Archivi tag: Jim Mageean

Blow away the morning dew

Leggi in italiano

In the older version of the ballad known as The Baffled Knight, a young and inexperienced knight meets a girl in the fields and asks her to have sex, but the lady makes fun of her love inexperience and tricks him into a ploy.

BLOW AWAY THE MORNING DEW (Blow the winds)

Child ballad #112 D

This ballad is reported in many text versions both in the eighteenth-century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as transmitted orally in Great Britain and America with the titles of “Blow (Clear) (Stroll) Away The Morning Dew”; the male protagonist from time to time is a gentleman, or a shepherd boy / peasant. The novelty compared to the versions A and B already seen (here and here) is the refrain that, declined in a couple of variations, recalls an allusive morning breeze that sweeps away the night’s dew.
The Renaissance courtly ballad of the “Baffled Knight” is now transposed into a popular setting, linking it to an ancient Celtic auspicious and healthy ritual, still practiced by the peasants, that of the Bath in the dew of Beltane.(see more).

CECIL SHARP VERSION

Geoff Woolfewrites “Cecil Sharp noted several versions of this song in his travels around Somerset in the early 1900s, and in 1916 published what became the ‘standard’ version later sung by many schoolchildren and choirs. Vaughan Williams used the tune for his folk song suite for military band in the 1920s. The text in Mrs Nation [Elisabeth Nation of Bathpool, Somerset]’s version is similar to most others; its meaning may have been lost on collectors and schoolchildren in more innocent times” (from here)

Oscar Brand & Joni Mitchell 1965: a still unknown Joni Anderson, but already refulgent. This video is part of the television series “Let’s Sing Out” conducted by Oscar Brand, which was recorded on various Canadian university campuses and aired on Canadian television from 1963 to 1966. The textual version of the ballad has been slightly retouched and reduced in the form of humorous song.

I
There was a young farmer(1)
Kept sheep all on the hill;
And he walk’d out one May morning(2)
To see what he could kill.(3)
Chorus
And sing blow away the morning dew
The dew, and the dew.
Blow away the morning dew,
How sweet the birds they sing(4)
II
He looked high, he looked low,
He cast an under look;
And there he saw a pretty maid
that swimming in a brook.
III
“If you take to my father’s castle(6)
Which is walled all around,
And, you may have a kiss from me
And twenty thousand pound”(7).
IV
When they got to her father’s gate,
quicly she ride in:
There is a fool without
And here’s a maid within.
V
There is a flower in the garden,
they call it Marigold(8):
And if you do not
when you’re young(9),
then you may not when you’re olde.

NOTE
1) or “shepherd boy” in  Phyllis Marshall (which collected 26 popular songs between 1916 and 1917 from Bathpool and West Monkton, Somerset). In the Somerset Scrapbook, Bob and Jackie Patten write: “in 1916 and 1917 Miss Phyllis Marshall was collecting songs around West Monkton. Although only a small collection, her note books contain some choice material. This collection only came to light in the 1970s when it was found in a second-hand book shop and bought for a few pence“. Both the Oscar Brand and Phyllis Marshall versions are attributable to the “standard” one published by Cecil Sharp in 1916.
2) the verse is significant and clarifies the refrain: it is the May Day, when the sun of Beltane gives more power to the dew (vedi).
3) here the young man goes hunting for necessity, but initially he was a gentleman hunting for pleasure: it is evident the allusion to the woman as prey
4)the verse has been changed to make it more “winking”, The refrain reported by Cecil Sharp says:
And sing blow away the morning dew,
The dew, and the dew.
Blow away the morning dew,
How sweet the winds do blow.
5)in this version are missing a couple of verses as reported by Phyllis Marshall
“The dew’s all on the grass, it’ll spoil my wedding gown
Which cost my father out of his purse as many pounds as crowns”
“I’ll take off my riding coat and wrap it round and round
There is a wind come from the west which soon will blow it down”
The woman tries to dissuade the man with a pretext (and who sings does not seem to have doubts about the incongruity of the two just out of the stream where they were supposedly naked swimming), that of the dress that is rubbing (it is here is even a wedding dress , a Bride of May?) is a staple of the story that already in its seventeenth-century versions warned the inexperienced (in love) young men  “Spare not for her gay clothing, But lay her body flat on the ground”
6) normally it is a gate, I assume that Oscar Brand used the word “castle” to confirm the “ancient” origin of the ballad, (making a little effort to make it stand in the metric)
7) the girl boasts a rich dowry that could tempt the man not to go immediately to rape, but to aim at obtaining the consent of the parents (he can have money only in exchange for the marriage of course) the stanza collected by Phyllis Marshall, that it could be misunderstood if not included in the context, it says “And you shall see what I can do for fifty thousand pounds”
8) flower that already in the second half of 1600 was brought to America by the first settlers. The flower takes up the solar symbolism and was considered a protective plant. In this context it symbolizes the virtue of the girl
9) the maximum is softened

Eliza Carthy – Blow the winds from Red Rice 1998 (following The Game of Draughts)

I
There was a shepherd’s son,
He kept sheep on the hill.
He laid his pipe and his crook aside
And there he slept his fill.
Chorus
And blow the winds high-o, high-o
Sing blow the winds high-o
II
Well he looked east and he looked west,
He took another look
And there he saw a lady gay
Was dipping in a brook.
III
She said: “Sir, don’t touch my mantle,
Come let my clothes alone.
I will give you as much bright money
As you can carry home.”
IV
“I will not touch your mantle,
I’ll let your clothes alone,
But I’ll take you out of the water clear
My dear to be my own.”
V
He mounted her on a milk white steed,
Himself upon another,
And there they rode along the road
Like sister and like brother.
VI
And as they rode along the road
He spied some cocks of hay,
“Oh look!” he says, “there’s a lovely place
For men and maids to play (1).”
VII
And when they came to her father’s house
They rang long at the ring,
And who is there but her brother
To let the young girl in.
VIII
When the gates were opened
This young girl she jumped in,
“Oh, look!” she says, “you’re a fool without
And I’m a maid within!
IX (2)
“There is a horse in my father’s stable,
He stands behind the thorn,
He shakes himself above the trough
But dares not pry the corn.
X
“There is cock in my father’s yard,
A double comb (3) he wears,
He shakes his wings and he crows full loud
But a capon’s crest he bears.
XI
“And there is a flower in my father’s garden,
It’s called the marigold,
The fool that will not when he can,
He shall not when he would.”
XII
Says the shepherd’s son as he doffed his shoes,
“My feet they shall run bare
And if I ever meet another girl
I’ll have that girl, beware.”

NOTE
1) curious inversion of roles now it is the girl to tease the boy that does not react
2) the two strophes are “veiled” insults, the girl insinuates that the boy is a powerless
3) review of cock’s crests (see more)

Clear Away the Morning Dew

Ian Robb from “Ian Robb and hang the Piper” 1979
In the notes Ian writes ” the bulk of the text and the tune coming from ‘This Singing Island’, MacColl and Seeger


I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To see what I could shoot,
I there espied a pretty fair maid
Come a-tripping by the road.
CHORUS
And sing, Hail the dewy morning’
Blow all the winds high-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
How sweet the winds do blow.
II
We both jogged on together
‘Till we came to some pooks of hay.
She said’ “Young man, there is a place,
Where you and I can lay”.
III
I put me arms around her waist
And I tried to throw her down.
She said “Young man, the dewy grass
Will rumple my silk gown. (1) “
IV
“But if you come to me father ‘s house
There you can lay me down.
You can take away me maidenhead,
Likewise a thousand pounds.”
V
So I took her to her father’s house,
But there she locked me out.
She said’ “Young man, I’m a maid within,
And you’re a fool without! ”
VI
So it’s if you come to a pretty maid,
A mile outside of town,
Don’t you take no heed
of the dewy grass
Or the rumpling of her gown.

NOTE
1) very curious the attitude of the girl who first teases him by proposing to lie down between the hay (with an obvious double meaning) and then complains when he hugs her

Dew Is on the Grass

From the field recording of Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1907 from the testimony of Jake Willisof Hadleigh, Suffolk, in Folk Songs Collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams (Roy Palmer 1983 )
Lisa Knapp from Wild & Undaunted 2007


I
As I walked out one midsummer’s morn
All in in the month of May, sir,
O there I beheld a fair pretty maid
Making of the hay, sir.
Chorus
Fol de lie de lay
II
I boldly stepped up to her
Asked her to lay down, sir.
The answer that she gave to me
Was, “The dew is on the ground, sir.”
III
“O but if you come to my father’s house
You may lay in my bed, sir;
You can have my maidenhead
All on a bed of down, sir.”
IV
But when we got to her father’s house,
It was walled in all around, sir.
And she ran in and shut the gate,
Shut the young man out, sir.

V
“O when you met with me at first
You did not meet a fool, sir;
Take your Bible under your arm,
Go a little more to school, sir.
VI
“And if you meet a pretty girl
A little below the town, sir;
You must not mind her squalling
Or the rumpling of your gown, sir.
VII
“There is a cock in my father’s garden
Will not tread the hen (1), sir;
And I do think in my very heart
That you are one of them, sir.
VIII
“There is a flower in my father’s garden
Called a marigold, sir,
And if you will not when you may
You shall not when you would, sir.”
NOTE
1) now the insult is explicit: the boy is an impotent, in the Irish versions the most recurring phrase is:” when they got to bed upstairs, sure the bay he wasn’t able
ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Dew is on the grass, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

LINK
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/163.html
http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11204
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/phyllism.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64609

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=23532
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=149112
https://afolksongaweek.wordpress.com/2012/05/20/week-39-stroll-away-the-morning-dew/ http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=717 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1207 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5962 http://www.rosaleengregory.ca/the-baffled-knight.html http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/43791/

Blow away the morning dew sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

The ballad known as The Baffled Knight is reported in many text versions both in the eighteenth-century collections and in the Broadsides, as well as orally transmitted in Great Britain and America with the titles of “Blow (Clear) (Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” or “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning “: the male protagonist from time to time, is a gentleman, or a shepherd boy / peasant.

It could not miss the sea shanty version of this popular ballad in the text version best known as “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 version D), summarized in four stanzas

Nils Brown from Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)

I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”

JOHN SHORT VERSION

Another sea shanty version comes from the testimony of John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] comments that although Short started his Blow Away the Morning Dew with a verse of The Baffled Knight, he then digresses into floating verses. In fact three of the verses recorded and published by Terry, not one derive from The Baffled Knight! Short sang only the “flock of geese” verse to Sharp. Sharp did not publish the shanty, but other authors also give Baffled Knight versions. The other predominant version in collections is the American whaling version but still using the tune associated with The Baffled Knight and the chorus remaining close to the usual words. (from here)

Jim Mageean  from Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3

I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

LINK
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

Bold Riley oh

Leggi in italiano

A sea shanty collected by A.L. Lloyd who recordered for his album “A Sailor’s Garland” (1962): “Shellbacks manning the windjammers of the West Indies trade brought back to Liverpool and Bristol more than sugar, bananas and rum; they also brought back many songs. Some of these they kept to themselves, some they handed on to vessels sailing in other waters. Thus the fine hexatonic tune of Bold Riley O, which started life as a Tobago reel, was sung at the halyards of many an East Indiaman bound for Bombay and the Bengal ports.”
Part of the song was found in the Georgia Sea Islands where a work song entitled “Riley” was collected (Roud 18160, also inThe Friends of Old Time Music: The Folk Arrival 1961-1965 – Smithsonian Folkways anthology 2006), but it is only after Lloyd’s recording that the song knew a certain popularity in the folk circuits during the 70s.

A.L. Loyd from “A Sailor’s Garland” 1962

Clayton Kennedy from Assassin’s Creed Rogue

The folk versions prefer a slower melody that emphasizes the farewell / lament mood
Johnny Collins & Jim Mageean from Shanties and Sea Songs (1996) who sing a more extensive version of the one reported

Kate Rusby from Hourglass 1997  who learned the song from Jim Mageean’s version

The Wailin’ Jennys live 2014 (also in  Live at the Mauch Chunk Opera House, 2009) except first stanza


Chorus :
Goodbye, my darling,
goodbye, my dear O,

Bold Riley O, boom-a-lay (1)
Goodbye, my sweetheart(2),
goodbye, my dear O,

Bold Riley O, gone away
I
The anchor is weighed and the rags we’ve all set,
Bold Riley O, boom-a-lay
Them Liverpool judies we’ll never forget,
Bold Riley O, (has) gone away
 
II
The rain it is raining all the day long,
The northerly winds they blow so strong,
III
Cheer up, Mary Ellen (3), and don’t look so glum,
On Whitestocking Day (4) you’ll be drinking (hot) rum.
IV
We’re outward bound for the Bengal Bay (5)
Get bending, my lads, it’s a hell of a way.

NOTES
1) Nautical term in the folk versions is replaced by “Bold Riley”
2) or my darling
3) Kate Rusby sings “Well come on, Mary”
4) also quoted in Rio Grande (Boung for the Rio Grande) the Whitestocking Day was the day when the wives (mothers) of the sailors dressed well to go and collect the advance on the salary accrued by the sailor, the promissory note (advance note) it was only payable if the sailor had actually embarked the month before. The Allotment of Pay was instead issued by the Admiralty (since the Napoleonic wars) to pay in the due month, part of the salary of the sailor to his wife or to the boarding master. A practice spread also at the merchant marine that became mandatory with the Merchant Shipping Acts in the late 1800s. White cotton stockings were synonymous with elegance.
5) typhoons that are formed in the Bengal Bay have two seasonal peaks one in April and the other in October-November in conjunction with the monsoon winds

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boldriley.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bold-riley.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50732
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17866

Blow away the morning dew shanty

Read the post in English

La ballata nota come The Baffled Knight è riportata in moltissime versioni testuali sia nelle raccolte settecentesche che nei Broadsides, oltrechè trasmessa oralmente in Gran Bretagna e America con i titoli di ” Blow (Clear)(Stroll) Away The Morning Dew” oppure “Blow Ye Winds in the Morning”: il protagonista maschile di volta in volta è un gentleman, o un pastorello / contadinello.

Non poteva mancare la versione sea shanty di questa popolarissima ballata nella versione testuale più nota come “The Shephers lad” (The Baffled knight Child’s # 112 versione D), riassunta in quattro strofe
Nils Brown in Assassin’s Creed 4: Black Flag (Sea Shanty Edition, Vol. 2)


I
There was a shepherd boy,
keeping sheep upon the hill,
he laid his bow and arrow down
for to take his fill
Blow ye wind in the morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
He looked high and he looked low,
He gave an under look
And there he spied a pretty maid,
Swimming in a brook.
III
“Carry me home to my father’s gate
before you put me down
then you shall have my maidenhead
and twenty thousand pounds”
IV
And when she came to her father’s gate
So nimbly’s she whipt in;
and said ‘Pough! you’re a fool without,’
‘And I’m a maid within.”
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’era un pastorello
che governava le pecore sulla collina
posò l’arco e la freccia
per dissetarsi
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Guardò in alto e guardò in basso
e di guardò intorno
e là vide una bella fanciulla
che nuotava nel ruscello
III
“Portami a casa da mio padre
prima di mettermi sotto,
poi avrai la mia verginità
e ventimila sterline”
IV
Quando arrivò al portone della casa paterna
in un guizzò lei entrò
e disse ” Puah! Sei uno scemo fuori
e io una fanciulla dentro”

LA VERSIONE DI JOHN SHORT

Un’altra versione sea shanty viene dalla testimonianza di John Short: [Richard Runciman] Terry [in The Shanty Book Part II (J. Curwen & Sons Ltd., London. 1924)] commenta che sebbene Short abbia iniziato il suo Blow Away the Morning Dew con un versetto da “The Baffled Knight”, poi divaga con versi fluttuanti. In effetti dei tre dei versi registrati e pubblicati da Terry, nemmeno uno derivano da The Baffled Knight! Short cantava solo la strofa “flock of geese” di Sharp. Sharp non ha pubblicato la shanty ma anche altri autori danno delle versioni di Baffled Knight. L’altra versione predominante nelle collezioni è la versione americana della caccia alle balene, ma che usa ancora la melodia associata a The Baffled Knight con  il coro che resta simile alle solite parole. (tratto da qui)

Jim Mageean  in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3


I
As I walked out one morning fair,
To view the meadows round,
it’s there I spied a maid fair
Come a-tripping on the ground.
Blow ye wind of morning
Blow ye winds aye-O.
Clear away the morning dew,
and blow boys blow.
II
My father has a milk white steed
He is in the stall
he will not eat it’s hay or corn
And it will not go at all
III
When we goes in a farm’s yard
see a flocking geese
we downed their eyes
and closed their eyes
and knocked five or six
IV
As I was a-walking
down by a river side,
it’s there I saw a lady fair
a-biding in the tide
V
As I was a-walking
out by the Moonlight,
it’s there I saw the yallow girl
and arise (then shown) so bright
VI
(?
into the field of?)
she says “Young man this is the place
for a man must play”
VII
As I was a-walking
down Paradise street
it’s there I met a (junky?) ghost
he says (“Where you stand to a treat”?)
* ci sono ancora troppe parole di cui non capisco bene la pronuncia
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Mentre camminavo un bel mattino
per ammirare i prati nei dintorni
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
in giro per la campagna
Soffia vento del mattino,
soffia vento aye-o
spazza via la rugiada del mattino
e forza, ragazzi, forza

II
Mio padre aveva un destriero bianco latte, è nella stalla
non mangerà nè fieno, nè grano
e non andrà affatto
III
Quando andiamo in un aia
a vedere uno stormo di oche
le fissiamo negli occhi
chiudiamo i loro occhi
e ne abbattiamo cinque o sei
IV
Mentre camminavo
lungo le rive del fiume
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
che aspettava la marea.
V
Mentre camminavo
sotto il chiaro di luna
fu là che vidi una  fanciulla bionda
?
VI
?
?
dice lei: “Giovanotto questo è il posto giusto dove un uomo può giocare”
VII
Mentre camminavo
per Paradise Street
là incontrai un fantasma
dice “
ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds in the Morning, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/venticelli-e-pecore-nella-balladry-inglese/
https://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/thebaffledknight.html

http://www.musicnotes.net/SONGS/04-BLOWY.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/tenthousandmilesaway.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/BlowYeWinds/index.html

http://www.contemplator.com/child/morndew.html
https://mudcat.org//thread.cfm?threadid=64609

Yankee John Stormalong

Appartentente alla “Stormalong family, un vasto gruppo di halyard shanties d’origine afro-americana, Lize Lee (Yankee John, Stormalong) è classificata da Fred Buryeson come una “timber shanty,” cantata durante il lavoro di stivaggio del legname nei porti del Sud
“The most popular of the timber shanties were Miss Rosa Lee, Somebody Told Me So, and Yankee John, Storm Along. They are still sung by the negro timber stowers in the seaports of the South.”

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


Liza Lee she promised me
(Yankee John, Stormalong (1))
she promised for to marry me
When I sailed across the sea
Liza said she be true to me
I promised her a golden ring
She promised me that little thing
Liza Lee she’s slighted me
Now she will not marry me
O up aloft this yard must go
Mister Mate told the song
I thought I heard the skipper said
“One more pull and than belay”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Lize Lee mi promise
(Yankee John, Stormalong)
promise di sposarmi.
Quando navigano in mare
Liza disse che mi sarebbe stata fedele.
Io le promisi l’anello matrimoniale
lei mi promise quella” cosina”.
Lize Lee mi mentiva
e non mi vuole sposare.
O su in alto questo pennone deve andare e il Primo cantava la canzone,
credo di aver sentito il capitano dire
“Ancora un tito e poi lasciare”

NOTE
1) Stormie cioè il marinaio per eccellenza

FONTI
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.com/2011/11/29-yankee-john-stormalong.html

DON’T FORGET YOUR OLD SHIPMATES

La canzone del mare “Don’t forget your old shipmate” semi-sconosciuta prima del suo esordio nel film “Master and Commander” (2001)  è stata scritta dall’irlandese Richard Creagh Saunders (1809-1886), che ha trascorso ben 26 anni nella Royal Navy. Charles H. Firth (in Naval Songs and Ballads 1908) data la composizione al 1860 quando Saunders era di servizio sulla HMS Marlborough, la nave ammiraglia inglese della flotta mediterranea, poco dopo viene assegnato al servizio a terra come Istruttore Navale presso la Royal Naval School di Londra, un ente caritatevole per i figli degli ufficiali meno abbienti.

Jerry Bryant nel suo breve saggio “Long we’ve toiled on the rolling wave: One sea song’s journey from the gun deck to Hollywood” (2010) è riuscito a tracciare la genesi della canzone e il “folk process” che l’ha portata fino alla sua comparsa nel film, individuando la trasmissione di due distinte fonti coeve all’autore, le sue due pubblicazioni testuali e melodiche (la prima solo per il testo nel 1908, la seconda anche con la melodia nel 1931) e il suo rimaneggiamento durante il folk revival degli anni 70.
Il primo folksinger che la registrò, recuperandola dall’oblio, fu Jim Mageean nel 1978, il secondo che ci mise mano fu Dave Peloquin al di là dell’Oceano nel 1989, finchè venne registrata da Jerry Bryant nel 2000 il quale ebbe l’idea di lasciare un bel po’ di copie del suo Cd (Roast Beef of Old Englandsulla HMS Rose, la replica di una fregata inglese del XVIII secolo -che era finita nel 1985 a Bridgeport nel Connecticut per essere restaurata e rimessa in condizioni di navigare. Nel settembre 1991 alla Rose venne attribuita la Certificazione di Nave Scuola di Classe A, risultando così la più grande nave scuola a vela americana (vedi).

Sennonchè la nave fu “scritturata” nella parte della H.M.S Surprise del capitano Jack Aubrey dalla Fox Studios e una copia del Cd di Jerry Bryant finì nelle mani del regista Peter Weir .. per essere cantata in una scena del film

Da Master and Commander (strofe I e III)

Il successo commerciale del film ha portato alla popolarità anche la canzone “Don’t forget yer old shipmate” dando origine all’equivoco sulla sua datazione: la canzone viene spacciata come risalente alle guerre napoleoniche solo perchè il film è ambientato nel 1805.

Scrive Jerry Bryant nel suo saggio: “We can picture Naval Instructor Saunders in the ward room of the Marlborough, singing his new song for his fellow officers, and being asked in the following weeks to sing it again and again.  When visiting officers from other ships in the fleet joined the company, they would likely have heard the song and  joined in on the chorus as a decanter of port went round the table.  Perhaps it was at just such a convivial event that John Knox Laughton heard the song”. (tratto da qui)
John Knox Laughton amico fraterno di Saunders  è stato il tramite che ha passato la canzone a Charles H. Firth per la pubblicazione del testo senza però la melodia, nella sua già citata raccolta .
La canzone come la conosciamo oggi proviene però da un’altra fonte James Runciman, amante del mare (e figlio di un capitano di mare e poi guardia costiera del Northumberland), che in qualche modo e nonostante la sua breve vita è venuto in contatto con la canzone di Saunders per cantarla al nipote Richard Runciman Terry colui il quale la pubblicò nel suo “Salt Sea Ballads” (1931) con tanto di melodia e partitura per pianoforte.
Il folk revival tuttavia s’impossessa della canzone solo negli anni 70 quando Jim Mageean trovò nella Biblioteca di Newcastle upon Tyne il libro di Sir Richard R. Terry e al momento della registrazione ne modifica la struttura melodica.

ASCOLTA Jerry Bryant & Starboard Mess in Roast Beef of Old England (2000)

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed

La canzone è cantata da Joe che ricorda Jack, il marinaio con cui aveva fraternizzato sull’ultima nave: finito il loro arruolamento si domanda se ci saranno ancora occasioni d’incontro e amicizia anche a terra o su un’altra nave (che i marinai prima o poi s’imbarcano di nuovo!).


I (1)
Safe and sound at home again, let the waters roar (2), Jack (3).
Safe and sound at home again, let the waters roar, Jack.
Chorus
Long we’ve tossed on the rolling main, now we’re safe ashore, Jack.
Don’t forget yer old shipmate, faldee raldee raldee raldee rye-eye-doe!
II
Since we sailed from Plymouth Sound (4), four years gone, or nigh, Jack.
Was there ever chummies (5), now, such as you and I, Jack?
III
We have worked the self-same gun, quarterdeck division.
Sponger (6) I and loader you, through the whole commission.
IV
When the middle watch (7) was on, and the time went slow, boy,
Who could choose a rousing stave (8), who like Jack or Joe, boy?
V
There she swings, an empty hulk (9), not a soul below now.
Number seven starboard mess (10) misses Jack and Joe now.
VI
But the best of friends must part, fair or foul the weather.
Hand yer flipper (11) for a shake, now a drink together.
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Sani e salvi a casa siam, iI mare urla forte, Jack,
Sani e salvi a casa siam iI mare urla forte, Jack,
CORO
A lungo le onde cavalcato abbiam, ma ora siamo al sicuro a terra Jack
Non scordarti il tuo vecchio compagno di bordo!
II
Da quando partiti siam dalla Rada di Plymouth passati son quasi 4 anni,  Jack, ci sono mai stati fratelli, come te ed me Jack?
III
Abbiam lavorato allo stesso cannone, nella nostra divisione.
Io scovolavo, tu caricavi, per tutta la missione.
IV
Quando era il turno della guardia notturna e il tempo passava lento, ragazzo, chi sapeva scegliere una linea melodica entusiasmante, come Jack o Joe, ragazzo?
V
Adesso lei dondola là, come un pontone, senza nessuno dentro
Ora, il rancio numero sette dei destrali,
ha perso Jack e Joe.
VI
Ma anche i migliori amici devono separarsi, con il bello e il brutto tempo, qua la pinna per una stretta, ora beviamo insieme

NOTE
1) sulla querelle in merito al verso della prima strofa rimando alla trattazione di Jerry Bryant (qui)
2) letteralmente “il fragore delle acque”
3) guarda caso il nome del capitano Aubrey è proprio Jack, soprannominato il Fortunato
4) la baia sulla Manica nei pressi di Plymouth: sound è un termine marinaresco per rada, baia in cui si ha un buon ancoramento; significa anche Stretto o passo tra due terre (to sound sondare, scandagliare.)
Plymouth è un importante porto commerciale e base militare sulla foce dei fiumi Plym e Tamar in fondo a una rada ampia e articolata, “The Sound”, protetta ovunque da fortificazioni militari. (da Wikivoyage)
5) chummy è usato come aggettivo nel senso di amichevole, amicone
6) la bocca del cannone doveva essere ripulita dai residui di polvere prima di essere ricaricata con una nuova palla
7) la guardia notturna che va da mezzanotte alle 4 del mattino
8) oppure “Who could tune a rousing stave
Un tempo c’era in Gran Bretagna un curioso mestiere quello del “bussatore” ( knocker-up o knocker-upper) che con un lungo bastone detto “rousing stave” bussava alla finestra dei clienti per svegliarli. In alternativa era usata una cerbottana per lanciare legumi secchi contro i vetri dei dormienti.
La figura del bussatore era abbastanza nota durante l’Ottocento, viene descritto in “Grandi Speranze” di Charles Dickens.
La lunga pertica veniva usata anche in chiesa per dare la sveglia a coloro che sonnecchiavano durante la funzione (vedi). In questo contesto tuttavia stave non significa bastone quanto pentagramma e la frase si riferisce a una melodia stimolante in grado di fare stare svegli
9) hulk body of an abandoned vessel. Italo Ottonello suggerisce la traduzione di “pontone”: lo scafo delle vecchie navi era utilizzato per l’effettuazione di lavori pesanti

alloggio equipaggio sul clipper Cutty Sark

10) Number seven starboard mess: la traduzione suggerita da Italo Ottonello: Rancio (mess) numero sette dei destrali (starboard watch= guardia di dritta). L’alloggio equipaggio era diviso in due parti, una per ciascuna guardia dove gli uomini dormivano e mangiavano
11) flipper sta per mano

FONTI
http://www.hardtackers.com/JerryBryantPaper.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48079

Don’t forget your old shipmates…

STORMALONG JOHN

Illustrazione di Greg Newbold

Sea shanty in memoria del marinaio Stormie cioè il marinaio per eccellenza, secondo  A.L.Lloyd Stormalong era “the blusterous old skipper who stands his ground alongside Davy Jones and Mother Carey among the mythological personages of the sea. Some took him to be an embodiment of the wind, others believed he was a natural man…” ( Folk Song In England, 1967 ).
D’altro canto Alfred Bulltop Stormalong è un leggendario eroe americano del mare dalle proporzioni gigantesche e dalle imprese prodigiose, protagonista di molti racconti per bambini. E’ Stormalong “an able sailor, bold and true” e il suo funerale una sorta di ultimo addio alla gloriosa era dei grandi velieri, sconfitti sul finire dell’Ottocento dai battelli a vapore.
E’ classificata da Stan Hugill come la più vecchia nella serie della “Stormalong family”, un vasto gruppo di halyard shanties.

STORMALONG JOHN

Canto di origine afro-americane per il lavoro alle pompe o come canto all’argano.

ASCOLTA Jon Bartlett

ASCOLTA Assassin’s Creed per Black Flag In Game Soundtrack


Oh, poor old Stormy’s dead and gone
Stormalong boys! Stormalong John!
Oh, poor old Stormy’s dead and gone
Ah-ha, come along get along
Stormyalong John!
I dug his grave with a silver spade
I lower’d him down with a golden chain
I carried him away to Montego (Mobile) Bay
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Povero vecchio Stormy è morto stecchito Stormalong ragazzi! Stormalong John! Vieni avanti
Stormyalong John!
Ho scavato la sua fossa con una spada d’argento
l’ho calato giù con una catena d’oro
e l’ho portato lontano da Montego Bay

MR. STORMALONG

Una delle versioni di John Short è intitolata Old Stormey (Mister Stormalong)
ASCOLTA Barbara Brown in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


Old Stormy’s dead and gone
to me way Stormalong!
Oh from Cape Horn where he was born.
Ay, ay, ay, Mister Stormyalong
Stormy is dead I saw him die
And more than rain it dim my eyes.
and now we’ll sing few old song
Roll her over, long and strong.
we dug his grave with a silver spade
his shroud of the finest silk was made.
we lower’d him down with a golden chain
and we’ll see that he don’t rise again.
I wish I was old Stormy’s son
I give those sailors lots of rum.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Il povero vecchio Stormy è morto stecchito to me way Stormalong!
Oh a Capo Horn dov’era nato
Ay, ay, ay, Mister Stormyalong
Stormy è morto l’ho visto morire
e più di una lacrima offusca il mio sguardo
e adesso canteremo qualche vecchia canzone, falla andare grande e forte, abbiamo scavato la fossa con una spada d’argento, il suo sudario era fatto della seta più bella, l’abbiamo calato giù con una catena d’oro
e abbiamo visto che non si è rialzato.
Se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy
darei ai marinai un sacco di rum

Una versione più estesa è riportata in “American Sea Songs and Chanteys,” di Frank Shay, 1948
ASCOLTA Ivan Neville in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
Old Stormy’s gone, that good old man,
To my way hay,
Stormalong, John!

Oh, poor old Stormy’s dead and gone,
To my aye, aye, aye, aye,
Mister Stormalong!

We dug his grave with a silver spade,
His shroud of the finest silk was made.
We lowered him with a silver chain,
Our eyes all dim with more than rain.
An able sailor, bold and true,
A good old bosun to his crew.
II
He’s moored at last, and furled his sail,
No danger now from wreck or gale.
I wish I was old Stormy’s son,
I’d build me a ship of a thousand ton (1).
I’d fill her up with New England rum,
And all my shellbacks they would have some.
I’d sail this wide world ‘round and ‘round,
With plenty of money I would be found.
III
Old Stormy’s dead and gone to rest,
To my way hay, Stormalong, John!
Of all the sailors he was the best,
To my aye, aye, aye, aye, Mister Stormalong!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il vecchio Stormy è morto, quel brav’uomo A me way hay
Stormalong, John!

Il povero vecchio Stormy è morto stecchito A me aye, aye, aye, aye,
Mister Stormalong!
Abbiamo scavato la fossa con una spada d’argento, il sudario era fatto della migliore seta e lo abbiamo calato giù con una catena d’argento, con gli occhi pieni di pianto, un valido marinaio, ardito e sincero, un buon vecchio nostromo per la sua ciurma.
II
Infine è si è ormeggiato e ha ammainato la vela, nessun pericolo di un naufragio o di una tempesta, se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy costruirei una nave di mille tonnellate.
La riempirei con il rum del New England
e tutti i miei marinai ne avrebbero un po’.
Salperei per questo vasto mondo in lungo e in largo
e vorrei trovare un sacco di soldi.
III
Il vecchio Stormy è morto e andato a riposare a me way hay, Stormalong, John!
di tutti i marinai era il migliore!
To my aye, aye, aye, aye, Mister Stormalong!

NOTE
1) secondo John Sampson si tratta di John Willis armatore londinese che costruì il Cutty Sark; il padre John Willis potrebbe essere il nostro Stormalong; così scrive nel suo  “The Seven Seas Shanty Book” (1926) “I have heard that the prototype of this noble shanty was old John Willis, a famous early Victorian ship master and owner, whose son was the John Willis known as Old White Hat and who will be remembered chiefly as the owner of the famous Cutty Sark.”

IL LAMENT: Stormy Along, John

La versione di John Shortis a beautiful example of the fact that a tune does not have to have musical bars all the same length in order to give a consistent working rhythm.”

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 1 (su spotify)


I wish I was old Stormy’s son,
to me way-ay Stormalong John
O I wish I was old Stormy’s son
Ah-ha, come along get along
Stormyalong John!
And if I was old Stormy’s son
I build a ship of a thousand ton;
I’ll load her with jamaiky rum,
and all my shellbacks they have some;
I’d treat you well and raise your pay
and  stand you drinks five times a day (1);
O was you ever in Quebec?
A-stowing timber on the deck;
I wish I was in Baltimore
On the grand old American shore;
And when we get to Liverpool town
We’ll chased that judies round and round
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei essere il figlio del vecchio Stormy, a me way-ay Stormalong, John!
Vorrei essere il figlio del vecchio Stormy; procedete tutti uniti
Stormyalong John!
Oh se fossi il figlio del vecchio Stormy
costruirei una nave di mille tonnellate.
La riempirei con il rum giamaicano
e tutti i miei marinai ne avrebbero un po’. Vi tratterei bene e vi aumenterei la paga
e vi farei bere 5 volte al giorno.
Sietemai  stati in Quebec?
A caricare legna nella stiva;
Vorrei essere a Baltimora
sulla riva dei Grandi Laghi d’America;
e quando arriveremo a Liverpool
rincorreremo quelle ragazze dappertutto

NOTE
1) sono le razioni giornaliere del grog

continua Carry him to his burying ground
continua Yankee John Stormalong

FONTI
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/494.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/generaltaylor.html
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/11/23-mister-stormalong.html
http://shantiesfromthesevenseas.blogspot.it/2011/11/24-stormy-along-john.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=39676
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/stormalong.html
http://ingeb.org/songs/ostormys.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/sea-shanty/Stormalong.htm

Bold Riley sea shanty

Read the post in English

Una sea shanty raccolta da A.L. Lloyd che la registrò per il suo album “A Sailor’s Garland” del 1962, così scrive nelle note “Shellbacks manning the windjammers of the West Indies trade brought back to Liverpool and Bristol more than sugar, bananas and rum; they also brought back many songs. Some of these they kept to themselves, some they handed on to vessels sailing in other waters. Thus the fine hexatonic tune of Bold Riley O, which started life as a Tobago reel, was sung at the halyards of many an East Indiaman bound for Bombay and the Bengal ports.”
Una traccia della canzone è stata trovata nelle Georgia Sea Islands dove è stato collezionato un canto di lavoro dal titolo “Riley” (Roud 18160, anche in The Friends of Old Time Music: The Folk Arrival 1961-1965 – Smithsonian Folkways anthology 2006), ma è solo dopo la registrazione di Lloyd che la canzone conobbe una certa popolarità nei circuiti folk durante gli anni 70.

A.L. Loyd in “A Sailor’s Garland” 1962

Clayton Kennedy in Assassin’s Creed Rogue

Le versioni folk prediligono una melodia più lenta che sottolinea la dimensione di farewell/lament del brano
Johnny Collins & Jim Mageean in Shanties and Sea Songs (1996) che cantano una versione più estesa di quella riportata

Kate Rusby in Hourglass 1997 (salta la strofa I) che ha appreso il brano dalla versione di Jim Mageean

The Wailin’ Jennys live 2014 (anche in  Live at the Mauch Chunk Opera House, 2009) anche loro saltano la I strofa


Chorus :
Goodbye, my darling,
goodbye, my dear O,

Bold Riley O, boom-a-lay (1)
Goodbye, my sweetheart(2),
goodbye, my dear O,

Bold Riley O, gone away
I
The anchor is weighed and the rags we’ve all set,
Bold Riley O, boom-a-lay
Them Liverpool judies we’ll never forget,
Bold Riley O, (has) gone away
II
The rain it is raining all the day long,
The northerly winds they blow so strong,
III
Cheer up, Mary Ellen (3), and don’t look so glum,
On Whitestocking Day (4) you’ll be drinking (hot) rum.
IV
We’re outward bound for the Bengal Bay (5)
Get bending (6), my lads, it’s a hell of a way.
Traduzione italiana di Cattia Salto
Coro
Addio tesoro,
addia mia cara
bravo Riley oh, in posizione il boma 
Addio amore, 
addia mia cara
bravo Riley oh, in partenza
I
L’ancora è alzata e tutte le vele sono dispiegate
bravo Riley oh, in posizione il boma
quelle ragazze di Liverpool non dimenticheremo mai
bravo Riley oh, in partenza
II
Piove da tutto il giorno
i venti del Nord soffiano così impetuosi
III
Su di morale Mary Ellen  non essere triste,
il giorno delle Calze Bianche berrai il tuo rum caldo
IV
Stiamo facendo rotta per il Golfo Di Bengala
fatevi in quattro, ragazzi, è un vero inferno

NOTE
1) boma: (s.m.) (Alberatura e vele) boom Asta orizzontale utilizzata sui velieri per mantenere distesa una vela di tipo triangolare, normalmente una randa. Il boma della randa (o della trinchetta) è fissato all’albero con un perno rotante mentre l’altro capo ruota trattenuto da una cima (chiamata “scotta”) permettendo di variare l’orientazione della vela rispetto al vento. Meno comune è l’uso del boma per le vele di prua (fiocco bomato, trinchetta bomata); in tal caso il boma è imperniato sul relativo strallo ed è regolato da una scotta. Siccome il termine è molto tecnico nelle versioni folk è sostituito da “Bold Riley”
2) oppure my darling
3) Kate Rusby dice “Well come on, Mary” (=beh vieni Maria)
4) citato anche in Rio Grande (Boung for the Rio Grande) il Whitestocking Day era il giorno in cui le mogli (madri) dei marinai si vestivano bene per andare a ritirare l’anticipo sulla paga maturato dal marinaio, il pagherò (advance note) infatti era esigibile solo se il marinaio si fosse effettivamente imbarcato il mese prima. L’Allotment of Pay era invece emesso dall’Ammiragliato (dai tempi delle guerre napoleoniche) per pagare nel mese dovuto, una parte del salario del marinaio alla moglie o al boarding master. Una pratica diffusasi anche presso la marina mercantile e diventata obbligatoria con il Merchant Shipping Acts alla fine del 1800. Le calze bianche erano sinonimo di signorilità.
5) i tifoni che si formano nel bacino del Bengal Bay  hanno due picchi stagionali uno in aprile e l’altro in ottobre-novembre in concomitanza con i venti di monsone
6) la versione più volgare della frase è fottetevi ragazzi, andate all’inferno

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/boldriley.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/bold-riley.html

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50732
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17866

ROUND THE CORNER SALLY

Per quanto anedotticamente “round the corner” sia inteso dai marinai come “doppiare Capo Horn” questo sea shanty dal titolo “Round the corner Sally” nasce originariamente dai canti di lavoro degli schiavi afro-americani, in particolare inerenti alla lavorazione del mais.

CORN SHUCKING

Nelle Americhe dell’Ottocento la lavorazione per levare la buccia alla pannocchia di mais veniva svolta a mano, sia da schiavi neri che servitori bianchi, ma esclusivamente uomini, i quali spesso viaggiavano in varie piantagioni nella stagione del raccolto (l’autunno). Il lavoro era individuale e il canto non serviva a coordinare gli sforzi, quanto piuttosto ad alleggerire il carico di un lavoro monotono e ripetitivo. A volte il lavoro assumeva un carattere competitivo e i lavoratori facevano a gara a chi faceva il mucchio più alto.
Come molti canti di lavoro erano per lo più improvvisati sulla struttura “botta e risposta” (in inglese: call and response song) e venivano condotto da un cantante che non era necessariamente occupato nel lavoro. Evidentemente i lavoratori rendevano di più se intrattenuti con una canzone… il testo conteneva spesso battute volgari e commenti sui presenti o altri personaggi della comunità.

shucking-corn-north-carolina-1939

Accounts from eastern Kentucky, western Carolina, northern Alabama, the Shenandoah Valley, and Appalachian Tennessee provide more detail about the structure of the singing. According to John Van Hook “the man designated to act as [corn] general would stick a peacock feather in his hat and call all the men together and give his orders. He would stand in the center of the corn pile, start the singing, and keep things lively for them.” Initially, someone would strike up and singly give a few rude* stanzas, sometimes in rhyme, and sometimes in short expressive sentences while the rest unite[d] in chorus, and this he continue[d],until some other improviser relieve[d] him.” Dancing also played at part in the corn husking. Northern Georgia, eastern Kentucky, and West Virginia accounts document two elements of dancing that were part of the husking tradition. “When the corn was shucked about two or three o’clock in the morning they would catch the owner and ring and dance around him.” After everyone had eaten and toasted the master, group dancing might begin. “There was always a negro with a banjo, would could play and others dance.” 
*”rude stanzas” = sexually suggestive or sexually explicit verses (tratto da qui)

La sea shanty utilizzata per gli alaggi brevi (short haul shanty) cita due porti famosi della costa Occidentale, immancabili porti di scalo delle baleniere che doppiavano Capo Horn: delle “città di frontiera” molto simili ai covi dei pirati, frequentate da tagliagole e tipacci, zeppe di taverne e bordelli come il famosissimo Madam Gashee di Callao.

sailors_carouse_edited

ASCOLTA Tom Lewis: racconta Tom nel suo siparietto che i marinai, per pigrizia mentale, danno alle loro “girls” un nome standard a seconda del posto dove vivono, così tutte le ragazze di Liverpool si chiamano Judy, tutte le ragazze australiane sono Sheila, tutte le donne dei mari caraibici e del Sud America sono Sally; per distinguere però le ragazze sulla costa ovest (considerate migliori) da quelle della costa est, le chiamano “Round the Corner Sally” perchè devono doppiare Capo Horn per andare a trovarle!!


We’re – leaving sunny Mexico,
Round The Corner, Sally!
Around Cape Horn we’re bound to go,
Round The Corner, Sally!
Chorus:
Round The Corner is a long, long way,
To Valipo(1) and Callao Bay(2),
Round The Corner we must roam,
We don’t care if we never go home.
Was you ever off Cape Horn,
Where your ass is never warm?
There’s ice and snow and sleet and rain,
You’ll meet them coming back again.
When we reach those Pacific seas,
We’ll drop in to Madam Gashee’s(3).
Them Spanish gals will make you smile,
You’ll want to stay for a long, long while.
It’s up aloft this yard must go,
Cuz Mr. Mate has told us so.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Stiamo lasciando il soleggiato Messico
intorno all’Horn Sally!
per doppiare Capo Horn siamo in partenza
intorno all’Horn Sally!
Coro
intorno all’Horn è un lungo viaggio
da Vallipo(1) e Callao Bay(2)
intorno all’Horn dobiamo navigare e non preoccuparci se non torniamo più a casa

Sei mai stato a Capo Horn
dove il tuo culo non è mai al caldo?
Dove c’è ghiaccio e neve, nevischio e pioggia?
Le reincontrerai quando tornerai indietro,
quando raggiungeremo quei mari del Pacifico,
ci tufferemo da Madam Gashee.
Quelle ragazze spagnole ti faranno divertire
e vorrai restarci per molto, molto tempo
su in alto questo pennone deve andare
l’ufficiale Cuz ci ha detto così

NOTE
1) abbreviazione per Vall-i-paraiso = Valparaiso, rinomato porto del Cile
2) Callao si trova vicino a Lima nel Perù, le navi commerciali che facevano scalo a Callao caricavano il prezioso guano per portarlo in Inghilterra.
3) in un’altro sea shanty apprendiamo: There is a place called Madam Gashee’s way out in Callyo, Hurrah, me yeller girls, do do let me go!
A whorehouse known as Madam Gashee’s, a place you ought to go.
Hurrah, me yeller girls, do do let me go!

ASCOLTA in Assassin’s Creed Rogue Shanties

Common Boys!
Round the corner an’ away we’ll go
Round the corner, Sally!
Round the corner where them gals do go
Oh Sally Brown she’s the gal for me
She’s waitin’ there by the mango tree
She love good an’ she loves me long
She loves me hot an’ she loves me long
Was ye ever down in Kingston Town(4)?
Where the gals all spend our money around?
I wish I had that gal in tot
I’d take her in tow to Callyo(2)
To Callyo we’re bound to go
Around the corner where there’s ice an’ snow
So rund ‘er up an’ stretch ‘er luff
I think my Gawd we’ve hauled enough
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Doppiamo il corno e andiamo via
intorno all’Horn Sally!
Doppiamo il corno dove vanno quelle ragazze
Oh Sally Brown è la ragazza per me,
mi aspetta la accanto all’albero del mango
mi ama bene e mi ama da tanto
mi ama appassionatamente e e mi ama da tanto.
Sei mai stato a Kingston
Town?
Dove tutte le ragazze spendono i nostri soldi?
Vorrei avere quella ragazza
me la rimorchierei a Calleo(2)
a Calleo dobbiamo andare
a doppiare il corno dove c’è neve e ghiaccio
così facciamola girare e orziamo
credo per Dio che abbiamo issato abbastanza

NOTE
4) capitale e porto marittimo della Giamaica

ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)


Oh around the corner we will go
(Round the Corner Sally)
Oh around the corner we will go
Oh Madamoiselles we’ll take her in tow
we’ll take her in tow for Calleo
Oh I wish I was in Madam Gashee’s
It’s there me boys we’ll take a ??
to Madam Gashee’s we’ll bound to go
and Madamoiselles we all do know
oh madams is a cheery soul
so round the corner we will row
She says “me boy you’ll rue the day
When the girls have worn your pay away”
So round her up and stretch her loft
I think my boys we’ve hauled enough
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Intorno all’Horn andremo
(intorno all’Horn Sally!)
Intorno all’Horn andremo
oh singorinelle, la prenderemo a rimorchio
la rimorchieremo per Calleo
Vorrei essere da Madam Gashee
e là ragazzi predeneremo una ??
a Madam Gashee dobbiamo andare
per conoscere tutte le signorinelle
Oh Madam è un’anima buona
così doppieremo il Corno
lei dice miei ragazzi “vincerete il giorno
quando le ragazze esaurito la vostra paga
così facciamola girare e orziamo
credo ragazzi che abbiamo issato abbastanza

FONTI
https://girodelmondoattraversoilibri.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/sherwood-anderson-canti-del-mid-america/
http://www.tomlewis.net/lyrics/round_the_corner.htm
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/RoundTheCorner/colcord.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2014/06/descriptions-of-corn-husking-corn-songs.html
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2014/06/four-examples-of-round-corn-sally.html
https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/Clayton-Kennedy-Nils-Brown-Sean-Dagher-John-Giffen-David-Gossage/Round-the-Corner-Sally
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27195/27195-h/27195-h.htm

MAID OF AMSTERDAM OR OF PLYMOUTH? WHAT A-ROVING BOY!!!

Con il titolo di “A-roving” si indicano alcune canzoni marinaresche (sea shanty) risalenti (con discordi pareri tra gli studiosi) all’epoca Tudor o quantomeno al regno di Elisabetta I.
Altri le collegano alla canzone tradizionale scozzese “The  Jolly Beggar” con cui condividono il ritornello.
Si narra ovvero di una relazione sessuale tra il protagonista e una fanciulla più o meno “innocente”.
Nella versione che iniziò a circolare nelle raccolte di sea shanties a metà Ottocento è una capstan chanty occasionalmente cantata anche come “canzone ricreativa” nelle ore libere  (forebitter song) o nei momenti conviviali a terra. Il nostro marinaio è in cerca di ricreazione dopo essere sbarcato nel porto (di Amsterdam o di Plymouth)

MAID OF AMSTERDAM

Una prima versione è tratta dal film “Moby Dick” (1956)  con i marinai che bevono ai tavoli dello “Spouter Inn” a New Bedford. E’ evidentemente descritto un rapporto sessuale tra una “donnina del porto” e un marinaio, con parole che all’epoca non aveva bisogno di sottotitoli per essere comprese.

In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
and she was mistress of her trade
I’ll go no more a roving..
Her cheeks were red, her eyes were brown,
Mark well what I do say,
Her cheeks were red, her eyes were brown,
Her curly hair was hanging down
I’ll go no more a roving…

Paul Clayton  in Whaling And Sailing Songs 1954


I
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Who was always pinchin’ the sailor’s trade.
I’ll go no more a roving with you fair maid!
A rovin’, a rovin’,
Since rovin’s been my ru-i-in,
I’ll go no more a roving,
With you fair maid!
II
I took this maiden for a walk,
I took this maiden for a walk,/She wanted some gin and didn’t she talk.
III
She said, “You sailors I love you so,”
“All you sailors, I love you so,”
And the reason why I soon did know.
IV
She placed her hand upon my knee (1)
She placed her hand upon my knee,
I said “Young miss, you’re rather free.”
V
I gave this miss a parting kiss,
I gave this miss a parting kiss,
When I got aboard my money I missed.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla, ascoltate bene quello che ho da dirvi,
ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla
che era sempre in affari
con i marinai.
Non verrò più in giro con te bella.
In giro, in giro, da quando andare in giro è stata la mia rovina
non andrò mai più in giro
con te mia bella fanciulla!

II
Ho portato a spasso la fanciulla,
Ho portato a spasso la fanciulla,
ma lei voleva del gin e non parlava.
III
Disse “Amo così tanto voi marinai,
tutti voi marinai, amo così tanto”
e il perchè presto saprò!
IV
Mise la mano sul mio ginocchio
Mise la mano sul mio ginocchio
“Signorina come siete generosa!”
V
Le diedi il bacio dell’addio
Le diedi il bacio dell’addio e quando salii a bordo i miei soldi erano spariti!

NOTE
1) in altre versioni la strofa dice il contario cioè è l’uomo a fare la prima mossa
I placed my hand upon her knee—
She said, ‘Young man, you’re rather free.’

Nelle collezioni e raccolte di sea shanty si riportano numerose varianti testuali (vedi) in questa versione ad esempio, il galante incontro è bruscamente interrotto dalla comparsa di un teutonico marito, e si conclude molto probabile  con una bella scazzottata finale anche se non menzionata, infatti alla fine della storia il nostro marinaio raccomanda gli altri compagni di stare attenti a prendersi troppe libertà con le donne sposate!!


I
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
Mark well what I do say!
In Amsterdam there lived a maid,
And she was mistress of her trade.
I’ll go no more a roving with you fair maid!
A roving, a roving,
Since roving’s been my ru-i-in,
I’ll go no more a roving,
With you fair maid!
II
I asked this maid to take a walk,
I asked this maid out for a walk,
That we might have some private talk.
III
Then a great big Dutchman rammed my bow,
For a great big Dutchman rammed my bow,
And said “Young man, dees ees meine frau!”
IV
Then take fair warning boys from me,
So take fair warning boys from me
With other men’s wives, don’t make too free
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla,
ascoltate bene quello che ho da dirvi,
ad Amsterdam viveva una fanciulla
che era sempre in affari con i marinai.
Non verrò più in giro con te bella.
In giro, in giro
o da quando andare in giro è stata la mia rovina non andrò mai più in giro
con te mia bella fanciulla!
II
Ho chiesto alla ragazza di fare una passeggiata, perchè dovevamo fare una conversazione in privato
III
Allora un grande e grosso Olandese speronò la mia nave(1),
Allora un grande e grosso Olandese speronò la mia nave
e disse: “Giovanotto questa essere la mia signora!”(2)
IV
Così prendete un buon suggerimento da me, ragazzi,
con le mogli degli altri uomini, non prendetevi troppe libertà,

NOTE
1) termine nautico
2) pronunciare la frase con accento tedesco

MAID OF PLYMOUTH

La versione testuale per il progetto Short Sharp Shantie sosta il porto in Inghilterra e aggiunge qualche ulteriore strofa nella “progressione anatomica” del corteggiamento.
ASCOLTA Jim Mageean in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 2 (su spotify)


I
In Plymouth town there lived a maid,
bless you young women
In Plymouth town there lived a maid,
Mind well what I do say,
In Plymouth town there lived a maid,
And she was a mistress of her trade.
I’ll go no more a-roving with you,
fair maid./ 
A-roving, a-roving,
since roving’s been my ru-i-in,
I’ll go no more a-roving
with you, fair maid.

II
I took this fair maid for a walk,
I took this fair maid for a walk,
I took this fair maid for a walk,
And we had such a loving talk.
III
I took her hand within my own
I took her hand within my own
I took her hand within my own,
and said, “I’m bound for my old town”
IV
I put my arm around her waist
I put my arm around her waist
I put my arm around her waist
said she “Young man you are in great haste”
V
I put my hand upon her knee
I put my hand upon her knee
I put my hand upon her knee/ said she “Young man you’re much too free!”
VI
I put my hand upon her thigh
I put my hand upon her thigh
I put my hand upon her thigh
said she, “Young man, you’re not too hight!”
VII
I leaved that fair maid over the stile
I leaved that fair maid over the stile
I leaved that fair maid over the stile
and nine months after she had a little child
VIII
This girl she left me broken bent (1)
This girl she left me broken bent
This girl she left me broken bent
so back to see I quickly went
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
A Plymouth viveva una fanciulla,
che siano benedette le fanciulle
A Plymouth viveva una fanciulla, badate bene a quello che ho da dirvi,
A Plymouth viveva una fanciulla
che era una professionista della strada
Non verrò più in giro con te bella.
In giro, in giro, da quando andare in giro è stata la mia rovina
non andrò mai più in giro
con te mia bella fanciulla!

II
Ho portato a spasso questa bella fanciulla, ho portato a spasso questa bella fanciulla e abbiamo fatto una piacevole conversazione
III
Le presi la mano tra le mie
Le presi la mano tra le mie
e dissi “Sono in partenza per le mia vecchia città”
IV
Le misi il braccio attorno alla vita
Le misi il braccio attorno alla vita
Le misi il braccio attorno alla vita
e lei disse “Giovanotto andate di fretta!”
V
Le misi la mano sul ginocchio
Le misi la mano sul ginocchio
Le misi la mano sul ginocchio e lei disse “Giovanotto siete troppo in libertà”
VI
Le misi la mano sulla coscia
Le misi la mano sulla coscia
Le misi la mano sulla coscia
e lei disse “Giovanotto non siete troppo alto!”
VII
Lasciai quella graziosa fanciulla alla porta, asciai quella graziosa fanciulla alla porta
e nove mesi dopo ebbe un piccolo bambino
VIII
La ragazza mi lasciò a pezzi
La ragazza mi lasciò a pezzi
La ragazza mi lasciò a pezzi
così ritornai presto a rivederla

NOTE
1) la frase allude al contagio di una malattia venerea

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/aroving.html
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Maid_of_Amsterdam
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/amsterdam/index.html
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=336
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=337
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/maidams.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5070
http://boundingmain.com/lyrics/a_rovin.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/inplymo.html