Follow me up to Carlow

Leggi in italiano

The text of “Follow me up to Carlow” was written in the nineteenth century by the Irish poet Patrick Joseph McCall (1861 – 1919) and published in 1899 in the “Erinn Songs” with the title “Marching Song of Feagh MacHugh”.
Referring to the Fiach McHugh O’Byrne clan chief, the song is full of characters and events that span a period of 20 years from 1572 to 1592.

McCall’s intent is to light the minds of the nationalists of his time with even too detailed historical references on a distant epoch, full of fierce opposition to English domination. 16th century Ireland was only partly under English control (the Pale around Dublin) and the power of the clans was still very strong. They were however clans of local importance who changed their covenants according to convenience by fighting each other, against or together with the British. In the Tudor era Ireland was considered a frontier land, still inhabited by exotic barbarians.
front1

FIACH MCHUGH O’BYRNE

The land of the O’Byrne clan was in a strategic position in the county of Wicklow and in particular between the mountains barricaded in strongholds and control posts from which rapid and lethal raids started in the Pale. The clan managed to survive through raids of cattle, rivalries and alliances with the other clans and acts of submission to the British crown, until Fiach assumed the command and took a close opposition to the British government with the open rebellion of 1580 that broke out throughout the Leinster . In the same period the rebellion was reignited also in the South of Munster (known as the second rebellion of Desmond)

The new Lieutenant Arthur Gray baron of Wilton that was sent to quell the rebellion with a large contingent, certainly gave no proof of intelligence: totally unprepared to face the guerrilla tactics, he decided to draw out the O’Byrne clan, marching in the heart of the county of Wicklow, the mountains! Fiach had retired to Ballinacor, in the Glenmalure valley, (the land of the Ranelaghs), and managed to ambush Gray, forcing him to a disastrous retreat to the Pale.

glenmalure

Follow me up to Carlow

The melody was taken from McCall himself by “The Firebrand of the Mountains,” a march from the O’Byrne clan heard in 1887 during a musical evening in Wexford County. It is not clear, however, if this historical memory was a reconstruction in retrospect to give a touch of color! It is very similar to the jig “Sweets of May” (first two parts) and also it is a dance codified by the Gaelic League.

“Follow me up to Carlow” (also sung as “Follow me down to Carlow”) was taken over by Christy Moore in the 1960s and re-proposed and popularized with the Irish group Planxty; recently he is played by many celtic-rock bands or “barbarian” formations with bagpipes and drums.

Planxty

Fine Crowd

The High Kings live

FOLLOW ME UP TO CARLOW
I
Lift Mac Cahir Óg(1) your face,
broodin’ o’er the old disgrace
That Black Fitzwilliam(2) stormed your place,
and drove you to the Fern(3)
Gray(4) said victory was sure,
soon the firebrand(5) he’d secure
Until he met at Glenmalure(6)
with Fiach McHugh O’Byrne
CHORUS
Curse and swear, Lord Kildare(7),
Fiach(8) will do what Fiach will dare
Now Fitzwilliam have a care,
fallen is your star low(9)
Up with halberd, out with sword,
on we go for, by the Lord
Fiach McHugh has given the word
“Follow me up to Carlow!”(10)
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies

NOTES
1) Brian MacCahir Cavanagh married Elinor sister of Feagh MacHugh. In 1572 Fiach and Brian were implicated in the murder of a landowner related to Sir Nicholas White Seneschal (military governor) of the Queen at Wexford.
2) William Fitzwilliam “Lord Deputy” of Ireland, the representative of the English Crown who left office in 1575
3) In 1572 Brian MacCahir and his family were deprived of their properties donated to supporters of the British crown
4) Arthur Gray de Wilton became in 1580 new Lieutenant of Ireland
5) appellation with which he was called Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
6) Glenmalure Valley: valley in the Wicklow mountains about twenty kilometers east of the town of Wicklow, where the battle of 1580 occurred that saw the defeat of the English: the Irish clans ambushed the English army commanded by Arthur Wilton Gray made up of 3000 men
7) In 1594 the sons of Feach attacked and burned the house of Pierce Fitzgerald sheriff of Kildare, as a result Feach was proclaimed a traitor and he become a wanted crimunal
8) Feach in Irish means Raven
9) William Fitzwilliam returned to Ireland in 1588 once again with the title of Lieutenant, but in 1592 he was accused of corruption
10) Carlow is both a city and a county: the town was chosen more to rhyme than to recall a battle that actually took place: it is more generally an exhortation to take up arms against the British. Undoubtedly, the song made her famous.
11) Glen Imael, Tassagart and Clonmore are strongholds in Wicklow County
12) English Pale are the counties around Dublin controlled by the British. The phrase “Beyond the Pale” meant a dangerous place
13) Rory the young son of Rory O’More, brother of Feagh MacHugh, killed in 1578
14) Sir Nicholas White Seneschal of Wexford fell seriously ill in the early 1590s, shortly thereafter fell into disgrace with the Queen and was executed.
15) in the original version the character referred to is Sir Ralph Lane but is more commonly replaced by Arthur Gray who had left the country in 1582
16) Elizabeth I. Actually it was Feach’s head to be sent to the queen!
The new viceroy Sir William Russell managed to capture Fiach McHugh O’Byrne in May 1597, Feach’s head remained impaled on the gates of Dublin Castle.

LINKS
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52454&page=2
http://thesession.org/tunes/1583
http://thesession.org/tunes/10645
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/follow-me-up-to-carlow
http://www.clannobyrne.com/glenmalure.html
http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/irelands-wars-the-battle-of-glenmalure/
http://www.blogofmanly.com/2012/09/17/heroes-feach-mchugh-obyrne/
http://www.doyle.com.au/chiefs.html

Follow me up to Carlow

Read the post in English

Il testo di “Follow me up to Carlow” è stato scritto nell’Ottocento dal poeta irlandese Patrick Joseph McCall (1861 – 1919) e pubblicato nel 1899 nelle “Erinn Songs” con il titolo “Marching Song of Feagh MacHugh“.
Per quanto si faccia riferimento al capo clan Fiach McHugh O’Byrne la canzone è ricca di personaggi e vicende che abbracciano un periodo di 20 anni dal 1572 al 1592.

L’intento di McCall è quello di accendere gli animi dei nazionalisti del suo tempo con riferimenti storici anche fin troppo dettagliati su un epoca lontana, ricca di fiere opposizioni al dominio inglese. L’Irlanda del XVI secolo era solo in parte sotto il controllo inglese (il cosiddetto Pale intorno a Dublino ) e il potere dei clan era ancora molto forte. Erano tuttavia clan di importanza locale che cambiavano le alleanze a seconda della convenienza combattendo tra di loro, contro o insieme gli inglesi. In epoca Tudor l’Irlanda era considerata una terra di frontiera, abitata ancora da esotici barbari.
front1

FIACH MCHUGH O’BYRNE

La terra del clan O’Byrne si trovava in una posizione strategica nella contea di Wicklow e in particolare tra le montagne asserragliata in roccaforti e postazioni di controllo dalle quali partivano rapide e letali incursioni nel Pale. Il clan riuscì a barcamenarsi tra razzie di bestiame, rivalità e alleanze con gli altri clan e atti di sottomissione alla corona britannica finchè Fiach assunse il comando e intraprese una serrata opposizione al governo inglese sfociato nell’aperta ribellione del 1580 che divampò in tutto il Leinster. Nello stesso periodo si era riaccesa la ribellione anche nel Sud del Munster (nota come la seconda ribellione del Desmond)

Il nuovo Luogotente Arthur Grey barone di Wilton mandato a sedare la ribellione con un grosso contingente, non diede certo prova di intelligenza: totalmente impreparato a fronteggiare le tattiche di guerriglia dei clan decise di snidare gli O’Byrne marciando nel cuore della contea di Wicklow, le montagne! Fiach si era ritirato a Ballinacor, nella valle di Glenmalure, (la terra dei Ranelagh) e riuscì a tendere un imboscata all’incauto Grey costringendolo a una disastrosa ritirata verso il Pale.

glenmalure

Follow me up to Carlow

La melodia è stata tratta dallo stesso McCall da “The Firebrand of the Mountains”, una marcia del clan O’Byrne sentita nel 1887 durante una serata musicale nella contea di Wexford. Non è ben chiaro tuttavia se tale memoria storica sia stata una ricostruzione a posteriori per dare un tocco di colore! E’ molto simile alla jig “Sweets of May” (prime due parti) anche danza codificata dalla Gaelic League.

“Follow me up to Carlow” (cantato anche come “Follow me down to Carlow“) è stato ripreso da Christy Moore negli anni 60 e riproposto e reso popolare con il gruppo irlandese Planxty; recentemente è interpretato da molte band celtic-rock o dalle formazioni “barbare” con cornamuse e tamburi.

Planxty

Fine Crowd

The High Kings live


I
Lift Mac Cahir Óg(1) your face,
broodin’ o’er the old disgrace
That Black Fitzwilliam(2) stormed your place,
and drove you to the Fern(3)
Gray(4) said victory was sure,
soon the firebrand(5) he’d secure
Until he met at Glenmalure(6)
with Fiach McHugh O’Byrne
CHORUS
Curse and swear, Lord Kildare(7),
Fiach(8) will do what Fiach will dare
Now Fitzwilliam have a care,
fallen is your star low(9)
Up with halberd, out with sword,
on we go for, by the Lord
Fiach McHugh has given the word
“Follow me up to Carlow!”(10)
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies<
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Alza il viso giovane Mac Cahir e smetti di rimuginare sulla passata disgrazia,
Black Fitzwilliam ha  distrutto la tua casa
e ti ha mandato per la macchia.
Gray diceva che la vittoria era certa
e presto avrebbe tenuto a bada il “sobillatore”, finchè non s’incontrò a Glenmalure con Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
RITORNELLO: Giuri e maledici Lord Kildare, Fiach farà quello che Fiach oserà
ora Fitzwilliam devi preoccuparti
è caduta in basso la tua stella!
Su con l’alabarda, fuori la spada,
andiamo dal Lord
Fiach McHugh ha detto
“Seguitemi a Carlow”
II
Guarda le spade a Glen Imaal
lampeggiare sull’ English Pale
Guarda i figli dei Celti
sotto la bandiera di O’Byrne
Gallo di un lignaggio guerriero
vuoi che il gallo sassone
voli come un corvo sull’Irlanda?
Vola alto e insegnagli le buone maniere
III
Da Tassagart a Clonmore
scorre un fiume di sangue sassone,
che grande è il giovane Rory O’More
a mandare gli stupidi nell’Ade;
White è malato, Gray è fuggito
allora per il cranio di Black FitzWilliam,
glielo manderemo tutto inzuppato di rosso, alla Regina Lisa e alle sue damigelle

NOTE
1) Brian MacCahir Cavanagh ha sposato Elinor sorella di Feagh MacHugh. Nel 1572 Fiach e Brian sono stati implicati nell’omicidio di un proprietario terriero imparentato con Sir Nicholas White siniscalco (governatore militare) della Regina a Wexford.
2) William Fitzwilliam “Lord Deputy” d’Irlanda ovvero il rappresentante della Corona Inglese che lasciò la carica nel 1575
3) Nel 1572 Brian MacCahir e la sua famiglia sono stati privati delle loro proprietà donate ai sostenitori della corona britannica
4) Arthur Grey de Wilton diventato nel 1580 nuovo Luogotenente d’Irlanda
5) appellativo con cui veniva chiamato Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
6) Glenmalure Valley: vallata tra i monti Wicklow a una ventina di kilometri a est della cittè di Wicklow, in cui avvenne la battaglia del 1580 che vide la sconfitta degli Inglesi: i clan irlandesi tesero un’imboscata all’esercito inglese comandato da Arthur Grey di Wilton composta da ben 3000 uomini
7) Nel 1594 i figli di Feach hanno attaccato e dato alle fiamme la casa di Pierce Fitzgerald sceriffo di Kildare, come conseguenza Feach venne proclamato traditore e fu messa una taglia sulla sua testa.
8) Feach che in irlandese significa Corvo
9) William Fitzwilliam ritornò in Irlanda nel 1588 ancora una volta con il titolo di Luogotenente, ma nel 1592 venne accusato di corruzione
10) Carlow è sia una città che una contea: la cittadina è stata scelta più per fare rima che per richiamare una battaglia effettivamente svoltasi: è in senso più generale un’esortazione a prendere le armi contro gli inglesi. Indubbiamente la canzone l’ha resa famosa.
11) Glen Imael, Tassagart e Clonmore sono roccaforti nella contea di Wicklow
12) English Pale sono le contee intorno a Dublino controllate dagli inglesi. La frase “Beyond the Pale” stava a indicare un luogo pericoloso
13) Rory il giovane figlio di Rory O’More cognato di Feagh MacHugh ucciso nel 1578
14) Sir Nicholas White siniscalco di Wexford si ammalò gravemente nei primi anni del 1590, poco dopo cadde in disgrazia presso la regina e venne giustiziato.
15) nella versione originale il personaggio a cui si fa riferimento è Sir Ralph Lane ma più comunemente viene sostituito da Arthur Grey che aveva lasciato il paese nel 1582
16) Elisabetta I. In realtà fu la testa mozza di Feach a essere mandata alla regina
Il nuovo vicerè Sir William Russell riuscì a catturare Fiach McHugh O’Byrne nel maggio del 1597, la testa di Feach rimase impalata sui cancelli del castello di Dublino.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52454&page=2
http://thesession.org/tunes/1583
http://thesession.org/tunes/10645
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/follow-me-up-to-carlow
http://www.clannobyrne.com/glenmalure.html
http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/irelands-wars-the-battle-of-glenmalure/
http://www.blogofmanly.com/2012/09/17/heroes-feach-mchugh-obyrne/
http://www.doyle.com.au/chiefs.html

THE CROPPY BOY

8-a-government-repressionCroppy” è il soprannome dato ai ribelli irlandesi del 1798; significa “taglio corto dei capelli” perché, secondo George Denis Zimmerman (in “Songs of Irish Rebellion 1780-1900” -1966 ) i ribelli volevano emulare gli antichi romani al tempo della Repubblica, così come facevano i coevi rivoluzionari francesi.
Una versione più prosaica vuole far derivare il soprannome dalla tortura inventata dagli inglesi per l’occasione, detta pitchcapping, i quali rasavano i capelli dei ribelli e ricoprivano il loro cranio con la pece bollente; era quindi inizialmente un termine dispregiativo coniato dagli inglesi, poi rivendicato con orgoglio dagli Irlandesi.
Il termine compare anche nella canzone popolare anti-repubblicana “Croppies lie down” che celebra la sconfitta dei ribelli, la preferita dall’Orange Order (gli anglicani reazionari).

LA RIBELLIONE A WEXFORD

boysCon il nome di “The Croppy Boy” si riconoscono  due distinte versioni testuali una che inizia con “It was early, early in the spring…” e l’altra con “Good men and true in this house”, entrambe però hanno come contesto la contea di Wexford (Irlanda Sud-Est) dove i ribelli (mobilitati in grande numero) sconfissero i governativi a maggio, nella prima fase della rivolta.

Nel pomeriggio del 27 maggio (la domenica di Pentecoste) un migliaio di ribelli si erano uniti a Oulart Hill: erano male armati, alcuni con picche e armi da fuoco, ma la maggior parte con forconi e falcetti, eppure sconfissero la milizia e gli yeomen (1).

Il 29 maggio 5000 ribelli conquistarono la cittadina di Enniscorthy. Dopo pochi giorni l’esercito ribelle era arrivato a 15.000 uomini. Fu a Wexford (abbandonata dagli Inglesi in fuga) che l’esercito sempre più numeroso dei ribelli si diede una struttura di comando: Bagenal Harvey, un ricco protestante e leader degli Irlandesi Uniti di Wexford, liberato dal carcere, assunse il ruolo di comandante generale (poco dopo sostituito da padre Philip Roche).

Gli insorti non avevano una divisa, ma indossavano per lo più abiti civili ed era consuetudine aggiungere al cappello una fascia bianca o verde con la scritta ” Liberty and Equality” oppure “Erin go Braugh”. L’armamentario poi era quanto mai raffazzonato, costituito per lo più dalle picche (ovvero una punta metallica montata su una lunga asta di legno). Quest’arma serviva a contrastare le cariche della cavalleria, ma era diventata obsoleta con il diffondersi dell’artiglieria e superata infine con l’introduzione della baionetta.
Fu una vittoria di Pirro perché seguita quasi un mese dopo dalla battaglia di Vinegar Hill nelle vicinanze di Enniscorthy: i due eserciti erano quasi di pari forza, ma i ribelli erano male armati e men che meno addestrati. Anche la cittadina si difese strenuamente dai ripetuti attacchi della fanteria inglese (supportata da cannoni e cavalieri), ma pian piano i ribelli furono costretti a cedere il terreno; sulla collina di Vinegar i ribelli riuscirono infine a ritirarsi e a fuggire in un varco lasciato libero dell’incompleto accerchiamento dei governativi.

Vinhill

La città venne abbandonata e da allora i ribelli si dispersero in azioni di guerriglia e razzie che si trascinarono fino agli inizio dell’Ottocento.

VIDEO della rievocazione della Battaglia a Vinegar Hill organizzata dal National 1798 Rebellion Centre di Enniscorthy: le uniche battaglie che si dovrebbero vedere!

APPROFONDIMENTO
Vinegar Hill, Enniscorthy, ‘who fears to speak of 98’ http://www.irelandinpicture.net/2010/03/vinegar-hill-enniscorthy-who-fears-to.html
(delle foto strepitose nel blog “Pictures of Ireland” da un irlandese che per lavoro deve viaggiare per l’Irlanda!)
http://kildarelocalhistory.ie/1798-rebellion/background-to-rebellion/united-irishmen/
http://multitext.ucc.ie/d/The_1798_Rebellion_in_Wexford

PRIMA VERSIONE

Di questa versione si hanno molte varianti testuali essendo largamente diffusa come broadside ballad sia in Irlanda che in Inghilterra.

Per lo più le prime due strofe si ritrovano quasi identiche in tutte le trascrizioni: è il mese di maggio allo scoppio della rivolta quando anche gli uccelli sui rami cantano per la liberazione dell’Irlanda, il ribelle però viene catturato dagli inglesi, in alcune versioni a causa del tradimento del cugino che lo ha venduto per pochi soldi ai soldati.
Pure la strofa sulla sorella Mary è presente in quasi tutte le versioni anche se con declinazioni diverse: qui è disposta a tutto pur di non far condannare a morte il fratello; al contrario il padre lo rinnega, mentre in altre versioni il vecchio genitore non può che piangere con il resto della famiglia.

ASCOLTA The Halliard nell’album leggendario del debutto”It’s the Irish in me” del 1967(per la melodia vedere seconda versione)


I

‘Twas early, early in the spring,
the birds did whistle and sweetly sing changing their notes from tree to tree,
and the song they sang was “Old Ireland Free!”.
II
‘Twas in the darkest starless night,
the yeoman cavalry(1) gave me a fright,
the yeoman cavalry was my downfall,
and I was taken by Lord Cornwall(2).
III
As I was drive the long Wexford Street
my own first cousin I chanced to meet;
my own first cousin did me betray,
for one bare guinea swore my life away.
IV
My sister Mary heard the express,
she ran downstairs in her cold night dress
“My life my virtue I will lay down
to see my brother sail for Wexford town”
V
As I was stood on the gallows high
but my father was standing by
my father stood and did me deny
and the name he gave me was the Croppy boy
VI
In Duncannon(3) my hopes will lie,
for in Duncannon I must die,
don’t’ shed a tear as you pass by
for I go proudly as the Croppy Boy.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Accadde all’inizio della primavera, quando
gli uccellini cinguettavano dolcemente
cambiando registro, di ramo in ramo,
e la melodia che cantavano era: “Cara Irlanda Libera!”
II
Accadde in una notte buia e senza stelle
i soldati inglesi mi sorpresero.
i soldati inglesi sono la causa della mia rovina, fui preso da Lord Cornwallis.
III
Mentre ero portato per Wexford street per caso ho incrociato mio cugino di primo grado, è stato mio cugino a tradirmi,
ha venduto la mia vita per una sola, misera ghinea
IV
Mia sorella Mary sentì la notizia,
e corse giù dalle scale in camicia da notte
“La mia vita e virtù sacrificherò per vedere mio fratello salpare dalla città di Wexford”
V
Fui messo sulla forca in alto e mio padre mi stava vicino, mio padre era in piedi e mi ha rinnegato e il nome che mi ha dato fu il “Ragazzo Ribelle”
VI
A Duncannon le mie speranze giacciono
perché a Duncannon devo morire
non versate lacrime voi che passate
perché vado fiero di essere il “Ragazzo Irlandese Ribelle”

NOTE
1) yeoman: originariamente il nome dato ai coltivatori diretti inglesi del XVII secolo che fornirono soldati per lo più nel corpo a cavallo dell’esercito inglese. Nel 1790 vennero formati i reggimenti Yeomen in risposta alla minaccia rappresentata dalla Francia in seguito alla rivoluzione francese. Era una forza riservista e volontaria, composta principalmente da piccoli agricoltori e proprietari terrieri che erano fedeli alla Corona. Essi si trovavano in tutta la Gran Bretagna, ma fu in Irlanda, che vennero coinvolti come prima linea di difesa contro i ribelli. Qui indica una unità militare britannica impiegata nella Battaglia di Harrow del 26 maggio 1798 a Wexford, la Camolin Cavalry.
Occorre osservare ad onor del vero che le yeomanry nel XVIII secolo erano composte anche da volontari irlandesi, per lo più orangisti ovvero appartenenti all’Orange Order
2) Lord Charles Cornwallis (1738-1805) Lord luogotenente (ovvero Vicerè) d’Irlanda dal maggio 1798 (anche se è arrivato a Dublino dall’Inghilterra solo il 20 di giugno in concomitanza con la vittoria a Vinegar Hill – Enniscothy contea di Wexford)
3) il forte di Duncannon è una fortezza a pianta stellare sul promontorio del porto di Waterford (a pochi chilometri ad Ovest di Wexford). C’è ancora la cella del “croppy boy” dove i ribelli erano detenuti.
In altre versioni il luogo del processo e della condanna è invece la Caserma Ginevra, trasformata al tempo della ribellione in carcere temporaneo, diventato tristemente famoso per i maltrattamenti inflitti ai prigionieri. I ribelli che non erano condannati a morte erano deportati in Australia o arruolati a forza nella Royal Navy. Oggi restano solo poche rovine con una targa commemorativa.

SECONDA VERSIONE

Il testo è del poeta irlandese William B. McBurney che lo pubblicò su “The Nation” nel 1845 con lo pseudonimo di Carroll Malone, ispirandosi ad un aneddoto riportato in “The Sham Squire” di William John Fitzpatrick (vedi): il giovane ribelle irlandese si confessa davanti al sacerdote, in realtà un soldato inglese travestito, che lo fa imprigionare e impiccare come traditore.

496px-Charlotte_Schreiber_-_The_Croppy_Boy

Come nella precedente versione la melodia è “Cailín Óg a Stór” (Dearest young girl), o “Cailin Ó Cois tSúire me” (I am a handsome young girl): Calen o custure me era il nome di una canzone popolare alla corte inglese in epoca elisabettiana (“Handful of Pleasant Delights” di Clement Robinson-1584 in “When as I view”) e citata nell’Enrico V di Shakespeare- atto II scena IV-, ma originaria della contea di Wexford, forse una melodia per arpa.

ASCOLTA Caleno custure me, Deller Consort
ASCOLTA Callino Casturame & Caleno Custurme nell’arrangiamento di William Byrd (Fitzwilliam Virginal Book 1610-1620)

Tuttavia la melodia più diffusa era più simile a quella utilizzata con il titolo di “The Robber – Charley Reilly” in Ancient Music of Ireland (Edward Bunting, 1840) (vedi) riscontrabile poi in molte varianti. La melodia era molto diffusa infatti nella Gran Bretagna e utilizzata per molte ballate del genere “rambling boy” che trattavano temi di furti e rapine. Era anche diffusa tra le canzoni dei mare che parlavano di disastri e di morte.

La stessa melodia è stata utilizzata anche in Lord Franklin (una canzone tradizionale inglese di fine ‘800 sul tentativo di trovare il passaggio a Nord Ovest nel mare artico).

ASCOLTA Phelim Drew

I
“Good men and true in this house who dwell,
To a stranger bouchal(4) I pray you tell:
Is the priest at home, or may he be seen?
I would speak a word with Father Green.”
II
“The Priest’s at home, boy, and may be seen;
‘Tis easy speaking with Father Green.
But you must wait till I go and see
If the Holy Father alone may be.”
III
The youth has enter’d an empty hall;
What a lonely sound has his light footfall!
And the gloomy chamber’s chill and bare,
With a vested Priest in a lonely chair.
IV
The youth has knelt to tell his sins:
Nomine Dei,” the youth begins!
At “mea culpa” he beats his breast,
And in broken murmers he speaks the rest.
V
“At the siege of Ross(5) did my father fall,
And at Gorey(6) my loving brothers all.
I alone am left of my name and race;
I will go to Wexford and take their place.
VI
“I cursed three times since last Easter day;
At mass time once I went to play;
I passed the churchyard one day in haste,
And forgot to pray for my mother’s rest.
VII
“I bear no hate against living thing,
But I love my country above my king.
Now, Father! bless me and let me go
To die, if God has ordained it so.”
VIII
The priest said nought, but a rustling noise
Made the youth look above in wild surprise;
The robes were off, and in scarlet there
Sat a yoeman captain with fiery glare.
IX
With fiery glare and with fury hoarse,
Instead of blessing, he breathed a curse:
“‘Twas a good thought, boy, to come here to shrive,
For one short hour is your time to live.
X
“Upon yon river three tenders float;
The Priest’s in one — if he isn’t shot!
We hold his house for our Lord the King,
And, amen say I, may all traitors swing!”
XI
At Geneva Barrack(3) that young man died,
And at Passage(7) they have his body laid.
Good people who live in peace and joy,
Breathe a pray’r and a tear for the Croppy Boy.

NOTE
3) la caserma Ginevra vicino a Passage East, porto di Waterford era diventata anche sede di prigionia dei ribelli.
4) bouchal (buachail) è un termine in irlandese per ragazzo
5) la battaglia di New Ross sul fiume Barrow faceva parte del tentativo dei ribelli di diffondere la rivolta presso la contea di Kilkenny. La battaglia infuriò per tutto il giorno del 4 giugno 1798 con i ribelli che pur riuscendo a fare irruzione in città vennero alla fine respinti. Si sono conteggiate quasi 3.000 vittime tra i ribelli
6) Gorey piccola cittadina vicino a Wexford
7) Passage East, piccolo villaggio di pescatori sulla riva occidentale del porto di Waterford: nel cimitero della chiesa di Crooke c’è ancora la lapide del Croppy Boy

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
“Gentili e bravi uomini che abitate in questa casa,
vi prego di dire a un ragazzo straniero
se c’è il sacerdote e se può ricevere?
Vorrei parlare con Padre Green”

“Il prete è in casa, ragazzo e può ricevere
è facile parlare con Padre Green.
Ma dovete attendere che vado a vedere
se il santo padre è da solo”

Il giovane è fatto entrare in una sala vuota; che suono solitario ha il suo passo leggero!
E’ nella fredda camera cupa e spoglia con un prete su una sedia.
Il giovane si inginocchia per dire i suoi peccati: “Nomine Dei” inizia
e al “Mea culpa” si batte sul petto
e in un mormorio spezzato dice il resto

“All’assedio di Ross ho visto mio padre cadere e a Gorey tutti i miei amati fratelli.
Sono rimasto solo io della discendenza, e andrò a Wexford a prendere il loro posto”
Ho bestemmiato tre volte dall’ultimo giorno di Pasqua, all’ora della messa sono andato a giocare; ho attraversato il sagrato di corsa e ho dimenticato di pregare per il riposo di mia madre.

Non porto rancore verso i vivi,
ma amo il mio paese più del re.
Adesso, Padre, beneditemi e lasciatemi andare
a morire, se Dio lo vuole”

Il prete non disse niente ma un fruscio ha fatto alzare lo sguardo al ragazzo sorpreso,
i vestiti tolti e in rosso era seduto il capitano con sguardo ardente
Con sguardo ardente e furioso invece della benedizione sospirò una maledizione:
“E’ stata una buona idea, ragazzo, venire qui a confessarti,
perché ti resta solo un’ora da vivere.

Sul fiume laggiù tre navi galleggiano;
il prete è in una – se non è stato ucciso!
Occupiamo la sua casa per il Re nostro signore
e, amen dico, siano tutti i traditori impiccati”

Alla Caserma Ginevra quel giovane morì,
e a Passage hanno deposto il suo corpo
la brava gente che vive in pace e gioia
mandi una preghiera e una lacrima al ragazzo irlandese ribelle

FONTI
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/bbals_11.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=569
http://www.justanothertune.com/html/ladyfranklin.html