Shamrock shore

Leggi in italiano

Two texts in search of an author, with the same title “Shamrock shore” we distinguish two different songs, both as text and as melody, the first reported by PW Joyce at the end of the nineteenth century is an irish emigration song, the second ever traditional is also an emigration song, but above all a protest song, the social and political denunciation of the Irish question.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Already at the end of the 1800s P. W. Joyce reported it in his  “Ancient Irish Music” to then republish it in 1909, so he writes “This air, and one verse of the song, was published for the first time by me in my Ancient Irish Music, from which it is reprinted here. It was a favourite in my young days, and I have several copies of the words printed on ballad-sheets“. Again P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) reports further text
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

The Irish emigrant arrives in London, the tune is that generally known with the title of”Erin Shore” (see)

Horslips from Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

More than a song, a political rant about the need for the independence of Ireland and the evils of landlordism.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore

NOTES
1) The song is obviously post-Union (1800), because it refers to the dissolved Irish Parliament
2) the plague of landlordism
3)  in 1846 the entire crop of potatoes (basic diet of the Irish) was all destroyed due to a fungus, the peronospera; the “great famine” occurred (1845-1849 which some historians prolonged until 1852) which lasted for several years and almost halved the population; those who did not die of hunger were lucky if the
y could leave for England or Scotland, but more massive was the migration to America
4) ‘tithes and taxes’ paid in support of the Irish Church, so the song pre-dates the Act of Disestablishment in 1869
5) the years of large-scale industrial expansion (with relative upgrading of infrastructure) began in Britain starting from 1840-50
6) John Bull is the national personification of the Kingdom of Great Britain

Paddy’s Green Shamrock Shore

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm

ELIZA LEE

Questa canzone marinaresca (sea shanty) detta anche “Clear the track”, “Let the Bulgine Run”, oppure” Margaret (Margot) Evans” era secondo Stan Hugill una capstan shanty. Secondo John Short si tratta di una variante della canzone tradizionale irlandese “Shule Agra”: così argomenta Johana Colcord The probability is that some Irish sailor, ashore on liberty in Mobile, sang “Shule Agra” in a water-front saloon. It pleased the ear of the negroes hanging about outside; and the next day they sang what they could remember while screwing home the great bales of cotton in some Liverpool ship’s hold. Negro fashion, they put in the rattling sucession of 16th notes, and added “bulgine” for good measure. The crew of the ship heard and liked it, perhaps without recognizing its origin; and took it back with them to Liverpool. There the crew of the Margaret Evans, a well known American packet-ship, lying in the Clarence or the Waterloo Dock, picked it up and fitted in the name of their ship, and took it back to New York, with Liza Lee and the bulgine still in close conjunction with the low-backed car, to the puzzlement of future folk-lorists!” (Colcord, Johana C. 1924. Roll and Go)

Secondo Wikipedia la Margaret Evans era un postale che faceva la spola tra Londra e New York, è stata varata nel 1846 e ha continuato i suoi viaggi fino al 1860. “She was 899 tons, built 1846 in New York by Westervelt & MacKay and owned by E.E. Morgan. She continued sailing into the 1860s.”

clipper-coulter

I CLIPPER

Navi dallo scafo basso e affusolato, un dispiegamento di superficie velica imponente, i clipper sfrecciavano sui mari a velocità mai viste prima (un Clipper poteva raggiungere la velocità di 9 nodi (16 km/h), con punte di 20 nodi (37 km/h), mentre la velocità massima delle altre navi era di 5 nodi (9 km/h) scarsi).
I primi vascelli di questo tipo ad essere varati sono stati i piccoli Clipper di Baltimora che vennero realizzati negli USA durante la guerra del 1812. Inizialmente la principale rotta sulla quale furono utilizzati i Clipper fu la New York-San Francisco via Capo Horn, che restò la via più breve tra le due città fino all’inaugurazione della ferrovia. Grazie ad essi questa linea era in servizio continuo, dato che per le navi precedenti risultava troppo pericoloso il passaggio continuo per Capo Horn. L’epoca d’oro dei Clipper durò dal 1840 al 1870 circa. Nel 1852 i cantiere americani vararono ben 61 Clipper, nel 1853, invece, furono 125. In questo periodo, i Clipper furono le navi preferite per il trasporto di carichi poco ingombranti e molto redditizi come le spezie, la seta, la lana o il tè. Con queste cifre in gioco si sviluppò una feroce competizione, molto popolare e seguita da tutti i giornali inglesi dell’epoca, tra i diversi equipaggi e le diverse compagnie di navigazione che diede origine a quella che venne chiamata la Great Tea Race. Questa competizione avveniva sulla rotta di 15.000 miglia (27.780 km) tra Shanghai e la Gran Bretagna. Veniva vinta dalla prima nave che giungeva in porto in Inghilterra. Inizialmente il record era di 113 giorni di traversata che successivamente, nel 1866, venne portato a 90. Una grande gara, che durò per vari anni, coinvolse in particolare due Clipper: il Thermopylae e il Cutty Sark. (tratto da qui)

ASCOLTA Alan Mills in Songs of the Sea 1957


Oh, the smartest clipper(1) you can find.
Ah ho Way-oh, are you most done.
Is the Marget Evan(2) of the Blue Cross Line(3).
So clear the track, let the Bullgine(4) run.
Tibby Hey rig a jig in a jaunting car(5).
(Ah ho Way-oh, are you most done.
With Lizer Lee(6) all on my knee.
So clear the track, let the Bullgine run.)
Oh the Marget Evans of the Blue Cross Line
She’s never a day behind her time.
Oh the gels are walking on the pier
And I’ll  soon be home to you, my dear.
Oh when I come home across the sea,
It’s Lizer you will marry me.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper(1) più tosto che tu possa trovare
(e via hai quasi finito)
è la Margaret Evan(2) della Blu Cross Line(3).
Così, sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4), hey Tommy fatti un giro sul calesse(5), e via hai quasi finito
con Liza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore

La Margaret Evan della compagnia “Blu Cross”
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo.
Oh le ragazze stanno camminando sul molo e presto sarò a casa da te, tesoro, oh quando ritornerò a casa dal mare è Liza che mi sposerà!

NOTE
1) Agli inizi Ottocento si richiedono sempre più navi veloci e non più “armate” come nel secolo precedente (epoca di galeoni, vascelli e fregate): si richiedono navi per il trasporto delle merci, senza tanti fronzoli e con più vele, nasce così il “Clipper”. Sono gli ultimi modelli delle navi a vela, l’apogeo dell’età della vela poi a breve subentreranno i motori..
2) In altre versioni è la Rosalind della Black Ball line
3) Più che il nome di una compagnia navale (riportato variamente come Blue Cross Line, Blue Star line o una ancora più improbabile blue sky line) ci si riferisce alla bandiera con una stella o una croce blu al centro.Throughout the various changes of management the Black Ball liners carried a crimson swallowtail flag with a black ball in the centre; the Dramatic liners, blue above white with a white L in blue and a black L in white for the Liverpool ships, and a red swallowtail with white ball and black L in the centre for the New Orleans ships; the Union Line to Havre, a white field with black U in the centre; John Griswold’s London Line, red swallowtail with black X in centre; the Swallowtail Line, red before white, swallowtail for the London ships, and blue before white, swallowtail for the Liverpool ships; Robert Kermit’s Liverpool Line, blue swallowtail with red star in the centre; Spofford & Tillotson’s Liverpool Line, yellow field, blue cross with white S. T. in the centre. These flags disappeared from the sea many years ago. (tratto da qui). Ci fu una Blue star line, una compagnia navale inglese ma venne fondata solo nel 1911.
4) bullgine (bulgine) è un termine slang per engine, ma anche il termine degli afro-americani per dire locomotiva (La John Bull fu una locomotiva americana che iniziò la sua corsa nel 1831 circa) Si tratta ovviamente di una gara tra il clipper e il trasporto via treno: la rotta  New York-San Francisco via Capo Horn, restò la via più breve tra le due città fino all’inaugurazione della ferrovia.
5) anche “Timme Hey, Rig-a-jig, and a jaunting run!” E’ scritto anche low-backed (back) car(cart) ovvero il caratteristico carro-calesse irlandese a due ruote: letteralmente “balla una giga sul calesse” ma il doppio senso è implicito
6) è il nome della ragazza a dare più spesso il titolo alla canzone

ASCOLTA Johnny Collins in Shanties & Songs of the Sea 1998 il testo apporta delle piccole variazioni alla versione precedente e aggiunge ulteriori strofe.


Oh, the smartest clipper(1) you can find.
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Is the Marget Evan(2) of the Blue Star Line(3).
Clear away the track, let the Bullgine(4) run.
To my aye rig a jig in a junting car(5),
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee, clear away the track and let the bulgine run.
Oh the Marget Evans of the Blue Star Line
She’s never a day behind her time.
And when we’re outward bound in New York Town,
We’ll dance their bowly girls around,
When we’ve stowed our freight at the West Street Pier
We’ll ahead get back to Liverpool pier,
Oh I thought I heard the old man say
“We’ll keep the brig three points away.”
Oh, when we’re back in Liverpool town,
I’ll stand your whiskeys all around!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper(1) più tosto che tu possa trovare
(Ho eh, ho ah, hai finito?)
è la Margaret Evan(2) della Blu Star Line(3).
Così, sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4),
fatti un giro sul calesse(5) con me,
e via hai quasi finito?
Con ELiza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4)

La Margaret Evan della Blu Star
Line
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo.
E quando saremo nella città di New York
danzeremo in cerchio con quelle vivaci ragazze
e quando avremo stivato il nostro carico al Molo di West Street
andremo dritti verso il molo di Liverpool.
Mi è sembrato di sentire dire dal capitano “Terremo il brigantino a tre punti di distanza”
E quando saremo di ritorno nella città di Liverpool mi attaccherò al tuo whiskey!

ASCOLTA The Dreadnoughts in Victory Square 2009 (un rimake della versione di Johnny Collins con dei mix testuali tra le due versioni precedenti)


The smartest clipper you can find is,
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
Shes’s the Margaret Evans on a Blue Star line(3)!
Clear away the track and let the bulgine run(4).
To my aye rig a jig in a junting gun(5),
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
With Eliza Lee all on my knee, Clear away the track and let the bulgine run.

Oh, we’re outward bound for the West creek pier
We’ll go ashore at Liverpool pier,
And when we’re over in New York Town,
We’ll dance their bowly girls around,
Oh the Margaret Tenans on the blue star line(3),
Shes never a day behind the time,
Oh, when we’re back in Liverpool town,
I’ll stand your whiskeys all around!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
O il clipper più tosto che tu possa trovare è, Ho eh, ho ah, hai quasi finito?
E’ la Margaret Evan della Blu Star Line(3)
sgombra la pista, fai correre il motore(4)
Con me balla una giga sul calesse (5)
Ho eh, ho ah, hai quasi finito?
Con Liza Lee sulle mie ginocchia
sgombra la pista,
fai correre il motore.

Oh, dobbiamo partire dal Molo di West Creek
e sbarcheremo sul Molo di Liverpool
e quando saremo nella città di New York
danzeremo in tondo con quelle vivaci ragazze
Oh la Margaret Tenans della Blue Star Line(3)
non ha mai un giorno di ritardo
e quando saremo di ritorno nella città di Liverpool
mi attaccherò al tuo whiskey!

NOTE
5) scritto impropriamente gun per fare rima con run. Si tratta in realtà  del caratteristico carro-calesse irlandese a due ruote

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT: The Bull John Run

ASCOLTA Sam Lee in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


I wish I was a fancy man
Ho eh, ho ah, are you most done?
I wish I was a fancy man
So clear the track,
let the Bullgine run.

As I walked out one morning fair
I met Miss Liza I declare
The day was fine and the wind was free
with Lize Lee all on my knee.
I said “My dear when you’ll be mine,
I’ll dress you up in silk so fine”
I wish I was in London Town
it was there I saw the gals all around
The london judies hung around
and then my Lize will be fine
You’ll ever be in New York, New York
is there you’ll see those girls fly around
and Marigold I love so dear
with there .. away some golden air (*)
I’ll take another girl on my knee
and leave behind my Lize Lee
With me hey rig-a-jig in a low-back car
I wish I was a shantyman
With me hey rig-a-jig in a low-back car

* non riesco a capire la pronuncia dele parole

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere un uomo elegante
Ho eh, ah ah hai quasi finito?
Vorrei essere un uomo elegante
Così, sgombra la pista,
fai correre il motore
.
Mentre ero a passeggio in un bel mattino incontrai Miss Liza, dico.
Il giorno era bello e non c’era vento
con Lize Lee sulle mie ginocchia.
dissi “Mio caro quando sarai mia
ti vestirò con seta tanto bella”.
Vorrei essere a Londra, era lì che ho visto le ragazze tutt’intorno.
Le ragazze londinesi erano in giro
così la mia Lize andrà bene.
Se sarai a New York, New York
è lì vedrai quelle ragazze volare in giro
e Marigold amo così tanto
???
Prenderò un’altra ragazza sulle mie ginocchia
e lascerò da parte la mia Lize Lee
Con me, balla una giga sul calesse
Vorrei essere uno shantyman
Con me, balla una giga sul calesse

FONTI
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20774/20774-h/20774-h.htm#Clear_the_track_let_the_Bullgine_run
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/898.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Song_about_the_Margaret_Evans
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/elizalee.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1208
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8629
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3864
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=8578
https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/letthebulginerun.html

La terra del verde trifoglio

Read the post in English

Due testi in cerca di autore, con lo stesso titolo “Shamrock shore” distinguiamo due diverse canzoni, sia come testo che come melodia, la prima riportata da P. W. Joyce alla fine dell’Ottocento è una irish emigration song, la seconda sempre tradizionale è anche una emigration song ma soprattutto una party song di protesta, la denuncia sociale e politica della questione irlandese.

EMIGRATION SONG: To London fair

Già alla fine del 1800 P. W. Joyce la riporta nella sua raccolta “Ancient Irish Music” per poi ripubblicarla nel 1909, così scrive “Una delle mie ballate preferite della mia gioventù di cui ho diverse copie delle parole stampate sui fogli volanti “.
Ancora P. W. Joyce in Old Irish Folk Music (1909) riporta ul ulteriore testo
“Ye muses mine, with me combine and grant me your relief,
While here alone I sigh and moan, I’m overwhelmed with grief:
While here alone I sigh and moan far from my friends and home;
My troubled mind no rest can find since I left the Shamrock shore.”

L’emigrante irlandese sbarca a Londra, la melodia è quella generalmente conosciuta con il titolo di “Erin Shore” (vedi)

Horslips in Happy to meet, sorry to part, 1972

PW Joyce, 1890
I
In early spring when small birds sing and lambkins sport and play,
My way I took, my friends forsook, and came to Dublin quay;
I enter’d as a passenger, and to England I sailed o’er;
I bade farewell to all my friends,
and I left the shamrock shore.
II
To London fair, I did repair some pleasure there to find
I found it was a lovely place,
and pleasant to mine eye
The ladies to where fair to view,
and rich the furs they wore
But none I saw, that could compare to the maids of the shamrock shore…
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
All’inizio della primavera quando gli uccellini cantano e gli agnellini si divertono e giocano, presi la mia decisione di abbandonare gli amici per andare al molo di Dublino.
Mi imbarcai come passeggero e partii per l’Inghilterra, dissi addio a tutti i miei amici e lasciai la terra del trifoglio.
II
Nella bella Londra mi rifugiai,
per cercare un po’ di divertimento laggiù, trovavo che fosse un bel posticino e gradevole alla vista,
le donne del posto piacevoli da guardare con indosso delle costose pellicce, ma niente vidi che si sarebbe potuto paragonare alla fanciulle della terra del trifoglio

PARTY SONG: You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle

Più che una canzone una concione politica sulla necessità dell’indipendenza dell’Irlanda e sui mali del latifondismo.
Matt Molloy, Tommy Peoples, Paul Brady (1978)


I
You brave young sons of Erin’s Isle
I hope you will attend awhile
‘Tis the wrongs of dear old Ireland I am going to relate
‘Twas black and cursed was the day
When our parliament was taken away
And all of our griefs and sufferings commences from that day (1)
For our hardy sons and daughters fair
To other countries must repair
And leave their native land behind in sorrow to deplore
For seek employment they must roam
Far, far away from the native home
From that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
II
Now Ireland is with plenty blessed
But the people, we are sore oppressed
All by those cursed tyrants we are forced for to obey
Some haughty landlords for to please
Our houses and our lands they’ll seize
To put fifty farms into one (2) and take us all away
Regardless of the widow’s sighs
The mother’s tears and orphan’s cries
In thousands we were driven from home which grieves my heart full sore
We were forced by famine and disease (3) To emigrate across the seas
From that sore, opressed island that they called the shamrock shore
III
Our sustenance all taken away
The tithes and taxes for to pay
To support that law-protected church to which they do adhere (4)
And our Irish gentry, well you know
To other countries they do go
And the money from old Ireland they squandered here and there
For if our squires  would stay at home
And not to other countries roam
But to build mills and factories (5) here to employ the laboring poor
For if we had trade and commerce here
To me no nation could compare
To that sore, oppressed island that they call the shamrock shore
IV
John Bull (6), he boasts, he laughs with scorn
And he says that Irishman is born
To be always discontented for at home we cannot agree
But we’ll banish the tyrants from our land
And in harmony like sisters (7) stand
To demand the rights of Ireland,
let us all united be
And our parliament in College Green
For to assemble, it will be seen
And happy days in Erin’s Isle we soon will have once more
And dear old Ireland soon will be
A great and glorious country
And peace and blessings soon will smile all around the shamrock shore
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto*
I
Voi fieri giovani figli dell’isola di Erin
spero che prestiate attenzione per un momento : sono i torti della cara vecchia Irlanda che vi andò a riferire
nero e maledetto fu il giorno in cui il nostro parlamento fu abolito e tutti i nostri guai e le sofferenze iniziarono da allora.
Perchè i nostri figli robusti e le nostre belle figlie devono recarsi in altri paesi e lasciare la loro terra natia alle spalle, con dolore condannati
a cercare un lavoro, devono viaggiare
lontano, molto lontano dalla loro casa
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio
II
L’Irlanda è benedetta con l’abbondanza, ma la gente è oppressa, a tutti quei tiranni maledetti dobbiamo obbedire, per compiacere i boriosi padroni che delle nostre case e delle nostre terre s’impadroniranno  per mettere 50 fattorie in una e portarci tutti via, senza riguardo ai pianti della vedova, alle lacrime della madre e ai lamenti dell’orfano.
In migliaia siamo stati cacciati da casa, che mi rattrista il cuore, siamo stati costretti dalla carestia e dalla malattia a emigrare attraverso i mari
da quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
III
Il nostro sostentamento portato via per pagare le decime e le tasse
per sostenere la chiesa protetta dalla legge a cui loro aderiscono
e la nostra gentry inglese, è risaputo,
vanno in altri paesi e i soldi della vecchia Irlanda vanno sperperando in lungo e in largo. Perchè se i nostri possidenti restassero a casa e non viaggiassero per altri paesi, costruirebbero opifici e fabbriche qui per dare lavoro alla povera gente; perchè se avessimo il commercio e l’economia, per me nessun’altra nazione si potrebbe paragonare a quell’isola oppressa e sofferente che chiamano la terra del trifoglio.
IV
L’inglese si vanta, ride con disprezzo
e dice che l’irlandese è nato
per essere sempre scontento perchè in sull’isola non andremo mai daccordo,
eppure bandiremo i tiranni dalla nostra terra
e da buone sorelle ci alzeremo a chiedere i diritti dell’Irlanda.
Quindi uniamoci tutti
e  il nostro parlamento al College Green si riunirà per le assemblee
e giorni felici nell’isola di Erin avremo presto ancora una volta
e la cara vecchia Irldanda presto sarà
una grande e gloriosa nazione
e pace e benedizioni presto sorrideranno alla terra del trifoglio

NOTE
1) la canzone è stata scritta dopo il 1800 e l’atto di unione con il regno di Gran Bretagna ( Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda)
2) la piaga del latifondismo
3)  nel 1846 l’intero raccolto delle patate (dieta base degli irlandesi) andò tutto distrutto a causa di un fungo, la peronospera; sopravvenne “la grande carestia” (1845-1849 che alcuni storici prolungano fino al 1852) che durò per vari anni e dimezzò quasi la popolazione; chi non moriva di fame era fortunato se riusciva a partire per l’Inghilterra o la Scozia, ma più massiccia fu la migrazione in America continua
4) decime obbligatorie per il sostenamento della Chiesa Anglicana. Solo sotto il primo ministero Gladstone fu tolto (1869) alla Chiesa episcopale irlandese il riconoscimento di confessione ufficiale e fu promulgata la prima legge (Land Act) protettiva dei fittavoli.
5) gli anni dell’espansione industriale su grande scala (con relativo potenziamento delle infrastrutture)  iniziano in Gran Bretagna a partire dal 1840-50
6) John Bull è la personificazione nazionale del Regno di Gran Bretagna, il nomigliolo nasce nel 1700 a rappresentare il tipo del gentiluomo di campagna, uomo d’affari capace e onesto ma collerico e di umore variabile, amante dello scherzo e della buona tavola.(Treccani)
7) letteralmente “in armonia come sorelle”, non colgo però l’allusione

FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/yebravey.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=62929 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=130087

https://thesession.org/discussions/13438
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/casey/shamrock.htm