispiegate con il bel tempo e il vento favorevole per prendere la massima velocità. E tuttavia con il cattivo tempo vengono ammainate perchè c’è il rischio che siano strappate via. La frase vuole dire i marinai preferiscono far garrire tutte le vele anche con il rischio di danneggiarle pur di arrivare prima a Maui!

strofa aggiuntiva V (in Stan Hugill)
And now we’re anchored in the bay
with the Kanaka’s(5) all around
With chants and soft aloha ois(oes),
they greet us homeward bound;
And now ashore we’ll have some fun,
we’ll paint them beaches red(6);
Awaken in the arms of an island maid
with a big fat aching head(7).

(Traduzione italiano):
adesso siamo all’ancora alla baia
con le hawaiane(5) tutt’intorno,
con canti e dolci “aloha”
che salutano il nostro ritorno a casa;
e ora a terra ci divertiremo
tingeremo le loro spiagge di rosso(6), risvegliandoci fra le braccia di una fanciulla nativa
con un grande fottuto mal di testa(7)

5) “kanakas” — kanaka is the Hawaiian word for man, or person, or human being. Another word for man is “kane”, which is specifically male, as opposed to “wahine”, woman più in generale indica gli “Hawaiian.”
6) si riferisce al sangue delle balene, oggi l’isola di Maui è il punto di partenza da dicembre a maggio per il “whale waching” quando le megattere migrano verso le acque calde hawaiane per accoppiarsi e partorire. ” Be Aware Whale ” è il motto del Pacific Whale Foundation che ogni anno organizza la giornata mondiale delle balene per festeggiare il ritorno delle balene nell’isola. Se proprio non potete fare a meno di visitare l’isola un ottimo vademecum di Mattia Pedrani qui
7) noto effetto postumo di una colossale sbornia

APPROFONDIMENTO
Jack Tar nelle sea shanty
The Bonny Ship The Diamond

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/rollingdowntooldmaui.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/maui.htm http://www.jsward.com/shanty/old_maui.html http://www.8notes.com/scores/5512.asp
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33324
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94585