Morag and the Kelpie

Leggi in italiano

In the most placid rivers of Ireland and in the dark depths of the Scottish lakes live water demons, fairy creatures, that feed on human flesh: they are “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich- mhara “(in English sea horse); to want to be picky kelpie lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while each uisge prefers the lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both. Similar creatures are also told in Norse legends (Bäckahästen, the river horse) – and Germanic (nix in the form of fish or frog). (first part)

MORAG AND THE KELPIE

At the summer pastures of the Highlands they are still told of the beautiful Morag (Marion) seduced by a kelpie in human form; she, while noticing the strangeness of her husband, did not understand his true nature, if not after the birth of their child and … she decided to abandoning baby in swaddling clothes and husband shapeshifter!

On the Isle of Skye they still sing a song in Gaelic, ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ or ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) the “Lullaby of the kelpie” a melancholy air with which the kelpie cradled his child without a mother, and at the same time a plea to Morag to return to them, both he and the child needed her.
Of this lament we know several textual versions handed down to today in the Hebrides. The melodies revolve around an old Scottish aria entitled “Crodh Chailein” (in English “Colin’s cattle) evidently considered a melody of the fairies.
Another song, sweet and melancholic at the same time, is entitled Song of the Kelpie or even ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

So translates from Scottish Gaelic Tom Thomson “I got up early, it would have been better not to” (see)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Scottish gaelic
Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
English translation *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
NOTE
English translation also here
1)  the kelpie, suffering from loneliness, leaves the lake early in the morning and takes on human form
2) the shapeshifter promises food and comfort to the girl to convince her to follow him, but he warns her, he is a nocturnal creature and will not wake up with her in the morning!
3) gamhna = cattle between 1 year and 2 years translates Tom Thomson stitks; that is heifer, the cow that has not yet given birth, the verse in addition to qualifying the work of the girl (herdswoman) also wants to be a compliment, in Italian “bella manza” as a busty woman, with abundant and seductive shapes
4) the kelpie remembers the night meeting when they had sex (and obviously nine months later their son was born)
5) after the good memories of the past it comes the present, the woman has discovered the true nature of her companion and she dislikes their child
6) continuing in the comparison the kelpie calls “calf” its baby, that is “small child”
7) A typical “exposition” of fairy children is described. A practice of “birth control” widespread in the countryside of Europe, was the abandonment of newborns in the forest, so that fairies would take care of them; once the practice was widespread both against illegitimate people, and newborns with obvious physical deformations or ill-looking. The custom of “exposing” the baby was connected with the belief that he was “swapped” or kidnapped by the fairies and replaced with a changeling, a shapeshifter who for a while resembles the human child, but ultimately always takes its true appearance.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson translates = speckled band (of withy). I searched the dictionary: it is a crown made by intertwining the branches of willow; it reminds me of the Celtic crowns of flowers and leaves

 

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald recorded it under the title “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” in 2001 (from Colla Mo Rùn) following the collection of Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

english translation *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II and IV
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
scottish gaelic
I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà

NOTE
1) The kelpie sings the lullaby to its child abandoned by the human mother and comforts him by telling him that when he grows up he’ll be a little heartbreaker

With the title of ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan the same story is present in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais, from the voice of three witnesses of the Isle of Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

A similar story is told in the island of Benbecula with the title of Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg see


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 sings another fragment with the title “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (see the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser below)

English translation *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling! Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.

NOTE
1) Mhórag or Mór is the name of the maiden loved by the kelpie
2) it is the incessant cry of the child abandoned by his human mother in the cold and without food
3) mountain between Gesture and Portree on the Isle of Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

With the title “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, the same fragment sung by Caera is also reported in the book of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (page 94)

Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
II
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
III
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

Sources
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

Kelpie: water shapeshifter of the Celtic folklore

Leggi in italiano

In the most placid rivers of Ireland and in the dark depths of the Scottish lakes live water demons, fairy creatures, that feed on human flesh: they are “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich- mhara “(in English sea horse); to want to be picky kelpie lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while each uisge prefers the lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both. Similar creatures are also told in Norse legends (Bäckahästen, the river horse) – and Germanic (nix in the form of fish or frog). (first part)

Liiga Klavina Kelpie

KELPIE: WATER SHAPESHIFTER

In the time of the myth it was believed that there was a certain symmetry between the terrestrial creatures and those of the waters, so men and women were the newts and the mermaids, while among the marine animals there was the horse with the fish tail. It sleeps in solitary ponds or in the sea, is shown on the banks of rivers and lakes, and although its reign is the aquatic one, the kelpie can take the form of a beautiful horse (sometimes with a white mantle sometimes with a black mantle) but also of a beautiful boy or of a lovely girl.

a Kelpie in the form of a maiden

FAIRY LOVERS

Being a solitary creature, Kelpie is often looking for a partner who is described as a “leannan-sith” (a fairy-lover). Mary Mackellar in her essay ‘The Shieling: Its Traditions and Songs‘ writes of the many enchanted seductions to the summer pastures, when shepherds carried sheep on the highlands, going to live for the whole season in the isolated huts (shielings) next to rivers and ponds. The only way to distinguish the shapeshifters when they took the form of a young boy or a girl was to comb their hair: if sand and algae were caught in the comb it was a kelpie!

LOCH GARVE’s KELPIE

In some legends the kelpie is described as a solitary crature that to find a partner, it abducts a young woman: the kelpie is considerate and kind to her, and while keeping her prisoner, tries to comfort her. This one comes from the land of Clan Mackenzie and concerns the kelpie who lives in Loch Garve (Inverness)

“There’s a spot at the eastern end of Loch Garve, ye ken,” [Rupert] said, rolling his eyes around the gathering to be sure everyone was listening, “that never freezes. It’s always black water there, even when the rest o’ the loch is frozen solid, for that’s the waterhorse’s chimney.”
The waterhorse of Loch Garve, like so many of his kind, had stolen a young girl who came to the loch to draw water, and carried her away to live in the depths of the loch and be his wife. Woe betide any maiden, or any man, for that matter, who met a fine horse by the water’s side and thought to ride upon him, for a rider once mounted could not dismount, and the horse would step into the water, turn into a fish, and swim to his home with the hapless rider still stuck fast to his back.

(From OUTLANDER by Diana Gabaldon, chapter 18, “Raiders in the Rocks”. Copyright© 1991 by Diana Gabaldon. All rights reserved.)

With the passing of time in Scotland the kelpie has become however a monster of the waters as the infamous Nessie of the Loch Ness.

THE WATER DEMON

The Kelpie is considered an evil creature a kind of demon that hunts victims to seduce and drown (and devour) them in the abyss (a memory of ancient sacrifices to the spirits of the waters?) So popular wisdom first recommended not to climb incautiously on the back of a lonely horse (because once we climbed on a kelpie there is no possibility of going down) and secondly if we have climbed and we are going to end up dragged in the deep water, we have to look for bridles to tame it (easier said than done naturally).

THE WATER FAIRES

416px-Stromkarlen_1884
Nix of german river

The equivalent in Germanic folklore is nix or nixie (depending on whether male or female) of which the kelpie is one of the possible incarnations: the nix is shown in the form of frog or toad or small fish or a strange fish to human form. Wanting to make a distinction between Kelpie and Nix we can say that the first prefers to attract the victims in the form of a horse to get them on the back and carry them to the abyss; the second instead attracts them in human form with sweet melodies (they are sirens / nymphs with a beautiful singing or mermen skilled musicians)

Liga Kļaviņa
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

Sourses
http://novelpointsofview.blogspot.it/2016/02/valentines-not-just-for-february_11.html
http://www.apjpublications.co.uk/skye/poetry/collect21.htm http://www.romanticamentefantasy.it/emozioni-in-tartan-leggenda-kelpie/ http://fairyroom.com/2013/03/bad-fairy-nixie/

Il Kelpie mutaforma acquatico del folklore celtico

Read the post in English

Nei fiumi più placidi d’Irlanda e nelle profondità oscure dei laghi scozzesi vivono dei demoni acquatici, creature fatate mutaforma, che si nutrono di carne umana: sono “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi. Di creature analoghe si narra anche nelle leggende norrene (Bäckahästen, il cavallo di fiume)- e germaniche (nix sotto forma di pesce o di rana). (prima parte)

Liiga Klavina Kelpie

IL KELPIE: MUTAFORMA DELLE ACQUE

Nel tempo del mito era convinzione che esistesse una certa simmetria tra le creature terrestri e quelle delle acque, così uomini e donne erano i tritoni e le sirene, mentre tra gli animali marini non mancava la figura del cavallo con la coda di pesce. Dorme negli stagni solitari o in mare, si mostra sulle rive dei fiumi e dei laghi, e benchè il suo regno sia quello acquatico, il kelpie può assumere le sembianze di un bellissimo cavallo (a volte dal manto candido a volte dal manto nero) ma anche di bel ragazzo o d’amabile fanciulla.

un Kelpie in sembianze di fanciulla

AMANTI FATATI

Essendo una creatura solitaria, il Kelpie  è spesso in cerca di un compagno/compagna e viene descritto come un “leannan-sith” ovvero una “fata-amante”. Mary Mackellar nel suo saggio ‘The Shieling: Its Traditions and Songs’ (Gaelic Society of Inverness 1889 qui) scrive delle molte seduzioni fatate ai pascoli estivi, quando i pastori portavano le pecore sugli altopiani, andando a vivere per tutta la stagione nelle isolate malghe (shielings) accanto a fiumi e laghetti. L’unico modo per distinguere i mutaforma quando prendevano le sembianze di un giovanetto o di una fanciulla era quella di pettinare i loro capelli: se sabbia e alghe restavano impigliate nel pettine si trattava di un kelpie!

IL KELPIE DI LOCH GARVE

In alcune leggende il kelpie è descritto come una cratura solitaria che per mettere su famiglia, rapisce una giovane donna, eppure è premuroso e gentile con lei, e pur tenendola prigioniera, cerca di confortarla. Questa viene dalla terra del Clan Mackenzie e riguarda il kelpie che abita nel Loch Garve (dalle parti di Inverness)

Nel libro “La Straniera” di Diana Gabaldon troviamo questa versione della leggenda del Kelpie. “A quanto potei capire, questi esseri abitavano in qualunque tipo di massa acquatica, ed erano particolarmente frequenti nei fiordi e nei canali, benché molti vivessero dentro agli abissi dei lochs. «C’è un punto, nell’estremità orientale di Loch Garve», disse, spostando lo sguardo tra i vari membri del gruppo per accertarsi che tutti lo stessero ascoltando, «che non gela mai. L’acqua lì è sempre nera, anche quando il resto del loch è tutto ghiacciato: si tratta infatti del comignolo del cavallo d’acqua.» Quello di Loch Garve, come molti altri della sua razza, aveva rapito una fanciulla che era venuta al loch ad attingere acqua, e se l’era portata con sé in fondo agli abissi perché gli facesse da moglie. Qualunque donna, o uomo se è per questo, provi il desiderio, dopo aver trovato un bel cavallo in riva al lago, di salirgli in groppa, andrà incontro a parecchi guai, perché una volta montato il cavaliere non potrà più scendere; a quel punto il cavallo si tufferà in acqua, si trasformerà in un pesce e nuoterà fino alla sua dimora con lo sventurato cavaliere saldamente attaccato al dorso. «Orbene, una volta sott’acqua il cavallo avrà solo denti da pesce», disse Rupert, ondulando il palmo per imitare il movimento delle pinne, «e si nutre di lumache, di alghe e di altri cibi freddi e bagnati. Ha il sangue gelido come l’acqua, e non gli serve nessun fuoco, mentre una donna umana ha bisogno di calore.» …«Dunque la moglie del cavallo d’acqua era triste e soffriva il freddo e la fame, nella sua nuova dimora subacquea, non piacendole granché le lumache e le alghe che lui le serviva per cena. Così il cavallo, essendo di buon cuore, si recò sulla riva del loch vicino alla casa di un uomo che aveva fama di essere un bravo capomastro. E, quando l’uomo scese giù al fiume e vide il bell’animale dorato con le briglie d’argento che risplendevano al sole, non poté resistere alla voglia di montargli in sella. «Naturalmente il cavallo si tuffa in acqua e lo porta fino alla sua dimora fredda e viscida negli abissi. A quel punto dice al capomastro che se vuol tornare in libertà dovrà costruire un bel caminetto, con tanto di comignolo, in modo che sua moglie possa avere un fuoco dove scaldarsi le mani e friggere il pesce.» «Così il capomastro, non avendo altra scelta, fece come gli era stato chiesto. E il cavallo mantenne la promessa: lo riportò sulla riva vicino a casa sua. Fu così che la moglie del cavallo d’acqua poté starsene al calduccio, tutta contenta, con grande abbondanza di pesce fritto per cena. Dunque l’acqua non gela mai, all’estremità orientale di Loch Garve, perché il calore del comignolo del cavallo d’acqua scioglie il ghiaccio. » (Pag.317)

Con il passar del tempo in Scozia il kelpie è diventato tuttavia un mostro delle acque come il famigerato Nessie del Loch Ness.

IL DEMONE ACQUATICO

Più spesso il Kelpie è considerata una creatura malvagia una sorta di demone che va a caccia di vittime da sedurre e far annegare (e divorare) negli abissi (un ricordo di antichi sacrifici agli spiriti delle acque?) Così la saggezza popolare raccomandava per prima cosa di non salire mai incautamente in groppa ad un cavallo solitario (perchè  una volta saliti su un kelpie non c’è più possibilità di scendere) e per seconda cosa se proprio ci siamo saliti e stiamo per finire trascinati nelle acque profonde, di cercare le briglie per domarlo (più facile a dirsi che a farsi naturalmente).

I FOLLETTI ACQUATICI

416px-Stromkarlen_1884
Nix del fiume

Il corrispettivo nel folklore germanico è il nix o nixie (a secondo se di sesso maschile o femminile) di cui il kelpie è una delle possibili incarnazioni: il nix si mostra nella forma di rana o rospo o di piccolo pesce o di uno strano pesce a forma umana. Volendo fare un distinguo fra Kelpie e Nix possiamo affermare che il primo preferisce attirare la vittima sotto forma di cavallo per farla salire in groppa e trasportarla negli abissi il secondo invece l’attira in forma umana con dolci melodie (sono sirene/ninfe dal bel canto o tritoni abili musicisti).

Liga Kļaviņa
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVIO CANTI
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

FONTI

http://novelpointsofview.blogspot.it/2016/02/valentines-not-just-for-february_11.html
http://www.apjpublications.co.uk/skye/poetry/collect21.htm http://www.romanticamentefantasy.it/emozioni-in-tartan-leggenda-kelpie/ http://fairyroom.com/2013/03/bad-fairy-nixie/

Morag e il Kelpie

Read the post in English

Nei fiumi più placidi d’Irlanda e nelle profondità oscure dei laghi scozzesi vivono dei demoni acquatici, creature fatate mutaforma, che si nutrono di carne umana: sono “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi. (prima parte)

MORAG E IL KELPIE

Ai pascoli estivi delle Highlands ancora si narra della bella Morag (Marion) sedotta da un kelpie in forma umana; la fanciulla pur notando delle stranezze del marito non si accorse della sua vera natura, se non dopo la nascita del loro bambino e … se la diede a gambe abbandonando bambino in fasce e marito mutaforma!

Nell’isola di Skye  si canta ancora un canto in gaelico,  ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ oppure ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) la “Ninna nanna del kelpie” una nenia malinconica con cui il kelpie cerca di far addormentare il bambino rimasto senza mamma, e nello stesso tempo una supplica verso Morag perchè ritorni da loro, sia lui che il bambino hanno bisogno di lei.
Di questo lamento si conoscono diverse versioni testuali tramandate fino a oggi nelle Isole Ebridi. Le melodie girano intorno ad una vecchia aria scozzese dal titolo “Crodh Chailein” (in inglese “Colin’s cattle) evidentemente considerata una melodia delle fate (qui)
Un’altra melodia dolce e malinconica nello stesso tempo è intitolata Song of The Kelpie o anche ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

Così traduce Tom Thomson (vedi)”I got up early, it would have been better not to” (mi sono alzato presto ma era meglio se non lo facevo)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Traduzione inglese *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Mi sono alzato presto,
mi sono alzato presto
non l’avrei fatto,
ma fu l’angoscia che mi mandò fuori
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
C’era nebbia sulla collina,
nebbia sulla collina
e piovigginava
e mi sono imbattuto in una graziosa fanciulla
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Ti darò del vino
ti darò del vino
e ogni cosa che vorrai
ma non mi alzerò con te al mattino
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
bella manza
bella manza
ero insieme a te al pascolo
mentre gli altri dormivano
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
la bella moretta malvagia
la bella moretta malvagia
che mi ha dato un figlio
anche se lo ha allevato con freddezza
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
il bimbo della mia canzone
il bimbo della mia canzone
era accanto a una collinetta,
senza fuoco, protezione o riparo
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Morag amore mio
Morag amore mio, ritorna dal tuo piccino
e ti darò una bella ghirlanda variopinta
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.

NOTE
si veda anche la traduzione qui
1)  il kelpie, soffrendo di solitudine, esce dal lago di mattina presto e prende forma umana
2) il mutaforma promette cibo e agiatezze alla fanciulla per convincerlo a seguirlo, però l’avvisa, è una creatura notturna e non si sveglierà con lei al mattino!
3) gamhna= cattle between 1 year and 2 years traduce Tom Thomson stitks; in italiano= giovenca, la mucca che non ha ancora partorito, il verso oltre a qualificare il lavoro della fanciulla (mandriana) vuole essere anche un complimento, per dirla in italiano “bella manza” come donna procace, dalle forme abbondanti e seducenti
4) il kelpie ricorda l’incontro notturno quando i due hanno fatto sesso (e ovviamente nove mesi dopo è nato il loro figlioletto)
5) ecco che dopo i bei ricordi del passato arriva il presente, la donna ha scoperto la vera natura del compagno e ha voluto meno bene al bambino generato con lui
6) proseguendo nel paragone il kelpie chiama “vitellino” il suo bambino, un termine vezzeggiativo per small child
7) Morag nel fuggire ha abbandonato il bambino sotto una balma al freddo e senza protezione. Si descrive una tipica “esposizione” dei bambini delle fate. Una pratica di “controllo delle nascite” diffusa nelle campagne d’Europa, era l’abbandono dei neonati  nel bosco (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi, che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. L’usanza di “esporre” il neonato era connessa con la convinzione che  fosse stato “scambiato” ovvero rapito dalle fate e sostituito con un changeling, un mutaforma il quale per un po’ assomiglia al bambino umano, ma alla fine riprende sempre il suo vero aspetto.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson traduce= speckled band (of withy). Ho cercato sul dizionario: si tratta di una corona fatta intrecciando i rami di salice; in italiano = coroncina di vimini, mi richiama le coroncine celtiche di fiori e foglie

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald la registrano con il titolo di “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” nel 2001(in Colla Mo Rùn) dalla collezione di Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà
III=I
IV=II
Traduzione inglese *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio
Dormi bambino mio
Coro
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
piè veloce
come un grande cavallo sei tu
II
Caro figlio mio
mio bel cavallino
sei lontano dalla cittadina
sarai il più rinomato

NOTE
1) Il kelpie canta la ninna-nanna al figlioletto abbandonato dalla madre umana e lo conforta dicendogli che da grande sarà un ruba-cuori

Con il titolo di ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan la stessa storia è presente negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais, dalla voce di tre testimoni dell’isola di Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

Una storia analoga è raccontata nell’isola di Benbecula con il titolo di Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg vedi


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 ne riporta un altro frammento con il titolo di “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (vedasi la versione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser più sotto)

GAELICO SCOZZESE
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh, is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri do bheul beag baoth is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 

Traduzione inglese *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling!
Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara,
ritorna dal tuo piccolo bambino
e avrai una trota maculata dal lago!
Morag mia cara,
questa notte è umida
e piovosa per mio figlio
in una balma della collinetta,
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
Lasciato senza fuoco, senza cibo e rifugio,
ti lamenti senza sosta.
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio sdentato
alla tua sciocca bocca,
e io che canto ninnananne sul Monte Frochkie

NOTE
1) Mhórag o Mór è il nome della fanciulla amata dal kelpie è anche scritto A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh (Mhor mia, amore, mia gioia)
2) è il pianto incessante del bambino che ha freddo e fame, abbandonato dalla mamma umana. Anche se non esplicitato presumo che la madre abbia “esposto” il figlio, cioè l’abbia abbandonato all’aperto (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate o il kelpie; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. vedi
3) montagna tra Gesto e Portree sull’isola di Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

Con il titolo di “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, lo stesso frammento cantato da Caera è riportato anche nel libro di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser e Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (pag 94)

ASCOLTA la versione classica nell’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser

trasposizione inglese Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Amore mio, mia gioia
vieni dal tuo bimbo,
e le trote guizzeranno dal lago in abbondanza
Cuore mio, la notte è buia,
umida e piovosa.
Ecco il tuo bambino nella balma
II
Suvvia, amore mio, mia gioia,
c’è bisogno di fuoco qui,
bisogno di riparo e conforto
il nostro bambino sta piangendo accanto al  lago.
III
Sposa mia, cuore mio!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio
che bacia le tue dolci labbra
e io che canto vecchie canzoni per te
sul Monte Frochkie
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVIO CANTI
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg