Archivi tag: Jolie Holland

Silver apples of the moon

MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933) The Silver Apples of the Moon
MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933)
The Silver Apples of the Moon

Leggi in italiano

The song of wandering Aengus was published in 1899, in the collection of poems “The Wind among the reeds” by William Butler Yeats (1865-1939).

Aengus (Oengus)  is the god of love of Irish mythology, belonging to the mythical ranks of the Tuatha De Dannan, eternally young ruler of the Brug na Boinne near the banks of the river Boyne. It is said of him that he fell in love with a beautiful girl seen in a dream and, sick with love, looked for her for a long time before finding her and taking her to her kingdom.

In poetry, however, the character is a young mortal (perhaps the poet himself) in search of his poetic inspiration or the most ancestral side of knowledge. He tells of his initiation into the past, because he became old, in the perennial search for beauty, or poetic enlightenment, embodied by the girl with the apple blossoms in her hair.

The first to put the poem into music was the same Yeats who composed or adapted a traditional Irish melody: in 1907 he published his essay ‘Speaking to the Psaltery’ in which the poem is recited bardically, sung with the accompaniment of the psaltery; but many other artists were inspired by the text and composed further melodies.

Burt Ives with the title The Wandering of Old Angus  in ‘Burl Ives: Songs of Ireland‘ Decca DL 8444 (ca. 1954) in the liner notes the Yeats melody is credited

Judy Collins with the title ‘Golden Apples of the Sun’  – Golden Apples of the Sun 1962. “Learned from the singing of Will Holt, this stunning song is a musical setting of a W. B. Yeats poem ‘The Song of the Wandering Angus’. It is not a folk song, it tends to be an art song. It has a traditional feeling about it; the repetitiveness gives you the impression of an incantation, which the poem does too. Of her learning it I had heard the song almost two years ago. When I heard Will Holt sing it late one night at the Gate of Horn, I was greatly impressed, and determined to learn it. Will sang it for me a number of times, and even gave me a tape of it. I lived with the Golden Apples of the Sun almost a year-and-a-half before I ever sang it, and then it burst out one day – almost of its own accord – while I was visiting friends. It took me a long time to assimilate it, but now it’s part of me. I feel that the song has something to do with what people want – what they don’t have – and sometimes the desire for these things is almost as satisfying as the getting.'”

Donovan in H. M. S. 1971

Richie Havens in “Mixed Bag II” 1974

Christy Moore in “Ride On” 1986

Paul Winter & Karen Casey in Celtic Solstice 1999

Jolie Holland in Catalpa 2003

Waterboys in “An Appointment with Mr Yeats” 2011
an almost spoken version

Sedrenn  in De l’autri cotè 2013 (the review of the cd here

Robert Lawrence & Jill Greene (music by Jill Diana Greene) 2016

I
I went out to the hazel wood
because a fire was in my head(1)
and cut and peeled a hazel wand(2)
and hooked a berry to a thread.
II
And when white moths were on the wing
and moth-like stars were flickering out
I dropped the berry in the stream(3)
and caught a little silver trout(4).
III
When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire aflame
But something rustled on the floor
and someone called me by my name.
IV
It had become a glimmering girl
with apple blossom(5) in her hair
who called me by my name and ran
and vanished through the brightening air
V
Though I am old with wandering
through hollow lands and hills lands
I will find out where she has gone
and kiss her lips and take her hands.
VI
And walk among long dappled grass
and pluck till time and times are done
the silver apples of the moon
the golden apples of the sun(5).

NOTES
1) it’s the fire what characterizes the visionary experience of shamanism (see). In the book “The Fire in the Head” (2007) Tom Cowan examines the connections between shamanism and Celtic imagination, analyzing the myths, the stories, the ancient Celtic poets and narrators and describing the techniques used to access the world of the shamans. So the protagonist approaches the waters of the river to practice a ritual that allows him to travel in the Other World.
2) the hazelnut is the fruit of science and falls into the sacred spring, where it is eaten by salmon / trout (which becomes the salmon of knowledge).
3) most likely it is the Boyne River. According to mythology, Brug na Boinne or “Boyne River Palace” is the current Newgrange. Dimora del Dagda and then the son Aengus (Oengus) and the most important gods. The mound rises on the north bank of the Boyne River, east of Slane (County Meath).

new-grange
here is how the mound was once

4)A reference to a mythological tale by Fionn Mac Cumhaill (salomon of knowledge).

Even the trout is considered by the Celtic tradition as a guardian spirit of the waterways, and represents the Underworld, which it is materially embodied under the gaze of the poet in a young girl from the Other World, in a sort of dream or vision ( aisling) that disappears when the day is cleared: the poet tells us he will dedicate his life to chasing that girl or to reach (in life) the Other World
5) The apple tree and its fruit are always present in the Otherworld and most of the time it is a female creature to offer the golden apple to the hero or the poet. The apple is the fruit of immortality but also of death, of eternal sleep.
The access (in life) to the Other Celtic World is an honor reserved for poets, semi-divine heroes and a few privileged visitors (sometimes ravished by fairies for their beauty), Yeats hopes to be able to feed on Avalon apples and obtain the gift of immortality (poetic).

Aengus il vagabondo

Angelo Branduardi in “Branduardi canta Yeats” 1986 music by Donovan, text-translation by Luisa Zappa

Fu così che al bosco andai,
chè un fuoco in capo mi sentivo,
un ramo di nocciolo io tagliai
ed una bacca appesi al filo.
Bianche falene vennero volando,
e poi le stelle luccicando,
la bacca nella corrente lanciai
e pescai una piccola trota d’argento.
Quando a terra l’ebbi posata
per ravvivare il fuoco assopito,
qualcosa si mosse all’improvviso
e col mio nome mi chiamò.
Una fanciulla era divenuta,
fiori di melo nei capelli,
per nome mi chiamò e svanì
nello splendore dell’aria.
Sono invecchiato vagabondando
per vallate e per colline,
ma saprò alla fine dove e`andata,
la bacerò e la prenderò per mano;
cammineremo tra l’erba variegata,
sino alla fine dei tempi coglieremo
le mele d’argento della luna,
le mele d’oro del sole.

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44244 http://branoalcollo.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/le-metamorfosi-di-yeats/ http://lebuoneinterferenze.blogspot.it/2010/02/le-mele-della-notte.html http://www.ilcerchiosciamanico.it/articoli/p2/123/il-regno-sotto-le-acque-il-recupero-dello-sciamanesimo-celtico-di-sharon-paice-macleod.html

The Grey Funnel Line

Il folksinger Cyril Tawney  scrisse “The Grey Funnel Line” nel 1959 prima di congedarsi dalla Marina Reale del Regno Unito. E’ lo stesso Cyril a raccontare la genesi del brano (vedi): come in molti shanty il marinaio si lamenta del suo arruolamento desiderando con nostalgia la vita accanto al proprio amore, ma sono in genere lacrime da coccodrillo..
ASCOLTA Jolie Holland Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs and Chanteys ANTI 2006, una versione con molto soul

ASCOLTA Dolores Keane, Mary Black, Emmylou Harris

ASCOLTA Islands in A Sleep & a Forgetting 2012 Strofe I, II, V, VI


I
Don’t mind the rain or the rolling sea,
The weary night never worries me.
But the hardest time in sailor’s day
Is to watch the sun as it dies away.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line (1).
II
The finest ship that sailed the sea
Is still a prison for the likes of me.
But give me wings like Noah’s dove,
I’d fly up harbour to the girl I love.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
III
There was a time my heart was free
Like a floating spar on the open sea.
But now the spar is washed ashore,
It comes to rest at my real love’s door.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
IV
Every time I gaze behind the screws (2)
Makes me long for old Peter’s shoes (3).
I’d walk right down that silver lane
And take my love in my arms again.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
V
Oh Lord, if dreams were only real
I’d have my hands on that wooden wheel (4).
And with all my heart I’d turn her round
And tell the boys that we’re homeward bound.
It’s one more day on the Grey Funnel Line.
VI
I’ll pass the time like some machine
Until blue water turns to green.
Then I’ll dance on down that walk-ashore
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.
And sail the Grey Funnel Line no more.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non bado alla pioggia o al mare agitato
la notte fredda non mi preoccupa mai
ma il tempo più duro in una giornata da marinaio è guardare il sole mentre tramonta, un altro giorno nella Gray Funnel Line
II
La nave più bella che solcò il mare è tuttavia una prigione per quelli come me. Ma dammi le ali come la colomba di Noe volerò oltre il porto dalla ragazza che amo. Un altro giorno nella Gray Funnel Line
III
Ci fu un tempo in cui il mio cuore era libero come una piattaforma galleggiante nel mare aperto. Ma ora la piattaforma è trasportata a riva, si ferma alla porta del mio vero amore. un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
IV
Ogni volta che guardo dentro ai motori ad elica mi viene da desiderare le scarpe del vecchio Peter.
Camminerei su quella scia d’argento e prenderei di nuovo il mio amore tra le braccia
un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
V
Oh Signore, se i sogni fossero realtà
metterei le mani su quella ruota di legno
e con tutto il cuore la farei girare
e direi ai ragazzi che siamo diretti verso casa
un altro giorno nella Grey Funnel Line.
VI
Passerò il tempo come quella macchina
finchè l’acqua azzurra non diventerà verde.
E ballerò su quel pontile
e non navigherò mai più con la Grey Funnel Line
e non navigherò mai più con la Grey Funnel Line.

NOTE
1) i fumaioli delle navi a vapore essendo i tratti più evidenti e riconoscibili nelle lunghe distanze erano verniciati con colori ditintivi dalla varie linee mercantili, così i fumaioli della Royal Navi per Cyril Tawney erano grigio canna di fucile
2) non so se ho tradotto correttamente
3) Old Peter o Saint Peter’s shoes sono le scarpe del vecchio pescatore biblico, che grazie alla fede camminò sulle acque: Se avesse avuto l’abilità di Pietro di camminare sull’acqua, avrebbe potuto camminare sulla scia della luna per titornare tra le braccia del suo amore
4) il timone

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/thegreyfunnelline.html
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16942

The Wandering of Old Angus

Read the post in English

MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933) The Silver Apples of the Moon
MARGARET MACDONALD MAKINTOSH (1865-1933)
The Silver Apples of the Moon

The song of wandering Aengus (La canzone di orgAengus l’errante) è stata pubblicata nel 1899, nella raccolta di poesie “The Wind among the reeds” (Il vento fra le canne) di William Butler Yeats (1865-1939).

Aengus (Oengus) è il dio dell’amore della mitologia irlandese, appartenente alle mitiche schiere dei Tuatha De Dannan, eternamente giovane regnante del Brug na Boinne vicino alle rive del fiume Boyne. Di lui si narra che si fosse innamorato di una bellissima fanciulla vista in sogno e, malato d’amore, la cercasse a lungo prima di trovarla e portarla nel suo regno.

Nella poesia però il personaggio è un giovane mortale (forse il poeta stesso) alla ricerca dell’ispirazione poetica o del lato più ancestrale della conoscenza. Egli narra della sua iniziazione al passato, poiché si è fatto vecchio, alla perenne ricerca della bellezza, ovvero dell’illuminazione poetica, incarnata dalla fanciulla con i boccioli di melo tra i capelli.

Il primo a mettere in musica la poesia è stato lo stesso Yeats che la compose o che vi adattò una melodia tradizionale irlandese : nel 1907 diede alle stampe il suo saggio ‘Speaking to the Psaltery’ in cui la poesia viene recitata alla maniera bardica ovvero cantata con l’accompagnamento del salterio; ma molti altri artisti furono ispirati dal testo e composero ulteriori melodie.

Burt Ives con il titolo The Wandering of Old Angus  in ‘Burl Ives: Songs of Ireland‘ Decca DL 8444 (ca. 1954) nelle note di copertina si accredita la melodia a Yeats

Judy Collins con il titolo ‘Golden Apples of the Sun’  – Golden Apples of the Sun 1962. La stessa Collins dice in merito: “Imparata dal canto di Will Holt, questa stupenda canzone è la messa in musica di una poesia di W. B. Yeats “La canzone del vagabondo Angus”. Non è una canzone popolare, quanto piuttosto una art song [cantata per voce e pianoforte]. Ha un sensibilità di tipo tradizionale a riguardo; la ripetitività ti dà l’impressione di un incantesimo, quello che fa anche la poesia. In merito al suo apprendimento avevo sentito la canzone quasi due anni fa. Quando ho sentito Will Holt cantarla a tarda  notte al Gate of Horn, sono rimasta molto colpita e determinata a impararla. La cantò per me un certo numero di volte, e persino me la diede su nastro. Ho vissuto con the Golden Apples of the Sun quasi un anno e mezzo prima di cantarla, e poi è esplosa un giorno – quasi di sua spontanea volontà – mentre visitavo degli amici. Mi ci è voluto molto tempo per assimilarla, ma ora è parte di me. Sento che la canzone ha qualcosa a che fare con ciò che la gente vuole – ciò che non hanno – e talvolta il desiderio di queste cose è quasi altrettanto soddisfacente dell’averle”

Donovan in H. M. S. 1971

Richie Havens in “Mixed Bag II” 1974

Christy Moore in “Ride On” 1986

Paul Winter & Karen Casey in Celtic Solstice 1999

Jolie Holland in Catalpa 2003 con venature country

Waterboys in “An Appointment with Mr Yeats” 2011
una versione quasi parlata che chiude con la melodia del flauto, come un refolo di vento

Eoin O’Brien 2013

ASCOLTA Sedrenn  in De l’autri cotè 2013 (la recensione del cd qui

Robert Lawrence & Jill Greene (su musica di Jill Diana Greene) 2016

I
I went out to the hazel wood
because a fire was in my head(1)
and cut and peeled a hazel wand(2)
and hooked a berry to a thread.
II
And when white moths were on the wing
and moth-like stars were flickering out
I dropped the berry in the stream(3)
and caught a little silver trout(4).
III
When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire aflame
But something rustled on the floor
and someone called me by my name.
IV
It had become a glimmering girl
with apple blossom(5) in her hair
who called me by my name and ran
and vanished through the brightening air
V
Though I am old with wandering
through hollow lands and hills lands
I will find out where she has gone
and kiss her lips and take her hands.
VI
And walk among long dappled grass
and pluck till time and times are done
the silver apples of the moon
the golden apples of the sun(5).

NOTE
1) il ‘fuoco nella testa’ è quello che caratterizza l’esperienza visionaria propria dello sciamanesimo (vedi). Nel libro “Il fuoco nella testa (2007) Tom Cowan esamina le connessioni tra sciamanismo e immaginazione celtica, analizzando i miti, i racconti, gli antichi poeti e narratori celtici e descrivendo le tecniche usate per accedere al mondo degli sciamani. Gli sciamani sono in grado di accedere a un particolare stato di coscienza nel quale sperimentano un viaggio nei regni non-ordinari dell’esistenza dove raccolgono conoscenza e potere che usano poi per se stessi o a favore di altri membri del loro gruppo sociale. In quest’ottica e in una lettura autobiografica il protagonista si avvicina alle acque del fiume per praticare un rituale che gli permetta di viaggiare nell’Altro Mondo
2) la nocciola è frutto della scienza e cade nella sorgente sacra, dove viene mangiata dal salmone/trota (che diventa il salmone della conoscenza)
3) molto probabilmente si tratta del fiume Boyne. Secondo la mitologia il Brug na Boinne o «Palazzo del fiume Boyne», è l’attuale Newgrange. Dimora del Dagda e poi del figlio Aengus (Oengus) e degli dèi più importanti. Il tumulo sorge sulla riva settentrionale del fiume Boyne, a est di Slane (contea di Meath).

new-grange
ecco come doveva presentarsi un tempo il tumulo di Newgrange

4) Il riferimento ai boschi di nocciolo e all’apprestarsi a cucinare una trota appena pescata sembra riferirsi ad un racconto mitologico di Fionn Mac Cumhaill. All’epoca era a fare il suo apprendistato presso il maestro Finnegas che da ben sette anni dava la caccia al salmone della saggezza (o conoscenza, ispirazione poetica): infine lo cattura e lo fa cucinare dal fanciullo con la raccomandazione di non mangiare la sua carne (perchè tutta la saggezza va a colui che ne mangia il primo boccone) Fionn si scotta un pollice e si porta il dito alla bocca, così facendo inghiotte un pezzetto di pelle di salmone: ogni volta che si succhierà il dito potrà fare ricorso alla saggezza.
Anche la trota è considerata dalla tradizione celtica uno spirito-guardiano dei corsi d’acqua, e rappresenta il Mondo di Sotto, che materialmente si incarna sotto lo sguardo del poeta in una fanciulla dell’Altro Mondo, in una sorta di sogno o visione (aisling) che scompare al rischiararsi del giorno: il poeta ci dice dedicherà la sua vita a inseguire quella fanciulla ovvero a raggiungere (in vita) l’Altro Mondo 
5) Il melo e il suo frutto sono sempre presenti nell’AltroMondo e il più delle volte è una creatura femminile a offrire la mela d’oro all’eroe o al poeta. La mela è il frutto dell’immortalità ma anche della morte, del sonno eterno.
L
‘accesso (in vita) all’Altro Mondo celtico è un onore riservato a poeti, eroi semi-divini e pochi privilegiati visitatori (a volte rapiti dalle fate per la loro bellezza), Yeats spera di potersi nutrire delle mele di Avalon e di ottenere il dono dell’immortalità (poetica).

La canzone di Aengus il vagabondo

Angelo Branduardi in “Branduardi canta Yeats” 1986 sulla melodia di Donovan, testo-traduzione di Luisa Zappa

Fu così che al bosco andai,
chè un fuoco in capo mi sentivo,
un ramo di nocciolo io tagliai
ed una bacca appesi al filo.
Bianche falene vennero volando,
e poi le stelle luccicando,
la bacca nella corrente lanciai
e pescai una piccola trota d’argento.
Quando a terra l’ebbi posata
per ravvivare il fuoco assopito,
qualcosa si mosse all’improvviso
e col mio nome mi chiamò.
Una fanciulla era divenuta,
fiori di melo nei capelli,
per nome mi chiamò e svanì
nello splendore dell’aria.
Sono invecchiato vagabondando
per vallate e per colline,
ma saprò alla fine dove e`andata,
la bacerò e la prenderò per mano;
cammineremo tra l’erba variegata,
sino alla fine dei tempi coglieremo
le mele d’argento della luna,
le mele d’oro del sole.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44244 http://branoalcollo.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/le-metamorfosi-di-yeats/ http://lebuoneinterferenze.blogspot.it/2010/02/le-mele-della-notte.html http://www.ilcerchiosciamanico.it/articoli/p2/123/il-regno-sotto-le-acque-il-recupero-dello-sciamanesimo-celtico-di-sharon-paice-macleod.html