Archivi tag: Jesse Ferguson

Belle Dame sans Merci, by John Keats in music and film

Leggi in italiano

John Melhuish Strudwick

In 1819 the English poet John Keats reworked the figure of the “Queen of Faerie” of Scottish ballads (starting with Tam Lin and True Thomas) in turn writes the ballad “La Belle Dame sans Merci”, giving rise to a theme that has become very popular among the Pre-Raphaelite painters, that of the vamp woman who has however already a consideration in the beliefs of folklore: the
Lennan or leman shee – Shide Leannan (literally fairy child) that is the fairy who seeks love between humans. The fairy, who is both a male and a female being, after having seduced a mortal abandons him to return to his world. The lover is tormented by the love lost until death.
Fairy lovers have a short but intense life. The fairy who takes a human as lover is also the muse of the artist who offers talent in exchange for a devout love, bringing the lover to madness or premature death.
The title was paraphrased from a fifteenth-century poem written by Alain Chartier (in the form of a dialogue between a rejected lover and the disdainful lady) and became the figure of a seductive woman, a dark lady incapable of feelings towards the man the which falls prey to its spell. We are in reverse of the much older theme of “Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight

John William Waterhouse – La Belle Dame sans Merci (1893)

THE SEASONS OF THE HEART

In the ballad there are two seasons, spring and winter: in spring among the meadows in bloom, the knight meets a beautiful lady, a forest creature, daughter of a fairy, who enchants him with a sweet lullaby; the knight, already hopelessly in love, puts her on the saddle of his own horse and lets himself be led docilely in the Cave of the Elves; here he is cradled by the dame, who sighs sadly, and he dreams of princes and diaphanous kings who cry out their slavery to the beautiful lady.
On awakening we are in late autumn or in winter and the knight finds himself prostrate near the shore of a lake, pale and sick, certainly dying or with no other thought than the song of the fairy.
The keys to reading the ballad are many and each perspective increases the disturbing charm of the verses

There are two pictorial images that evoke the two seasons of the heart and ballad, the first – perhaps the most famous painting – is by Sir Frank Dicksee, (dated 1902): spring takes the colors of the English countryside with the inevitable roses in the first plan; the lady has just been hoisted on the fiery steed of the knight and with her right hand firmly holding the reins, with the other hand she leans against the saddle to be able to lean towards the beautiful face of the knight and whisper a spell; the knight, in precarious balance, is totally concentrated on the face of the lady and kidnapped.

caitiffknight
Sir Frank Dicksee La Belle Dame sans merci

The second is by Henry Meynell Rheam (painted in 1901) all in the tones of autumn, which recreates a desolate landscape wrapped in the mist, as if it were a barrier that holds the knight prostrate on the ground; while he dreams of pale and evanescent warriors (blue is a typical color to evoke the images of dreams) that warn him, the lady leaves the cave perhaps in search of other lovers.

Curiously, the armors of the two knights are very similar, but both are not really medieval and more suitable for being shown off in tournaments that on the battlefields. Elaborate and finely decorated models date back to the end of the fifteenth century.

Henry Meynell Rheam La Belle Dame sans merci

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: a “live action short” by Hidetoshi Oneda

The ballad could not fail to inspire even today’s artists, here is a cinematic story a “live action short” directed by the Japanese Hidetoshi Oneda. The short begins with giving body to the imaginary interlocutor who asks the knight “O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms …” so we find ourselves in 1819 on an island after the shipwreck of a ship and we witness the meeting between the castaway and an old decrepit kept alive by regret ..

THE PLOT (from here) 1819. The Navigator and the Doctor survive a shipwreck only to find themselves lost in a strange forest. The Navigator is challenged by the gravely ill Doctor into pursuing his true passion – art. While he protests, the ailing Doctor dies. Later, the Navigator is beside a lake, where he finds an Old Knight who tells him his story: once, he encountered a mysterious Lady, and fell in love with her. But horrified by her true form – an immortal spirit and the ghosts of her mortal lovers – the Young Knight begged for release. Awoken and alone, he realized his failure. Thus he has waited, kept alive for centuries by his regret. The Navigator considers his own crossroads. What will he be when he returns to the world?

La Belle Dame Sans Merci by Hidetoshi Oneda – 2005

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI IN MUSIC

The first to play the ballad was Charlse Villiers Stanford in the nineteenth century with a very dramatic arrangement for piano but a bit dated today, although popular in his day.
The ballad was put into music by different artists in the 21st century.

Susan Craig Winsberg from La Belle Dame 2008

Jesse Ferguson

Giordano Dall’Armellina from “Old Time Ballads From The British Isles” 2007

Penda’s Fen (Richard Dwyer)

Loreena McKennitt from “Lost Souls” 2018

POETIC READING
 Ben Whishaw

I
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge is wither’d from the lake(1),
And no birds sing.
II
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrel’s granary is full,
And the harvest ‘s done.
III
I see a lily(2) on thy brow thy
With anguish moist and fever dew;
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.’
IV
I met a lady in the meads,
Full beautiful — a faery’s child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild(3).
V
I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She look’d at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan.
VI
I set her on my pacing steed
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sideways would she lean, and sing
A faery’s song(4).
VII
She found me roots of relish sweet
And honey wild and manna(5) dew,
And sure in language strange she said,
“I love thee true (6)
VIII
She took me to her elfin grot(7),
And there she wept and sigh’d fill sore(8);
And there I shut her wild, wild eyes
With kisses four.
IX
And there she lullèd me asleep,
And there I dream’d — Ah! woe betide!
The latest dream I ever dream’d
On the cold hill’s side.
X
I saw pale kings and princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried – “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”
Hath thee in thrall!”
XI
I saw their starved lips in the gloam
With horrid warning gapèd wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
On the cold hill’s side.
XII
And this is why I sojourn here
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is wither’d from the lake,
And no birds sing.’

NOTES
1) not by chance the landscape is lacustrine, the waters of the lake are beautiful but treacherous, but it is a desolate landscape and more like the swamp
2) the lily is a symbol of death. The knight’s brow of a deadly pallor is bathed in the sweat of fever and the color of his face is as dull as a dried rose. The symptoms are those of the consumption: the always mild fever does not show signs of diminution, turns on two “roses” on the cheeks of the sick. It is also said that Keats was a toxic addict to the use of nightshade that in the analysis of Giampaolo Sasso (The secret of Keats: The ghost of the “Belle Dame sans Merci”) is represented in the Lady Without Mercy
3) the whole description of the danger of the lady is concentrated in the eyes, they are as wild but also crazy. The rider ignores the repeated signs of danger: not only the eyes but also the strange language and the food (honey wild)
4) the elven song leads the knight to slavery
5) the manna is a white and sweet substance. It is well known that those who eat the food of fairies are condemned to remain in the Other World
6) the fairy is expressed in a language incomprehensible to the knight and then in reality could have said anything but “I love you”; yet the language of the body is unequivocal, at least as far as sexual desire is concerned
7) the elf cave is the Celtic otherworldly (see more)
8) why the fairy is sorry? Would not want to annihilate the knight but can not do otherwise? Does she know that a man’s love is not eternal and that sooner or later his knight will leave her with a breaking heart? Is love inevitably destructive?

LA BELLA DAMA SENZA PIETA’

To the disquieting fascination of the ballad could not escape Angelo Branduardi the Italian Bard, the final part of the melody of each stanza takes the traditional English song “Once I had a sweetheart.”

Angelo Branduardi from La Pulce d’acqua 1977


Guarda com’è pallido
il volto che hai,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
Vedo nei tuoi occhi
profondo terrore,
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…
Guarda come stan ferme
le acque del lago
nemmeno un uccello che osi cantare…
“è stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai
e come se mi amasse lei mi guardò”.
Guarda come l’angoscia
ti arde le labbra,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
“E`stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai…”
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…

“Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò
io l’anima le diedi ed il tempo scordai.
Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò…”.
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Al limite del monte
mi addormentai
fu l’ultimo mio sogno
che io allora sognai;
erano in mille e mille di più…”
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Erano in mille
e mille di più,
con pallide labbra dicevano a me:
– Quella che anche a te
la vita rubò, è lei,
la bella dama senza pietà”.

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: GERMAN VERSION

Faun from “Buch Der Balladen” 2009.


“Was ist dein Schmerz, du armer Mann,
so bleich zu sein und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt?”
“Ich traf ein’ edle Frau am Rhein,
die war so so schön – ein feenhaft Bild,
ihr Haar war lang, ihr Gang war leicht,
und ihr Blick wild.Ich hob sie auf mein weißes Ross
und was ich sah, das war nur sie,
die mir zur Seit’ sich lehnt und sang
ein Feenlied.Sie führt mich in ihr Grottenhaus,
dort weinte sie und klagte sehr;
drum schloss ich ihr wild-wildes Auf’
mit Küssen vier.
Da hat sie mich in Schlaf gewiegt,
da träumte ich – die Nacht voll Leid!-,
und Schatten folgen mir seitdem
zu jeder Zeit.Sah König bleich und Königskind
todbleiche Ritter, Mann an Mann;
die schrien: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci
hält dich in Bann!”Drum muss ich hier sein und allein
und wandeln bleich und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt.”
English translation (from here)
“What ails you, my poor man,
that makes you pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard (1)?”
“I met a noble lady on the Rhine,
so very fair was she – a fairy vision,
her hair was long, her gait was light,
and wild her stare.I lifted her on my white steed
and nothing but her could I see,
as she leant by my side and sang
a song of the fairies.She led me to her cave house
where she cried and wailed much;
so I closed her wild deer eyes (2)
with four kisses of mine.
She lulled me to sleep then,
and I dreamt a nightlong song!
and shadows follow me since
be it day or night (3).I saw a pale king and his son
knights pale as death, face to face;
who cried out: “The fair lady without mercy
has you in her spell!”Thus shall I remain here alone
to wander, pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard”


NOTES
1) lit “(where) no bird sings”
2) I assume it’s “Aug(en)” instead of “Auf'”
3) the original says “all the time” but I opted for (hopefully) more colorful English

LINK
http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/belle.html http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/k/keats/john/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/
http://noirinrosa.wordpress.com/tag/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/ http://zerkalomitomania.blogspot.it/search/label/Belle%20Dame%20sans%20Merci
http://www.celophaine.com/lbdsm/lbdsm_top.html
http://www.craigrecords.com/recordings/la-belle-dame/

The Final Trawl

Una sea song scritta da Archie Fischer sul modello delle sea shanty, “The Final Trawl”(in italiano “L’ultima pesca a strascico”) trae ispirazione dai pescherecci arrugginiti e dismessi ormeggiati nello Scrabster Harbor (uno dei più importanti porti in Scozia per l’industria del pesce). Una melodia che è un lament e anche l’addio del pescatore che, cresciuto da ragazzo secondo la legge del mare, preferisce morire nella sua nave: approferà nell’Isola dei Beati Marinai, dove il tempo è sempre mite, i violini non smettono mai di suonare, le ragazze sono bellissime e la birra è gratis.. (continua)
Registrata negli anni 70 insieme a Tommy Makem il brano è stato riprosposto da Archie nel suo album Garnet Rogers 1984
ASCOLTA
ASCOLTA The Tannahill Weavers

ASCOLTA The Clancy Brothers & Robbie O’Connell

ASCOLTA Jesse Ferguson live 2010


Now it’s three long years since we made her pay
Sing “Haul away”, my laddie O
And the owners say that she’d had her day
And sing “Haul away”, my laddie O
So heave away for the final trawl
It’s an easy pull, for the catch is small
Then’s stow your gear, lads,
and batten down
And I’ll take the wheel, lads, and I’ll turn her ‘round
And we’ll join the Venture and the Morning Star
Riding high and empty towards the bar
For I’d rather beach her on the Skerry Rock
Than to see her torched in the breaker’s dock
And when I die you can stow me down
In her rusty hold, where the breakers sound
Then I’d make the haven of Fiddlers Green
Where the grub is good and the bunks are clean
For I’ve fished a lifetime, boy and man
And the final trawl scarcely makes a cran
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Sono tre lunghi anni da quando abbiamo finito di pagarla,
canta “Haul away”, ragazzo mio
e i propretari dicono che ha fatto i suoi giorni
e canta “Haul away”, ragazzo
Così partiamo per l’ultimo strascico
è una pesca facile perche il pescato è piccolo, allora riponete l’attrezzatura, ragazzi e chiudete (i boccaporti)
prenderò il timone, ragazzi e la farò virare
e ci uniremo alla Venture e alla Morning Star
puntando, sulla cresta e il vuoto, verso la barriera, perchè la spiaggerò su Skerry Rock
piuttosto che vederla incendiata nel molo delle demolizioni!
E quando morirò mi metterete
nella sua stiva arrugginita dove i demolitori martellano[1],
allora sarò nel paradiso di Fiddlers Green
dove la sbobba è buona e le cuccette sono pulite
perchè ho pescato per tutta la vita, da ragazzo a uomo, e l’ultima pesca a malapena fa un cran[2]

FONTI
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/backmoon/final.htm
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2005
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=112601
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/thefinaltrawl.html

I’M A MAN YOU DON’T MEET EVERY DAY

ALTRI TITOLI: Jock Stuart – Jock Stewart

Irlandesi e scozzesi rivendicano la paternità della canzone che alcuni ritengono non sia di tradizione popolare ma risalente ai repertori dei music-halls in voga nell’Ottocento. Il music-hall inglese è il precursore del teatro di varietà trattandosi di un locale in cui la gente del popolino mangiava e beveva seduta al tavolo e assisteva a degli spettacoli che si alternavano sul palco, un misto di numeri comici, circensi e canzoni popolari. Questa forma di intrattenimento ha preso piede tra il 1830 e il 1850 periodo in cui si iniziarono a costruire degli appositi music hall al posto delle “public houses” che già offrivano spettacoli.

La versione diventata standard è quella della traveller scozzese Jeannie Robertson di Aberdeen, che la registrò nel 1960. Sembra sia stata lei ad aggiungere il nome “Jock Stewart” (in riferimento ai suoi nonni) poi nel 1976 un altro artista scozzese Archie Fisher riprese quasi integralmente il testo. Così scrive nelle note di copertina del suo album “The Man with a Rhyme“: An Irish narrative ballad that has been shortened to an Aberdeenshire drinking song. Though I’ve searched the map of Eire in vain for a “River Kildare”, and changed verse three so that the dog doesn’t get shot, the song is essentially still Jeannie Robertson’s version heard many years ago and re-inspired by the singing of her daughter, Lizzie Higgins.

Jock Stewart

Il protagonista invita gli amici a bere con lui: egli è prodigo non sono ad aiutare economicamente chi ha bisogno di un prestito, ma è anche generoso di spirito e riesce a mettere a proprio agio sia il gentiluomo che il vagabondo. E’ una drinking song che si presta come canto dell’addio a fine concerto.

a-meeting-at-the-three-pigeons-heywood-hardy

ASCOLTA Archie Fischer 1976 (I, IIA, IIIA, IV)
ASCOLTA The Tannahill Weavers 1979 (I, IIB, IIIB, IV)

ASCOLTA The Dubliners 1987 (I, IIC, IIA, IIIC, IV)
ASCOLTA Dougie MacLean in The Plant life Years 2009 (I, IIA, IIIA, IIID, IV)
ASCOLTA Rapalje 2010 in una versione live molto maschia e teutonica (strofe I, IV, III, IV)
ASCOLTA Jesse Ferguson live 2011 (strofe I, II, IV, III, IV)
ASCOLTA Ewan McLennan & Tim O’Brien per Transatlantic Session 2013 (I, IIC, IIB, IIIB, IV, I)


I
Now, my name is Jock Stewart,
I’m a canny gaun man,(1)
And a roving young fellow I’ve been.
CHORUS
So be easy and free
When you’re drinkin(2) wi’ me.
I’m a man you don’t meet every day.
tradotto da Cattia Salto
II
Mi chiamo Jock Stewart, e sono ora un uomo prudente(1), ma sono stato da giovane un compagno vagabondo.
RITORNELLO
Mettiti comodo e a tuo agio quando bevi(2) con me, sono un uomo che non si trova tutti i giorni.
IIA
I have acres of land, I have men at command; I have always a shilling to spare(3).
[Ho acri di terra e uomini al mio comando, e ho sempre uno scellino da prestare.]
IIB
And its oft have I sat with both bottle and friend Is there ae man could e’er ask for more?
[E spesso mi sono seduto con una bottiglia e un amico; cosa vorrebbe di più un uomo?]
 IIC
I’m a piper to trade(4), I’m a roving young blade(5), And manys the tunes I can play
[Sono un piper ambulante(4), un giovanotto spericolato(5) e so’ suonare molte melodie]
IIIB
Let us catch well the hours and the minutes that fly Let us share them sae weel while we may(7)
[Afferiamo bene le ore e i minuti e passiamoli in compagnia finchè possiamo(7)]
IIIA
Now, I took out my gun,
With my dog I did shoot(6)
All down by the River Kildare.
[Prendevo la pistola e con il cane andavo a caccia(6) lungo il fiume Kildare]
IIID
I took out my gun
And with my dog i did go(6)
All down by the banks of the Tay
[Prendevo la pistola e con il cane andavo a caccia lungo le rive del Tay]
 IIIC
With my dog and my gun I go out for to shoot(6)
All along the green banks o’ the Spey
[Con il mio cane e la pistola esco per sparare lungo le verdi rive dello Spey]
IV
So, come fill up your glasses
Of brandy and wine(8),
And whatever the price (cost), I will pay.
IV
Così venite a riempire i bicchieri di brandy e vino(8)
e qualunque sia il prezzo lo pagherò

NOTE
1) canny =warily gaun=going; canny gaun man=an easy going or cautious man, who in his younger days wasn’t quite so cautious (but a roving young fellow).
2) Dougie MacLean dice “courting ”
3) Dougie MacLean dice “But my money I foolishly spend”che è quasi la stessa cosa ma con una magnanimità che rasenta lo sperpero
4) questo verso è stato aggiunto da Sheila Stewart nella registrazione del 1999 effettuata da Doc Rowe che così scrive nelle note (And Time goes on: song and stories): Popular on the folk scene, this song was found by the Stewarts in their letterbox when they returned from shopping one day! An anonymous writer simply stated that it was written for [Sheila’s father] Alec, a fine piper and storyteller. Versions are found in Ireland.
5) ) letteralmente “spada, lama itinerante”, si riferisce all’atteggiamento macho degli uomini traveller sempre pronti ad attaccar briga pur di difendere il loro onore
6) il verso controverso (e scusate il bisticcio) è quello in merito all’uccisione del cane: in alcune versioni (ad es. Pogues) si dice proprio che l’uomo esce armato di pistola e con il cane per ucciderlo, ma Archie Fischer le trasforma in modo che i due stiano andando a una battuta di caccia. Ora perchè l’uomo volesse o dovesse uccidere il cane è spiegato dai più come se si trattasse di un atto dovuto perchè il cane era malato e quindi un gesto pietoso per alleviare le sue sofferenze. Così la canzone assume un carattere di “lamento” la celebrazione di un funerale di un caro amico (il cane) con tanto di bevute. Ovviamente questa versione è più vicina al tono comico-sarcastico tipico delle canzoni del music-halls ottocenteschi
6) And we’ll share them together this day
7) whisky and beer

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/imamanyoudontmeeteveryday.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/j/jockstew.htmlhttp://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35897http://wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/10/meeteveryday.htmhttp://wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/20/meet.htm

WHEN WE WERE YOUNG MAGGIE/NORA

George Washington Johnson [1839-1917], insegnante e poeta canadese nel 1864 scrisse una poesia per la moglie “Maggie” Margaret Clark, poco più che ventenne che stava già morendo di tubercolosi (nonostante la malattia si erano sposati nell’ottobre dello stesso anno). La poesia venne pubblicata nella raccolta “Maple Leaves” con il titolo “When we were Young Maggie”. Nel 1866, su richiesta dell’amico, J.A.Butterfield ne scrisse la musica ma, Maggie era ormai morta nella primavera del 1865.

George immagina di aver trascorso una vita insieme alla moglie (invece dei pochi mesi che le restano) e le dice “But to me you’re as fair as you were, Maggie, When you and I were young

GUIDA ALL’ASCOLTO
La canzone ebbe una grande popolarità sia in America che in Irlanda ed è diventata un classico della musica country ma anche della irish music. Può essere letta come la canzone della giovinezza perduta ma anche, per chi ne conosce il background, delle occasioni mancate o perdute, l’elegia di una vita che sarebbe potuta trascorrere insieme alla persona amata (ma invece si è rimasti soli)

 

Pam Gleichman Old Mill Black And White"
Pam Gleichman Old Mill Black And White”

ASCOLTA Donna Stewart & Ron Andrico
ASCOLTA Tom Roush
ASCOLTA Magic Fern con il testo leggermente modificato

I
I wandered today to the hill(1), Maggie, To watch the scene below; The creek and the creaking old mill, Maggie, As we used to long ago. The green grove is gone from the hill, Maggie, Where first the daisies sprung; The creaking old mill is still, Maggie Since you and I were young.CHORUS
And now we are agéd and gray, Maggie, And the trials of life nearly done; Let us sing of the days that are gone, Maggie, When you and I were young.

II
A city so silent and lone, Maggie, Where the young and the gay and the best(2), In polished white mansions of stone, Maggie, Have each found a place of rest, Is built where the birds used to play, Maggie, And join in the songs that were sung; For we sang as gay as they, Maggie, When you and I were young.

III
They say I am feeble with age, Maggie, My steps are less sprightly than then, My face is a well written page, Maggie, But time alone was the pen. They say we are agéd and gray, Maggie, As sprays by the white breakers flung; But to me you’re as fair as you were, Maggie, When you and I were young.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Oggi ho camminato sulla collina Maggie e guardato la scena sottostante il torrente e il vecchio mulino scricchiolante, Maggie proprio come eravamo soliti fare molto tempo fa. Il boschetto verde è scomparso dalla collina Maggie, dove prima spuntavano le margherite; il vecchio mulino scricchiolante c’è ancora, Maggie come quando tu ed io eravamo giovani
CORO
Adesso siamo anziani e grigi, Maggie e la corsa della vita vicina alla fine, allora cantiamo dei giorni che sono passati, Maggie, quando tu ed io eravamo giovani
II
Una città così silenziosa e solitaria Maggie dove i giovani, i belli e i migliori, in nitidi palazzi di pietra bianca, Maggie hanno tutti trovato un posto dove riposare, è costruita dove gli uccelli sono soliti cantare Maggie, e unita alle canzoni che erano cantate che noi cantavamo allegri come loro, Maggie quando tu ed io eravamo giovani
III
Dicono che sono debole per l’età Maggie, i miei passi sono meno arzilli di allora, la mia faccia è una pagine ben scritta Maggie ma solo il tempo fu la penna dicono che siamo anziani e grigi, Maggie come spruzzi lanciati dalle bianche onde ma per me tu sei bella com’eri Maggie quando tu ed io eravamo giovani

NOTE
1) Hamilton mountain, Hamilton Ontario
2) la frase è chiaramente riferita alla condizione della moglie, giovane, bella e buona, quasi come il suo epitaffio

NORA/MAGGIE
Nel 1926 il drammaturgo irlandese Sean O’Casey riscrisse il testo di “When we were young” con il titolo di Nora per la sua opera “The Plough and The Stars” (Dublin Trilogy). Il protagonista maschile della storia la canta alla giovane moglie Nora. Così alcuni interpreti cantano la versione scritta da O’Casey ma con il nome di Maggie (a partire dai De Dannan)!

ASCOLTA Maura O’Connell & De Dannan 1997
ASCOLTA Eleanor Shanley live
ASCOLTA Jesse Ferguson
ASCOLTA The Blarney Lads che accelerano un po’ il tempo

I
The violets were scenting the woods, Nora, Displaying their charm to the bee(s) When I first said I loved only you, Maggie, And you said you loved only me.
II
The chestnut blooms gleamed through the glade, Nora, A robin sang loud from a tree, When I first said I loved only you, Nora, And you said you loved only me.
III
The golden rows of daffodils shone, Nora, And danced with the leaves on the trees, When I first said I loved only you, Nora, And you said you loved only me.
IV
Birds in the trees sang a song, Nora, Of happier transports to be, When I first said I loved only you, Nora, And you said you loved only me.
V
Our dreams they have never come true, Nora, Our hopes they never were to be, When I first said I loved only you, Nora, And you said you loved only me. When I first said I loved only you, Nora, And you said you loved only me.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Le violette profumavano i boschi, Nora esibendo il loro fascino sulle api quando ti ho detto per primo “Amo solo te” Nora e tu mi hai detto che ami solo me.
II
I boccioli del castagno sfolgoravano nella radura, Nora, un pettirosso cantava forte sull’albero quando ti ho detto per primo “Amo solo te” Nora e tu mi hai detto che ami solo me.
III
Le file dorate dei narcisi brillavano Nora, e danzavano con le foglie sugli alberi quando ti ho detto per primo “Amo solo te” Nora e tu mi hai detto che ami solo me.
IV
Gli uccelli sull’albero cantavano una canzone, Nora per essere i più felici mezzi di trasporto quando ti ho detto per primo “Amo solo te” Nora e tu mi hai detto che ami solo me
V
I nostri sogni non si erano mai diventati realtà, Nora le nostre speranze non si erano mai avverate Nora quando ti ho detto per primo “Amo solo te” Nora e tu mi hai detto che ami solo me.

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/maggie.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5651

ILLUSTRAZIONI
http://fineartamerica.com/featured/old-mill-black-and-white-pam-gleichman.html

La Belle Dame sans Merci

Read the post in English

John Melhuish Strudwick

Nel 1819 il poeta inglese John Keats rielaborando la figura della “Queen of Faerie” delle ballate scozzesi (a partire da Tam Lin e True Thomas) scrive a sua volta la ballata “La Belle Dame sans Merci”, (la bella dama senza pietà) dando origine a un tema diventato molto popolare tra i pittori Pre-Raffaelliti, quello della donna vamp (la femme fatale) che ha però già un corrispettivo nelle credenze del folklore la
Lennan o leman shee – Shide Leannan (letteralmente fata bambino) cioè la fata che cerca l’amore tra gli umani. La fata, che è un essere sia di genere maschile che femminile, dopo aver sedotto un mortale lo abbandona per ritornare nel suo mondo. L’amante si tormenta per l’amore perduto fino alla morte.
Gli amanti delle fate hanno una vita breve, ma intensa. La fata che prende come amante un umano è anche la musa ispiratrice dell’artista che offre il talento in cambio di un amore devoto, portando l’amante alla follia o a una morte prematura.
Il titolo è stato parafrasato da un poemetto del XV secolo scritto da Alain Chartier (in forma di dialogo tra un amante respinto e la dama sdegnosa) ed è diventato la cifra di una donna seduttrice, una dark lady incapace di sentimenti verso l’uomo il quale cade preda del suo incantesimo. Siamo all’inverso del tema ben più antico di “Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight” (vedi)

John William Waterhouse – La Belle Dame sans Merci (1893)

LE STAGIONI DEL CUORE

Nella ballata ci sono due stagioni la primavera e l’inverno: in primavera tra i prati in fiore, il cavaliere incontra una dama bellissima, creatura del bosco, figlia di una fata, che lo incanta con una dolce nenia; il cavaliere, già perdutamente innamorato, la mette in sella al proprio destriero e si lascia condurre docilmente nella Grotta degli elfi; qui viene cullato dalla fanciulla, che sospira tristemente, e sogna di principi e re diafani i quali gridano la loro schiavitù verso la bella dama.
Al risveglio siamo nel tardo autunno o nell’inverno e il cavaliere si ritrova prostrato presso la riva di un lago, pallido e malato, certamente morente o senza altro pensiero che il canto della fata.
Le chiavi di lettura della ballata sono moltissime e ogni prospettiva accresce il fascino inquietante dei versi.

Due sono le immagini pittoriche che evocano le due stagioni del cuore e della ballata, la prima – forse il dipinto più famoso- è di Sir Frank Dicksee, (datato 1902): la primavera prende i colori della campagna inglese con le immancabili rose in primo piano; la dama è stata appena issata sul focoso destriero del cavaliere e con la mano destra tiene saldamente le redini, con l’altra mano si appoggia alla sella per potersi chinare verso il bel viso del cavaliere e sussurrare un incantesimo; il cavaliere, in precario equilibrio, è totalmente concentrato sul volto della dama e come rapito.

caitiffknight
Sir Frank Dicksee

Il secondo è di Henry Meynell Rheam (dipinto nel 1901) tutto nei toni dell’autunno, il quale ricrea un paesaggio desolato avvolto nella bruma, come se fosse una barriera che tiene prigioniero il cavaliere prostrato a terra; mentre egli sogna di pallidi e evanescenti guerrieri (l’azzurro è un colore tipico per evocare le immagini dei sogni) che lo mettono in guardia, la dama lascia la grotta forse in cerca di altri amanti.

Curiosamente le armature dei due cavalieri sono molto simili, ma entrambe non propriamente medievali e più adatte ad essere sfoggiate nei tornei che non indossate nei campi di battaglia. Modelli elaborati e finemente decorati risalgono alla fine del XV secolo.

Henry Meynell Rheam

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: IL FILMATO

La ballata non poteva non ispirare anche gli artisti di oggi, ecco un racconto cinematografico un “live action short” diretto dal giapponese Hidetoshi Oneda. Lo short inizia con il dare corpo all’interlocutore immaginario che domanda al cavaliere ” O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms..” cosi ci troviamo nel 1819 su un isola dopo il naufragio di una nave e assistiamo all’incontro tra il naufrago e un vecchio decrepito tenuto in vita dal rimpianto..

LA STORIA (tratto da qui) 1819. The Navigator and the Doctor survive a shipwreck only to find themselves lost in a strange forest. The Navigator is challenged by the gravely ill Doctor into pursuing his true passion – art. While he protests, the ailing Doctor dies. Later, the Navigator is beside a lake, where he finds an Old Knight who tells him his story: once, he encountered a mysterious Lady, and fell in love with her. But horrified by her true form – an immortal spirit and the ghosts of her mortal lovers – the Young Knight begged for release. Awoken and alone, he realized his failure. Thus he has waited, kept alive for centuries by his regret. The Navigator considers his own crossroads. What will he be when he returns to the world?

La Belle Dame Sans Merci di Hidetoshi Oneda – 2005

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI IN MUSICA

Il primo a musicare la ballata fu Charlse Villiers Stanford nell’Ottocento con un arrangiamento per piano molto drammatico ma un po’ datato oggi, anche se popolare ai suoi tempi.
La ballata è stata messa in musica da diversi artisti nel XXI secolo.

Susan Craig Winsberg in La Belle Dame 2008

Jesse Ferguson

Giordano Dall’Armellina in “Old Time Ballads From The British Isles” 2007

Penda’s Fen (Richard Dwyer)

Loreena McKennitt in “Lost Souls” 2018

LA LETTURA POETICA
dalla voce di Ben Whishaw

versi in italiano


I
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge is wither’d from the lake(1),
And no birds sing.
II
O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrel’s granary is full,
And the harvest ‘s done.
III
I see a lily(2) on thy brow thy
With anguish moist and fever dew;
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
Fast withereth too.’
IV
I met a lady in the meads,
Full beautiful — a faery’s child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
And her eyes were wild(3).
V
I made a garland for her head,
And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She look’d at me as she did love,
And made sweet moan.
VI
I set her on my pacing steed
And nothing else saw all day long,
For sideways would she lean, and sing
A faery’s song(4).
VII
She found me roots of relish sweet
And honey wild and manna(5) dew,
And sure in language strange she said,
“I love thee true (6)
VIII
She took me to her elfin grot(7),
And there she wept and sigh’d fill sore(8);
And there I shut her wild, wild eyes
With kisses four.
IX
And there she lullèd me asleep,
And there I dream’d — Ah! woe betide!
The latest dream I ever dream’d
On the cold hill’s side.
X
I saw pale kings and princes too,
Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried – “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”
Hath thee in thrall!”
XI
I saw their starved lips in the gloam
With horrid warning gapèd wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
On the cold hill’s side.
XII
And this is why I sojourn here
Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge is wither’d from the lake,
And no birds sing.’
traduzione italiano M Roffi
I
Che mai ti cruccia, o cavaliere armato,
solo e pallido errante?
Giace prostrato il giunco in riva al lago(1),
né uccello canta.
II
Che mai ti cruccia, o cavaliere armato,
così smunto e abbattuto?
Lo scoiattolo ha colmo il suo granaio,
e fu colto ogni frutto.
III
Un giglio(2) hai sulla fronte
rugiadosa di febbre e di tormento,
e sulla guancia una rosa appassita
rapidamente muore.
IV
Una dama incontrai
bella nei prati, figlia delle fate;
lunghi i capelli e il passo suo leggero,
e gli occhi folli.(3)
V
Composi una ghirlanda pel suo capo,
e braccialetti e un cinto
fragrante, mi guardava innamorata,
con un dolce lamento.
VI
Sul mio corsiero al passo la posai,
né altro vidi quel giorno,
ché reclina da un lato ella cantava
canzoni d’incantesimo.(4)
VII
Cercò per me dolci radici e miele
e rugiada di manna(5);
nel suo ignoto linguaggio ella mi disse:
«Amo te solo»(6)
VIII
Nella magica grotta(7) mi condusse,
là pianse disperata e sospirò(8)
là io le chiusi i folli folli occhi
con quattro baci.
IX
Mi cullò fino al sonno,
là misero sognai l’ultimo sogno
da me sognato mai lungo il pendio
della fredda collina.
X
Vidi pallidi re, guerrieri e principi
dal mortale pallore che gridavano:
«La belle Dame sans merci
ti ha preso nella rete».
XI
Nel crepuscolo vidi le arse labbra
in orrida minaccia spalancate,
e quivi mi svegliai lungo il pendio
della fredda collina.
XII
Per questo io qui soggiorno
solo e pallido errante,
benché il giunco è prostrato in riva al lago,
né uccello canta.

NOTE
1) non a caso il paesaggio è lacustre, le acque del lago sono belle ma infide, si tratta però di un paesaggio desolato e più simile alla palude
2) il giglio è un simbolo di mort. La fronte del cavaliere di un pallore mortale è bagnata dal sudore della febbre e il colorito del viso è smorto come una rosa appassita. I sintomi sono quelli della tisi: la febbre sempre lieve, ma che non accenna a diminuire, accende due “rose” sulle guance dei malati. Si dice anche che Keats fosse un tossico dedito all’uso della Belladonna che nell’analisi di Giampaolo Sasso (Il segreto di Keats: Il fantasma della “Belle Dame sans Merci”) è rappresentata nella Dama Senza pietà

3) tutta la descrizione della pericolosità della dama è concentrata negli occhi, definiti selvaggi ma anche folli. Il cavaliere ignora i ripetuti segnali di pericolo : non solo gli occhi ma anche la lingua strana (Language strange), il cibo (honey wild)
4) il canto elfico conduce il cavaliere alla schiavitù
5) la manna è una sostanza bianca e dolce. E’ risaputo che coloro che mangiano il cibo delle fate sono condannati a restare nell’Altro Mondo
6) la fata si esprime in un linguaggio incomprensibile al cavaliere e quindi in realtà avrebbe potuto dirgli tutt’altro che “ti amo”; eppure il linguaggio del corpo è inequivocabile, almeno per quanto riguarda il desiderio sessuale
7) la grotta dell’elfo è l’altromondo celtico (vedi)
8) perchè la fata è dispiaciuta? Non vorrebbe annientare il cavaliere ma non può fare altrimenti? Sa che l’amore di un uomo non è eterno e che prima o poi il suo cavaliere la lascerà spezzandole il cuore? E’ l’amore inevitabilmente distruttivo?

Un’altra bella traduzione in italiano ( tratta da qui)
Qual è la tua pena, o Cavaliere in armi,
Che qui – pallido – indugi in solitudine?
Sfiorita è la carice del lago,
Tacciono gli uccelli.

Qual è la tua pena, o Cavaliere in armi,
Che appari affranto e desolato?
Ricolmo è il granaio dello scoiattolo,
Mietuto ormai il raccolto.

Un giglio sulla tua fronte
Ròrida d’angoscia e febbre,
Rose morenti sulle guance
Anch’esse troppo presto sfiorite.

Una Dama incontrai sui prati,
Bella oltre ogni dire – Figlia di Fate,
Lunghi i capelli, leggero il piede,
Selvaggi gli occhi.

Una ghirlanda per la sua fronte intrecciai,
E braccialetti, e una fragrante cintura.
Mi guardò come Amore guarda,
Dolce emise un gemito.

La issai sul mio destriero al passo,
E altro se non lei per tutto il giorno vidi.
Verso me protesa,
Cantava una melodia delle Fate.

Per me cercò radici dolci al gusto,
E miele selvatico e stille di manna.
E – certo – in una lingua ignota, ripeteva,
“Il mio amore è sincero”.

Alla sua grotta fatata mi condusse,
E là sospirò e pianse con grande tristezza,
E là quei suoi occhi selvaggi chiusi,
Baciandoli quattro volte.

E là mi addormentò cantando,
E là – oh, sventurato!- sognai l’ultimo sogno
Che avrei mai sognato
Sul gelido pendìo del colle.

Pallidi Re e pallidi prìncipi vidi;
E pallidi guerrieri – oh, di quale pallore mortale!
La Belle Dame sans Merci – gridavano –
Ti ha ormai in suo potere.

Vidi le loro labbra livide nell’oscurità
Orribilmente spalancate nel grido.
Mi svegliai, e mi ritrovai qui,
Sul gelido pendìo del colle.

Ed ecco perché ivi mi trattengo,
Pallido – indugiando in solitudine,
Benchè avvizzita sia la carice del lago,
E tacciano gli uccelli.

VERSIONE IN ITALIANO: LA BELLA DAMA SENZA PIETA’

Al fascino inquietante della ballata non poteva sfuggire il nostrano Bardo che si avvale delle sonorità lamentose del sitar per esaltarne il fascino soprannaturale. La parte finale della melodia di ogni strofa riprende il brano tradizionale inglese Once I had a sweetheart.

Angelo Branduardi in La Pulce d’acqua 1977


Guarda com’è pallido
il volto che hai,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
Vedo nei tuoi occhi
profondo terrore,
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…
Guarda come stan ferme
le acque del lago
nemmeno un uccello che osi cantare…
“è stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai
e come se mi amasse lei mi guardò”.
Guarda come l’angoscia
ti arde le labbra,
sembra tu sia fuggito dall’aldilà…
“E`stato in mezzo ai prati
che io la incontrai…”
che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…

“Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò
io l’anima le diedi ed il tempo scordai.
Quando al mio fianco
lei poi si appoggiò…”.
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Al limite del monte
mi addormentai
fu l’ultimo mio sogno
che io allora sognai;
erano in mille e mille di più…”
Che bianche e gelide dita tu hai…”
Erano in mille
e mille di più,
con pallide labbra dicevano a me:
– Quella che anche a te
la vita rubò, è lei,
la bella dama senza pietà”.

BELLE DAME SANS MERCI: VERSIONE IN TEDESCO

Interessante anche questa versione di un gruppo tedesco medieval-folk che ho avuto modo di ascoltare dal vivo nel 2005 alla Festa celtica di Beltane organizzata dall’Associazione Antica Quercia a Masserano (Biella – Piemonte): intrigante mix di strumenti tradizionali ed elettronici.

Faun in “Buch Der Balladen” 2009.


“Was ist dein Schmerz, du armer Mann,
so bleich zu sein und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt?”
“Ich traf ein’ edle Frau am Rhein,
die war so so schön – ein feenhaft Bild,
ihr Haar war lang, ihr Gang war leicht,
und ihr Blick wild.Ich hob sie auf mein weißes Ross
und was ich sah, das war nur sie,
die mir zur Seit’ sich lehnt und sang
ein Feenlied.Sie führt mich in ihr Grottenhaus,
dort weinte sie und klagte sehr;
drum schloss ich ihr wild-wildes Auf’
mit Küssen vier.
Da hat sie mich in Schlaf gewiegt,
da träumte ich – die Nacht voll Leid!-,
und Schatten folgen mir seitdem
zu jeder Zeit.Sah König bleich und Königskind
todbleiche Ritter, Mann an Mann;
die schrien: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci
hält dich in Bann!”Drum muss ich hier sein und allein
und wandeln bleich und so gering,
wo im verdorrten Schilf am See
kein Vogel singt.”
traduzione inglese (tratto da qui)
“What ails you, my poor man,
that makes you pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard (1)?”
“I met a noble lady on the Rhine,
so very fair was she – a fairy vision,
her hair was long, her gait was light,
and wild her stare.I lifted her on my white steed
and nothing but her could I see,
as she leant by my side and sang
a song of the fairies.She led me to her cave house
where she cried and wailed much;
so I closed her wild deer eyes (2)
with four kisses of mine.
She lulled me to sleep then,
and I dreamt a nightlong song!
and shadows follow me since
be it day or night (3).I saw a pale king and his son
knights pale as death, face to face;
who cried out: “The fair lady without mercy
has you in her spell!”Thus shall I remain here alone
to wander, pale and humbled so,
among the withered seashore reeds
where the song of no bird is heard”

NOTE
1) lit “(where) no bird sings”
2) I assume it’s “Aug(en)” instead of “Auf'”
3) the original says “all the time” but I opted for (hopefully) more colorful English

FONTI
http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/belle.html http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/k/keats/john/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/
http://noirinrosa.wordpress.com/tag/la-belle-dame-sans-merci/ http://zerkalomitomania.blogspot.it/search/label/Belle%20Dame%20sans%20Merci
http://www.celophaine.com/lbdsm/lbdsm_top.html
http://www.craigrecords.com/recordings/la-belle-dame/

ERIN GO BRAGH

Ci sono diverse canzoni con questo titolo ma di provenienza diversa, alcune dall’Irlanda e una in particolare, dalla Scozia.

Erin Go Bragh” è il titolo di una canzone scozzese molto popolare diffusa anche nei broadside di metà 800 (vedi) che racconta la storia di un Highlander scambiato per un irlandese e perciò discriminato nientemeno che nelle Lowlands del suo stesso paese. Alla metà dell’Ottocento in seguito alla carestia delle patate molti irlandesi si presentavano come lavoratori agricoli stagionali soprattutto al tempo della mietitura, così come molti Highlanders ed entrambi i gruppi erano discriminati dagli scozzesi delle pianure e considerati con disprezzo come Papisti “bog-walkers” che non sapevano nemmeno parlare Inglese!

no-irish

In effetti c’è molta più comunicazione tra gli scozzesi del Nord e gli Irlandesi soprattutto per quanto riguarda le canzoni che tra scozzesi delle Highlands e scozzesi delle Lowlands. Tuttavia l’integrazione tra le due comunità avvenne giocoforza dopo le cosiddette “Clearances” le emigrazioni in seguito alle mutate condizioni e agli sgomberi forzosi degli Highlanders dalle loro terre (vedi)

BOG WALKERS

Il protagonista si trova ad Edimburgo nei pressi del porto e fiero della sua “scozzesità” reagisce in modo violento ai malmenamenti di un poliziotto che lo ha scambiato per un Irlandese e per di più criminale: e però la reazione è così violenta che probabilmente gli spacca la testa con il suo bastone da passeggio, o forse il poliziotto è solo tramortito a terra, ma la gente inferocita lo scambia per morto e si getta contro al nostro Duncan; fortunosamente egli riesca a disimpegnarsi e a fuggire su di un battello diretto a Nord.

La melodia abbinata è “Auld Reekie“, ma ci sono anche versioni con “Whitechapel Street“. La canzone è documentata anche dalle registrazioni sul campo negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais vedi

ASCOLTA Dick Gaughan in Handful of Earth 1981

ASCOLTA Jesse Ferguson


I
Ma name’s Duncan Campbell(1) fae the shire o Argyll
A’ve traivellt this country for mony’s the mile
A’ve traivellt thro Irelan, Scotlan an aa(2)
An the name A go under’s(3) bauld Erin-go-Bragh(4)
II
Ae nicht in Auld Reekie(5) A walked doun the street
Whan a saucy big polis A chanced for tae meet
He glowert in ma face an he gied me some jaw
Sayin whan cam ye owre, bauld Erin-go-Bragh?
III
Well, A am not a Pat tho in Irelan A’ve been
Nor am A a Paddy tho Irelan A’ve seen
But were A a Paddy, that’s nothin at aa
For thair’s mony’s a bauld hero in Erin-go-Bragh”
IV
“Well A know ye’re a Pat by the cut o yer hair
Bit ye aa turn tae Scotsmen as sune as ye’re here
Ye left yer ain countrie for brakin the law
An we’re seizin aa stragglers fae Erin-go-Bragh”
V
An were A a Pat an ye knew it wis true
Or wis A the devil, then whit’s that tae you?
Were it no for the stick that ye haud in yer paw
A’d show ye a game played in Erin-go-Bragh”
VI
An a lump o blackthorn(6) that A held in ma fist
Aroun his big bodie A made it tae twist
An the blude fae his napper A quickly did draw
An paid him stock-an-interest for Erin-go-Bragh
VII
Bit the people cam roun like a flock o wild geese
Sayin “catch that daft rascal he’s killt the police”
An for every freen A had A’m shair he had twa
It wis terrible hard times for Erin-go-Bragh
VIII
Bit A cam tae a wee boat that sails in the Forth(7)
An A packed up ma gear an A steered for the North
Fareweill tae Auld Reekie, yer polis an aa
An the devil gang wi ye says Erin-go-Bragh
IX
Sae come aa ye young people, whairever ye’re from
A don’t give a damn tae whit place ye belang
A come fae Argyll in the Heilans sae braw
Bit A ne’er took it ill bein caad Erin-go-Bragh
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Mi chiamo Duncan Campbell(1) della contea di Argyll
ho attraversato questo paese in lungo e in largo
ho girato per l’Irlanda e la Scozia per ognidove
e vengo preso(3) per un baldo Erin-go-Bragh(4)
II
Una notte a Edimburgo mentre camminavo per la strada
incappai in un poliziotto insolente
che mi guardò in cagnesco e mi colpì alla mascella
dicendo “Quando sei arrivato baldo Erin-go-Bragh?”
III
“Io non sono un Pat anche se sono stato in Irlanda
e nemmeno un Paddy anche se ho visto l’Irlanda
ma anche se fossi un Paddy cosa te ne importa?
perchè ci sono molti baldi eroi a Erin-go-Bragh”
IV
“So che sei un Pat dal taglio dei capelli,
ma voi tutti vi credete scozzesi non appena arrivate qui,
hai lasciato il tuo paese per infrangere la legge,
e stiamo acciuffando tutti i vagabondi da Erin-go-Bragh”
V
“Se io fossi un Pat e tu lo sapessi per certo
o se fossi il diavolo, che cosa te ne viene?
Se non fosse per il bastone che tieni nella zampa,
ti mostrerei una partita che si gioca a Erin-go-Bragh”
VI
E un tocco di prugnolo(6) che stringevo in pugno,
sul suo grosso corpo ho abbattuto
e il sangue dalla sua testa ho fatto zampillare
e l’ho ripagato del suo interessamento per Erin-go-Bragh.
VII
Allora la gente mi venne intorno come uno stormo di oche selvatiche
dicendo “Prendi quello stupido mascalzone che ha ucciso il poliziotto!”
E per ogni amico che avevo, giuro che ce n’erano due contro,
erano tempi terribilmente duri per Erin-go-Bragh.
VIII
Ma è arrivata una nave che navigava nel Forth (7)
e ho impacchettato le mie cose e mi sono diretto al Nord,
addio Edimburgo, con tutti i tuoi poliziotti
e la banda di diavoli con te dice “Erin-go-Bragh”.
IX
Allora venite tutti voi giovani ovunque voi siate,
non me ne frega un accidente da quale posto veniate,
io vengo da Argyll nelle Highlands così splendide,
e ne faccio una malattia se vengo chiamato Erin-go-Bragh

NOTE
1) a volte di nome Pat Murphy
2) all
3) letteralmente “il nome che mi danno”
4) La versione in Inglese standard dell’Irlandese Éirinn go Brách si traduce come “Irlanda per sempre” sinonimo dell’identità irlandese. In gaelico scozzese “Eirinn gu Brath” significa “Irlanda fino al giorno del Giudizio
5) Auld Reekie” (“Old Smokey”) ossia Edimburgo.
6) probabilmente si tratta del bastone da passeggio tipicamente irlandese dal nome shillelagh
7) il Firth of Forth è un fiordo che collega il Forht (il “fiume Nero”) al Mare del Nord

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://republicancommunist.org/blog/tag/erin-go-bragh/
http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiERNGOBRA;ttERNGOBRA.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=79420
http://abcnotation.com/tunePage?a=www.cranfordpub.com/tunes/abcs/silver_apple.txt/0024

PEGGY GORDON

peggy-gordonCollezionata in Nuova Scozia da Helen Creighton (1899-1989) “Peggy Gordon” è una love song pubblicata in “Maritime Folk Songs” (Ryerson Press, Toronto, Ontario, 1962) di probabile origine scozzese.

La canzone è diventata popolare anche in Irlanda a cavallo degli anni 60-70 tramite la versione dei Dubliners. La melodia richiama “The Banks of Sweet Primroses” anche detta “Sweet Primroses” con le prime edizioni stampate che risalgono al 1840.

VERSIONI IRLANDESI

Il protagonista si dichiara alla giovane Peggy e descrive le sue sofferenze d’amore amore, perchè lei sembra essere indifferente al suo corteggiamento; così vorrebbe emigrare in una terra d’oltremare o ritirarsi un una valle solitaria per ascoltare solo il canto degli uccelli, al fine di ritrovare un po’ di tranquillità.

The Dubliners con la voce di Luke Kelly, (strofe da I a V)

Nelle seguenti versioni si omette la IV strofa
Sinéad O’Connor in Sean-Nós Nua
The Chieftains & The Secret Sisters in Voice of Ages

The Corrs in Home 2005



Oh, Peggy Gordon you are my darling
Come sit you down upon my knee
and tell to me the very reason
Why I am slighted so by thee.(1)
II
I’m so in love that I can’t deny it
My heart lies smothered in my breast
It’s not for you to let the world know it
A troubled mind can know no rest.
III
I put my head to a glass of brandy(2)
It was my fancy I do declare
For when I’m drinking I’m always thinking
And wishing Peggy Gordon was here.
IV
I wish I was away in England,
Far across the briny sea,
Or sailing o’er the deepest ocean,
Where care and troubles can’t bother(3) me.
V
I wish I was in some lonesome valley
Where womankind could not be found
Where the little birds sing on the branches
And every moment a different sound.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Oh Peggy Gordon, mia cara,
vieni a sederti sulle mie ginocchia,
e dimmi il vero motivo
per cui mi disprezzi. (1)
II
Sono così tanto innamorato che non posso negarlo, il cuore mi sta stretto in petto, ma non è da te far sapere a tutti che un’anima inquieta non conosce pace.
III
Mi sono attaccato al brandy (2)
posso solo dire che ne avevo voglia,
perché quando bevo penso e desidero sempre che Peggy Gordon sia qui.
IV
Vorrei essere lontano dall’Inghilterra,
oltre il mare salmastro,
o navigare sull’oceano più profondo
dove affanni e dolori  non possono assillarmi (3)
V
Vorrei essere in qualche valle solitaria
dove non ci sia traccia  del genere femminile
e dove gli uccellini cantano sui rami
in ogni momento una melodia diversa.

NOTE
Tutte le versioni ripetono la prima strofa anche in chiusura, in questo modo il rapporto tra i due si riduce ad un breve per quanto aspro litigio tra innamorati con finale riappacificazione.
1) letteralmente sono così insignificante per te
2) anche “cask of brandy”; letteralmente ho messo la testa in un barile di brandy
4) bother= preoccupare, termine anglo-irlandese del linguaggio colloquiale

SWEET MAGGIE GORDON

Nella raccolta americana “Music for Nation” presso la Biblioteca del Congresso (Library of Congress) il brano è intitolato Sweet Maggie Gordon (vedi), come pubblicato da Pauline Lieder (New York 1880) che aggiunge una strofa da Carrickfergus, con una melodia a tempo di valzer arrangiata per pianoforte diversa da quella attuale
Jesse Ferguson di Cornwall, Ontario,


I
Oh, Peggy Gordon you are my darling,
Come sit you down all on my knee,
And tell to me the very reason
Why I am slighted so by thee.
II
I’m deep in love but I dare not show it,
My heart lies smothered all in my breast,
It’s not for you to let the whole world know it,
A troubled mind that has no rest.
III
I laid my head on a cask of brandy
Which was my fancy I do declare,
For while I’m drinking, I’m always thinking
How I’m to gain that lady fair.
IV
I put my back against an oak tree,
Thinking it was a trusty tree,
But first it bent and then it broke,
And that’s the way my love served me.
V
I wish my love was one red rosy
A-planted down on yonder wall,
And I myself could be a dewdrop
That in her bosom I might fall.
VI
I wish I was in Cupid’s castle
And my true love along with me,
Oh, Peggy Gordon, you are my darling,
Oh, Peggy Gordon, I’d die for thee.
VII
The sea is deep, I cannot wade it,
Neither have I got wings to fly,
But I wish I had some jolly boatman
To ferry over my love and I.
VIII
I will go down to some lonesome valley,
Where no womankind is ever to be found,
Where the pretty little birds do change their voices,
And every moment a different sound.
IX
I wish I was as far as Ingo (1)
Way out across the briny sea,
A-sailing over the deep blue water
Where love nor care never trouble me.
X
I wish I was in Spencervania (2)
Where the marble stones are black as ink,
Where the pretty little girls they do adore me,
I’ll sing no more till I get a drink (3).
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oh Peggy Gordon, mia cara,
vieni a sederti sulle mie ginocchia,
e dimmi il vero motivo
per cui sono così insignificante per te.
II
Sono così tanto innamorato che non posso negarlo, il cuore mi sta stretto in petto, ma non è da te far sapere a tutti che un’anima inquieta non conosce pace.
III
Mi sono attaccato al brandy
posso solo dire che ne avevo voglia,
perché quando bevo penso e desidero sempre che Peggy Gordon sia qui.
IV
Mi sono appoggiato a una quercia
pensando che fosse un albero solido, ma prima si è piegato e poi si è rotto
proprio come il mio amore
V
Vorrei che il mio amore fosse una rosa rossa, piantata ai piedi di quel muro, e io vorrei essere una goccia di rugiada, per cadere nel suo bocciolo
VI
Vorrei essere nel castello di Cupido, con il mio amore
Oh Peggy Gordon mia cara
Oh Peggy Gordon, morirei per te
VII
Ma il mare è vasto, non riesco ad attraversarlo e nemmeno ho ali per volare
vorrei trovare un abile barcaiolo, per traghettare oltre il mio amore e me.
VIII
Vorrei essere in qualche valle solitaria
dove non ci sia traccia  del genere femminile e dove gli uccellini cantano sui rami
in ogni momento una melodia diversa.
IX
Vorrei essere lontano dall’Inghilterra,
oltre il salatissimo mare,
o navigare sull’oceano più profondo
dove affanni e dolori  non possano assillarmi
X
Vorrei essere a Spencervania
dove le pietre di marmo sono nere come inchiostro, e dove le ragazzine mi  adorano
ma non canterò ancora finchè non avrò un altro bicchiere

NOTE
1) forse espressione dialettale “Engle” che sta per “England”
2) forse sta per Pennsylvania
3) strofa aggiunta dal cantante per chiedere al suo pubblico un altro bicchiere

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/peggygordon.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=21179
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=21282