Auld Lang Syne: melodies in search of an author

auld

Leggi in italiano

At New Year’s Eve the most widespread song in Scottish homes is Auld Lang Syne, a song sung all over the world on many occasions.
The song is accompanied by a collective ritual: in a circle we hold each other’s hands during the first verse. Then the arms must be crossed by grasping the hands of the neighbor during the last verse.

The title is composed of three terms in Scottish that mean old, long, since three words to indicate the past time, “the good old days”. This is an old song that Robert Burns says he heard from an elderly singer, Burns also states that the song had been passed down only orally. Here is the correspondence between Burns and the publisher George Thomson (1793): “The following song, an old song, of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manuscript until I took it down from an old man’s singing, is enough to recommend any air”

Similar rhymes and melodies date back to 1500: in particular two, the ballad Auld Kyndnes Foryett -in Bannatyne Manuscript 1568- and the ballad attributed to the court poet Sir Robert Ayton (1570-1638) published in 1711 by James Watson in “Choice Collection of Scots Poems” collection; for the latter some verses are the same that are found in the Burns’ ones.
Should auld Acquaintance be forgot,
a
nd never thought upon,
The Flames of Love extinguished,
And freely past and gone?
I
s thy kind Heart now grown so cold
I
n that Loving Breast of thine,
That thou canst never once reflect
On Old-long-syne?

In 1724 Allan Ramsay wrote in his “A Collection of Songs” the song entitled “Should auld acquaintance be forgot” (perhaps taken from the sixteenth-century ballad Auld Kyndnes Foryett) and the song was then published in Vol 1 of the “Scots Musical Museum” 1787, with the title “Auld Lang Syne” but the verses are light years away from those of Burns!

THE MELODIES 
"O Can Ye Labor Lea" 
"For old long Gine my jo"  
(from Playford in "Original Scotch Tunes" 1700)

Johnson publishes “Auld Lang Syne” from the first version of Burns in the Scots Musical Museum, vol 5, 1796; but Robert Burns sent his writings about this song even to the publisher George Thomson, and in particular his third version. Later, Thomson learns from Stephen Clarke that Johnson already had a copy of Burns’ song and that the melody was always transcribed by Johnson in the version of Ramsay. Burns, so he replies:‘The two songs you saw in Clarke’s are neither of them worth your attention. The words of ‘Auld lang syne are good, but the music is an old air, the rudiments of the modern tune of that name. The other tune you may hear as a common Scots country dance.’ Burns 1794.

So the first melody that Robbie calls “an old air” is that published by Johnson “O Can Ye Labor Lea“, while the second melody “For old long Gine my jo” is the one in Playford.

THE MARK OF A GENIUS

Burns’ merit was to write a couple of verses and to modify and arrange the others. A fragment written by Robert Burns in 1793 is kept at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum (see)

THE MERIT OF THE EDITOR

WhenGeorge Thomson published “Auld Lang Syne” in the “Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs”, 1799 replaced the first melody with the much more popular one in the eighteenth century called “The Miller’s Wedding” (formerly in “Scots Reels”, Bremner 1759) and commonly called ‘Sir Alexander Don’s Strathspey’ because also played by the famous violinist Niel Gow: a typically Scottish dance melody the strathspey!

THE EDITOR MELODY WITH BURNS’ VERSES


George Thomson republished “Auld Lang Syne” in 1817 with a new arrangement by the Czech composer Leopold Kozeluch


Burns had already reused the same melody in two songs: “O can ye labor lea” ( “I fee’d a man at Martinmas”) and “Coming thro ‘the rye.

THE LEGEND ON DAVID RICCIO

Lately on the web (of course only on Italian sites) in the wake of Jesse Blackadder’s novel “The Raven’s Heart”, 2011 they have spread the attribution of the melody to Davide Rizzo (or David Riccio as they called in Scotland ). The journalist and writer Renzo Rossotti (in “Assassinio in Scozia” da “Piemonte magico e misterioso”, Newton Compton Editori, 1994 see) in his “Assassinio in Scozia” reports an italian legend according to which David Riccio is the author of “Auld Lang Syne”, but this is indeed a legend.

Two old friends, meeting after many years of separation, remember the youth and toast to the old days! 

AULD LANG SYNE
Robert Burns 1799 (George Thomson)

Dougie MacLean in Tribute– 1996
Velvety voice, pronounced seductively scottish, guitar background, a delicate arrangement

AULD LANG SYNE Robert Burns in SMM vol 5 1796 (James Johnson)

 Jim Malcolm  in Acquaintance
Velvety voice, pronounced seductively scottish, a splash of notes on the piano, guitar and violin background. The melody is slightly different as the sequence of strophes I, IV, II, III, V and the theme of the Waltz is recorded in the final played by the guitar alone

Paolo Nutini

Eddi Reader


I
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days auld lang syne?
CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear(1),
For days auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup of kindness yet,
For days auld lang syne!
II
We twa hae run about the braes(3)
And pou’d the gowans(4) fine,
But we’ve wander’d monie a weary fit(5),
Sin days auld lang syne.
III
We twa hae paidl’d in the burn
Frae morning sun till dine,
But seas between us braid(6) hae roar’d,
Sin days auld lang syne.
IV
And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp(2)
And surely I’ll be mine,
And we’ll tak a cup o kindness(8) yet,
For days auld lang syne!
V
And there’s a hand my trusty fiere(7),
And gie’s a hand o thine,
And we’ll tak a right guid-willie waught(8),
For days auld lang syne
NOTE
1) or “jo”
2) stowp= vessel, 
3) braes= hills,
4) gowans= daisies,
5) monie a weary fit= many a weary foot,
6) braid= broad
7) fiere= friend,
8) right guid-willie waught= “cup of kindness” good toast, friendly draught, 

 

brindisiPOPULARITY IN THE WORLD

The song has been translated all over the world (in at least forty languages). The popularity of “Auld Lang Syne” derives most probably from its inclusion with the title “Farewell Waltz” in the film “Waterloo bridge” (1940) directed by Mervyn LeRoy, with Vivien Leigh and Robert Taylor. This film was the prototype of the typical Hollywood melodrama.

The famous scene of the waltz.

The Farewell Waltz version was arranged by Cedric Dumont (1916-2007) Swiss composer, author and conductor and it was translated / arranged in Italian by the authors Larici & Mauri in 1943 like danceable. At the time, the Anglo-Saxon melodies were forbidden in Italy by the war censorship, but it was enough to change the title and arrangement and here is “Il valzer delle candele”!

IL VALZER DELLE CANDELE

Tati Casoni 

I
Domani tu mi lascerai
e più non tornerai,
domani tutti i sogni miei
li porterai con te.
II
La fiamma del tuo amor
che sol per me sognai invan
è luce di candela che
già si spegne piano pian.
III
Una parola ancor
e dopo svanirà
un breve istante di
felicità.
IV
Ma come è triste il cuor
se nel pensare a te
ricorda i baci tuoi
che non son più per me.
V
Domani tu mi lascerai
e più non tornerai,
domani tutti i sogni miei
li porterai con te.
VI
La fiamma del tuo amor
che sol per me sognai invan
è luce di candela che
già si spegne piano pian.

Nini Rosso.

The melody has finally become a new song titled “Il Canto dell’Addio” well know by all those who have been scouts, or have spent their summer in the italian colonies, or at the shelters run by priests and the like.

I
È l’ora dell’addio, fratelli,
è l’ora di partir;
e il canto si fa triste; è ver:
partire è un po’ morir.
RITORNELLO
Ma noi ci rivedremo ancor
ci rivedremo un dì
arrivederci allor, fratelli,
arrivederci sì.
II
Formiamo una catena
con le mani nelle man,
stringiamoci l’un l’altro
prima di tornar lontan.
III
Perché lasciarci e non sperar
di rivederci ancor?
Perché lasciarci e non serbar
questa speranza in cuor?
IV
Se attorno a questo fuoco qui,
l’addio ci dobbiam dar;
attorno ad un sol fuoco un dì
sapremo ritornar.
V
Iddio che tutto vede e sa
la speme di ogni cuor;
se un giorno ci ha riuniti qui,
saprà riunirci ancor.
VI
Ma non addio diciamo allor
che ancor ci rivedrem:
arrivederci allor, fratelli,
arrivederci insiem!
VII
Fratello non dolerti se
la fiamma langue già:
doman la stessa fiamma ancor
fra noi risplenderà.

second part

LINK
http://sarahannelawless.com/2009/12/31/happy-hogmanay/ http://www.electricscotland.com/HISTORY/articles/langsyne.htm http://www.electricscotland.com/history/articles/langsyne.htm http://www.robertburns.org/encyclopedia/AuldLangSyne.5.shtml http://www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/ online/AuldLangSyne/default.asp?id=4 http://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/online-exhibitions/auld-lang-syne/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16346 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29124 http://www.kultunderground.org/art/305 http://www.kultunderground.org/art/395 http://www.renzorossotti.it/notetorinesi.htm#menestrello http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erALS.htm

I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig by Robert Burns

ritratto di Robert Burns
Robert Burns – by Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Leggi in italiano

The lea-rig (The Meadow-ridge) is a traditional Scottish song rewritten by Robert Burns in 1792 under the title “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig“.
The term Rigs describes an old cultivation technique that involves working the land in long and narrow strips of raised land (the traditional drainage system of the past): the fields were divided into earthen banks raised, so that the excess water drained further down the deep side furrows. These bumps could reach up to the knee and hand sowing was greatly facilitated: the grass grew in the lea rigs.

THE TUNE

We find the beautiful melody in many eighteenth-century manuscripts, known by various names such as An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber

THE LYRICS

rigsA “romantic” meeting in the summer camps declined in many text versions with a single melody (albeit with many different arrangements) that has known, like so many other Scottish eighteenth-century songs, a notable fame among the musicians of German romanticism and in good living rooms over England, France and Germany.

The oldest text can be found in the manuscript of Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, by anonymous author who starts like this:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

With the title “My Ain Kind Dearie O” it is published later in the Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (see here) on Robert Burns’ dispatch to James Johnson with the note that it was the version originally written by the edinburgh poet Robert Fergusson ( 1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson died only 24 years old in the grip of madness while he was hospitalized in the Edinburgh Asylum because subject to a strong existential depression (and yet there are those who insinuate it was syphilis); he had just enough time to write about eighty poems (published between 1771 and 1773) and was the first poet to use the Scottish dialect as a poetic language; he lived for the most part a bohemian life, sharing the intellectual ferment of Edinburgh in the period known as the Scottish Enlightenment, always in contact with musicians, actors and editors; in 1772 it joined the “Edinburgh Cape Club”, not a Masonic lodge but a club for men only for convivial purposes (in which tables were laid out with tasty dishes and above all large drinks); for Robert Burns he was ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn rewrote the poem in October 1792 for the publisher George Thomson, to be published in the “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in what will be the most commonly known version of The Lea Rig) published with the musical arrangement of Joseph Haydn (who also arranged the traditional My Ain Kind Deary version); and he also wrote a more bawdy version published in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia” (1799) under the title My Ain Kind Deary (page 98) (text here)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

and in the classic version on arrangement by Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
english translation
I
When over the hill the eastern star
Tells the time of milking the ewes is near, my dear,
And oxes from the furrowed field
Return so lethargic and weary O:
Down by the burn where scented birch trees
With dew are hanging clear, my dear, I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
II
At midnight hour, in darkest glen,
I’d rove and never be frightened O, If thro’ that glen I go to thee,
My own kind dear, O:
Altho’ the night were  never so wild,
And I were never so weary O,
I’ll meet thee on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!
III
The hunter loves the morning sun,
To rouse the mountain deer, my dear,
At noon the fisher takes the glen,
down the burn to steer, my dear;
Give me the hour o’ gloamin grey,
It maks my heart so cheary O
on the grassy ridge, My own kind dear, O!

NOTES
1) the morning star
2) milking time is early in the morning
3) or “birken buds”
4) or irie
5) in the copy sent to Thomson Robert Burns wrote “wet” then corrected with wild: a summer night with severe air with lightning in the distance
6) or “I’d”

Compare with the version attributed to the poet Robert Fergusson

SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
english translation
I
Will you go the over the lea rigg,
My own kind dear, O
And cuddle there so kindly
with me, my kind deary-o!
At thorn dry-stone wall and birche tree,
we will make merry, and never be weary-o;
They’ll screen unfriendly eyes from you and me,
My own kind dear, O!
II
No herds, with sheep-dogs there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But larks whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for world’s riches, my sweetheart,
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
with you, my kind deary, O!

NOTES
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen.
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart, my dear

Scottish country dance: “My own kind deary”

The Scottish Country dance entitled “My own kind deary” with music and dance instructions appears in John Walsh’s Caledonian Country Dances (vol I 1735)


for dance explanation see

LINK
http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

The Lea Rig (ti incontrerò tra i campi)

ritratto di Robert Burns
ritratto di Robert Burns – Alexander Nasmyth 1787

Read the post in English

The lea-rig (in inglese The Meadow-ridge) è una canzone tradizionale scozzese riscritta da Robert Burns nel 1792 con il titolo di “I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea Rig”.
Il termine Rigs si traduce in italiano con una desueta parola “porche”, una tecnica colturale che prevede la lavorazione del terreno in lunghe e strette strisce di terra rialzate ovvero il sistema di drenaggio tradizionale di un tempo: i campi si suddividevano in argini di terra rialzati, in modo che l’acqua in eccesso defluisse più in basso nei profondi solchi laterali. Queste cunette potevano arrivare fino al ginocchio  e il lavoro di semina a mano era notevolmente facilitato. Se la lavorazione del terreno era fatta con l’aratro esisteva uno strumento particolare il Mugellese che permetteva di lavorare i solchi tracciati con l’aratro  uno sì uno no, in modo da ricoprire i solchi non rilavorati e formare così porche e solchi di irrigazione. Le porche venivano poi sarchiate quando le piantine avevano raggiunto la dimensione opportuna. Si formavano con questo tipo di lavorazione i corn rigs e i lea rigs ossia le porche di grano e gli argini d’incolto dove cresceva l’erba.

LA MELODIA

Troviamo la bella melodia in molti manoscritti setteceneschi, conosciuta con vari nomi quali An Oidhche A Bha Bhainis Ann, The Caledonian Laddy, I’ll Meet Thee On The Lea-rig, The Lea Rigg, The Lea Rigges, My Ain Kind Dearie, My Ain Kind Deary O

Tony McManusAlasdair Fraser & Jody Stecher in Driven Bow 1988

John Carnie

Julian Lloyd Webber in Unexpected Songs 2006

LE VERSIONI TESTUALI

rigsUn incontro “romantico” nei campi estivi declinato in molte versioni testuali con un’unica melodia (sebbene con molti diversi arrangiamenti) che ha conosciuto, come tante altre canzoni scozzesi settecentesche, una notevole fama tra i musicisti del romanticismo tedesco e nei salotti bene  d’Inghilterra, Francia e Germania.

Il testo più antico si trova nel manoscritto di Thomas D’Urfey, “Wit and Mirth, or Pills to Purge Melancholy” 1698, di autore anonimo che inizia così:
I’ll lay(rowe) thee o’er the lea rig,
My ain kind dearie O.
Although the night were ne’er sae wat,
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll rowe thee o’er the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O;

Con il titolo “My Ain Kind Dearie O” è pubblicata successivamente nello Scots Musical Museum vol I (1787) (vedi qui) su invio di Robert Burns a James Johnson con la nota che si trattava della versione scritta originariamente dal poeta edimburghese Robert Fergusson (1750-74).
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg, my ain kind deary-o! And cuddle there sae kindly wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
220px-Alexander_Runciman_-_Robert_Fergusson,_1750_-_1774__Poet_-_Google_Art_ProjectRobert Fergusson morì a soli 24 anni in preda alla pazzia mentre era ricoverato nel Manicomio di Edimburgo perchè soggetto a una forte depressione esistenziale (e tuttavia c’è chi insinua si sia trattato di sifilide); fece in tempo a scrivere appena un’ottantina di poesie (pubblicate tra il 1771 e il 1773) e fu il primo poeta a usate il dialetto scozzese come lingua poetica; visse per lo più una vita da bohemien, condividendo il  fermento intellettuale di Edimburgo nel periodo conosciuto come l’Illuminismo scozzese, sempre a contatto con musicisti, attori ed editori; nel 1772 aderì alla loggia “Edinburgh Cape Club”, non proprio una loggia massonica ma un club per soli uomini per scopi conviviali (in cui si imbandivano tavolate con gustose pietanze e soprattutto grandi bevute); per Robert Burns fu ‘my elder brother in Misfortune, By far my elder brother in the muse’.

Burn riscrisse la poesia nell’ottobre del 1792 per l’editore George Thomson, affinchè fosse pubblicata nel “Selected Collection of Original Scottish Air” (in quella che sarà la versione più comunemente detta The Lea Rig) pubblicata con l’arrangiamento musicale di Joseph Haydn (il quale arrangiò anche la versione tradizionale My Ain Kind Deary); e scrisse anche una versione più bawdy pubblicata nel “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“(1799) con il titolo My Ain Kind Deary (pag 98) (testo qui)
I’ll lay thee o’er the lea rig, Lovely Mary, deary O

Andy M. Stewart 1991, live

Roddy Woomble

Paul McKenna Band

e nella versione classica su arrangiamento di Joseph Haydn
ASCOLTA Jamie MacDougall & Haydn Eisenstadt Trio JHW. XXXII/5 no. 372, Hob. XXXIa no. 31ter

Robert Burns
I
When o’er the hill the eastern star(1)
Tells bughtin time(2) is near, my jo,
And owsen frae the furrow’d field
Return sae dowf and weary, O,
Down by the burn, where scented birks(3)
Wi’ dew are hangin clear, my jo,
I’ll meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
II
At midnight hour in mirkest glen
I’d rove, and ne’er be eerie(4), O,
If thro’ that glen I gaed to thee,
My ain kind dearie, O!
Altho’ the night were ne’er sae wild(5),
And I were ne’er sae weary, O,
I’ll(6) meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
III
The hunter lo’es the morning sun
To rouse the mountain deer, my jo;
At noon the fisher takes the glen
Adown the burn to steer, my jo:
Gie me the hour o’ gloamin grey –
It maks my heart sae cheery, O,
To meet thee on the lea-rig,
My ain kind dearie, O.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Quando sulla collina la stella dell’est(1)
dice che l’ora (2) di mungere le pecore è vicina, mia cara
e i buoi dal campo arato
ritornano così svogliati e stanchi;
giù al ruscello dove le betulle (3)
profumate di rugiada pendono bianche, mia cara,
ti incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
II
A mezzanotte, nella valle più tenebrosa
vagavo senza mai avere paura (4)
perchè per quella valle andavo da te
mia cara amata;
anche se la notte fosse sì tempestosa (5) e io sì tanto stanco
t’incontrerò tra gli argini erbosi
mia cara amata
III
Il cacciatore ama il sole del mattino
che risveglia il cervo della montagna, mia cara;
a mezzogiorno il pescatore cerca la valle e verso ruscello si dirige, mia cara
dammi l’ora del grigio crepuscolo
che fa diventare il mio cuore così allegro, per incontrarti tra gli argini erbosi, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) è la stella del mattino
2) bughtin-time = the time of milking the ewes; il tempo della mungitura è di prima mattina (una bella descrizione qui)
3) in altre versioni “birken buds” in effetti la frase ha più senso essendo Down by the burn, where birken buds
Wi’ dew are hangin clear = giù al ruscello dove le gemme rugiadose delle betulle pendono bianche

4) scritto anche come irie
5) nella copia mandata a Thomson Robert scrisse “wet” poi corretta con wild: una notte estiva  dall’aria grave con lampi in lontananza
6) ma anche “I’d”

Si confronti con la versione attribuita al poeta Robert Fergusson

anonimo in SMM 1787
I
‘Will ye gang o’er the leerigg(1),
my ain kind deary-o!
And cuddle there sae kindly
wi’ me, my kind deary-o!
At thornie dike(2), and birken tree,
we’ll daff(3), and ne’er be weary-o;
They’ll scug(4) ill een(5) frae you and me,
mine ain kind deary o!’
II
Nae herds, wi’ kent(6) or colly(7) there,
shall ever come to fear ye, O!
But lav’rocks(8), whistling in the air,
shall woo, like me, their deary, O!
While others herd their lambs and ewes,
and toil for warld’s gear(9), my jo(10),
Upon the lee my pleasure grows,
wi’ you, my kind deary, O!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Verrai tra gli argini erbosi (1)
mia cara amata
per stare abbracciati là con tenerezza
con me, mia cara amata.
Accanto alla siepe (2) e alla betulla
saremo felici (3) e non ci stancheremo mai;
ci schermeranno (4)dagli sguardi malevoli (5) mia cara amata
II
Nessun gregge con bastone da pastore o cani lì, mai verrà a spaventarti
ma le allodole (8) che cantano nel cielo
e corteggiano come me , il loro amore.
Mentre gli altri conducono gli agnelli e le pecore
e si affaticano per le ricchezze (9) terrene mia cara (10),
nei campi cresce il mio divertimento
con te, mia cara amata

NOTE
1) lea rigg = grassy ridge
2) thornie-dike= a thorn-fenced dike along the stream below the ridge
3) Daff = Make merry
4) ‘Scug’ is to shelter or take refuge. It can also refer to crouching or stooping to avoid being seen. (come si dice in italiano “infrattarsi”)
5) Een = evil eyes
6) Kent = sheperd’s crook
7) Colly = Schottisch sheep-dog
8) Lav’rocks =larks
9) Gear = riches, goods of any kind
10) Jo = sweetheart

LA DANZA: “My own kind deary”

La Scottish Country dance dal titolo “My own kind deary”con tanto di musica e istruzioni per la danza compare in Caledonian Country Dances di John Walsh (vol I 1735)
VIDEO
Le istruzioni qui

FONTI
The Forest Minstrel, James Hogg (1810) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.tunearch.org/wiki/Lea_Rig_(The) http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/497.htm http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-i,-song-049,-page-50-my-ain-kind-deary-o.aspx http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/songs/14MyAinKindDearieO.jpg http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/robertburns/works/my_ain_kind_dearie/ http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/ The_Poetical_Works_of_Robert_Fergusson_With_Biographical_1000304352/187 https://thesession.org/tunes/13977 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=3380 http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=90757
http://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/w/103940/Franz-Joseph-Haydn-The-lea-rig

Auld Lang Syne: melodie in cerca d’autore

auld

Read the post in English

A Capodanno il canto più diffuso nelle case scozzesi è Auld Lang Syne, una canzone cantata in tutto il mondo nelle più svariate occasioni.
La canzone è accompagnata da un rituale collettivo: in cerchio ci si tiene per mano durante il primo verso. Poi le braccia vanno incrociate afferrando le mani del vicino durante l’ultimo verso

Il titolo è composto da tre termini in scozzese che significano old, long, since tre parole per indicare il tempo passato, e che si traducono in inglese come “the good old days“, in italiano “i bei tempi andati” (Addio bei tempi passati..). Si tratta di una vecchia canzone che Robert Burns dice di aver ascoltato da un anziano cantore, Burns dichiara inoltre che la canzone era stata tramandata solo oralmente in ambito popolare. Ecco il carteggio tra Burns e l’editore George Thomson (1793 ): la canzone che segue, una vecchia canzone, dei vecchi tempi, e che non è mai stata stampata e nemmeno manoscritta finchè la presi da un vecchio cantore, è sufficiente da raccomandare ogni melodia.

In realtà rime e melodie simili si fanno risalire al 1500: in particolare due, la ballata Auld Kyndnes Foryett -nel Bannatyne Manuscript 1568- e la ballata attribuita al poeta di corte Sir Robert Ayton (1570-1638) pubblicata nel 1711 da James Watson nella raccolta “Choice Collection of Scots Poems“; per quest’ultima alcuni versi sono gli stessi che si ritrovano nella stesura di Burns.
Should auld Acquaintance be forgot,
a
nd never thought upon,
The Flames of Love extinguished,
And freely past and gone?
I
s thy kind Heart now grown so cold
I
n that Loving Breast of thine,
That thou canst never once reflect
On Old-long-syne?

Nel 1724 Allan Ramsay ha scritto nel suo “A Collection of Songs” il brano dal titolo “Should auld acquaintance be forgot” (forse tratto dalla ballata cinquecentesca Auld Kyndnes Foryett) e la canzone venne poi pubblicata nel Vol 1 dello “Scots Musical Museum” 1787, con il titolo “Auld Lang Syne” ma i versi sono lontani anni luce da quelli di Burns!]

 [LE MELODIE]
"O Can Ye Labor Lea" 
"For old long Gine my jo"  
(da Playford in "Original Scotch Tunes" 1700)

Johnson pubblica “Auld Lang Syne” dalla prima versione di Burns nel Scots Musical Museum, vol 5, 1796; ma Robert Burns inviò i suoi scritti in merito a questa canzone anche all’editore George Thomson e in particolare la sua terza versione. Più tardi Thomson viene a sapere da Stephen Clarke che Johnson aveva già una copia della canzone di Burns e che la melodia era trascritta sempre da Johnson nella versione di Ramsay. Burns, così gli risponde: “Le due canzoni che hai visto da Clarke non sono degne d’attenzione. Le parole di ‘Auld lang syne sono buone, ma la musica è un’aria vecchia, i rudimenti della melodia moderna con quel nome. L’altra melodia sembra una comune danza scozzese. “Burns 1794.]

Quindi la prima melodia che Robbie definisce “an old air” è quella pubblicata da Johnson “O Can Ye Labor Lea”, mentre la seconda melodia è “For old long Gine my jo” è quella in Playford.

[L’IMPRONTA DEL GENIO]
Il merito di Burns fu quello di scrivere un paio di strofe e di modificare e arrangiare le altre, se non proprio di aver riscritto il testo in modo integrale. Un frammento scritto da Robert Burns nel 1793 è conservato presso il Robert Burns Birthplace Museum (vedi)

[IL MERITO DELL’EDITORE]

George Thomson quando pubblicò “Auld Lang Syne” nel “Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs”, 1799 sostituì la prima melodia con quella molto più popolare nel Settecento chiamata “The Miller’s Wedding” (già in “Scots Reels”, Bremner 1759) e comunemente chiamata ‘Sir Alexander Don’s Strathspey’ perchè interpretata anche dal famoso violinista Niel Gow: una melodia da danza tipicamente scozzese la strathspey!
[LA MELODIA DELL’EDITORE CON I VERSI DEL BARDO]

George Thomson ripubblicò “Auld Lang Syne” nel 1817 con un nuovo arrangiamento a cura del compositore ceco Leopold Kozeluch


Burns del resto aveva già riutilizzato la stessa melodia in due canzoni: “O can ye labour lea” (la versione ripulita è diventata “I fee’d a man at Martinmas”) e “Coming thro’ the rye.

LA LEGGENDA SU DAVID RICCIO

Ultimamente in rete (ovviamente solo nei siti italiani) sulla scia del romanzo di Jesse Blackadder “The Raven’s Heart” , 2011 si è diffusa l’attribuzione della melodia a Davide Rizzo (o David Riccio come lo chiamavano in Scozia). Il giornalista e scrittore Renzo Rossotti (in “Assassinio in Scozia” da “Piemonte magico e misterioso”, Newton Compton Editori, 1994 vedi) nel suo “Assassinio in Scozia” riporta una leggenda torinese secondo cui Davide Rizzio sarebbe l’autore di Auld Lang Syne, ma si tratta appunto di una leggenda.

Due vecchi amici incontrandosi dopo molti anni di separazione, ricordano la gioventù e brindano ai tempi andati!

AULD LANG SYNE
Robert Burns 1799 (George Thomson)

Dougie MacLean in Tribute– 1996
[Voce vellutata, pronuncia seducentemente scozzese, sottofondo di chitarra, un delicato arrangiamento]

AULD LANG SYNE Robert Burns in SMM vol 5 1796 (James Johnson)

 Jim Malcolm  in Acquaintance
[Voce vellutata, pronuncia seducentemente scozzese, una spruzzata di note al piano, sottofondo di chitarra e violino. La melodia è leggermente diversa come la sequenza delle strofe I, IV, II, III, V e il tema del Valzer è ripreso nel finale suonato dalla sola chitarra]

Paolo Nutini

Eddi Reader


I
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days auld lang syne?
CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear(1),
For days auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup of kindness yet,
For days auld lang syne!
II
We twa hae run about the braes(3)
And pou’d the gowans(4) fine,
But we’ve wander’d monie a weary fit(5),
Sin days auld lang syne.
III
We twa hae paidl’d in the burn
Frae morning sun till dine,
But seas between us braid(6) hae roar’d,
Sin days auld lang syne.
IV
And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp(2)
And surely I’ll be mine,
And we’ll tak a cup o kindness(8) yet,
For days auld lang syne!
V
And there’s a hand my trusty fiere(7),
And gie’s a hand o thine,
And we’ll tak a right guid-willie waught(8),
For days auld lang syne
traduzione italiano (tratta da vedi)
I
Credi davvero che i vecchi amici
si debbano dimenticare e mai ricordare?
Credi davvero che i giorni trascorsi insieme
si debbano dimenticare?
Ritornello:
Perchè i giorni sono ormai trascorsi,
amico mio, perchè i giorni sono andati,
faremo un brindisi per ricordare con affetto
i giorni ormai trascorsi!
II
Noi due abbiamo corso per le colline
e strappato margherite selvatiche
ma ora siamo lontani l’uno dall’altro
perchè i giorni sono ormai trascorsi
III
Noi due abbiamo navigato nel fiume
da mattina a sera
ma ora vasti oceani si frappongono tra noi,
perchè i giorni sono ormai trascorsi
IV
Tu puoi pagare il tuo boccale di birra
e io pagherò il mio,
faremo un brindisi per ricordare con affetto
i giorni ormai trascorsi
V
Perciò prendi la mia mano, amico mio fidato, e dammi la tua
faremo un brindisi pieno d’affetto insieme,
in ricordo di quei giorni trascorsi

NOTE
1) nella seconda versione di Burns era “jo” (=amico)
2) stowp= vessel, boccale
3) braes= hills, colline
4) gowans= daisies, margherite
5) monie a weary fit= many a weary foot, molti passi stanchi
6) braid= ampio, vasto
7) fiere= friend, amico
8) right guid-willie waught= “cup of kindness” good toast, friendly draught, brindisi

VECCHI TEMPI ANDATI
Questa traduzione poetica, raccolta da un programma di Raiuno da Bartolomeo Di Monaco, da qui rende omaggio alla commovente espressività del testo scozzese! La sequenza delle strofe è quella riportata da George Thomson

  I
 Si dovrebbero dimenticare le vecchie
 amicizie e non ricordarle più?
 Si dovrebbero dimenticare le vecchie
 amicizie e i giorni lontani e passati?
 Per i vecchi tempi, amico mio,
 per i vecchi tempi
 berremo una coppa di tenerezza,
 ancora per i vecchi tempi.
  II
 Noi due abbiamo corso sui sereni
 pendii e raccolto bei fiori,
 ma abbiamo camminato stancamente
 molte volte da quei tempi lontani.
  V
 Abbiamo camminato a piedi nudi sulle
 rive dal sole del mattino fino alla sera,
 ma ora gli oceani hanno ruggito
 da quei vecchi giorni lontani.
  IV
 Eccoti la mano, mio fedele amico
 e tu dammi la tua
 e faremo un'abbondante bevuta
 ancora per i vecchi tempi.
  III
 E sarò per te come un sorso
 di birra, e tu lo sarai per me.
 E berremo una tazza di tenerezza,
 ancora per i vecchi tempi andati.
 Per i vecchi tempi, amico mio,
 per i vecchi tempi
 berremo una coppa di tenerezza,
 ancora per i vecchi tempi.
 brindisi

LA POPOLARITA’ NEL MONDO

La canzone è stata tradotta in tutto il mondo (in almeno una quarantina di lingue). La popolarità di “Auld Lang Syne” deriva molto probabilmente dal suo inserimento nel film “Waterloo bridge” (in italiano “Il ponte di Waterloo”) del 1940 diretto da Mervyn LeRoy, con Vivien Leigh e Robert Taylor con il titolo di Farewell Waltz Il film è stato il prototipo del tipico melodramma hollywoodiano con la famosa scena del valzer.

La versione Farewell Waltz è stata arrangiata da Cedric Dumont (1916-2007) compositore -autore svizzero e direttore d’orchestra e tradotta/arrangiata in italiano dagli autori Larici&Mauri nel 1943 (che riprendono il tema della scena del film con la separazione dei due amanti) come ballabile. All’epoca le melodie anglo-sassoni erano vietate dalla censura di guerra ma bastava cambiare titolo e arrangiamento ed ecco che nasce “Il valzer delle candele”!

IL VALZER DELLE CANDELE

Tati Casoni 

I
Domani tu mi lascerai
e più non tornerai,
domani tutti i sogni miei
li porterai con te.
II
La fiamma del tuo amor
che sol per me sognai invan
è luce di candela che
già si spegne piano pian.
III
Una parola ancor
e dopo svanirà
un breve istante di
felicità.
IV
Ma come è triste il cuor
se nel pensare a te
ricorda i baci tuoi
che non son più per me.
V
Domani tu mi lascerai
e più non tornerai,
domani tutti i sogni miei
li porterai con te.
VI
La fiamma del tuo amor
che sol per me sognai invan
è luce di candela che
già si spegne piano pian.

Nini Rosso.

La melodia infine è diventata una nuova canzone con il testo “Il Canto dell’Addio” che ben conoscono tutti coloro che sono stati scout, o hanno trascorso la loro estate nelle colonie, o presso i rifugi gestiti da sacerdoti e affini (sob!).

I
È l’ora dell’addio, fratelli,
è l’ora di partir;
e il canto si fa triste; è ver:
partire è un po’ morir.
RITORNELLO
Ma noi ci rivedremo ancor
ci rivedremo un dì
arrivederci allor, fratelli,
arrivederci sì.
II
Formiamo una catena
con le mani nelle man,
stringiamoci l’un l’altro
prima di tornar lontan.
III
Perché lasciarci e non sperar
di rivederci ancor?
Perché lasciarci e non serbar
questa speranza in cuor?
IV
Se attorno a questo fuoco qui,
l’addio ci dobbiam dar;
attorno ad un sol fuoco un dì
sapremo ritornar.
V
Iddio che tutto vede e sa
la speme di ogni cuor;
se un giorno ci ha riuniti qui,
saprà riunirci ancor.
VI
Ma non addio diciamo allor
che ancor ci rivedrem:
arrivederci allor, fratelli,
arrivederci insiem!
VII
Fratello non dolerti se
la fiamma langue già:
doman la stessa fiamma ancor
fra noi risplenderà.

seconda parte

LINK
http://sarahannelawless.com/2009/12/31/happy-hogmanay/ http://www.electricscotland.com/HISTORY/articles/langsyne.htm http://www.electricscotland.com/history/articles/langsyne.htm http://www.robertburns.org/encyclopedia/AuldLangSyne.5.shtml http://www.themorgan.org/exhibitions/ online/AuldLangSyne/default.asp?id=4 http://burnsc21.glasgow.ac.uk/online-exhibitions/auld-lang-syne/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16346 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29124 http://www.kultunderground.org/art/305 http://www.kultunderground.org/art/395 http://www.renzorossotti.it/notetorinesi.htm#menestrello http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erALS.htm

TAE THE WEAVER’S GIN YE GO

Una vecchia canzone scozzese trascritta da Robert Burns in modo integrare per la parte del ritornello, mentre le strofe sono di sua invenzione fu pubblicata nello ‘Scots Musical Museum’ Vol II stampato del 1788 da James Johnson, la più importante collezione di canzoni scozzesi del XVIII e XIX secolo.

Purtroppo non ho trovato altre informazioni in merito tranne una “Weavers’ march” (anche Morris dance) che però non ha attinenza con la melodia di questo brano (vedi)
Non possiamo che prendere atto della sfrenata fantasia di Robbie che ci riporta ancora una volta un quadro della Vecchia Scozia, quando gli uomini tessevano, perché ci voleva una buona massa muscolare per maneggiare i grossi (e pesanti) telai!

prentices

La storia è gustosamente piccante e allusiva: una ragazza di campagna (mandata dalla madre) porta la lana dal tessitore artigiano di Calton per farne una coperta (proprietario di un telaio pre-rivoluzione industriale: erano proprio quelli gli anni della grande trasformazione e cominciavano a comparire le prime fabbriche tessili in Scozia vedi Calton weaver);  lei è al filarello (a filare la lana) e lui al telaio ma alla fine del lavoro lei è in dolce attesa; da qui l’avvertimento del ritornello di non andare a tessere di notte!

ASCOLTA The Tannahill Weavers con the Blackberry Bush reel in The Tannahill Weavers 1979 (traccia 3) strofe I, III, IV, V e VI. – Per il reel vedi

ASCOLTA The McCalmans
ASCOLTA Andy M. Stewart & Manus Lunny


VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS 1788
I
My heart was ance as blithe and free
As simmer days were lang;
But a bonie, westlin weaver lad
Has gart me change my sang.
Chorus.
Tae the weaver’s gin ye go, fair maids(1),
Tae the weaver’s gin ye go;
I rede you right, gang ne’er at night,
Tae the weaver’s gin ye go.
II
My mither sent me to the town,
To warp a plaiden wab(2);
But the weary, weary warpin o’t
Has gart me sigh and sab.
III
A bonie, westlin weaver lad
Sat working at his loom;
He took my heart as wi’ a net,
In every knot and thrum.
IV
I sat beside my warpin-wheel(3),
And aye I ca’d it roun’;
But every shot and evey knock,
My heart it gae a stoun.
V
The moon was sinking in the west,
Wi’ visage pale and wan,
As my bonie, westlin weaver lad
Convoy’d me thro’ the glen.
VI
But what was said, or what was done,
Shame fa’ me gin I tell;
But Oh! I fear the kintra soon
Will ken as weel’s myself!

Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
Il mio cuore una volta era così spensierato e libero, mentre i giorni estivi erano lunghi: ma un affascinante ragazzo tessitore dell’Ovest mi ha fatto cambiare canzone
Se andate dal tessitore belle ragazze,
se andate dal tessitore
vi ammonisco in verità, non andateci di notte, se andate dal tessitore
II
Mia madre mi mandò in città
per tessere una coperta di lana grezza
ma il lavoro faticoso
mi ha fatto sospirare e piangere.
III
Un affascinante tessitore dell’Ovest era al lavoro al suo telaio;
mi ha preso il cuore come in una rete,
in ogni nodo e frangia.
IV
Sedevo dietro al filatoio a ruota
e sempre lo facevo girare;
e a ogni tiro e a ogni colpo,
il mio cuore mi faceva male
V
La luna tramontava ad Ovest
con il volto pallido ed esangue,
mentre il mio affascinante tessitore dell’Ovest, mi scortava verso la valle.
VI
Che cosa fu detto e che cosa fu fatto,
vergogna su di me se lo dicessi;
ma ahimè temo che presto tutti
lo sapranno meglio di me!

NOTE
* per la versione inglese qui
1) I Tannies dicono “my lass”
2) wab=web: homespun tweeled woolen
3) warpin-wheel e spinnig-wheel non sono però lo stesso attrezzo, qui è chiaramente descritto l’uso di un filatoio a ruota infatti nel verso successivo dice “a ogni tiro e a ogni colpo”, il tiro è riferito alla quantità di fibra tirata via dalla conocchia: si tiene il fascio di fibra con una mano (la mano che lavora la fibra), mentre con l’altra si tiene il filo di avvio e la fibra (la mano che tira). Il meccanismo viene azionato con il piede sul pedale (il colpo) che imprime la velocità della lavorazione facendo torcere la fibra, la ruota prende la fibra e contemporanemente se ne tira dell’altra

FONTI

http://www.burnsscotland.com/items/v/volume-ii,-song-103,-page-106-to-the-weavers-gin-ye-go.aspx
http://www.cobbler.plus.com/wbc/poems/translations/597.htm
http://www.tannahillweavers.com/lyrics/103lyr3.htm

http://abchobby.it/hobby-creativi/filatura-tintura/112-arcolaio-filatoio-ad-alette.html

Ca’ the Yowes to the Knows

“Ca ‘the Yowes to the Knows’ (“Drive the ewes to the hills”) is a pastoral love song transcribed by Robert Burns in 1789. A tune “touched by fairies” enveloping and hypnotic, with a sound that drops slowly and then vibrate under the moonlight.
“Ca ‘the Yowes to the Knows” (Porta le pecore sulle colline) è una canzone bucolica trascritta da Robert Burns nel 1789. Tra le melodie celtiche “toccata dalle fate” avvolgente e ipnotica, con la voce che scende goccia a goccia e poi vibra sotto la luce della luna.

There are actually two versions of this song (on the same tune)
Del brano si hanno in realtà due versioni (con la stessa melodia)

Drouthy Neebors in Battle Tunes and Ballads, 2018 

FIRST ROBERT BURNS VERSION

The version coming from the popular tradition was attributed to Mrs. Isobel “Tibbie” Pagan (c. 1741-1821), an eccentric character of Muirkirk (East Ayrshire, south-west Scotland) who sold smuggled whiskey in her cottage converted into a brewery, a place frequented by locals, but also by elegant gentlemen who went hunting in the area. She was a singer with a beautiful voice, who also composed her songs and poems published in “A collection of Poems and Songs” – Glasgow, 1805
La versione proveniente dalla tradizione popolare è stata attribuita alla signora Isobel “Tibbie” Pagan (c. 1741-1821), un personaggio eccentrico di Muirkirk (East Ayrshire, sud-ovest Scozia) che vendeva whisky di contrabbando nel suo cottage trasformato in una birreria, un luogo frequentato dalla gente del posto, ma anche dai signorotti eleganti che andavano a caccia nella zona. Era una cantante dalla bella voce, che compose anche sue canzoni e poesie pubblicate in “A collection of Poems and Songs” – Glasgow, 1805

As reported by Burns himself, he listened to the song sung by the Reverend John Clun(z)ie to Mcrkinchde and he refers to ‘Ca’ the Ewes to the Knows’ as ‘a beautiful song’ in ‘the old scotch taste, yet I do not know that ever air or words were in print before.’ In a first version Burns transcribed that song modifying some parts and adding the last stanza.
A quanto riferito dallo stesso Burns egli ascoltò la canzone cantata dal reverendo John Clun(z)ie a Mcrkinchde definendola semplicemente come “una bellissima canzone su di una vecchia aria scozzese, tuttavia non so se la melodia e le parole siano mai stati dati alle stampe prima“. Nella prima versione Burns la trascrisse modificando alcune parti e aggiungendo l’ultima strofa.

The first version of this song was sent by Robert Burns to James Johnson to be included in the “Scots Musical Museum”, the singer is a shepherdess who meets her love (also a shepherd), among the heather hills: they swear eternal love with a courtship song.
La prima versione della canzone fu inviata da Robert Burns all’editore James Johnson per essere inserita nello “Scots Musical Museum“; chi canta è una pastorella che incontra il suo amore (anche lui pastore), tra le colline d’erica: si giurano amore eterno con un canto di corteggiamento!

The Corries, live

Sileas in “Beating Harps” 1987
the Scottish duo of harp and voice, with very few touches, creates a dreamy atmosphere; the melody of the harp caresses the voice and the delicate counter-voice  in the resumption of the refrain expands like an echo.
il duo scozzese di arpa e voce, con pochissimi tocchi crea un’atmosfera sognante; la melodia dell’arpa accarezza la voce e il delicato controcanto della seconda voce nella ripresa del ritornello si espande come un eco.

ROBERT BURNS SMM 1790*
Chorus
“Ca’
the yowes tae the knowes
Ca’ them whare the heather grows
Ca’ them whare the burnie rows
My bonie dearie”
I (1)
As I gaed doon the water-side
There I met my shepherd lad
He row’d me sweetly in his plaid
And he ca’d me his dearie
II
Will ye gae doon the water-side
And see the waves sae sweetly glide
Beneath the hazels spreading wide
The moon it shines fu’ clearly
III
I was bred up at nae sic school
My shepherd-lad, to play the fool
And a’ the day to sit in dool
and naebody to see me
IV
Ye sall get gowns and ribbons meet
Cauf-leather shoon upon your feet
And in my arms ye’se lie and sleep
And ye sall be my dearie
V
If ye’ll but stand to what ye’ve said
I’ll gyang wi’ you, my shepherd lad
And ye maun rowe me in your plaid (1)
And I sall be your dearie
VI 
While waters wimple to the sea, 
While day blinks in the lift sae hie, 
Till clay-cauld death sall blin’ my e’e (2), 
Ye sall be my dearie
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Coro
“Porta le pecore sulle colline
portale dove cresce l’erica
portale dove il torrente scorre
amor mio bello”
I LEI
Appena scendevo per il rivo
lì incontravo il mio pastorello
mi avvolgeva con tenerezza nel mantello,
e mi chiamava “amore mio”
II LUI
“Scenderai per il rivo
a guardare l’acqua che scorre piano
tra il boschetto di noccioli,
la luna brilla così luminosa”
III LEI 
“Sono cresciuta senza essere andata a scuola, mio pastorello, che mi prendi in giro,
e tutto il giorno sono triste
e nessuno mi vede”
IV LUI
“Tu metterai vestiti guarniti su misura,
scarpe di vitello ai piedi
e tra le mie braccia starai a riposare
e sarai il mio amore”
V LEI
“Se manterrai la tua promessa
verrò con te mio pastorello
e tu mi avvolgerai nel tuo mantello
e io sarò il tuo amore”
VI LUI
“Finchè le acque scorrono verso il mare,
Finchè il giorno risplende alto nel cielo
prima che la fredda terra mi chiuderà gli occhi
tu sarai il mio amore”

NOTE
* english translation here
1) Woman was under the mantle of man, that is under his protection, in the ritual of medieval marriage the groom’s cloak was supported on the shoulders of the bride to witness this dominion, but also the commitment of the man to take care of the woman
un tempo la donna stava sotto il mantello dell’uomo ovvero sotto la sua protezione, nel rituale del matrimonio medievale si appoggiava il mantello dello sposo sulle spalle della sposa per testimoniare questo dominio, ma anche impegno da parte dell’uomo di farsi carico della donna
2) it looks like a handfasting  ritual with relative marriage vows
sembra un rituale da handfasting con relative promesse matrimoniali

SECOND ROBERT BURNS VERSION

ritratto di Robert BurnsA few years later Robert Burns rewrote it, and sent it to Thomson: only the first stanza remained the same. Now the protagonist is the poet himself hopelessly in love with his beautiful shepherdess, the description of the surrounding landscape becomes predominant, nocturnal and supernatural, so that all poetry is more in tune with the melody itself.
Qualche anno dopo Robert Burns ne fece una revisione e riscrittura che inviò a Thomson: solo la prima strofa rimase uguale. Adesso il protagonista è il poeta stesso perdutamente innamorato della sua bella pastorella, la descrizione del paesaggio circostante diventa predominante, notturna e soprannaturale, di modo che tutta la poesia e più in sintonia con la melodia stessa.

William Strang

Tannahill Weavers! in Are ye sleeping Maggie 1976 (I, II, III, V, VI)
masterly interpretation; a fairy-tale-like chant with the notes of the flute that accentuate the nocturnal character of the vision, (flute and violin duet of the final is almost baroque)
magistrale interpretazione; un’atmosfera fatata, cantilenata e le note del flauto traverso nello strumentale accentuano il carattere notturno della visione, e poi semplicemente sublime il duetto flauto e violino del finale, quasi barocco

Andy M. Stewart in Songs of Robert Burns 1991

Dougie McLean in Tribute 1996
velvety voice, seductively Scottish pronunciation, equally unforgettable interpretation; the instrumental theme is anticipated by the guitar and punctuated by the piano; after having sung the first three strophes Dougie lets the notes of the piano flow and entrusts the song to the harmonica, and what expressiveness in that breath !! Then he starts again to sing, only the last verse, with the repetition of the first stanza and, as a romantic seal, again the duet between piano and harmonica.
voce vellutata, pronuncia seducentemente scozzese, altrettanto indimenticabile interpretazione; il tema strumentale è anticipato dalla chitarra e punteggiato dal pianoforte; dopo aver cantato le prime tre strofe Dougie lascia scorrere le note di pianoforte e affida il canto all’armonica, e che espressività in quel soffio!! Riprende a cantare poi, solo l’ultima strofa, con la ripetizione della prima e, a romantico suggello, ancora il duetto tra piano e armonica.

Ian Bruce in The Complete Songs of Robert Burns Volume 3, 1997

Maz O’Connor in ‘Upon a Stranger Shore’ 2012
I and VI stanzas are as Burns version but then she segues into Over Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie [Le strofe I e VI sono come la versione di Burns, ma poi continua con Over Yon Hill There Lives a Lassie]

ROBERT BURNS Thomson’s Collection, 1794 *
I
Ca’ the yowes to the knowes,
Ca’ them where the heather grows,
Ca’ them where the burnie rowes,
My bonie dearie.
II
Hark, the mavis e’ening sang
Sounding Clouden’s woods amang
Then a-faulding let us gang.
My bonie dearie.
III
We’ll gae down by Clouden side,
Thro the hazels, spreading wide
O’er the waves that sweetly glide
To the moon sae clearly.
IV
Yonder Clouden’s silent towers
Where, at moonshine’s midnight hours,
O’er the dewy bending flowers
Fairies dance sae cheery.
V
Ghaist nor bogle shalt thou fear
Thou’rt to Love and Heav’n sae dear
Nocht of ill may come thee near,
My bonie dearie.
VI
Fair and lovely as thou art,
Thou hast stown my very heart;
I can die – but canna part,
My bonie dearie.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Porta le pecore sulle colline
portale dove cresce l’erica
portale dove il torrente scorre
amore mio bello.
II
Ascolta il verso serale dell’usignolo
tra i boschi del Clouden(1) canterino
poi portaci all’ovile
amore mio bello
III
Scenderemo alla riva del Clouden
tra il boschetto di noccioli
accanto alle acque che scorrono piano
sotto la luna così luminosa
IV
Alle torri ruinose (2) del Clouden laggiù
dove, alla luna di mezzanotte
sopra i rugiadosi fiori dormienti
le fate danzano allegramente
V
Fantasmi e demoni non ti faranno paura,
tu che sei all’Amore e al Cielo così cara,
nessun male può venirti vicino,
mio amore bello.
VI
Dolce e bella sei tu
tu che hai rubato il cuore mio
potessi morire se ti lascio,
amore mio bello.

NOTE
english translation  here
1) Clouden is a tributary of the Nith River [Clouden è un affluente del fiume Nith]
2) the ruins of Lincluden Abbey, still a destination for visitors today, a hidden gem in the Border, one of Scotland’s best Gothic architecture [le rovine di Lincluden Abbey, ancora oggi meta di visitatori, una gemma nascosta nel Border, una delle migliori architetture gotiche della Scozia]

ca-yowes
William Forrest (1805-1889) “The Land of Burns, a Series of Landscapes and Portraits” (Glasgow 1840), the ruins of Lincluden Abbey, Dumfriesshire

The Yowe Lamb / Lovely Molly

A third version is to considered apart, perhaps the original one sung by Mrs. Isobel “Tibbie” Pagan. According to Robert B. Waltz in the Traditional Ballad Index, The Yowe Lamb or Lovely Molly “is apparently the original of the Burns song Ca’ the Ewes to the Knowes, but he changed it so substantially that they must be considered separate songs, and the reader must be careful to distinguish.
Una terza versione è da considerare a parte, forse la versione originale cantata da Tibbie Pagan. Secondo Robert B. Waltz in Traditional Ballad Index, The Yowe Lamb o Lovely Molly “sembra essere l’originale della canzone di Burns Ca ‘the Ewes to the Knowes, ma è cambiata in modo così sostanziale che devono essere considerati brani separati, e il lettore deve fare attenzione a distinguere.
Lyrics from Robert Ford’s ‘Vagabond Songs and Ballads of Scotland’ (1899) 
La versione è raccolta in “Vagabond songs and Ballads of Scotland” (1899) di Robert Ford

Gillian Frame in Pendulum 2016


I
As Molly was milking her yowes on a day,
Oh by came young Jamie who to her did say,
“Your fingers go nimbly, your yowes they milk free.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
II
“Oh where is your father?” the young man he said,/“Oh where is your father my tender young maid?”
“He’s up in yon greenwood a-waiting for me?”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
III
“My father’s a shepherd has sheep on yon hill,
If you get his sanction I’ll be at your will,
And if he does grant it right glad will I be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
IV
“Good morning old man, you are herding your flock,
I want a yowe lamb to rear a new stock;
I want a yowe lamb and the best she maun be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly! (1)
V
“Go down to yon meadow, choose out your own lamb,/And be sure you’re as welcome an any young man;/You are heartily welcome—the best she maun be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
VI
He’s down to yon meadow, taen Moll by the hand,/ And soon before the old man the couple did stand;/ Says, “This is the yowe lamb I purchased from thee.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
VII
“Oh was e’er an auld man so beguiled as I am,
To sell my ae daughter instead of a lamb;
Yet, since I have said it, e’en sae let it be.”
Ca’ the yowes tae the knowes, lovely Molly!
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Un giorno quando Molly mungeva le sue pecore
ecco venire il giovane Jamie che le disse
“Le vostre dita si muovono agilmente mentre mungete le vostre pecore”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
II
“Dov’è vostro padre?” disse il giovanotto
“Dov’è vostro padre, mia giovane e fresca fanciulla?”
“E’ in quel bosco che mi aspetta?
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
III
“Mio padre è un pastore che ha le pecore sulla collina, se ottenete la sua approvazione sarò a vostra e se sarà contento anch’io sarò felice”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
IV
“Buongiorno vecchio che state radunando il vostro gregge, vorrei una pecorella per crescere una nuova stirpe, vorrei una pecorella e che sia la migliore!”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
V
“Andate in quel prato e sceglietevi la vostra pecorella e assicuratevi di essere bene accetto come giovanotto, di essere accolto calorosamente come meglio lei sappia fare”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
VI
E giù verso il prato prese Molly per mano
e in breve la coppia davanti al vecchio si presentò e dice
“Questa è la pecorella che ho comprato da voi”
Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara
VII
“Mai ci fu vecchio così ingannato come lo fui io,
per vendere la mia sola figlia invece di un agnellino; tuttavia poichè ho dato la parola, così sarà”/ Porta le pecore sulle colline, Molly cara

NOTE
1) or “We’ll ca the yowes tae the knowes lovely Molly.”

 

LINK
https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/catheewes.html
http://www.robertburnsfederation.com/poems/translations/ca_the_yowes_to_the_knowes.htm
http://www.robertburnsfederation.com/poems/translations/ca_the_yowes_to_the_knowes_second_set.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/9039
The Song of Isabel Pagan in http://tibbiepagan.blogspot.it/
Women, Poetry and Song in Eighteenth-Century Lowland Scotland (Margery Palmer McCulloch)
https://www.ramshornstudio.com/yowes.htm

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9127
https://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1021

DAINTY DAVY

Controversa la sua origine (se inglese o scozzese), di certo sappiamo che una delle melodie risale al XVII secolo essendo pubblicata nel “The English Dancing Master” di John Playford (per la precisione nella sua decima edizione risalente al 1698). la versione testuale più diffusa è quella di Robert Burns .

Della canzone si conoscono diverse versioni testuali e almeno due diverse melodie (vedi ), ma la melodia più accreditata dagli interpreti attuali è “The Gardener’s March“, la stessa utilizzata anche per “Rantin ‘Rovin’ Robin”, data alle stampe daJames Aird in ‘Selection of Scotch, English, Irish, and Foreign Airs’ (1782).

WILLIAMSON DavidCollezionata (o scritta) anche da Robert Burns (e pubblicata postuma in “The Merry Muses of Caledonia“) questa versione testuale è accompagnata da un aneddoto storico o pseudostorico avvenuto alla fine del 1600 (1692).

Il reverendo presbiteriano David Williamson ovvero il nostro Davie “dalla delicata bellezza”, stava soggiornando nella tenuta dei Kerrs, Cherrytrees vicino a Yetholm (Scottish Border), quando sopraggiunse un drappello di dragoni mandati sulle sue tracce per catturarlo.
Il giovane, dalla delicate fattezze, venne nascosto da Lady Kerrs camuffato da donna, nel letto della figlia diciottenne. Però mentre la madre distraeva i soldati offrendo whisky nel salotto, Davie si dava da fare nel letto con la figlia! Per nascondere lo scandalo, e per amore della causa, la donna acconsentì poi al matrimonio riparatore tra i due.
Un’altra versione della storia (riportata da Burns) narra che il bel giovane inseguito nottetempo dai soldati a cavallo, si rifugiò in casa dei Kerrs di Cherrytrees entrando nella camera della figlia, passando per la finestra.

Carlo II quando venne a conoscenza dell’episodio sembra abbia esclamato “Trovatemi quell’uomo che lo farò vescovo!” Il reverendo David Williamson (1630-1706) fu un amante infaticabile, morì all’età di circa 70 anni dopo aver sposato ben sette mogli (Jane Kerrs fu solo la terza della serie)

VERSIONE BAWDY

Dopo l’epoca dei fatti circolarono dalla parte scozzese molte versioni “piccanti” e ironiche della vicenda.

ASCOLTA Ian Campbell
tratta da Scots Songs di David Herd   -1776: questa versione è la più infarcita di vecchi termini scozzesi (bawdy ballads)


I
Being pursued by the dragoons,
Within my bed he was laid down,
And weel I wat he was worth his room,
My ain dear dainty Davie.
Chorus
O leeze me on(3) his curly pow(4),
Bonie Davie, dainty Davie;
Leeze me on his curly pow,
He was my dainty Davie.
II
My minnie laid him at my back,
I trow he lay na lang at that,
But turn’d, and in a verra crack
Produc’d a dainty Davie(7).
III
Then in the field amang the pease,
Behin’ the house o’ Cherrytrees,
Again he wan atweesh my thies(8),
my dear dainty Davie(9).
IV
But had I goud(10), or had I land,
I should be a’ at his command;
I’ll ne’er forget what he pat i’ my hand,
It was sic a dainty Davie.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANA DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Essendo inseguito dai cavalleggeri,
nel mio letto lui si coricò,
credevo fosse un degno compagno di stanza,
proprio il mio caro bel Davie.
Coro
Così cara per me la testa riccia del
bello e tenero Davie,
Così cara per me la testa riccia
lui era il mio tenero Davie.
II
Mia madre ci fece stendere schiena contro schiena,
credevo non rimanesse a lungo in quella posizione,
ma si girò, e di colpo,
produsse un “grazioso Davie”.
III
Allora nei campi tra i piselli,
dietro alla casa di Cherrytrees,
di nuovo si insinuò tra le mie cosce,
il mio caro e delicato Davie
IV
Se avessi oro o terreni,
sarebbero tutti a sua disposizione;
non dimenticherò mai quello che mi mise in mano,
è stato un così tenero Davie

 

VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS: The Merry Muses

VERSIONE DI ROBERT BURNS tratta da The Merry Muses of Caledonia   – 1799, una versione testuale piuttosto casta  rispetto al tono più bawdy degli   altri canti

La versione dei Dubliners ha fatto scuola per le interpretazioni successive
ASCOLTA The Dubliners


VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS 1799
I
It was in and through the window broads(1)
And a’ the tirliewirlies(2) o’d
The sweetest kiss that e’er I got
Was from my Dainty Davie.
Chorus:
Oh, leeze me(3) on your curly pow(4)
Dainty Davie, Dainty Davie
Leeze me on your curly pow
You are my own dear Dainty Davie.
II
It was doon(5) amang my Daddy’s pease
And underneath the cherrytrees(6)
Oh, there he kissed me as he pleased
For he was my own dear Davie.
III
When he was chased by a dragoon
Into my bed he was laid doon
I thought him worthy o’ his room
For he’s my Dainty Davie.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Aprì le persiane ed entrò
e tutti i soprammobili scavalcò,
il bacio più dolce che mi hanno dato
fu del mio bel Davie.
Coro:
Benedetta le testolina riccia
del bel Davie,
Benedetta le testolina riccia
del mio caro bel Davie.
II
Fu giù tra i piselli di mio padre
e nella tenuta dei Cherrytrees
oh là lui mi baciò come voleva
perchè lui era proprio il mio caro Davie.
III
Quando era inseguito dai cavalleggeri
nel mio letto si distese
credevo fosse un degno compagno di stanza,
perchè lui è il mio bel Davie.

NOTE
1) broads= boads
2) tirliewirlies= Knick-knacks
3) leeze me on = termine arcaico e contrazione di mio caro, nel significato   di grande piacere o amore per una persona o cosa.
4) pow= head nel senso di capelli ricci ma anche nel doppio senso di tutto   ciò che di peloso può esserci in un corpo maschile! Fiumi d’inchiostro sono   stati scritti per interpretare il senso della frase!
5) doon= down
6) Cherrytrees è la tenuta dei Kerrs vicino a Yetholm quindi la frase si può   tradurre come “nella tenuta dei Cherrytrees” oppure “sotto gli alberi di ciliegio”
7) doppio senso
8) thies = thighs   o knees
9) nelle versioni più   licenziose la frase diventa “And creesh’d them weel wi’ gravy” oppure   anche “And, splash! gaed out his gravy” nel senso del sopraggiunto   godimento maschile e in effetti la frase da un senso compiuto al verso   contenuto nella strofa successiva (I’ll never forget what he put in my hand)
10) gould= gold

VERSIONE ROBERT BURNS: da SMM

loversQuesta versione è molto bucolica e romantica, scritta da Robert Burns nel 1793 e contenuta in “The Scots musical museum” (editore James Johnson).

In effetti la poesia è stata composta nel 1789 da Burns con il titolo di “The Gardener wi’ his paidle” dall’ultima frase di ogni strofa. (vedi)
Paidle è un termine scozzese per pagaia, ma qui ha più senso come pala (il giardiniere con la sua pala)

ASCOLTA The Gardener wi’ his paidle come doveva essere eseguita all’epoca
ASCOLTA Karine Polwart

Con il titolo di “Dainty Davie” Burns apporta lievi modifiche a “The Gardener wi’ his paidle” aggiungendo inoltre il coro: anche in questa versione i due si rotolano nottetempo nel prato! La melodia è indicata chiaramente come quella di “The Gardener’s March”.

ASCOLTA Eddi Reader


I
Now rosy May comes on wi’ flowers
to deck her gay green spreading bowers
now comes in the happy hours
wandering wi’ my Davie
CHORUS
o leeze me (meet me) on the Warlock   knowe(1)
dainty Davie, dainty Davie
there I’ll spend the day wi’ you
my ain(2) dear dainty Davie
II
the crystal waters round us flow
and merry birds are lovers a’
the scented breezes round us blaw(3)
wandering wi’ my Davie
III
when purple morning starts the hare
to steal upon his earthly fare
then through the dews I will repair
to meet my ain dear Davie
IV
when day expirin’ in the west
the curtain draws o’er nature’s rest
I’ll flee to arms I love the best
that’s my ain dear Davie

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO
I
Ora il roseo Maggio arriva con i fiori
e decora i pergolati con profusione di foglie vivaci
ora arriva l’ora felice
di passeggiare con il mio Davy
CHORUS
Incontriamoci sul tumulo di Warlock
leggiadro Davie
là passerò il giorno con te
mio caro bel Davie
II
Le acque cristalline intorno a noi scorrono
e tutti gli uccelli felici si amano,
la brezza profumata intorno a noi soffia
per passeggiare con il mio Davy
III
Quando sorge l’alba la lepre si muove furtivamente per il suo cibo terreno,  allora nella rugiada mi sistemerò per incontrare il mio caro bel Davie
IV
Quando il giorno svanisce a ovest
il sipario cala sul riposo della natura
fuggirò nelle braccia di colui che amo
che è proprio il mio caro Davie

NOTE
1) knowe= mound
2) ain = own
3) blaw= blow

FONTI
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/scottish/meetmeon.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9055
http://www.eddireader.net/tracks/erDD.htm

Johnny Lad, a scottish street ballad

“Johnny Lad” is a traditional song located in the northern counties of Scotland and especially in the Lowlands (in particular in Aberdeenshire), but also widespread in Ireland and Cape Breton. There are many text versions combined with different melodies.
“Johnny Lad” è una canzone tradizionale diffusa nelle contee settentrionali della Scozia e soprattutto nelle Lowlands (in particolare nll’Aberdeenshire), ma popolare anche in Irlanda e a Capo Bretone. Esistono molte versioni testuali abbinate a diverse  melodie.

Johnny Lad: street ballad/ nursery song version
Jinkin’ You, Johnnie Lad: bothy ballad
Cock Up Your Beaver (Robert Burns)
Hey how Johnie Lad (Robert Burns)
Och, Hey! Johnnie, Lad (Robert Tannahill)

The main written sources for the textual part are three: Peter Buchan’s “Ancient Ballads and Songs of the North of Scotland“, 1828; Robert Ford’s “Vagabond Song and Ballads of Scotland” 1899-1904 ;  John Ord’s “Bothy Ballads”, 1930. Many stanzas were added in the 1950s and there are also several recordings collected by Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) folklorist and poet, a bard of the Scottish people of the contemporary era. (here)
Le fonti scritte principali per la parte testuale sono tre: Peter Buchan “Ancient Ballads and Songs of the North of Scotland“, 1828; Robert Ford  “Vagabond Song and Ballads of Scotland”,1899-1904; John Ord “Bothy Ballads”, 1930
Molte strofe sono state aggiunte negli anni del 1950 e si hanno anche diverse registrazioni collezionate da Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) folklorista e poeta, un bardo del popolo scozzese dell’era contemporanea. (qui)

The song is often collected among the “bothy ballads” that is the popular songs composed and sung by the farm laborers of Lowland to pass the evening in their dormitory into joy (in Scottish “bothy”).
La canzone è spesso collezionata tra le “bothy ballads” ossia le canzoni popolari composte e cantate dai braccianti agricoli delle Lowland per passare in allegria la serata nel loro dormitorio (in scozzese “bothy”).

STREET BALLAD/NURSERY SONG

A “street ballad” is a song in which the verses (often nonsense or
satirical or double meaning) are added by the singer at will. 
Ewan McColl released this version in the 1950s
Una “street ballad” è un genere di canzone in cui le strofe (spesso senza senso o a doppio senso) sono aggiunte dal cantante a piacere. 
E’ stato Ewan McColl a divulgare questa versione negli anni 1950

Ewan McColl & Peggy Seeger

Already when The Corries were a trio  (and with the Ian Campbell folk group) recorded their own version with a “fast” rhythm, the stanzas change from studio recordings and live TV shows: in this version they adds a couple of satirical stanzas. On the album “This Is the Ian Campbell Folk Group” , 1963 it’s written “This is a Glasgow street song which has been popular since the early days of the folk song revival in Britain. There are a great many existing verses—bawdy, satirical, and irreverent—and more being created all the time; we are constantly encountering new verses, often highly topical and sometimes unfit for public performance. Johnny Lad is one of the proofs that the oral tradition is not yet dead in Britain.”
The Corries
già nella formazione in trio ( e con Ian Campbell folk group)
hanno registrato una versione con un tempo “veloce”, le strofe cambiano dalle registrazioni in studio rispetto ai live televisivi: in questa versione live ad esempio aggiungono un paio di strofe satiriche.
Così riporta la nota nell’album “This Is the Ian Campbell Folk Group” , 1963. 
“Questa è una street song di Glasgow che è stata popolare sin dai primi giorni del revival folk in Gran Bretagna. Ci sono un gran numero di versi esistenti – osceni, satirici e irriverenti – e altri ancora vengono creati continuamente; stiamo costantemente incontrando nuovi versi, spesso di grande attualità e talvolta inadatti alla rappresentazione pubblica. Johnny Lad è una delle prove che la tradizione orale non è ancora morta in Gran Bretagna.”

The Irish Rovers & The Clancy Brothers & Lou Killen live 1973 (I, V, stanzas not shown-IX)


I
I bought a wife in Edinburgh
for a bawbee(1)
I got a farthing(2) back
to buy tobacco wi’
CHORUS
And wi’ you, and wi’ you,
and wi’ you my Johnny lad
I’ll dance the buckles off my shoon (3)
with you my Johnny lad
II 
Samson was a mighty man (4)
and he fought wi’ a cuddie (5)’s jaw
He fought a thousand battles
wearin’ crimson flannel draws (6)
III
There was a man o’ Nineveh (7)
and he was wondrous wise.
He louped (8) intae a hawthorn bush
and scratched out baith his eyes.
III (The Corries)
Now Solomon and David
led very wicked lives
Winchin’ (9) every evening
wi’ other peoples wives (10)
IV
And when he saw his eyes wis out
he wis gey troubled then
So he louped  intae anither bush
and scratched them in again.
V
Napoleon was an emperor
and he ruled the land and sea
He ruled o’er France and Germany,
but he didn’t rule Jock McGhee (11)
VI
As I was walk’n on Sunday
and there I saw the Queen
A playing at the football
with the lads on Glasgow Green
VII
The captain o’ the other side
was scorin’ with great style
The Queen she called a policeman
and had him thrown in jail
IX
Now, Johnny is a bonnie lad,
he is a lad of mine
I’ve never had a better lad
and I’ve had twenty-nine (12)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Ho comprato una moglie a Edimburgo
per sei penny 
e ho ricevuto in resto un quarto di penny
per comprare del tabacco
CORO
E con te, e con te 
e con te Johnny ragazzo mio
ballerò finché si slacceranno le scarpe,
con te Johnny ragazzo mio
II
Sansone era un uomo forte
e ha combattuto con la mascella d’asino ,
ha combattuto centinaia di battaglie
indossando mutandoni di flanella rossa
III
C’era un uomo di Ninive 
e lui era un mirabile saggio
si gettò in un cespuglio di biancospino
e si graffiò entrambi gli occhi
III (The Corries)
Salomone e Davide
vissero da peccatori
giacendo ogni sera
con le mogli degli altri
IV
E quando vide i suoi occhi graffiati
allora iniziò a preoccuparsi,
così si gettò in un altro cespuglio
e li graffiò di nuovo
V
Napoleone era un imperatore
e governò mari e monti
governò sulla Francia e la Germania,
ma non comandò su Jock McGhee
VI
Mentre passeggiavo di domenica
vidi la Regina
giocare a calcio
con i ragazzi sul prato di Glasgow
VII
Il capitano della squadra avversaria
stava segnando con grande stile,
la Regina chiamò un poliziotto
e lo fece gettare in prigione
IX
Ora Johnny è un bel ragazzo,
è il ragazzo che fa per me
non ho mai avuto un ragazzo migliore
e ne ho fatti 29 

NOTE
1) bawbee=six pence Scots (or half a penny in English money) 
2) farthing=a quarter of a penny
3) shoon=shoes. In popular language, any reference to shoe buckles has an allusion to the sexual act [Nel linguaggio popolare ogni riferimento alle fibbie delle scarpe ha un che di allusivo all’atto sessuale] letteralmente: ballerò le fibbie dalle mie scarpe
4) The Corries 
Samson was a mighty man
he fed on fish and chips
He bauchled round the Gallowgate
just pickin’ up the dips
[Sansone era un uomo forte
che si nutriva di pesce e patatine.
faceva il venditore ambulante al Gallowgate
solo raccogliendo le salse]
5) cuddies’=horses’. In the Bible it is a donkey jaw [Nella Bibbia è una mascella d’asino]
6) draws, drawers= underpants
7) “The man of Ninevah (Thessaly, Bablyon) who scratched out his eyes is unbiblical. But it may be the oldest part of the song, and may have originated independently. The lines appear, in rather different form, in Tom Thumb’s Pretty Song Book Volume II (c. 1744); others appear in the second edition of Gammer Gurton’s Garland or The Nursery Parnassus (c. 1799). These verses can be found in Baring-Gould-MotherGoose #28, p. 40, [“There was a Man so Wise”].
These verses seem to have provoked a great deal of discussion.” (from here) Ninive was the capital of the Assyrian kingdom, seat of the Temple of Ishtar, the Assyrian-Babylonian goddess of love and war. In 612 BC the city was destroyed and reduced to a poor semi-uninhabited village (today an archaeological site near Mosul). The Bible condemns the city to desolation [“L’uomo di Ninive che si è graffiato occhi non è biblico. Ma potrebbe essere la parte più antica della canzone, e potrebbe essere stata originata in modo indipendente. I versi appaiono, in forma diversa, in Pretty Song Book  di Tom Thumb (volume II, 1744 circa); altri compaiono nella seconda edizione di  Gammer Gurton “Garland o The Nursery Parnassus” (1799 circa). Questi versetti possono essere trovati in Baring-Gould-MotherGoose # 28, p. 40, [“C’era un uomo così saggio”]. Questi versi sembrano aver provocato una grande discussione. “Ninive era la capitale del regno assiro sede del Tempio di Ishtar, la dea assiro-babilonese dell’amore e della guerra. Nel 612 a.C. la città venne distrutta e ridotta a misero villaggio semi disabitato (oggi sito archeologico nei pressi di Mossul). La Bibbia condanna la città alla desolazione]
8) louped=jumped 
9) to wench= To court, to keep company with one of the opposite sex
la strofa è ripresa anche nella seconda versione
10) and they continue with two more stanzas [e proseguono con altre due strofe]
IV The Corries
una delle contrapposizioni più affascinanti dell’atletica negli anni 70-80: Sebastian Coe versus Steve Ovett al momento non riesco a trascrivere tutta la strofa
V The Corries
Now Johnny is a Nationalist
but Johnny he’s no fool
says “All our problems will be solved
when England gets Home Rule”
[Ora Johnny è un nazionalista
ma Johnny non è un cretino
“Tutti i nostri problemi verranno risolti
quando l’Inghilterra otterrà l’Autogoverno”]
11) Clancy Brothers sing “but he never ruled Tralee”
12) il riferimento è all’età della protagonista

LINK
https://sangstories.webs.com/johnnielad.htm
http://www.rampantscotland.com/songs/blsongs_johnnylad.htm
http://ingeb.org/songs/iboughta.html
http://gestsongs.com/25/johnny.htm

http://books.google.it/books?id=aVkOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA444&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7570
https://www.kinglaoghaire.com/lyrics/650-johnny-lad
https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/tab/the_corries/johnny_lad_chords_2526750
https://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/c/corries/johnny_lad.html
https://www.justsomelyrics.com/1663288/the-corries-johnny-lad-the-corries-general-folk-lyrics.html
https://www.irish-folk-songs.com/johnny-lad-guitar-chords-and-lyrics.html