Morag and the Kelpie

Leggi in italiano

In the most placid rivers of Ireland and in the dark depths of the Scottish lakes live water demons, fairy creatures, that feed on human flesh: they are “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich- mhara “(in English sea horse); to want to be picky kelpie lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while each uisge prefers the lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both. Similar creatures are also told in Norse legends (Bäckahästen, the river horse) – and Germanic (nix in the form of fish or frog). (first part)

MORAG AND THE KELPIE

At the summer pastures of the Highlands they are still told of the beautiful Morag (Marion) seduced by a kelpie in human form; she, while noticing the strangeness of her husband, did not understand his true nature, if not after the birth of their child and … she decided to abandoning baby in swaddling clothes and husband shapeshifter!

On the Isle of Skye they still sing a song in Gaelic, ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ or ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) the “Lullaby of the kelpie” a melancholy air with which the kelpie cradled his child without a mother, and at the same time a plea to Morag to return to them, both he and the child needed her.
Of this lament we know several textual versions handed down to today in the Hebrides. The melodies revolve around an old Scottish aria entitled “Crodh Chailein” (in English “Colin’s cattle) evidently considered a melody of the fairies.
Another song, sweet and melancholic at the same time, is entitled Song of the Kelpie or even ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

So translates from Scottish Gaelic Tom Thomson “I got up early, it would have been better not to” (see)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Scottish gaelic
Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
English translation *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
NOTE
English translation also here
1)  the kelpie, suffering from loneliness, leaves the lake early in the morning and takes on human form
2) the shapeshifter promises food and comfort to the girl to convince her to follow him, but he warns her, he is a nocturnal creature and will not wake up with her in the morning!
3) gamhna = cattle between 1 year and 2 years translates Tom Thomson stitks; that is heifer, the cow that has not yet given birth, the verse in addition to qualifying the work of the girl (herdswoman) also wants to be a compliment, in Italian “bella manza” as a busty woman, with abundant and seductive shapes
4) the kelpie remembers the night meeting when they had sex (and obviously nine months later their son was born)
5) after the good memories of the past it comes the present, the woman has discovered the true nature of her companion and she dislikes their child
6) continuing in the comparison the kelpie calls “calf” its baby, that is “small child”
7) A typical “exposition” of fairy children is described. A practice of “birth control” widespread in the countryside of Europe, was the abandonment of newborns in the forest, so that fairies would take care of them; once the practice was widespread both against illegitimate people, and newborns with obvious physical deformations or ill-looking. The custom of “exposing” the baby was connected with the belief that he was “swapped” or kidnapped by the fairies and replaced with a changeling, a shapeshifter who for a while resembles the human child, but ultimately always takes its true appearance.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson translates = speckled band (of withy). I searched the dictionary: it is a crown made by intertwining the branches of willow; it reminds me of the Celtic crowns of flowers and leaves

 

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald recorded it under the title “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” in 2001 (from Colla Mo Rùn) following the collection of Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

english translation *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II and IV
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
scottish gaelic
I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà

NOTE
1) The kelpie sings the lullaby to its child abandoned by the human mother and comforts him by telling him that when he grows up he’ll be a little heartbreaker

With the title of ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan the same story is present in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais, from the voice of three witnesses of the Isle of Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

A similar story is told in the island of Benbecula with the title of Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg see


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 sings another fragment with the title “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (see the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser below)

English translation *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling! Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.

NOTE
1) Mhórag or Mór is the name of the maiden loved by the kelpie
2) it is the incessant cry of the child abandoned by his human mother in the cold and without food
3) mountain between Gesture and Portree on the Isle of Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

With the title “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, the same fragment sung by Caera is also reported in the book of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (page 94)

Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
II
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
III
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

Sources
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

Sting: Christmas at sea

The most beautiful adventures are not the ones we are looking for ..
[“Si può remare per tutto il giorno ma è quando si torna al calar della notte, e si guarda la stanza familiare, che trovi l’amore o la morte che ti attende accanto alla stufa; le più belle avventure non sono quelle che andiamo a cercare“.] (R.L.Stevenson)

In his “If On a Winter’s Night” (2009) Sting sings “Christmas at Sea” which text is taken from a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson with the addition of a chorus in Scottish Gaelic belonging to a waulking song from the Hebrides..
The music is by Sting and Mary Macmaster.
[Nel Cd di Sting “If On a Winter’s Night” (2009) tra i vari traditionals e carols natalizi troviamo un brano più particolare il cui testo è ripreso da una poesia di Robert Louis Stevenson con l’aggiunta di un coro in gaelico scozzese che appartiene ad una waulking song delle Isole Ebridi.
La musica è di Sting e di Mary Macmaster.]

Da ascoltare la versione degli italianissimi Practical Solution

STEVENSON’S POEM

Robert Louis Stevenson is a strange character and an anomalous Scottish who preferred (because of the poor health) the seas of the South to those of the North, and left in June 1888 for a trip through the Pacific islands where he spent the last six years of his life. And precisely in December 1888 this poem was published entitled “Christmas at Sea”.
Sting has extrapolated from the poem the central verses.
[Curioso personaggio Robert Louis Stevenson uno scozzese anomalo che preferì (a causa della cagionevole salute) i mari del Sud a quelli del Nord, e partito nel giugno del 1888 per un viaggio tra le isole del Pacifico vi trascorse gli ultimi sei anni della sua vita. E proprio nel dicembre del 1888 fu pubblicato questa poesia del titolo “Christmas at Sea”.  Del poema vengono estrapolate le strofe centrali]


I
All day we fought the tides
between the North Head (1) and the South (2)
All day we hauled the frozen sheets,
to ‘scape the storm’s wet mouth
All day as cold as charity (3),
in bitter pain and dread,
For very life and nature
we tacked from head to head.
II
We gave the South a wider berth,
for there the tide-race roared;
But every tack we made we brought
the North Head close aboard:
We saw the cliffs and houses,
and the breakers running high,
And the coastguard in his garden,
his glass against his eye.
III
The frost was on the village roofs
as white as ocean foam;
The good red fires were burning bright
in every ‘longshore home;
The windows sparkled clear,
and the chimneys volleyed out;
And I vow we sniffed the victuals
as the vessel went about.
IV
The bells upon the church were rung
with a mighty jovial cheer;
For it’s just that I should tell you how
(of all days in the year)
This day of our adversity
was blessed Christmas morn,
And the house above the coastguard’s
was the house where I was born.
V
And well I knew the talk they had,
the talk that was of me,
Of the shadow on the household
and the son that went to sea;
And O the wicked fool I seemed,
in every kind of way,
To be here and hauling frozen ropes
on blessed Christmas Day.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Tutto il giorno lottammo
contro i flutti tra Capo Nord (1) e il Sud (2),
tutto il giorno governammo le vele ghiacciate
per fuggire alla morsa umida della tempesta,
tutto il giorno al freddo senza pietà (3),
con acuta sofferenza e terrore,
per la vita stessa e la natura,
abbiamo virato da capo a capo
II
Ci tenevamo alla larga da Capo Sud,
che là la corrente ruggisce,
e a ogni virata che facevamo ci portavamo sempre più vicini alla Punta Nord:
vedevamo le scogliere e le case,
e i frangenti altissimi
e la guardia costiera nel suo giardino
scrutare con il cannocchiale
III
Il gelo era sui tetti del villaggio,
bianchi come la schiuma dell’oceano;
i fuochi rosso vivo, stavano scoppiettando
in ogni casa lungo la costa;
le finestre sfavillavano
e i comignoli sbuffavano;
giuro che si annusava il profumo delle vivande mentre il vascello procedeva.
IV
Le campane della chiesa stavano suonando potenti allegri saluti
perchè devo dirvi che
(di tutti i giorni dell’anno)
questo giorno della nostra tribolazione
era il mattino del santo Natale
e la casa sopra alla guardia costiera
era la casa dove sono nato
V
E bene conoscevo
i discorsi che si facevano su di me,
dell’ombra sulla famiglia
e del figlio andato per mare
e oh che povero sciocco sembravo,
da ogni punto di vista,
stare qui a alare le cime gelate
nel giorno del benedetto Santo Natale.

NOTE
1) Capo Nord porto di Sydney?
2) South Sea, South Head?
2) as cold as charity
it is an idiomatic phrase said with irony that indicates extreme indifference or coldness,: it is charity made by moral obligation, but without heart.
[è una frase idiomatica che indica un’estrema indifferenza o freddezza, letteralmente freddo come la carità, detto con ironia: è la carità fatta per obbligo morale, ma senza cuore.]

WAULKING SONG: Thograinn thograinn

The chorus of  “Christmas at Sea” is taken from a waulking song in Scottish Gaelic entitled “Òran Mòr Sgoirebreac” (in English “The Great Song of Scorrybreac”), from Hebrides islands: the full version of one of the fragments of the waulking song here
[Il coro di “Christmas at Sea” è preso da una waulking song delle Isole Ebridi in gaelico scozzese dal titolo “Òran Mòr Sgoirebreac” (in inglese “The great song of Scorrybreac”) la versione integrale di uno dei frammenti della waulking song qui]
Even in the ancient song who sings regrets not being at home, the lands of Scorrybreac are the ancestral lands of the MacNeacail clan (Mac Nicol) and Scorrybreac Castle (Portree Bay) on the Isle of Skye was for centuries the castle of MacNicols. (history of the MacNicol’s)
[Anche nell’antica canzone chi canta rimpiange di non essere a casa, le terre di Scorrybreac sono le terre ancestrali del clan MacNeacail (Mac Nicol) e Scorrybreac Castle (Portree Bay) nell’isola di Skye fu per secoli il castello dei MacNicols. (storia del clan MacNicol)]

The subject of the song would appear to be a Nicolson of Scorrybreck, and the occasion of its composition his marriage in the late seventeenth century to a sister of Iain Garbh MacLeod of Raasay.  (from here)
english version here
[Il soggetto della canzone sembrerebbe essere un Nicolson di Scorrybreck, e l’occasione per la composizione, il suo matrimonio alla fine del diciassettesimo secolo con una sorella di Iain Garbh MacLeod di Raasay. (da qui)
versione inglese qui]

Thograinn thograinn
Thograinn thograinn bhith dol dhachaidh
E ho ro e ho ro
Gu Sgoirebreac a chruidh chaisfhinn
E ho hi ri ill iu o
Ill iu o thograinn falbh
Gu Sgoirebreac a’ chruidh chais-fhionn
Ceud soraidh bhuam mar bu dual dhomh


I wish we were going home
E ho ro e ho ro
To Scorrybreac of the white-footed cattle
E ho hi ri ill iu o
To Scorrybreac of the white-footed cattle
The first blessing from me, as is my right
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Vorrei che fossimo a casa
E ho ro e ho ro
a Scorrybreac del bestiame con le zampe bianche, E ho hi ri ill iu o
a Scorrybreac del bestiame con le zampe bianche, il primo brindisi com’è mio diritto


LINK
https://popularvictorianpoetry.wordpress.com/an-anthology-of-popular-victorian-poetry/r-l-stevensons-christmas-at-sea-in-the-scots-observer-1888/
https://julianstockwin.com/2013/12/23/christmas-at-sea/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/oran_mor_sgoirebreac/
https://www.librarything.com/topic/171360
http://www.ondarock.it/recensioni/2015_hiddenorchestra_reorchestrations.htm

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~bwickham/nicname.htm

‘S FLIUCH AN OIDHCHE

La waulking song dal titolo “‘S Fliuch an Oidhche” (Wet the Night) è ambientata nelle isole Ebridi (isola di Uist) e si riferisce a un passato mitico delle isole quando i sea raiders andavano per mare a prendersi il bottino e la gloria. Condivide la melodia e la struttura del canto con un’altra waulking song dal titolo Coisich a rùin e talvolta le due canzoni sono unite insieme.

Si conoscono diverse versioni testuali tramandate dalla tradizione orale (vedere archivi di tobar an dualchais nelle fonti), ma non conoscendo il gaelico non riesco a seguire il testo.

immagine tratta da https://www.behance.net/gallery/West-Highland-(Hebridean)-Galley-Reconstruction/5296087
immagine tratta da https://www.behance.net/gallery/West-Highland-(Hebridean)-Galley-Reconstruction/5296087

ASCOLTA Catherine-Ann Macphee in The Barra MacNeils

ORIGINALE GAELICO  (tratto da qui con fonetica)
‘S Fliuch an oidhche, Hù ill oro
Nochd ‘s gur fuar i, O hì a bhò
Ma thug Cloinn Nìll, Hù ill oro
Druim a’ chuain orr’ Boch ho rinn o.

Luchd nan seòl àrd,
‘S na long luatha
‘S nam brataichean
Dearg is uaine
‘S nan gunnaichean
Glasa cruadhach
‘S iomadh sgeir dhubh
Ris na shuath i
Agus bàirneach
Ghlas a ghluais i.
Agus duileasg
Gorm a bhuain i.
Bheir thu mach i
Dh’uisge fuaraidh
Bheir thu steach i
Dh’Abhainn Chluaidh i.
Mo bheannachd siud
Dhan t-saor a dh’fhuadhail i
Dh’fhag i dìonach
làidir luath i.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Wet is the night
Tonight is cold
If Clan Neil
They of the tall sails
And the fast ships
And the banners,
red and green
And the guns,
grey and hard.
Many a dark rock
Has she brushed against.
And grey limpet
Has she shifted.
And seaweed
Green she reaped.
You’ll take her out
To cold water.
You’ll bring her in
To River Clyde.
My blessing to the sawyer
Who made her.
She would leave water-tight,
Strong and swift.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO di Cattia Salto
Umida è la notte
stanotte è freddo
se gli O’Neil
quelli delle vele alte
e dalle navi veloci
e le insegne
rosse e verdi
e le pistole
grigie e metalliche.
Più di una roccia scura
essa ha sfiorato
e le patelle grigie
ha spostato
e le alghe
verdi ha raccolto.
Tu la farai uscire
dal fiordo
e la condurrai
al fiume Clyde
le mie benedizioni al carpentiere
che l’ha costruita
essa fenderà la marea
con forza e velocità

FONTI
https://www.behance.net/gallery/West-Highland-(Hebridean)-Galley-Reconstruction/5296087
http://www.celticartscenter.com/Songs/Scottish/SFliuchAnOidhche.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/alba/oran/orain/fliuch_an_oidhche/
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/23944/2
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/97571/2
http://tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/13132/2

Morag e il Kelpie

Read the post in English

Nei fiumi più placidi d’Irlanda e nelle profondità oscure dei laghi scozzesi vivono dei demoni acquatici, creature fatate mutaforma, che si nutrono di carne umana: sono “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi. (prima parte)

MORAG E IL KELPIE

Ai pascoli estivi delle Highlands ancora si narra della bella Morag (Marion) sedotta da un kelpie in forma umana; la fanciulla pur notando delle stranezze del marito non si accorse della sua vera natura, se non dopo la nascita del loro bambino e … se la diede a gambe abbandonando bambino in fasce e marito mutaforma!

Nell’isola di Skye  si canta ancora un canto in gaelico,  ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ oppure ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) la “Ninna nanna del kelpie” una nenia malinconica con cui il kelpie cerca di far addormentare il bambino rimasto senza mamma, e nello stesso tempo una supplica verso Morag perchè ritorni da loro, sia lui che il bambino hanno bisogno di lei.
Di questo lamento si conoscono diverse versioni testuali tramandate fino a oggi nelle Isole Ebridi. Le melodie girano intorno ad una vecchia aria scozzese dal titolo “Crodh Chailein” (in inglese “Colin’s cattle) evidentemente considerata una melodia delle fate (qui)
Un’altra melodia dolce e malinconica nello stesso tempo è intitolata Song of The Kelpie o anche ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

Così traduce Tom Thomson (vedi)”I got up early, it would have been better not to” (mi sono alzato presto ma era meglio se non lo facevo)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Traduzione inglese *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Mi sono alzato presto,
mi sono alzato presto
non l’avrei fatto,
ma fu l’angoscia che mi mandò fuori
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
C’era nebbia sulla collina,
nebbia sulla collina
e piovigginava
e mi sono imbattuto in una graziosa fanciulla
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Ti darò del vino
ti darò del vino
e ogni cosa che vorrai
ma non mi alzerò con te al mattino
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
bella manza
bella manza
ero insieme a te al pascolo
mentre gli altri dormivano
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
la bella moretta malvagia
la bella moretta malvagia
che mi ha dato un figlio
anche se lo ha allevato con freddezza
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
il bimbo della mia canzone
il bimbo della mia canzone
era accanto a una collinetta,
senza fuoco, protezione o riparo
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Morag amore mio
Morag amore mio, ritorna dal tuo piccino
e ti darò una bella ghirlanda variopinta
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.

NOTE
si veda anche la traduzione qui
1)  il kelpie, soffrendo di solitudine, esce dal lago di mattina presto e prende forma umana
2) il mutaforma promette cibo e agiatezze alla fanciulla per convincerlo a seguirlo, però l’avvisa, è una creatura notturna e non si sveglierà con lei al mattino!
3) gamhna= cattle between 1 year and 2 years traduce Tom Thomson stitks; in italiano= giovenca, la mucca che non ha ancora partorito, il verso oltre a qualificare il lavoro della fanciulla (mandriana) vuole essere anche un complimento, per dirla in italiano “bella manza” come donna procace, dalle forme abbondanti e seducenti
4) il kelpie ricorda l’incontro notturno quando i due hanno fatto sesso (e ovviamente nove mesi dopo è nato il loro figlioletto)
5) ecco che dopo i bei ricordi del passato arriva il presente, la donna ha scoperto la vera natura del compagno e ha voluto meno bene al bambino generato con lui
6) proseguendo nel paragone il kelpie chiama “vitellino” il suo bambino, un termine vezzeggiativo per small child
7) Morag nel fuggire ha abbandonato il bambino sotto una balma al freddo e senza protezione. Si descrive una tipica “esposizione” dei bambini delle fate. Una pratica di “controllo delle nascite” diffusa nelle campagne d’Europa, era l’abbandono dei neonati  nel bosco (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi, che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. L’usanza di “esporre” il neonato era connessa con la convinzione che  fosse stato “scambiato” ovvero rapito dalle fate e sostituito con un changeling, un mutaforma il quale per un po’ assomiglia al bambino umano, ma alla fine riprende sempre il suo vero aspetto.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson traduce= speckled band (of withy). Ho cercato sul dizionario: si tratta di una corona fatta intrecciando i rami di salice; in italiano = coroncina di vimini, mi richiama le coroncine celtiche di fiori e foglie

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald la registrano con il titolo di “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” nel 2001(in Colla Mo Rùn) dalla collezione di Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà
III=I
IV=II
Traduzione inglese *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio
Dormi bambino mio
Coro
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
piè veloce
come un grande cavallo sei tu
II
Caro figlio mio
mio bel cavallino
sei lontano dalla cittadina
sarai il più rinomato

NOTE
1) Il kelpie canta la ninna-nanna al figlioletto abbandonato dalla madre umana e lo conforta dicendogli che da grande sarà un ruba-cuori

Con il titolo di ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan la stessa storia è presente negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais, dalla voce di tre testimoni dell’isola di Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

Una storia analoga è raccontata nell’isola di Benbecula con il titolo di Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg vedi


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 ne riporta un altro frammento con il titolo di “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (vedasi la versione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser più sotto)

GAELICO SCOZZESE
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh, is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri do bheul beag baoth is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.

Traduzione inglese *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling!
Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara,
ritorna dal tuo piccolo bambino
e avrai una trota maculata dal lago!
Morag mia cara,
questa notte è umida
e piovosa per mio figlio
in una balma della collinetta,
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
Lasciato senza fuoco, senza cibo e rifugio,
ti lamenti senza sosta.
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio sdentato
alla tua sciocca bocca,
e io che canto ninnananne sul Monte Frochkie

NOTE
1) Mhórag o Mór è il nome della fanciulla amata dal kelpie è anche scritto A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh (Mhor mia, amore, mia gioia)
2) è il pianto incessante del bambino che ha freddo e fame, abbandonato dalla mamma umana. Anche se non esplicitato presumo che la madre abbia “esposto” il figlio, cioè l’abbia abbandonato all’aperto (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate o il kelpie; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. vedi
3) montagna tra Gesto e Portree sull’isola di Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

Con il titolo di “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, lo stesso frammento cantato da Caera è riportato anche nel libro di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser e Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (pag 94)

ASCOLTA la versione classica nell’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser

trasposizione inglese Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Amore mio, mia gioia
vieni dal tuo bimbo,
e le trote guizzeranno dal lago in abbondanza
Cuore mio, la notte è buia,
umida e piovosa.
Ecco il tuo bambino nella balma
II
Suvvia, amore mio, mia gioia,
c’è bisogno di fuoco qui,
bisogno di riparo e conforto
il nostro bambino sta piangendo accanto al  lago.
III
Sposa mia, cuore mio!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio
che bacia le tue dolci labbra
e io che canto vecchie canzoni per te
sul Monte Frochkie
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVIO CANTI
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

WAULKING THE TWEED! DHEANAINN SUGRADH

The Dark-haired Girl (in italiano la ragazza dai capelli scuri, in gaelico scozzese Dheanainn súgradh ) è una tipica waulking song.
Qui il coro ha un senso compiuto e non ci sono “vocables”, peraltro il significato della storia è confuso, si può presumere si “parli” di una storia d’amore con botta e risposta tra lui e lei presi dalle rispettive faccende quotidiane, con immagini cariche di doppi sensi e battute salaci.

ASCOLTAThe Clannad in Clannad 2, 1974

ASCOLTAThe Poozies in The Celtic Legacy

ASCOLTA Alyth McCormack in An lomall

ASCOLTA Méav in Silver sea

GAELICO SCOZZESE
Sèist:
Dheanainn sùgradh ris an nighinn duibh,
Agus éiridh moch ‘s a mhaduinn;
Dheanainn sùgradh ris an nighinn duibh.
1. Dheanainn sùgradh ri Catriona,
Treis mu ‘m fiachainn an cadal.
2. Dheanainn sùgradh ris a’ ghruagaich
Nuair a bhiodh a’ sluagh nan cadal.
3. Dheanainn sùgradh ris a’ ghruagaich,
Ri nighinn duinn a’ chuailein chleachdaich.
4. Dheanainn sùgradh air bheag gruamain,
Ri nighinn donn a chuailein chleachdaich.
5. Dheanainn sùgradh ri Catriona,
Leam bu mhiannach i bhi agam.
6. ‘S bòidheach leam cumadh do chalpa,
‘S bòidhche na sin t’ fhalbh is t’ astar.
7. Gu ‘m bithidh buill nach feum a spliceadh,
Ri mo mhaighdinn-sa tighinn dhachaidh.
8. ‘S nuair a théid thu null a dh’Éirinn
Gheibh thu ‘m bréid nach feum am paitseadh.
9. Dheanainn sùgradh, mire, ‘s mùirn,
An àm na siùil a bhith ‘gam pasgadh.
10. Dheanainn sùgradh ris a mhaighdinn,
‘N àm nan coinnlean ‘bhith ‘g a’ lasadh.
11. Gur bòidheach leam thu fo d’ éideadh,
Gaoth a’ séideadh ‘s an là frasach.
12. Di-Luain an déidh Di-Dòmhnaich
Dh’fhalbh sinn le Seònaid a Arcaibh.
13. ‘S ann Di-Luain an déidh Di-Dòmhnaich
Sheòl sinn a Steòrnabhagh a’ chaisteil.
14. Reef ‘san topsail, is dhà ‘san fhòre-sail,
‘S ceann a’ bhoom an déidh a laiseadh.
15. Reef ‘ga cheangal, ‘s reef ‘ga fhuasgladh
Muir fo cluais is fuaim fo planca.


TRADUZIONE INGLESE (da qui)
I’d have fun with the dark-haired maiden,
And rise early in the morning;
I’d have fun with the dark-haired maiden.
1. I’d have fun with Catriona,
All the while I should be sleeping.
2. I’d have fun with the lass
While the world would be sleeping.
3. I’d have fun with the lass,
With the brown-haired maiden of the clustering ringlet.
4. I’d have fun with little gloom,
With the brown-haired maiden of the clustering ringlet.
5. I’d have fun with Catriona,
I thought it was pleasant to have her.
6. Beautiful to me is the shape of your calf,
And likewise beautiful are your carriage and the way you go.
7. Oh, there will be ropes that do not need splicing
On my maiden coming home.
8. When you go over to Ireland
You’ll get a sail that doesn’t need patching.
9. I’d have fun, mirth, entertainment,
When I should be folding the sail.
10. I’d have fun with the girl,
When the stubble should be burning.
11. How beautiful you are to me under your kilt,
The wind blowing on a showery day.
12. On a Monday after Sunday
We left with Janet from Orkney.
13. On a Monday after Sunday
We sailed from Stornoway of the castle.
14. A reef in the topsail and two in the foresail,
The end of the boom was lashed.
15. A reef being tied and a reef being loosened,
Sea under her sail and a noise under her planks.

tradotto da Cattia Salto
Mi divertivo con la fanciulla dai capelli scuri
e mi alzavo al mattino presto,
Mi divertivo con la ragazza dai capelli scuri
I. Mi divertivo con Catriona
tutto il tempo invece di dormire
II. Mi divertivo con la ragazza mentre  il mondo era addormentato
III. Mi divertivo con la ragazza,
con la fanciulla dai capelli scuri raccolti a treccia
IV. Mi divertivo  al crepuscolo
con la fanciulla dai capelli scuri raccolti a treccia
V.  Mi divertivo con Catriona
credevo fosse bello averla
VI. Bello per me è la sagoma del tuo vitello
e altrettanto bello è il tuo carro e il modo di portarlo
VII. Ci saranno corde che non hanno bisogno di giunzioni
Oh donna mia, torno a casa
VIII. Quando vai in Irlanda avrai una vela che non ha bisogno di rattoppi.
IX. Vorrei divertirmi, rallegrarmi e spassarmela invece di dover ripiegare la vela
X. Vorrei divertirmi con la ragazza
quando le stoppie dovranno essere bruciate (1)
XI. Come sei bello per me sotto  il kilt
con il vento che soffia in un giorno di pioggia
XII. Di Lunedì dopo la Domenica
lasciammo Janet dalle Orcadi (2)
XIII.  Di Lunedì dopo la Domenica
salpammo da Stornoway (3) del castello
XIV.  Con una mano alla gabbia e due al trinchetto  (4)
e l’asta di contro fiocco rientrata (5)
XV. Con una mano presa e l’altra mollata, con il mare sotto le vele e il suo sciabordare contro il fasciame (6)

NOTE
1) in autunno
2) le isole Orcadi
3) capoluogo dell’isola Lewis e Harris  la più estesa delle Isole Ebridi “La parte settentrionale dell’isola è chiamata ‘Lewis’, mentre la parte meridionale ‘Harris’ ed entrambe sono spesso nominate come se fossero isole distinte. Il confine tra Lewis e Harris è costituito da uno stretto istmo che parte da Loch Resort (Reasort) a Ovest fino a Loch Seaforth (Shiphoirt) a Est.” (tratto da Wikipedia)
4) E qui Italo Ottonello traduce tutta la strofa, spiegando in modo molto chiaro l’operazione di riduzione di una vela detta in termini nautici “prendere una mano di terzaroli”, a causa del forte vento le vele di gabbia e di trinchetto vengono regolate  “con una mano presa e l’altra mollata” e anche nel verso successivo
terzarolo, are: parte di vela che può essere serrata per sottrarla all’azione del vento. (to reef, reefing); mano (di terzarolo): superficie della vela che si sottrae all’azione del vento quando si prende un terzarolo (reef).
5) così leggo nell’Enciclopedia Treccani: si fanno rientrare le aste di fiocco per ridurre la superficie esposta nell’ingagliardire del tempo
6) ancora Italo Ottonello traduce poeticamente il verso
con il verbo sciabordare: intr. (aus. avere) con riferimento ad acqua o altri liquidi, frangersi, battere ripetutamente contro un ostacolo, producendo un caratteristico rumore continuato: si sentiva il mare sc. tra gli scogli; l’acqua sciaborda con fresca eloquenza contro le murate (Savinio).
FONTI
http://ingeb.org/songs/dheanain.html
http://www.thistleandbroom.com/scotland/waulking.htm
http://www.houseofscotland.org/waulking.html
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clannad/dheanainn.htm