Archivi tag: Irish Descendants

Sally Brown I rolled all night, capstan shanty

Leggi in italiano

In the sea shanties Sally Brown is the stereotype of the cheerful woman of the Caribbean seas, mulatta or creole, with which our sailor  tries to have a good time. Probably of Jamaican origin according to Stan Hugill, it was a popular song in the ports of the West Indies in the 1830s.
The textual and melodic variations are many.

ARCHIVE

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

SECOND VERSION: I ROLLED ALL NIGHT

In this version the chorus is developed on several lines and the song is classified, also with the title of “Roll and Go”, in the capstan shanty that is the songs performed during the lifting of the anchor.

Planxty live (which not surprisingly chuckle, given the name of the song)

Irish Descendants from Encore: Best of the Irish Descendants


Shipped on board a Liverpool liner,
CHORUS
Way hey roll(1) on board;
Well, I rolled all night
and I rolled all day,
I’m gonna spend my money with (on)
Sally Brown.

Miss Sally Brown is a fine young lady,
She’s tall and she’s dark(2) and she’s not too shady
Her mother doesn’t like the tarry(3) sailor,
She wants her to marry the one-legged captain
Sally wouldn’t marry me so I shipped across the water
And now I am courting Sally’s daughter
I shipped off board a Liverpool liner

NOTE
1) the term is generically used by sailors to say many things, in this context for example could mean “sail”.
2) it could refer to the color of the hair rather than the skin, even if in other versions Sally is identified as creole or mulatto. The term “Creole” can be understood in two exceptions: from the Spanish “crillo”, which originally referred to the first generation born in the “New World”, sons of settlers from Europe (Spain or France) and black slaves. The most common meaning is that which refers to all the black half-bloods of Jamaica from the color of the skin that goes from cream to brown and up to black-blue. In the nineteenth century with this term was also indicated a small elite urban society of light skin in Louisiana (resident mostly in New Orleans) result of crossings between some beautiful black slaves and white landowners who took them as lovers.
3) tarry is a derogatory term to distinguish the typical sailor. More generally Jack Tar is the term commonly used to refer to a sailor of merchant ships or the Royal Navy. Probably the term was coined in 1600, alluding to the tar with which the sailors waterproofed their work clothes.

Teddy Thompson from Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate   Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys,  ANTI 2006 in a more meditative and melancholic version

Sally Brown she’s a nice young lady,
CHORUS
Way, hay, we roll an’ go.
We roll all night
And we roll all day
Spend my money on Sally Brown.

Shipped on board off a Liverpool liner
Mother doesn’t like a tarry sailor
She wants her to marry a one legged captain
Sally Brown she’s a bright lady
She drinks stock rum
And she chews tobacco

LINK
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html

Rattlin’ Bog: The Everlasting Circle

Leggi in italiano

Like the  hopscotch known by children of all continents, even the “song of the eternal cycle” is a drop of ancient wisdom that survived our day: as well as a mnemonic game it is also a tongue twister that becomes increasingly difficult with increasing speed .

Some say it’s Irish, some it’s an Irish melody about a Scottish text, (or vice versa), others say it’s from the South of England or Wales, or from Breton origins, doesn’ t matter, more likely it is a collective nursery rhyme and archetypal of those that are found in the various European countries, coming from an ancient prayer-song, perhaps from the spring ritual celebrations , or how much it has survived of the ancient teaching, for metaphors, of the cycle life-death-life.

albero celtaTREE OF LIFE

One can not but think of the cosmic tree as an universal symbol, that is, the absolute starting point of life. In symbolic language, this point is the navel of the world, the beginning and end of all things, but it is often imagined as a vertical axis that, located at the center of the universe, crosses the sky, the earth and the underworld.

Greta Fogliani in her “Alla radice dell’albero cosmico” writes “In itself, the tree is not really a cosmological theme, because it is first and foremost a natural element that, by its attributes, has assumed a symbolic function. The tree always regenerates with the passing of the seasons: it loses its leaves, it is dry, it seems to die, but then each time it is reborn and recovers its splendor.
Because of these characteristics, it becomes not only a sacred element, but also a microcosm, because in its process of evolution it represents and repeats the creation of the universe. Moreover, because of its extension both downwards and upwards, this element inevitably ended up assuming a cosmological value, becoming the pivot of the universe that crosses the sky, the earth and the afterlife and acts as a link between the cosmic areas.

Gustav Klimt: Tree of life, 1905

From the many variations while maintaining the same structure, the melodies vary depending on the origin, a polka in Ireland, a strathspey in Scotland and a morris dance in England .. The Irish could not transform it into a drinking song as a game-pretext for abundant drink (whoever mistakes drinks).
In short, everyone has added us of his.

RATTLIN’ BOG

“STANDARD” MELODY: it is the Irish one that is a more or less fast polka.

The Corries (very communicative with the public).

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula

THE RATTLIN BOG
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash

NOTES
1) rattling = “fine”
2)  Irish Descendants  say “limb”
3) in the version circulating in Dublin (although not unique, for example it is also found in Cornwall) it becomes a flea

PREN AR Y BRYN

The Welsh version has two associative paths with the tree, one is the cosmic tree, the tree of life: the tree that stands on the hill that is in the valley next to the sea. So says the refrain, while the second chain starts from the tree and goes to the branch, the nest, the egg, the bird with feathers, and the bed. And here it stops sometimes adding a flea and then going back to the tree.

The less childish versions of the song once arrived at the bed continue with much more carnal conclusion (the woman and the man and then the child who grows and becomes an adult and from the arm to his hand plants the seed, from which grows the tree) . A funny way to teach the words of things to children, but also a message that everything is interconnected and we are part of the whole.

Heather Jones ♪

PREN AR Y BRYN
I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc,
o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth
o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy
o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw
o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu
o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely
o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
English translation
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea ..

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni in Wicker Man

MAYPOLE SONG
In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.

NOTES
1) Summerisle is the imaginary island where the film takes place

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

It is the Italian regional version also collected by Alan Lomax in his tour of Italy in 1954. Of Italian origin Lomax are the Lomazzi emigrated to America in the nineteenth century.
In July 1954 Alan arrives in Italy with the intent of fixing on magnetic tape the extraordinary variety of music of the Italian popular tradition. A journey of discovery, from the north to the south of the peninsula, alongside the great Italian colleague Diego Carpitella who produced over two thousand records in about six months of field work.

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn this version from the tree we pass from the branches to the nest and the egg and then to the little bird. The context is fresh, very springly.. to explain the origin of life and respond to the first curiosity of children about sex ..
The song ended up in the repertoire of the scouts and in the songs of the oratory and young Catholic gatherings, but also among the songs of the summer-centers and kindergartens.

IN MES AL PRÀ
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in  mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
English translation Cattia Salto
In the middle of the lawn, guess what was there, there was the tree, the tree in the middle of the lawn, the lawn around the tree and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the tree guess what was there,  there were the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn
Attached to the branches guess what was there, there were the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Attached to the twigs, guess what was there, there were the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the middle of the leaves, guess what was there, there was the nest, the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree, and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
Inside the nest, guess what it was,
there were the eggs, the eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves, the leaves attached to the twigs, the twigs attached to the branches, the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn.
In the eggs, guess what was there
there were the little birds, the little birds inside the little eggs, the little eggs inside the nest,
the nest in the middle of the leaves,
the leaves attached to the twigs,
the twigs attached to the branches,
the branches attached to the tree
and the tree planted in the middle of the lawn

NOTES
1) “brocco” is an archaic term for the large branches dividing from the central trunk of the tree!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

“The tree in the wood”, there is a womb, a resting place in that “and the green grass grows all around” ..

Luis Jordan

a children version

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND
There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.

LINK
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

Sally Brown I rolled all night

Read the post in English

Nei sea shanties Sally Brown è lo stereotipo della donnina dei mari caraibici, mulatta o creola con la quale il nostro marinaio cerca di spassarsela. Di probabile origine giamaicana secondo Stan Hugill, era un canto popolare nei porti delle Indie Occidentali negli anni 1830. Le varianti testuali e melodiche sono molte.

ARCHIVIO

WAY, HEY, ROLL AND GO (halyard shanty)
I ROLLED ALL NIGHT(capstan shanty)
ROLL BOYS ROLL
ROLL AND GO (John Short)

SECONDA VERSIONE: I ROLLED ALL NIGHT

In questa versione il coro si sviluppa su più versi e la canzone è classificata, anche con il titolo di “Roll and Go”, nelle capstan shanty cioè i canti eseguiti durante il sollevamento dell’ancora per mezzo dell’argano (o verricello).

Planxty live (che non a caso ridacchiano, dato la nomea della canzoncina)

Irish Descendants in Encore: Best of the Irish Descendants


Shipped on board a Liverpool liner,
CHORUS
Way hey roll(1) on board;
Well, I rolled all night
and I rolled all day,
I’m gonna spend my money with (on)
Sally Brown.
Miss Sally Brown is a fine young lady,
She’s tall and she’s dark(2) and she’s not too shady
Her mother doesn’t like the tarry(3) sailor,
She wants her to marry the one-legged captain
Sally wouldn’t marry me so I shipped across the water
And now I am courting Sally’s daughter
I shipped off board a Liverpool liner
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool-Caraibi
CORO Salpa(1) e vai,
ho lavorato(1) tutta la notte
e ho lavorato tutto il giorno,
e spenderò i miei soldi
con Sally Brown.
La signorina Sally Brown è una bella ragazza, è alta e scura e non è troppo ombrosa
ma a sua madre non piacciono i marinai, vorrebbe che sposasse un capitano con la gamba di legno,
Sally non mi vuole sposare, così ho preso il mare
e ora faccio la corte alla figlia di Sally e mi sono imbarcato sulla tratta di Liverpool

NOTE
1) non è un termine propriamente nautico, ma è genericamente utilizzato dai marinai per dire molte cose
2) si potrebbe riferire al colore dei capelli più che della pelle, anche se in altre versioni è identificata come creola o mulatta. Il termine “creolo” può essere inteso in due eccezioni: dallo spagnolo “crillo”, che originariamente si riferiva alla prima generazione nata nel “Nuovo Mondo”, figli di coloni dall’Europa (Spagna o Francia) e gli schiavi neri. Il significato più comune è quello che si riferisce a  tutti i neri mezzosangue della Giamaica dal colore della pelle che passa dal marrone al nero-blu. Nell’Ottocento con questo termine si indicava anche una piccola società urbana elitaria di pelle chiara nella Louisiana  (residente per lo più a New Orleans) risultato degli incroci tra le belle schiave nere e i proprietari terrieri bianchi che le prendevano come amanti
3) tarry è un termine dispregiativo per contraddistinguere il tipico marinaio. Più in generale Jack Tar è il termine comunemente usato per indicare un marinaio delle navi mercantili o della Royal Navy. Probabilmente il termine è stato coniato nel 1600 alludendo al catrame con il quale i marinai impermeabilizzavano i loro abiti da lavoro.

Teddy Thompson in Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate   Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys,  ANTI 2006 in una versione più meditativa e malinconica

Sally Brown she’s a nice young lady,
CHORUS
Way, hay, we roll an’ go (1).
We roll all night
And we roll all day
Spend my money on Sally Brown.
Shipped on board off a Liverpool liner
Mother doesn’t like a tarry sailor(3)
She wants her to marry a one legged captain
Sally Brown she’s a bright lady(2)
She drinks stock rum
And she chews tobacco
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
CORO
Salpa e vai,
ho lavorato tutta la notte
e ho lavorato tutto il giorno,
spenderò i miei soldi con Sally Brown.
imbarcato sulla tratta Liverpool,
a sua madre non piacciono i marinai, vorrebbe che sposasse un capitano con la gamba di legno,
Sally Brown è una bella ragazza
beve la riserva di rum
e mastica tabacco

NOTE
2) la “fine young lady” si beve la riserva di rum (ovvero grandi quantità di rum) e mastica tabacco – non proprio quello che si dice “una lady”!!!

FONTI
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/sally_brown/
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=148935
http://pancocojams.blogspot.it/2012/04/sally-brown-sally-sue-brown-sea-shanty.html
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/sallyb.html
http://www.brethrencoast.com/shanty/Roll_Boys.html

EILEEN OGE

Il brano è stato scritto per la parte testuale da Percy French nel 1891, cantautore irlandese e scrittore di teatro, la musica è probabilmente dell’amico e collaboratore Houston Collisson con il quale calcò le scene della Gran Bretagna e Irlanda diventando famoso nei mondo dei Music-hall (fecero anche un tour in Nord America e nelle Indie Occidentali).

percy-french-homePercy French (1845-1920) nato da una famiglia benestante di Roscommon, era una persona eclettica, bruciata dall’arte e costretto negli studi scientifici; fortunatamente invece di avviarsi verso una carriera di ingegnere civile, si è indirizzato prima al giornalismo e al teatro e poi si è dedicato a tempo pieno alla sua passione: comporre e cantare canzoni comiche e satiriche (era anche portato per la pittura e fu un prolifico pittore di paesaggi); la sua verve di entertainer gli era così connaturata che si narra un aneddoto in merito a una causa portata in tribunale per diffamazione a causa della sua canzone ‘Are Ye Right There Michael’ nella quale prendeva in giro la pessima gestione della ferrovia della contea di Clare. All’udienza del processo intentato dalla Compagnia Ferroviaria Percy arrivò in ritardo e al Giudice irritato e offeso ha risposto: ‘Your honour, I travelled by the West Clare Railway’.
GUIDA ALL’ASCOLTO
Il giorno del matrimonio di Avelina (la giovane: oggi più conosciuto come acronimo óg o oge in gaelico significa “young”) è giorno di lutto per i tanti suoi spasimanti i quali si sono visti soffiare una grande bellezza da Big McGrath: abituata ad avere tutti ai suoi piedi la ragazza si è sentita attratta dall’unico che le mostrava indifferenza, così il consiglio finale per chi vuole conquistare una bella ragazza è “If you want them to run after you just walk the other way”
Possiamo quindi ritenerla una risposta comica alle ballate cosiddette della “Falsa Sposa” che affrontano il tema dell’amore non corrisposto (vedi) tra le quali si annovera anche Bhríd Óg Ní Mháille la dolente slow air diffusa nel Donegal in cui l’innamorato si dispera per essere stato abbandonato da una donna bellissima di nome Bridget (vedi)
LA MELODIA
E’ una hornpipe (vedi) spesso suonata in set per musiche da danza
ASCOLTA De Danann la melodia suonata in set con “The Rights of Man” (un po’ veloci come hornpipes, ma l’esecuzione ha fatto scuola)
ASCOLTA Liz Knowles la melodia è suonata in modo più cadenzato, in set con “Byrns March
ASCOLTA Dubliners, non poteva mancare la versione “tradizionale” dei “dublinesi”
ASCOLTA Mike Considine in Continental Drift 1992: interessante questa versione per voce e bodhran che si conclude con la danza portata e cadenzata da organetto e violino
ASCOLTA Irish Descendants in Across The Water 2004, una versione con batteria suonata come un ballabile con belle fioriture dell’organetto e del violino
ASCOLTA Cathy Jordan live 2012: l’interpretazione vocale più interessante dalla voce leader dei Dervish nel suo tour di debutto come solista, quasi jazzata

Eileen Oge, an’ that the darlin’s name is
Through the barony her features they were famous
If we loved her who is there to blame us
For wasn’t she the Pride of Petravore(1).
But her beauty made us all so shy
Not a man could look her in the eye
Boys! O boys! Sure that’s the reason why
We’re in mournin’ for the Pride of Petravore
CHORUS
Eileen Oge! Me heart is growin’ grey
Ever since the day you wandered far away
Eileen Oge! There’s good fish in the see,(2)
But there’s no one like the Pride of Petravore.
II
Friday at the Fair of Ballintubber(3),
Eileen met McGrath, the cattle jobber(4),
I’d like to set me mark upon the robber,
For he stole away the Pride of Petravore.
He never seem’d to see the girl at all,
Even when she ogle’d him underneath her shawl,
Lookin’ big and masterful, when she was looking small,
Most provokin’ for the Pride of Petravore.
III
So it went as it was in the beginning,
Eileen Oge was bent upon the winning,
Big McGrath contentedly was grinning,
Being courted by the Pride of Petravore.
Sez he, ‘I know a girl that could knock you into fits,'(5)
At that Eileen nearly lost her wits.
The upshot of the ruction was that now the robber sits,
With his arm around the Pride of Petravore.
IV
Boys, oh boys! with fate ‘tis hard to grapple,
Of my eye ‘tis Eileen was the apple.
And now to see her walkin’ to the chapel
Wid the hardest featured man in Petravore.
And now, me boys, this is all I have to say,
When you do your courtin’ make no display,
If you want them to run after you just walk the other way,
For they’re mostly like the Pride of Petravore.

NOTE
1) Petravore sta per “Pedar a Voher’s” (dal gaelico Peadar A(n) Bhóthairin inglese Peter of the Roads) era il nome di un pub ovvero una locanda del XVII-XVIII secolo collocato in un crocevia a Tullynamoltra (vedi)
2) il noto detto scozzese “ci sono molti pesci nel mare” è una frase consolatoria che in genere si dice a chi resta solo alla fine di una storia d’amore.
3) Ballintubber si trova nella contea di Mayo nell’Ovest d’Irlanda, è un antico villaggio conosciuto per la sua Abbazia
4) Cattle Jobber: buyer & seller of cattle
5) to knock someone into fits = beat someone hollow. Il senso della frase è che c’è un’altra bella più bella di Eileen per la quale la ragazza si roderebbe dall’invidia.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
La giovane Eileen, e che bel nome, nella contea i suoi lineamenti erano famosi, chi può biasimarci se l’amavamo perchè era l’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio”. Ma la sua bellezza ci rendeva tutti timidi nessun uomo poteva sostenerne lo sguardo Ragazzi! Oh Ragazzi! Questo è esattamente il motivo per cui siamo in lutto per l’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio”(1)
CORO
Giovane Eileen! Il mio cuore è diventato triste da quando te ne sei andata via
Giovane Eileen! C’è tanto pesce in mare(2) ma nessuno è come l’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio”
II
Venerdì alla fiera di Ballintubber(3) Eileen incontrò McGrath, il mercante di bestiame(4) vorrei mettere il mio marchio sul ladro che rubò l’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio” Non ha mai dato segno di vedere la ragazza anche quando lei lo adocchiava da sotto lo scialle tanto grande e maestoso quando lei sembrava piccola ma più stimolante per l’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio”
III
Così è andata fin dal principio la giovane Eileen era decisa a vincere il grande McGrath soddisfatto sorrideva, essendo corteggiato dall’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio” Disse lui “Conosco una ragazza che potrebbe scioccarti”(5) Al che Eileen quasi perse il senno. Il risultato del putiferio è che ora il ladro si trova con il braccio attorno all’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio”
IV
Ragazzi! Oh Ragazzi! Com’è duro affrontare il destino, ai miei occhi Eileen era la mela. E ora vedere lei che cammina nella cappella con l’uomo più tosto di “Peter del crocicchio” ragazzi, tutto quello che ho da dire quando il vostro corteggiamento non ha successo se volete che loro vi corrano dietro allora andate dall’altra parte perchè esse sono per lo più come l’orgoglio di “Peter del crocicchio”

FONTI
http://www.culturenorthernireland.org/article/18/the-mountains-of-mourne-sweep-down-to-the-sea http://percyfrench.co.uk/paintings/ http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82749 http://thesession.org/tunes/82 http://www.irishtune.info/tune/575/

 

L’albero in mezzo al prato

Read the post in English

Come il gioco della campana conosciuto dai bambini di tutti i continenti, anche la “canzone del ciclo eterno” è una goccia di antica sapienza sopravvissuta ai nostri giorni: oltre che gioco mnemonico è anche scioglilingua che diventa sempre più difficile articolare all’aumentare della velocità.

Alcuni dicono sia irlandese, altri che sia una melodia irlandese su di un testo scozzese, (o viceversa), altri ancora dicono che sia del Sud dell’Inghilterra o del Galles, o di origini bretoni, ma la canzoncina è talmente popolare che a nessuno importa discutere sulla paternità delle origini. Più probabilmente è una filastrocca collettiva e archetipa di quelle che si ritrovano nei vari paesi europei, proveniente da una antichissima preghiera-canto, di quelle che si praticavano nelle celebrazioni rituali primaverili, ovvero quanto è sopravvissuto dell’insegnamento antico, per metafore, del ciclo vita-morte-vita.

albero celtaL’ALBERO COSMICO

Non si può non pensare all’albero cosmico come simbolo universale, ossia il punto di inizio assoluto della vita. Nel linguaggio simbolico, questo punto è l’ombelico del mondo, inizio e fine di tutte le cose, ma viene spesso immaginato come un asse verticale che, situato al centro dell’universo, attraversa il cielo, la terra e il mondo sotterraneo.

Come sintetizza con chiarezza Greta Fogliani nel suo “Alle radici dell’Albero cosmico” “Di per sé, l’albero non è propriamente un motivo cosmologico, perché è innanzi tutto un elemento naturale che, per i suoi attributi, ha assunto una funzione simbolica. L’albero, in quanto tale, si rigenera sempre con il passare delle stagioni: perde le foglie, secca, sembra morire, ma poi ogni volta rinasce e recupera il suo splendore.
Per queste sue caratteristiche, esso diventa non solo un elemento sacro, ma addirittura un microcosmo, perché nel suo processo di evoluzione rappresenta e ripete la creazione dell’universo. Inoltre, proprio per la sua estensione sia verso il basso sia verso l’alto, questo elemento ha finito inevitabilmente per assumere una valenza cosmologica, andando a costituire il perno dell’universo che attraversa cielo, terra e oltretomba e che funge da collegamento tra le zone cosmiche.”

Gustav Klimt: L’albero della vita, 1905

Dalle molteplici declinazioni pur mantenendo la stessa struttura, le melodie variano a seconda della provenienza, una polka in Irlanda, una strathspey in Scozia e una morris dance in Inghilterra.. Gli irlandesi non potevano non trasformarla in una drinking song come gioco-pretesto per abbondanti bevute (chi sbaglia beve).
Insomma paese che vai verso che trovi, ognuno ci ha aggiunto del suo.

RATTLIN’ BOG

MELODIA “STANDARD”: è quella irlandese che è una polka più o meno veloce

The Corries (molto comunicativi con il pubblico)

Irish Descendants

The Fenians

Rula Bula sempre più demenziale


CHORUS
Oh ho the rattlin'(1) bog,
the bog down in the valley-o;
Rare bog, the rattlin’ bog,
the bog down in the valley-o.
I
Well, in the bog there was a hole,
a rare hole, a rattlin’ hole,
Hole in the bog,
and the bog down in the valley-o.
II
Well, in the hole there was a tree,
a rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
Tree in the hole, and the hole in the bog/and the bog down in the valley-o.
III
On the tree … a branch,
On that branch… a twig (2)
On that twig… a nest
In that nest… an egg
In that egg… a bird
On that bird… a feather
On that feather… a worm!(3)
On the worm … a hair
On the hair … a louse
On the louse … a tick
On the tick … a rash
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Coro
Buona palude,
la palude giù nella valle
speciale palude, la bella palude,
la palude giù nella valle
I
Nella palude c’è un buco
un buco speciale, un bel buco
il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
II
Nel buco c’è un albero
un albero speciale, un bell’albero,
l’albero nel buco, e il buco nella palude
e la palude giù nella valle
III
sull’albero c’è un ramo
sul ramo un rametto
sul rametto c’è un nido
nel nido c’è un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
sulla piuma un verme
sul verme un capello
sul capello un pidocchio
sul pidocchio una zecca
sulla zecca un eczema

NOTE
1) rattling si traduce genericamente come “fine” cioè “molto buono/bello”
2)  gli Irish Descendants dicono “limb” con lo stesso significato d i ramo
3) nella versione che circola a Dublino (anche se non unica, ad esempio si trova anche in Cornovaglia) diventa a flea (una pulce)

PREN AR Y BRYN

La versione gallese ha due percorsi associativi che hanno come centro l’albero, viene da pensare all’albero cosmico, l’albero della vita: l’albero che sta sulla collina che è nella valle accanto al mare. Così dice il refrain, mentre la seconda catena parte dall’albero e va al ramo, al nido, all’uovo, all’uccello alle piume, e al letto. E qui si ferma a volte aggiungendo una pulce per poi ritornare indietro all’albero.

Le versioni meno fanciullesche della canzone una volta arrivate al letto proseguono con considerazioni molto più carnali (la donna e l’uomo e poi il bambino che cresce e diventa adulto e dal braccio alla sua mano pianta il seme, dal quale cresce l’albero). Ancora viene in mente un modo divertente per insegnare le parole delle cose ai bambini, sempre però trasmettendo il messaggio che tutto è interconnesso e noi facciamo parte del tutto.

I
Ar y bryn roedd pren,
o bren braf
Y pren ar y bryn a’r bryn
A’r bryn ar y ddaear
A’r ddaear ar ddim
Ffeind a braf oedd y bryn
Lle tyfodd y pren.
II
Ar y pren daeth cainc, o gainc braf
III
Ar y gainc daeth nyth, o nyth braf
IV
Yn y nyth daeth wy, o  wy  braf
V
Yn yr wy daeth cyw, o cyw braf
VI
Ar y cyw daeth plu, o plu braf
VII
O’r plu daeth gwely, o gwely braf
VIII
I’r gwely daeth chwannen…
Traduzione inglese
I
What a grand old tree,
Oh fine tree.
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
The valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
II
From the tree came a bough,
Oh fine bough !
III
On the bough came a nest,
Oh fine nest !
IV
From the nest came an egg,
Oh fine egg !
V
From the egg came a bird,
Oh fine bird !
VI
On the bird came feathers,
Oh fine feathers !
VII
From the feathers came a bed,
Oh fine bed !
VIII
From the bed came a flea
The flea from the bed,
The bed from the feathers,
the feathers on the bird,
The bird from the egg,
The egg from the nest,
The nest on the bough,
The bough on the tree,
The tree on the hill,
the hill in the valley,
And the valley by the sea.
Fine and fair was the hill
where the old tree grew.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Che grande vecchio albero,
oh un bell’albero
l’albero sulla collina,
la collina nella valle,
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva
II
Dall’alvero venne un ramo
Oh bel ramo!
III
Dall’albero venne un nido,
Oh bel nido!
IV
Dal nido venneun uovo,
Oh bell’uovo!
V
Dall’uovo venne un uccello
Oh bell’uccello
VI
Dall’uovo vennero le piume;
oh belle piume
VII
dalle piume venne il letto
oh bel letto
VIII
Dal letto venne una pulce
una pulce dal letto
il letto dalle piume
le piume sull’uccello
l’uccello dall’uovo
l’uovo dal nido
il nido dal ramo
il ramo sull’albero
l’albero sulla collina
la collina nella valle
la valle accanto al mare
buona e giusta era la collina
dove il vecchio albero cresceva

MAYPOLE SONG

Paul Giovanni dal film Wicker Man


In the woods there grew a tree
And a fine fine tree was he
And on that tree there was a limb
And on that limb there was a branch
And on that branch there was a nest
And in that nest there was an egg
And in that egg there was a bird
And from that bird a feather came
And of that feather was
A bed
And on that bed there was a girl
And on that girl there was a man
And from that man there was a seed
And from that seed there was a boy
And from that boy there was a man
And for that man there was a grave
From that grave there grew
A tree
In the Summerisle(1),
Summerisle, Summerisle, Summerisle wood
Summerisle wood.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Nei boschi cresceva un albero
un bel bell’albero c’era
sull’abero c’era un ramo
e sul ramo c’era un rametto
sul rametto c’era un nido
nel nido c’era un uovo
nell’uovo un uccello
sull’uccello una piuma
e dalla piuma un
letto
sul letto c’era una ragazza
sulla ragazza c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo c’era un seme
e da quel seme c’era un ragazzo
e dal ragazzo c’era un uomo
e dall’uomo la tomba
dalla tomba cresceva
un albero
a Summerisle
Summerisle, Summerisle il bosco di Summerisle,
il bosco di Summerisle

NOTE
1) Summerisle è l’isola immaginaria dove si svolge il film

IN MES’ AL PRÀ

E’ la versione regionale italiana collezionata anche da Alan Lomax nel suo giro per l’Italia nel 1954. Di origine italiane Lomax era il nome dei Lomazzi emigrati in America nell’Ottocento.
Nel luglio del 1954 Alan arriva in Italia con l’intento di fissare su nastro magnetico la straordinaria varietà delle musiche della tradizione popolare italiana. Un viaggio di scoperta, dal nord al sud della penisola, a fianco del grande collega italiano Diego Carpitella che ha prodotto oltre duemila registrazioni in circa sei mesi di lavoro sul campo..

240px-Amselnest_lokilechIn questa versione dall’albero si passa dai rami al nido e all’uovo e quindi all’uccellino. Il contesto è fresco, molto primaverile e pasquale.. per spiegare l’origine della vita e rispondere alle prime curiosità dei bambini sul sesso..
La canzoncina è finita nel repertorio degli scouts e nelle canzoni da oratorio e raduni giovani cattolici, ma anche tra le canzoncine dei centri-estivi e scuole dell’infanzia.

Un video trovato in rete proveniente dalla tradizione lombardo-emiliana.


In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
In mes al prà induina cusa ghʼera
ghʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in   mes al prà,
il prà intorno a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
A tac a lʼalbero induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i broc(1),  i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero  piantato in mes al prà
A tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai broc induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera i ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero piantato in mes al prà.
A tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
a tac ai ram induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera le   foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
In mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
in mes a le foie induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼeraʼl gnal, il   gnal in mes a le foie,
le foie a tac ai ram, i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼindal gnal induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uvin, gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie, le foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc, i broc a tac a lʼalbero e lʼalbero   piantato in mes al prà.
Dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
dentrʼagli uvin induina cusa ghʼera,
ghʼera gli   uslin, gli uslin dentrʼagli uvin,
gli uvin dentrʼindal gnal,
il gnal in mes a le foie,
e foie a tac ai ram,
i ram a tac ai broc,
i broc a tac a lʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato  in mes al prà.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
In mezzo al prato indovina cosa c’era
cʼera lʼalbero, lʼalbero in mezzo al prato, il prato intorno allʼalbero
e l
ʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera, allʼalbero indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano i brocchi, (1)i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e l’albero piantato in mezzo al prato
Attaccato ai brocchi indovina cosa c’era, cʼerano i rami, i rami attaccati ai  brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Attaccato ai rami indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano le foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
In mezzo alle foglie indovina cosa cʼera
cʼera il nido, il nido in mezzo alle  foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero, e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro al nido indovina cosa cʼera,
cʼerano gli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro al nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie, le foglie attaccate ai rami, i rami attaccati ai brocchi, i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato.
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
Dentro agli ovetti indovina cosa cʼera
cʼerano gli uccellini, gli uccellini dentro agli ovetti, gli ovetti dentro a nido,
il nido in mezzo alle foglie,
le foglie attaccate ai rami,
i rami attaccati ai brocchi,
i brocchi attaccati allʼalbero
e lʼalbero piantato in mezzo al prato

NOTE
1) è l’equivalente italiano del branch inglese: anche se in disuso il termine italiano “brocco” indica un ramo irto di spine e quindi per estensione un troncone di ramo, insomma i grossi rami che si dipartono dal tronco centrale dell’albero!

THE GREEN GRASS GROWS ALL AROUND

Ovvero “The tree in the wood”, c’è un che di grembo, di riposo tombale in quel “e l’erba verde cresce tutt’intorno” ..

Luis Jordan

una versione per bambini


There was a tree
All in the woods
The prettiest tree
That you ever did see
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that tree
There was a branch
The prettiest branch
That you ever did see
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that branch
There was a nest
The prettiest nest
That you ever did see
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that nest
There was an egg
The prettiest egg
That you ever did see
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And in that egg
There was a bird
The prettiest bird
That you ever did see
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
And on that bird
There was a wing
The prettiest wing
That you ever did see
And the wing on the bird
And the bird in the egg
And the egg in the nest
And the nest on the branch
And the branch on the tree
And the tree in the ground
And the green grass grows all around, all around
The green grass grows all around.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
C’era un albero
nei boschi
l’albero più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sull’albero
c’era un ramo
il ramo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.
E sul ramo
c’era un nido
il nido più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nel nido
c’era un uvoo
l’uovo  più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
E nell’uovo
c’era un uccello
l’uccello più grazioso
che si sia mai visto
e l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
e sull’uccello
c’ara un ala
l’ala più graziosa
che si sia mai vista
e l’ala sull’uccello
l’uccello nell’uovo
e l’uovo nel nido
e il nido sul ramo
e il ramo sull’albero
e l’albero nella terra
e l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno
tutt’intorno
l’erba verde cresceva tutt’intorno.

FONTI
http://www.instoria.it/home/albero_cosmico.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/bog.htm
http://thesession.org/tunes/583
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/610.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=57991
http://www.anpi.it/media/uploads/patria/2009/2/39-40_LEO_SETTIMELLI.pdf

SAM HALL, CHIMNEY SWEEP THE HARD LIFE OF A CLIMBING BOY

Nella ballata  si narra probabilmente di un fatto realmente accaduto, l’impiccagione a Londra di un ladro dal nome Jack o John Hall.

JACK HALL

Venduto bambino a uno spazzacamino Jack preferì dedicarsi al furto negli appartamenti. Fu arrestato una prima volta, condannato all’impiccagione, e poi graziato per la sua giovane età, ma al secondo o terzo arresto non ebbe più scampo!
Nel 1707 (per la verità le date oscillano dal 1700 al 1710) fu arrestato insieme a Stephen Bunce e Dick Low per un furto commesso in casa del Capitano Guyon, vicino a Stepney e impiccato alla forca di Tyburn.
‘Jack or John Hall…was born of poor parents who lived in a court off Grays Inn Road, London, and who sold him for a guinea at the age of 7 to be a climbing boy. Readers of Charles Kingsley’s Water Babies (1863) will know how such boys (and girls) swept chimneys by scrambling up inside them. The young Hall soon ran away from this disagreeable occupation, and made a living as a pickpocket. Later he turned to housebreaking, for which he was whipped in 1692 and sentenced to death in 1700. He was reprieved, then released, but returned to crime and was re-arrested in 1702 for stealing luggage from a stagecoach. This time, he was branded on the cheek and imprisoned for two years. Finally, having been taken in the act of burgling a house in Stepney, he was hanged at Tyburn on 17 December 1707.’ (stralcio da The Sound of History di Roy Palmer)

timthumb

CLIMBING BOYS

I climbing boys erano dei bambini orfani, o che vivevano per strada in stato di abbandono  presi (oppure venduti dai genitori molto poveri) e addestrati dallo spazzacamino, per arrampicarsi nelle strette canne fumarie con piccoli spazzole a ripulirle dalla fuliggine.
In cambio di un misero alloggio e dei pasti lavoravano dall’alba al tramonto sempre con il rischio di brutte cadute o di gravi (e mortali) infezioni polmonari a causa delle polveri respirate.
In Gran Bretagna l’attività dello spazzacamino venne regolamentata solo nel 1864, dalla legge che proibiva l’impiego dei minori nell’attività, erano stati infatti inventati già alla fine del 700 dei nuovi metodi di pulizia del camino, relativamente più sicuri, con l’impiego di attrezzature particolari che si infilavano dall’alto restando sul tetto.
Nel decennio del 1840 un cantante di music hall inglese William Gribbon Ross, fece una nuova versione della ballata cambiando il nome in Sam (la ballata è catalogata nella Bodleian Ballads come Harding B 15), con cui ottenne un discreto successo e la popolarità.
Ecco un resoconto dell’epoca riportato da Percival Leigh
“But the thing that did most take me was to see and hear one Ross sing the song of Sam Hall the chimney-sweep, going to be hanged: for he had begrimed his muzzle to look unshaven, and in rusty black clothes, with a battered old Hat on his crown and a short Pipe in his mouth, did sit upon the platform, leaning over the back of a chair: so making believe that he was on his way to Tyburn. And then he did sing to a dismal Psalm-tune, how that his name was Sam Hall and that he had been a great Thief, and was now about to pay for all with his life; and thereupon he swore an Oath, which did make me somewhat shiver, though divers laughed at it.  Then, in so many verses, how his Master had badly taught him and now he must hang for it: how he should ride up Holborn Hill in a Cart, and the Sheriffs would come and preach to him, and after them would come the Hangman; and at the end of each verse he did repeat his Oath.  Last of all, how that he should go up to the Gallows; and desired the Prayers of his Audience, and ended by cursing them all round.  Methinks it had been a Sermon to a Rogue to hear him, and I wish it may have done good to some of the Company.  Yet was his cursing very horrible, albeit to not a few it seemed a high Joke; but I do doubt that they understood the song.”

I TESTI A CONFRONTO: SAM HALL E JACK HALL

I testi riportati nelle Bodleian Ballads sono due, e la versione di Ross doveva essere simile, ma più probabilmente le parole utilizzate erano più sboccate

SAM HALL, CHIMNEY SWEEP
I
Oh, my name it is Sam Hall,
Chimney sweep!
Oh, my name it is Sam Hall,
Chimney sweep!
My name it is Sam Hall
I have robbed both great and small,
And now I pay for all,
Damn my eyes.
II
My master taught me flam-
Taught me flam.
My master taught me flam-
Taught me flam.
My master taught me flam,
Though he know’d it for b—–(bram??)
And now I must go hang,
Damn my eyes.
III
I goes up Holborn Hill in a cart,
In a cart.
I goes up Holborn Hill in a cart,
In a cart.
I goes up Holborn Hill,
At St. Giles I take my gill*,
And at Tyburn makes my will,
Damn my eyes.
IV
Then the sheriff he will come,
He will come.
Then the sheriff he will come,
He will come.
Then the sheriff he will come
And he’ll look so gallows glum,
And he’ll talk of kingdom come,
Blast his eyes.
V
Then the hangman will come too,
Will come too.
Then the hangman will come too,
Will come too,
Then the hangman will come too,
With all his bloody crew,
And he’ll tell me what to do,
Blast his eyes.
VI
And now I goes up stairs,
Goes up stairs.
And now I goes up stairs,
Goes up stairs,
And now I goes up stairs
Here’s an end to all my cares,
So —- (say? send?) up all your prayers,
Blast your eyes.

* gill- Four fluid ounces.

Harding B15 (274b)
Hodges, printer, London, c. 1846-1854, Bodleian Collection.

JACK HALL
I
My name it is Jack Hall,
chimney sweep, chimney sweep,
My name it is Jack Hall, chimney sweep,
My name it is Jack Hall,
And I rob both great and small,
But my life must pay for all,
When I die, when I die.
But my life must pay for all,
When I die.
II
I’ve furnished all my room,
that’s no joke, that’s no joke.
I’ve furnished all my room, that’s no joke.
I’ve furnished all my room,
Both with shovels and birch brooms
Besides a chimney pot that I stole,
That I stole, that I stole,
Besides a chimney pot that I stole.
III
I sold candles in the Jail
short of weight, short of weight,
I sold candles in the Jail short of weight.
But the candles that I sold,
They would light me to the hold,
They would light me to the hold,
Where I lay, where I lay,
They would light me to the hold
Where I lay.
IV
They told me in the Jail, I should die, I should die
They told me in the Jail I should die,
Oh! they told me in the Jail
I should drink no more brown ale,
But the ale will never fail
More shall I, more shall I,
But the ale will never fail,
More shall I.
V
As we goes up Holborn Hill in a cart, in a cart,
As we goes up Holborn hill in a cart;
As we goes up Holborn Hill,
At St. Giles we did fill,
Then for old Tyburn
We depart, we depart,
Then for old Tyburn,
We depart.
VI
The ladder and the rope
went up and down, up and down.
The ladder and the rope went up and down,
Oh! the ladder and the rope,
My collar bone they broke.
And a devil a word I spoke come down,
Coming down, coming down,
And a devil a word I spoke
Coming down.

Bodleian Ballads, Harding B 15(145a), printed   by Birt, London, c. 1833-1851.

4415304-3x2-700x467

La melodia è identica a quella di Capitan Kidd e si tratta con molta probabilità di un modello tipico di ballata dell’impiccato. Nel foglio della ballata stampato nel 1701, la melodia è detta “Coming Down“: come si sa, nei fogli di strada erano riportati solo i testi (per lo più anonimi) della ballata e per la melodia si faceva riferimento ad arie popolari e in voga; la ballata di Jack Hall era già conosciuta da tutti e terminava con “but never a word I said coming down“. Incidentalmente la melodia è simile alla ballata Admiral Benbow Air scritta nel 1702, mentre lo spartito è pubblicato nel 1783 in The Vocal Enchantress. Dalla stessa melodia popolare discende anche il brano “Ye Jacobites by name” scritto da Robert Burns nel 1792.
In America sulla melodia così orecchiabile si sono composti molti inni religiosi che hanno generato a loro volta una serie infinita di varianti e aggiustamenti

IL TESTAMENTO DELL’IMPICCATO

La ballata si può leggere come una specie di testamento morale in cui Sam, dopo aver dichiarato le proprie generalità, riconosce di essere un ladro, di aver derubato sia i ricchi che i poveri e di essere consapevole del destino che lo attende.
La ballata è caratterizzata da continue ripetizioni all’interno dei versi di ogni strofa (la prima strofa è ripetuta due volte) e in alcune versioni è circolare, ovvero inizia e finisce esattamente nello stesso modo.

Il brano si è diffuso in tutta la Gran Bretagna, in America e Canada e le varianti testuali sono infinite, tra cui le simili “Tedburn Hills”, “Samuel Small”, “Nobby Hall”, “Tallow Candles” e “Song of a Doomed Man”. Tedburn

ASCOLTA Irish Descendants che mantengono l’andamento del lament

ASCOLTA The Porters (strofe da I a IV) con un po’ più di brio

I
Oh, me name it is Sam Hall,
chimney sweep, chimney sweep
Oh, me name it is Sam Hall,
chimney sweep
Oh, me name it is Sam Hall,
and I’ve robbed both great and small(1)
And me neck will pay for all,
when I die, when I die
And me neck will pay for all,
when I die
II
I have 20 pounds in store,
that’s not all, that’s not all
I have 20 pounds in store,
that’s not all
I have 20 pounds in store,
and I’ll rob for twenty more
For the rich must help the poor,
so must I, so must I
For the rich must help the poor,
so must I
III
Oh, they brought me to Cootehill(2)
in a cart, in a cart
Oh, they brought me to Cootehill
in a cart
Oh, they brought me to Cootehill,
there I stopped to make my will
For the best of friends must part,
so must I, so must I
For the best of friends must part,
so must I
IV
Up the ladder I did grope(3),
that’s no joke, that’s no joke
Up the ladder I did grope,
that’s no joke
Up the ladder I did grope,
and the hangman pulled the rope
Oh, and ne’er a word I spoke,
tumblin’ down, tumblin’ down
Oh, and ne’er a word I spoke,
tumblin’ down
VI
Oh, me name it is Sam Hall,
chimney sweep, chimney sweep
Oh, me name it is Sam Hall,
chimney sweep
Oh, me name it is Sam Hall,
and I hate ‘yas one and all
You’re a bunch of muggers(4) all,
damn your eyes, damn your eyes
You’re a bunch of muggers all,
damn your eyes(5)
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Oh, il mio nome è Sam Hall,
spazzacamino.
Oh, il mio nome è Sam Hall,
spazzacamino.
Oh, il mio nome è Sam Hall
e ho rubato sia ai ricchi che ai poveri (1).
e il mio collo pagherà per tutto,
quando morirò
e il mio collo pagherà per tutto,
quando morirò.
II
Ho rubato 20 sterline
e non è tutto
Ho rubato 20 sterline
e ne ruberò 20 altre
che i ricchi devono aiutare i poveri
così faccio io
che i ricchi devono aiutare i poveri
così faccio io
III
Oh, mi portarono a Cootehill (2)
in un carro, in un carro
Oh, mi portarono a Cootehill
in un carro, in un carro
Oh, mi portarono a Cootehill
e fu lì che smisi di fare le mie volontà
perchè i migliori amici devono andare
così io farò
perchè i migliori amici devono andare
così io farò
IV
Sulla scala andai a tastoni (3),
non fu uno scherzo, non fu uno scherzo
Sulla scala andai a tastoni,
non fu uno scherzo, non fu uno scherzo
Sulla scala andai a tastoni,
e il boia tirò la corda
e nemmeno una parola pronunciai,
cadendo giù,
e nemmeno una parola pronunciai,
cadendo giù
VI
Oh, il mio nome è Sam Hall,
spazzacamino.
Oh, il mio nome è Sam Hall,
spazzacamino.
Oh, il mio nome è Sam Hall
e vi odio dal primo all’ultimo.
siete un branco di rapinatori (4)
vi pigliasse un colpo,
siete un branco di rapinatori
vi pigliasse un colpo (5).

NOTE
1) qui non nel significato di piccolo ma di “umile”, “povero”
2) la località originaria è Tyburn o Tiborne Hill,  il luogo deputato alle pubbliche impiccagioni nella città di Londra.
Il nome Tyburn deriva dal ruscello “Bourne” che affluiva nel Tamigi. Nel suo percorso, il torrente passava per Hay Hill e la combinazione tra le due parole è diventato Tyburn.
La zona già dal 1196 vedeva la condanna a morte dei prigionieri politici. Tra il 1571 e il 1759, era stata innalzata una forca permanente chiamata Tyburn Tree oppure Gallows.
I prigionieri arrivavano dalla Torre (quelli di alto rango) o dalle carceri di Newgate (i criminali comuni) in corteo a piedi o più spesso trasportati su un carro.
La gente assisteva all’esecuzione della condanna a morte (che spesso non si limitava alla sola impiccagione) come se fosse uno spettacolo, c’erano tribune con posti a sedere, si vendevano merci varie e cibarie.
La forca permanente è stata smantellata nel 1759 per una forca più ridotta e portatile. L’ultima impiccagione si è svolta il 7 Novembre 1783. Oggi, una targa indica la posizione approssimativa del patibolo.
3) termine colloquiale “palpata”, “tastata”
4) le varianti degli epiteti sono numerose
5) un’imprecazione diventata di moda

E sul versante americano in versione country l’arrangiamento di Tex Ritter ripreso da Johnny Cash in cui il condannato che è stato processato per omicidio manda tutti all’inferno!
ASCOLTA Johnny Cash in “Johnny Cash Sings the Ballads of the True West” 1965 e anche in “American IV: The Man Comes Around” 2002 da un arrangiamento di Tex Ritter 1936


I
Well, my name it is Sam Hall,
Sam Hall
Yes, my name it is Sam Hall;
it is Sam Hall
My name it is Sam Hall
an’ I hate you, one and all
An’ I hate you, one and all:
Damn your eyes
II
I killed a man, they said; so they said
I killed a man, they said; so they said
I killed a man, they said
an’ I smashed in his head
An’ I left him layin’ dead,
Damn his eyes
III
But a-swingin’, I must go; I must go
A-swingin’, I must go; I must go
A-swingin’, I must go while you critters down below,
Yell up: “Sam, I told you so”
Well, damn your eyes!
IV
I saw Molly in the crowd; in the crowd
I saw Molly in the crowd; in the crowd
I saw Molly in the crowd an’ I hollered, right out loud:
“Hey there Molly, ain’t you proud?
“Damn your eyes”
V
Then the Sherriff, he came to; he came to
Ah, yeah, the Sherriff, he came to; he came to
The Sherriff, he come to an he said:
“Sam, how are you?”
An I said: “Well, Sherriff, how are you,
“Damn your eyes”
VI
My name is Samuel, Samuel
My name is Samuel, Samuel
My name is Samuel,
an’ I’ll see you all in hell
An’ I’ll see you all in hell,
Damn your eyes.
tradotto da Alessandro Portelli*
I
Mi chiamo Sam Hall‎,
si, mi chiamo Sam Hall
mi chiamo Sam Hall
si, mi chiamo Sam Hall
mi chiamo Sam Hall
e vi odio dal primo all’ultimo
e vi odio dal primo all’ultimo
Vi pigliasse un colpo
II
Ho ucciso un uomo,
così dicono
Ho ucciso un uomo, così dicono
e l’ho colpito alla testa,
e l’ho lasciato steso morto
Vi pigliasse un colpo
III
Ma a penzolare devo andare
devo andare a penzolare
deva andare a penzolare
mentre voi animali lì sotto mi dite:‎
“Sam, te l’avevo detto!”‎
Vi pigliasse un colpo
IV
Ho visto Molly tra la folla
ho visto Molly tra la folla
ho visto Molly tra la folla
e ho gridato forte e chiaro
“Molly non sei orgogliosa?”
Vi pigliasse un colpo.‎
V
Allora lo sceriffo arrivò
Allora lo sceriffo arrivò
Allora lo sceriffo arrivò e disse
“Sam come stai?”
e io dissi “Bene, sceriffo e voi
come state?
Vi pigliasse un colpo”
VI
Mi chiamo Samuele‎,
mi chiamo Samuele
mi chiamo Samuele
e vi vedrò tutti all’inferno
e vi vedrò tutti all’inferno
Vi pigliasse un colpo

NOTE
* da “Note Americane. Musica e culture negli Stati Uniti”, ‎Shake/Acoma edizioni, 2011
FONTI
http://www.orsomarsoblues.it/2013/12/cera-una-volta-lo-spazzacamino-poco-romanticismo-tanta-miseria/
http://www.ctsweep.com/blog/top-sweep-stories/a-history-of-chimney-sweeping/
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=42411&lang=it
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/jackhall.html
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4760
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/vop/notes178.htm

ILLUSTRAZIONI
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/intothemusic/
an00782354001jpg/4415304
http://www.curatormagazine.com/rebeccamartin/chimneys-dark-spirits-bright/

THE ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN

The Rocky Road to Dublin” (in italiano La strada pietrosa per Dublino) è una canzone scritta da D. K. Gavan per Harry Clifton e comparsa in stampa nel 1841 (testo e melodia sono stampati nel “The Citizen – Dublin Monthly Magazine” di aprile): è la storia del viaggio accidentato di un giovane irlandese in cerca di lavoro, che dal paesello natale di Tuam (contea di Galway) emigra a Liverpool, passando per Dublino.

Ma a Mulligar (contea di Westmeath) a causa del suo abbigliamento antiquato, viene deriso dalle donne del posto, e a Dublino viene prima derubato e poi beffato per il suo pesante accento gaelico. Nel tragitto per mare è stivato insieme ai maiali e inoltre patisce il mal di mare al largo delle coste di Holyhead (Galles).
Finalmente arrivato a Liverpool, viene canzonato da un gruppetto di bulli locali, e per difendere la sua Irlandesità, benchè solo contro molti, inizia a menare botte con il suo bastone da passeggio: è subito soccorso da un gruppo di irlandesi della sua stessa contea, e così la canzone finisce, allegramente, in una colossale zuffa!

DAL CUORE AL SANGUE

Il climax della canzone viene sapientemente costruito: nella I strofa il cuore quasi gli si spezza per il dolore della separazione dalla sua famiglia, nella II strofa il cuore “sta per affogare” e “per andare in ebollizione” nella IV è il mare intorno a lui a ribollire e infine nella V strofa è la volta del suo sangue “ad andargli alla testa“: il finale, inevitabile sfogo di tanta pressione, è una virile scazzottata!!

KISS ME I AM IRISH

La storia ha un chiaro intento comico, e mette in burla il carattere tipicamente “irish” della gente di campagna, fu scritta infatti per intrattenere il pubblico londinese del Music hall e la stessa sgrammaticalità del testo è una cornice adeguata al contesto; l’irlandese è un gran bevitore (e ogni pretesto è buono per farsi un goccio), si crede un gran seduttore (e le ragazze sono tutte ai suoi piedi), è superstizioso e vede folletti dappertutto, amante della musica e del ballo, non si tira indietro quando è il momento di menare le mani!

LA MELODIA

postcards2496-crdLa melodia è una slip jig, di solito una musica strumentale da danza, insolitamente accelerata, che mette alla prova le qualità canore degli interpreti e la capienza dei loro polmoni, essendo le strofe particolarmente lunghe! Apprendiamo dalla poesia di Patrick J. McCall dal titolo “The Dance at Marley” datata 1861 che a Dublino e a quel tempo, “The Rocky Road” era una popolare barn dance  come questa “Road to Spencer”

Qualcuno ha notato la somiglianza con una melodia scozzese molto antica, ‘Cam Ye Ower Frae France’, ovvero ‘The Keys of the Cellar’.

Siccome è una canzone piena di testosterone è esclusivamente interpretata da voci maschili, non per niente è stata utilizzata nella scena del pugilato nel film “Sherlock Holmes” (il primo della serie uscito nel 2009).

ASCOLTA The Dubliners in The originals 2005 (in repertorio dal 1964)

ASCOLTA The High Kings live in “The High Kings” 2008

ASCOLTA Orthodox Celts da vedere per l’aplomb di Aleksandar “Celtic” Petrović, l’ottimo arrangiamento strumentale (Down the River) e il video!

ASCOLTA Gaelic Storm abbinata con un’altra slip jig dal titolo “Kid on the Mountain”

ASCOLTA Irish Descendants per aver integrato nella melodia una serie di jigs famose quali Morrison Jig (o Morning Dew) Irish Washerwoman, …

E’ stata fatta anche una versione in gaelico dal titolo “An Bairille
ASCOLTA Julie Fowlis and Muireann Nic AmhlaoibhTha ‘m Buntata Mor/An Bairille/Boc Liath Nan Gobhar

C’è una versione testuale del 1901 pubblicata a New York con un testo diverso dalla versione irlandese e con il ritornello che dice
For it is the rocky road, here’s the road to Dublin;
Here’s the rocky road, now fire away to Dublin!

Ma al momento non ho trovato un brano da ascoltare con questa versione.


I
In the merry month of May(1),
From my home I started,
Left the girls of Tuam,
Nearly broken hearted,
Saluted father dear,
Kissed my darlin’ mother,
Drank a pint of beer(2),
My grief and tears to smother,
Then off to reap the corn,
And leave where I was born,
I cut a stout blackthorn,
To banish ghost and goblin,
In a brand new pair of brogues,
I rattled o’er the bogs,
And frightened all the dogs,
On the rocky road to Dublin.
CHORUS
One, two, three, four five,
Hunt the hare and turn her
Down the rocky road
And all the ways to Dublin,
Whack-fol-lol-de-ra.
II
In Mullingar that night,
I rested limbs so weary,
Started by daylight,
Next mornin’ light and airy,
Took a drop of the pure(3),
To keep my heart from sinkin'(4),
That’s an Irishman’s cure(5),
Whene’er he’s on for drinking.
To see the lasses smile,
Laughing all the while,
At my curious style,
‘Twould set your heart a-bubblin’ (6).
They ax’d if I was hired,
The wages I required,
Till I was almost tired,
Of the rocky road to Dublin.
III
In Dublin next arrived,
I thought it such a pity,
To be so soon deprived,
A view of that fine city.
Then I took a stroll,
All among the quality,
My bundle it was stole,
In a neat locality;
Something crossed my mind,
Then I looked behind;
No bundle could I find,
Upon my stick a wobblin’.
Enquirin’ for the rogue,
They said my Connacht brogue(7),
Wasn’t much in vogue,
On the rocky road to Dublin.
IV
From there I got away,
My spirits never failin'(8)
Landed on the quay
As the ship was sailin’;
Captain at me roared,
Said that no room had he,
When I jumped aboard,
A cabin found for Paddy,
Down among the pigs
I played some funny rigs(9),
Danced some hearty jigs,
The water round me bubblin’,
When off Holyhead,
I wished myself was dead,
Or better far instead,
On the rocky road to Dublin.
V
The boys of Liverpool,
When we safely landed,
Called myself a fool;
I could no longer stand it;
Blood began to boil,
Temper I was losin’,
Poor ould Erin’s isle
They began abusin’,
“Hurrah my soul,” sez I,
My shillelagh(10) I let fly;
Some Galway boys were by,
Saw I was a hobble(11) in,
Then with a loud hurray,
They joined in the affray.
We quickly cleared the way,
For the rocky road to Dublin.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Nel ridente mese di maggio(1)
partii da casa mia,
lasciai le ragazze di Tuam
con il cuore a pezzi
salutai il mio caro padre,
baciai la mia cara madre
bevvi una pinta di birra(2),
cercando di soffocare dolore e lacrime,
poi via a mietere il grano,
e lasciare il luogo dov’ero nato;
tagliai un robusto prugnolo
per scacciare fantasmi e folletti
e con un nuovo paio di scarponi
andavo con fracasso per le paludi,
spaventando tutti i cani
lungo la strada pietrosa per Dublino.
Ritornello
Uno, due, tre, quattro cinque,
caccia la lepre e falla girare
giù per la strada rocciosa
e per le strade fino a Dublino ,
Whack-fol-lul-lee-ra!

II
A Mullingar quella notte
ho riposato le membra tanto stanche, svegliato dalla luce del sole
al mattino successivo, sereno e allegro, mi feci un goccio(3),
per farmi coraggio,(4)
è questa la cura di Paddy(5),
ogni volta che beve.
Vedere il sorriso delle ragazze,
che ridevano tutto il tempo
del mio curioso stile,
“ti rende il cuore felice”.(6)
Mi chiedevano se avevo lavoro,
ma un impiego cercavo,
che di zappare ero proprio stufo
sulla dura strada per Dublino.
III
Successivamente arrivai a Dublino,
e pensai fosse un vero peccato
di privarmi così presto
della visione di una città così bella.
Allora feci una passeggiata,
in mezzo a tutta quella roba fine
e il mio fagotto mi rubarono
nell’ordinata cittadina;
qualcosa mi incrociò il pensiero
e mi voltai indietro
e nessun fagotto trovai,
che penzolava sul bastone.
Domandando per il ladro,
mi dissero che lo “scarpone del Connacht”(7) non era molto in voga sulla strada per Dublino
IV
Da lì me ne andai,
con lo spirito saldo(8),
piombai sul molo,
mentre la nave stava per salpare
il capitano mi gridò,
e disse che non aveva più posto,
ma quando salii a bordo,
una cabina per Paddy trovò
giù tra i maiali;
feci qualche divertente trucchetto(9),
e ballai appassionate gighe,
l’acqua attorno a me faceva bolle
e quando fummo a Holyhead
desiderai di essere morto,
o meglio, lontano invece che
sulla strada pietrosa per Dublino.
V
I ragazzi di Liverpool,
quando sbarcammo in salvo,
mi diedero del pazzo;
non ho più potuto sopportarlo;
il sangue iniziò a bollirmi,
stavo perdendo la pazienza
la povera vecchia isola di Erin,
iniziarono a insultare
“Hurra per la mia anima” dissi io,
feci volare il mio bastone da passeggio(10);
alcuni ragazzi di Galway che erano vicini, videro che ero bloccato(11).
Con un forte hurra si unirono alla rissa
e liberammo velocemente il cammino,
per la dura strada verso Dublino

NOTE
1) a volte il mese è maggio, altre volte è giugno (ma siccome il nostro Paddy vuole andare a mietere il grano come bracciante stagionale è più probabile sia il mese di giugno)
2) ogni occasione è buona per bere una birra
3) l’irish drop è un eufemismo per minimizzare il quantitativo di alcol bevuto, tutt’altro che minimo
4) letteralmente “trattenere il cuore dall’affogare”
5) Paddy’s cure
6) letteralmente “mettere il cuore in ebollizione”
7) frase allusiva la parola brogue oltre che scarpone significa anche “un forte accento dialettale” con particolare riferimento a un irlandese che parla inglese. Il Connacht e la provincia più occidentale dell’Irlanda, quella più povera e meno abitata, ma anche la parte più selvaggia del paese: un tipico paesaggio è quello del Connemara, con aride torbiere e stagni, e i campi suddivisi dai tipici muretti in pietra dove pascolano tante pecore e montoni. E’ la zona del Gaeltacht in cui si parla il gaelico irlandese
8) o almeno credo sia questo il senso del verso
9) la frase potrebbe riferirsi sia al fatto che Paddy suonasse qualche strumento ma anche che si divertisse con qualche gioco essendo “rig” traducibile con “trick”
10) shillelagh è un tipico bastone irlandese da passeggio un po’ corto e usato occasionalmente come arma
11) Hobble anche scritto come a-wobbelin’

FONTI
http://monologues.co.uk/musichall/Harry-Clifton.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=80986
http://books.google.it/books?id=9LgRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA264-IA2&dq=%22Rocky+Road+to+Dublin%22&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22Rocky%20Road%20to%20Dublin%22&f=false
http://www.folkworld.de/42/e/screen.html
http://www.bellandcomusic.com/rocky-road-to-dublin.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/593
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/ROC.htm#ROCKY_ROAD_TO_DUBLIN_[1]

ILLUSTRAZIONI
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/image/rocky-road/

RAGGLE TAGGLE GIPSY

Una ballata originaria della Scozia sugli zingari e il fascino dell'”esotico”: una bella lady è rapita da uno zingaro o abbandona il marito di sua spontanea volontà e, inseguita dal marito, si rifiuta di tornare a casa.

Come sempre nel caso di ballate molto popolari ampiamente diffuse dalla tradizione orale, si hanno molte varianti del testo anche con diversi finali (vedi Child #200 aChild #200 b).

RAGGLE TAGGLE GIPSY

E’ questa la versione più conosciuta della ballata con dei toni tra il disprezzo e la burla.
Il marito abbandonato insegue la moglie e cerca di convincerla a ritornare a casa; indignato, fa appello al talamo nunziale (dove si presume abbiano da poco consumato la loro prima notte); poi fa appello alle sue “sostanze” e alla sicurezza economica che le può garantirle con il matrimonio.
Ma la Lady è ben intenzionata a lasciarlo e mi soffermo sulla strofa di chiusura, – presente solo in alcune versioni – che riprende, per simmetria, la corsa del marito per andare alla ricerca della sposa fuggita con lo zingaro, e che  racchiude il motivo per cui la donna lascia il marito seppure Lord.
ASCOLTA Jalan Crossland in una strepitosa versione live un uomo con sole due mani ma che usa tutte le dita per suonare.. e che senso del ritmo!! Assolutamente strepitoso!!

The Chieftains & Nickel Creek. (il cd Further Down the Old Plank Road – 2003 è una chicca): a cominciare dall’attacco, le due voci, il riff violino e flauto e tutto il ritmo un po’ “bluegrass” del mandolino, per chiudere con una danza più irish che gitana, ma che rende appieno il clima di festa che doveva esserci in quel “campo all’aperto” intorno al carrozzone degli zingari!

ASCOLTA Waterboys. Questa versione l’hanno presa un po’ lenta rispetto ad altri live, ma è ben interpretata, e con il violino proprio zingaro! Bella anche la ripresa finale del flauto!

ASCOLTA Irish Descendants nel Cd Gypsy’s And Lovers -2008. Non male anche se ci si aspetta che succeda qualcosa di più “raggle taggle” nello strumentale, qui però è presente la strofa di chiusura aggiuntiva.

ASCOLTA Derek Ryan

VERSIONE CHIEFTAINS
I
There were three old gypsies came to our door. They came brave and boldly-o. And one sang high and the other sang low
And the other sang a raggle taggle gypsy o.
II
It was upstairs, downstairs the lady went, Put on her suit of leather-o,
And it was the cry all around her door
“She’s away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o”
III
It was late that night when the lord came in, Inquiring for his lady-o,
And the servant girl she said to the Lord; “She’s away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o”
IV
“Well, saddle for me my milk-white steed My big horse is not speedy-o
And I will ride till I’ll seek my bride,
She’s away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o”
V
Now, he rode east and he rode west
He rode north and south also,
until he came to a wide open field
It was there that he spied his lady-o.
VI
“Tell me, how could you leave your goose feather bed
your blankets strewn so comely-o?
And how could you leave your newly wedded Lord
all for a raggle taggle gypsy-o?”
VII
“What care I for my goose feather bed
for my blankets strewn so comely-o?
Tonight I lie in a wide open field
in the arms of a raggle taggle gypsy-o”
VIII
“Tell me, How could you leave your house and your land?
how could you leave your money-o?
How could you leave your only wedded Lord
all for a raggle taggle gypsy-o?”
IX
“Well, What care I for my house and my land?
what care I for my money-o?
I’d rather have a kiss from the yellow gypsy’s lips
I’m away wi’ the raggle taggle gypsy-o!”
X (additional)
“Oh, for you rode east when I rode west
You rode high and I rode low.
I’d rather have a kiss of the yellow gypsy’s lips
Than all of your cash and your money-o”
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Tre zingari si presentarono alla porta,
vennero con grinta e baldanza
e uno cantava da tenore, l’altro da basso
e il terzo suonava una melodia gitana arruffata. (1)
II
La moglie andò avanti e indietro
per le scale,
si mise gli abiti in pelle
e ci fu un grido dietro la porta
“Se n’è andata con lo zingaro!”.
III
Era tardi quella sera quando il marito ritornò,
cercando la sua consorte
e la cameriera disse al Lord
“Se n’è andata con lo zingaro”.
IV
“Sellatemi il destriero bianco
perché il mio cavallo non è abbastanza veloce
e cavalcherò per cercare la mia sposa, che se n’è andata con lo zingaro”.
V
Cavalcò verso est e cavalcò a ovest, cavalcò verso nord e anche a sud
finchè arrivò in un campo aperto
e lì vide la moglie.
VI
“Dimmi, come hai potuto lasciare il tuo letto di piume,
le tue coperte ancora calde,
e come hai potuto lasciare tuo marito appena sposato,
tutto per uno zingaro?”
VII
“Cosa vuoi che m’interessi del letto di piume e delle lenzuola ancora calde?
stanotte mi trovo in un campo aperto tra le braccia del mio zingaro.”
VIII
“Dimmi, come hai potuto lasciare la tua casa e la tua terra,
come hai potuto lasciare il tuo denaro, come hai potuto lasciare tuo marito appena sposato, tutto per uno zingaro?”
IX
“Cosa vuoi che m’interessi della casa e
della terra,
cosa m’interessa del denaro?
Preferisco un bacio dalle labbra del mio gitano (2),
me ne vado con il mio zingaro!”
X
Perché tu cavalcavi ad est (3) quando io cavalcavo ad ovest,
tu cavalcavi in alto quando io cavalcavo in basso,
preferisco avere un bacio dalle labbra del mio gitano,
che tutto la tua moneta sonante”

NOTA
1) raggle-taggle: arruffato, scarmigliato, rude o rozzo
2) yellow gypsy” a mio avviso non si riferisce al colore della pelle (che se non vogliamo proprio tradurla con gialla si potrebbe tentare con un olivastra) ma al colore giallo, tipicamente indossato fin dal medioevo, dalla gente di strada: artisti girovaghi e prostitute, il colore stava a indicare la loro impudicizia. O più precisamente un termine con un marchio d’infamia. Detto dalla Lady assume un tono vezzegigativo
3) la frase ci dice del vero motivo per cui la donna lascia il Lord: una sorta di incompatibilità tra i due o l’incapacità dell’uomo di condividere passioni e interessi con la moglie; la freddezza di un rapporto basato sulle convenzioni sociali e d’interesse, troppo tardi lo sposo ha cavalcato nella stessa direzione della donna!

continua