She Moved through the Fair like the swan in the evening moves over the lake

Leggi in italiano

The original text of “She Moved trough the Fair” dates back to an ancient Irish ballad from Donegal, while the melody could be from the Middle Ages (for the musical scale used that recalls the Arab one). The standard version comes from the pen of Padraic Colum (1881-1972) which rewrote it in 1909. There are many versions of the text (additional verses, rewriting of the verses), also in Gaelic, reflecting the great popularity of the song, the song was published in the Herbert Hughes collection “Irish Country Songs” (1909), and in the collection of Sam Henry “Songs of the People” (1979).
In its essence, the story tells of a girl promised in marriage who appears in a dream to her lover. But the verses are cryptic, perhaps because they lack those that would have clarified its meaning; this is what happens to the oral tradition (who sings does not remember the verses or changes them at will) and the ballad lends itself to at least two possible interpretations.

In the first few strophes, the woman, full of hope, reassures her lover that her family, although he is not rich, will approve his marriage proposal, and they will soon be married; they met on the market day, and he looks at her as she walks away and, in a twilight image, compares her to a swan that moves on the placid waters of a lake.

cigno in volo

The third stanza is often omitted, and it is not easy to interpret: the unexpressed pain could be the girl’s illness (which will cause her death) – probably the consumption- for this reason people were convinced that their marriage would not be celebrated.
And we arrive at the last stanza, the rarefied and dreamy one in which the ghost of her appears at night: an evanescent figure that moves slowly to call him soon to death .

The other interpretation of the text (shared by most) supposes she escaped with another one (or more likely her family has combined a more advantageous marriage, not being the suitor loved by her quite rich). But the love he feels for her is so great and even if he continues his life by marrying another, he will continue to miss her.
The verses related to an unexpressed pain are therefore interpreted as the lack of confidence in the new wife because he will be still, and forever, in love with his first girlfriend.
The final stanza becomes the epilogue of his life, when he is old and dying, he sees his first love appear beside to console him.

As we can see both the reconstructions are adaptable to the verses, admirable and fascinating of the song, precisely because of their meager essentiality (an ante-litteram hermeticism): no self-pity, no sorrow shown, but the simplicity of a great love, that few memories passed together can be enough to fill a life.

A single, strong, elegiac image of a candid swan in the twilight, anticipation of her fleeting passage on earth. The song is a lament and there are many musicians who have interpreted it, recreating the rarefied atmosphere of the words, often with the delicate sound of the harp.

Loreena McKennitt  from Elemental  ( I, II, III, IV)
Nights from the Alhambra 2007

Moya Brennan & Cormac De Barra from Against the wind

Cara Dillon live

Sinead O’Connor  (Sinead has recorded many versions of this song )


I
My (young) love said to me,
“My mother(1) won’t mind
And my father won’t slight you
for your lack of kind(2)”
she stepped away from me (3)
and this she did say:
“It will not be long, love,
till our wedding day”
II
She stepped away from me (4)
and she moved through the fair (5)
And fondly I watched her
move here and move there
And then she turned homeward (6)
with one star awake(7)
like the swan (8) in the evening(9)
moves over the lake
III
The people were saying
“No two e’er were wed”
for one has the sorrow
that never was said(10)
And she smiled as she passed me
with her goods and her gear
And that was the last
that I saw of my dear.
IV (11)
Last night she came to me,
my dead(12) love came
so softly she came
that her feet made no din
and she laid her hand on me (13)
and this she did say
“It will not be long, love,
‘til our wedding day”
NOTES
1) Padraic Colum wrote
“My brothers won’t mind,
And my parents.. ”
2) kind – kine: “wealth” or “property”. Others interpret the word as “relatives” so the protagonist is an orphan or by obscure origins
3) or she laid a hand on me (cwhich is a more intimate and direct gesture to greet with one last contact)
4) or She went away from me
5) the days of the fair were the time of love when the young men had the opportunity to meet with the girls of marriageable age
6) Loreena McKennitt sings
And she went her way homeward
7) the evening star that appears before all the others is the planet Venus
8) The swan is one of the most represented animals in the Celtic culture, portrayed on different objects and protagonist of numerous mythological tales. see more
9) in the evening it refers to the moment when they separate
10) the sorrow that never was said: obscure meaning
11) Loreena McKennitt sings
I dreamed it last night
That my true love came in
So softly she entered
Her feet made no din
She came close beside me
12) some interpreters omit the word “death” by proposing for the dream version, or they say “my dear love” or “my own love” but also “my young love
13) or “She put her arms round me

Chieftains&Van Morrison

Chieftains&Sinead O’Connor
Fairport Convention

Alan Stivell from “Chemíns De Terre” 1973
Andreas Scholl

A version entitled “The Wedding Song” has been handed down, which develops the theme of abandonment, and which is to be considered a variant even if with a different title
second part

LINK
http://thesession.org/tunes/4735
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-meaning-and-interpretation-part-1/
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-modern-lyrics-and-variations/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/shemovesthroughthefair.html

IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY

Una volta, la donna che partoriva un figlio al di fuori del matrimonio, era considerata una donnaccia, ripudiata dalla famiglia e a malapena ripagata, dal padre del bambino, con qualche moneta; molte di questa sventurate finivano, se non sulla strada a prostituirsi di male in peggio nelle case della Maddalena.

THE MAGDALENE HOUSE

magdalene-sisterIn Irlanda le donne che partorivano fuori dal matrimonio erano punite (mentre gli uomini non erano ritenuti responsabili) e letteralmente carcerate in strutture “caritatevoli” dette “Magdalene Laundries“: bastava essere troppo bella o violentata dal marito o abusata da fratelli, padri e parenti per finire nelle Case della Maddalena (la prima casa venne fondata da una donna Lady Arbella Denny a Dublino nel 1766) e si consiglia caldamente di vedere “The Magdalene Sister” (2002) diretto da Peter Mullan, il film-denuncia dei soprusi subiti dalle ragazze nelle Case della Maddalena. continua

Così per inculcare dei saldi principi morali nelle fanciulle e scoraggiarle ad abbandonarsi alle gioie del sesso, la saggezza popolare faceva ricorso alle warning songs!

IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY

Anche con il titolo di: The Forsaken Mother And Child, The Cruel Father, It Was On A Winter’s Morning, The Snowstorm

La canzone è stata raccolta dalla tradizione orale in Irlanda  del Nord
ASCOLTA Sarah Makem, Armagh, 1952

( la troviamo in stampa in Folksongs of Britain and Ireland, Kennedy 1975 e anche in America in “Songs of the Newfoundland Outports” vol 2, in  Kenneth Peacock 1965 con il titolo The Forsaken Mother And Child ). Herbert Hughes ha raccolto nel Donegal un frammento della canzone con il titolo The Fanaid Grove, (in Irish Country Songs, Vol I 1909). La ballata è spesso suonata all’arpa celtica, come una ninna-nanna, su di una melodia triste.

La donna scacciata dalla famiglia e abbandonata dal suo falso innamorato, ammonisce le altre di non cedere alle lusinghe di un uomo, specialmente se di rango superiore al proprio, e di non lasciarsi abbagliare dalla bellezza di un giovanotto che è comunque fugace come neve al sole.
Il destino della donna, se non fosse riuscita a farsi sposare da qualche onesto lavoratore, sarebbe stato molto crudele, difficilmente sarebbe stata assunta a servizio a causa della sua immoralità e molto più facilmente sarebbe finita sulla strada!

ASCOLTA June Tabor in “Abyssinians” 1993 una voce ricca di sfumature, un’interpretazione sincera che sottolinea la disperazione della ragazza

ASCOLTA Dolores Kane in Tideland 2001


I
It was in the month of January,
the hills were clad in snow
And over hills and valleys,
to my true love I did go
It was there I met a pretty fair maid,
with a salt tear in her eye
She had a wee baby in her arms,
and bitter she did cry
II
“Oh, cruel was my father,
he barred the door on me
And cruel was my mother,
this fate she let me see
And cruel was my own true love,
he changed (1) his mind for gold
Cruel was that winter’s night,
it pierced my heart with cold”
III
Oh, the higher that the palm tree grows, the sweeter is the bark
And the fairer that a young man speaks, the falser is his heart
He will kiss you and embrace you,
‘til he thinks he has you won
Then he’ll go away and leave you
all for another one
IV
So come all you
fair and tender maidens,
a warning take by me
And never try to build your nest
on top of a high tree
For the roots (2), they will all wither,
and the branches all decay
And the beauties of a fair young man,
will all soon fade away”
TRADUZIONE DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Era il mese di Gennaio,
le colline erano coperte dalla neve,
e mentre per colline e valli
dal mio vero amore andavo
incontrai una graziosa fanciulla
lacrime amare avea agli occhi,
e un bambino tra le braccia,
e tristemente si lamentava.
II
“O crudele fu mio padre
che mi chiuse la porta in faccia,
e crudele fu mia madre
che mi lasciò a questo destino,
e crudele fu il mio vero amore
che cambiò la sua intenzione con l’oro,
crudele fu quella notte d’inverno
che mi trafisse il cuore con il ghiaccio.
III
Oh, più in alto cresce la palma
e più dolce è la sua corteccia,
così più dolcemente parla un uomo,
più falso è il suo cuore;
lui vi bacia e abbraccia
mentre pensa di avervi conquistate,
poi se ne andrà via
e vi lascerà per un’altra.
IV
Così venite voi
belle e giovani fanciulle,
un avvertimento prendete da me:
non cercate mai di costruire il vostro nido sulla cima di un albero alto (2),
perchè tutte le radici (3) si seccheranno
e tutti i rami cadranno
e la bellezza di un grazioso giovanotto
presto svanirà”

NOTE
1) l’uomo invece di sposarla come era nelle intenzioni (prima di ottenere la virtù della donna) preferisce darle un po’ di soldi e sbarazzarsi di lei e del bambino. Altri intendono invece che siano stati i genitori della ragazza a pagare l’amante povero per allontanarlo da ogni pretesa matrimoniale, ma così non si spiega perchè abbiano buttato fuori casa anche la figlia!! In altre versioni s’intende che il giovane sia andato via dal paese in cerca di fortuna, perchè troppo povero per mettere su una famiglia.
2) il verso è condiviso in molte altre warning songs sul tema dell’amore tradito o falsamente corrisposto. Vedasi “The verdant braes of Screen“, P stands for Paddy
3) a volte scritto come “leaves”

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/frankie.armstrong/ songs/itwasinthemonthofjanuary.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45014 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=126475 http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/17/forsaken.htm http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/13/morning.htm http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Fanaid_Grove http://tunearch.org/wiki/Fanaid_Grove

I KNOW MY LOVE

Un brano della tradizione popolare irlandese dalle probabili origini ottocentesche, pervenuto in varie versioni e largamente diffuso in Irlanda con un’atipica protagonista femminile che lamenta il suo amore non corrisposto.
Il riferimento nella II strofa ad una località detta Mardyke permette di collocare il racconto originario a Cork nel Munster, Irlanda del Sud.

1207421K4-THEMARDYKE_jpg

La protagonista dichiara il proprio amore nei confronti di un ragazzo del luogo, il quale, però, non ricambia il sentimento, anzi, frequenta altre donne dalla dubbia reputazione; così chi canta esprime gelosia ed infelicità, che culmina nel lamento nel ritornello, in cui lei piange disperata.

Come se non bastasse oltre a non essere particolarmente bella, lei non è nemmeno un “buon partito” che per un ragazzo così libertino e vagabondo potrebbe essere forse un’attrattiva per un matrimonio d’interesse; così l’umile condizione “socio-economica” non permette alla ragazza di mettere in luce le sue qualità di brava donna di casa e di donna dalle mani d’oro che sa come tessere e confezionare un buon vestito da uomo!

Nell’ultima strofa si deduce che il ragazzo lascerà l’Irlanda e, molto probabilmente, sposerà una straniera. Due sono le versioni nel merito: la sposa del ragazzo è una English damsel “donzella inglese”, nell’altra è una American girl “ragazza americana”

Sebbene la ragazza gelosa si lamenti e pianga, la melodia, allegra e veloce, ci fa propendere per una lettura in chiave umoristica e caricaturale della storia.

La prima versione pubblicata da Herbert Hughes, senza la IV strofa, si trova nel I volume di “Irish Country Songs” e risale al 1909.

ASCOLTA Jimmy Clowley in Uncorked 1998 (già membro dei Stokers Lodge di Cork con i quali aveva registrato il brano nel 1979 nell’album omonimo titolo peraltro presente in molte compilations di irish music) che lo aveva imparato da Luke Kelly dei Dubliners. La gente di Cork ha un suo accento e un suo slang

ASCOLTA Danny Carnahan in Journeys Of The Heart 1989 con un interessante arrangiamento al mandolino

The Chieftains e The Corrs in “Tears from Stone” 1999 La versione dei Chieftains eseguita con i Corrs è diventata la più imitata.


I
I know my love by his way of walking
And I know my love by his way of talking
And I know my love dressed in a suit of blue(1)
but if my love leaves me what will I do?[Refrain] :
And still she cried, “I love him the best
And a troubled mind sure can know no rest”
And still she cried, “Bonny(2) boys are few
And if my love leaves me what will I do”
II
There is a dance house in Maradyke(3)
And there my true love goes every night
He takes a strange(4) girl upon his knee
Well now don’t you think that that vexes me?(5)
III
If my love knew I can wash and wring(6)
If my love knew I can sew and spin
I’d make a coat of the finest kind
But the want of money sure leaves me behind
IV
I know my love is an arrant(7) rover
I know he’ll wander the wild world over(8)
In dear old Ireland he’ll no longer tarry(9)
An American girl he’s sure to marry(10)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Conosco il mio amore dal modo di camminare,
conosco il mio amore dal modo di parlare
conosco il mio amore dal suo vestito blu, ma se lui mi lascia cosa farò?Ritornello
E lei grida ancora, “Lo amo sopra ogni cosa e una mente in affanno di certo non conosce pace” E lei grida ancora,
“I ragazzi belli sono   pochi e se il mio amore mi lascia cosa farò?”
II
C’è una sala da ballo in Maradyke
ed è lì che il mio caro amore va ogni notte
prende una donnina sulle ginocchia,
così allora non credete che questo mi infastidisca?
III
Se il mio amore sapesse che so fare il bucato, se il mio amore sapesse che so   tessere e filare, potrei fargli un vestito della migliore qualità, ma la   mancanza di denaro me lo impedisce.
IV
Il mio amore è un perfetto vagabondo
che gira per tutto il mondo, perchè nella cara vecchia Irlanda più a lungo non rimarrà e una ragazza americana sicuramente sposerà.

NOTE
1) oppure “And I know my love in the jacket blue
2) bonny: bello, termine tipico del dialetto scozzese
3) Maradyke o Mardyke era una strada Cork: Il Walk Mardyke era una strada della zona portuale, popolata da marinai, ubriachi e postitute poi ripulita e trasformta in passeggiata più borghese, oggi inglobata nella zona universitaria. C’era un St. Francis’ Hall nota sala da ballo agli inizi del 1900 e ritrovo preferito dai giovani fino agli anni ’20.
4) letteralmente : ragazza strana ma eufemismo per prostituta, in altre versioni l’aggettivo è “quare” decisamente più volgare per indicare una vecchia baldracca
5) oppure “And don’t you know how that troubles me
6) tradotto in italiano con fare il bucato al posto di “lavare e strizzare”
7) oppure ” handsome” oppure “errant
8 oppure “And I know he’ll roam the whole world over
9) to tarry: “rimanere” forma dialettale in disuso equivalente a to stay
10) oppure “And an English girl sure he’s sure to marry

UNA VISITA A CORK

CORK E DINTORNI: UN’ALTRA IRLANDA
Cork è la seconda città d’Irlanda per dimensione dopo Dublino e la terza se si considera l’intera Isola (nel qual caso va aggiunta Belfast) nonché il capoluogo della propria contea (la più grande del Paese sebbene non arrivi neppure a 500.000 abitanti in totale) e la città principale della regione del Munster. Oggi è una cittadina middle class che non ha molti ricordi del suo passato sanguinoso e negli ultimi sei anni sta vivendo una specie di “Rinascimento”. Da città grigia e spenta è stata trasformata archettonicamente (trasformazione che tutt’ora continua incessante e che proseguirà fino alla ristrutturazione dei dock e il trasferimento del porto commerciale totalmente a Ringaskiddy) ed è attualmente una città vibrante e giovane, grazie anche alla sua università principale, UCC, il suo politecnico, CIT, ed i vari istituti d’arte che costellano la zona urbana. continua

FONTI
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/i/iknowmyl.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=20116
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/i-know-my-love
http://mainlynorfolk.info/eliza.carthy/songs/iknowmylove.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/FSWB143.html
http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie

ILLUSTRAZIONI
http://www.vintage-views.com/antique_prints-of-ireland/index10.html

MY LAGAN LOVE

Con la stessa melodia, una slow air delicata e malinconica, e due titoli simili si identificano ben tre canzoni.

LA VERSIONE DELLA TRADIZIONE IRLANDESE

Il testo è stato scritto nel 1904 dal poeta di Belfast Joseph Campbell (1879-1944) su una melodia tradizionale irlandese del Donegal. La canzone è stata pubblicata in “Songs of Uladh” di Herbert Hughes e Joseph Campbell, scritta probabilmente nel 1903 durante una vacanza nel nord del Donegal e nella nota si spiega come il brano sia arrivato a lui dalla tradizione orale ottocentesca.

“I got this from Proinseas mac Suibhne who played it for me on the fidil. He had it from his father Seaghan mac Suibhne, who learned it from a sapper working on the Ordnance Survey in Tearmann about fifty years ago. It was sung to a ballad called the “Belfast Maid,” now forgotten in Cill-mac-nEnain”
[Traduzione italiano: Ho ricevuto questo da Proinseas mac Suibhne che lo ha suonato per me al violino. L’ha avuto da suo padre Seaghan mac Suibhne, che lo imparò da un lavoratore… circa 50 anni fa. Era cantata con una melodia detta Belfast Maid ormai dimenticata.]

E’ la storia di un innamorato e del suo “lily fair” (in italiano bel giglio) dai capelli neri e dagli occhi nocciola che vive lungo le rive del fiume Lagan. L’uomo sbircia dal buco della serratura la vita della donna, che vive da sola con il padre barcaiolo, e nella quarta strofa finalmente anche lei ricambia il suo amore.

Sono le parole, unite alla melodia, ad essere intense, espressione di un amore totalizzante, che rende l’uomo schiavo perchè “love is lord of all“!

Ma nella prima strofa il poeta, noto nazionalista irlandese, dichiara velatamente il suo amore per l’Irlanda! Seosamh MacCathmhaoil cosi come si faceva chiamare il poeta in uno pseudonimo in gaelico, infarcisce il brano di credenze tradizionali preveniente da un mondo rurale idealizzato.

My-Lagan-Love
Illustrazione relativa a My Lagan Love pubblicata in “Songs of Uladh”

In genere nelle registrazioni in commercio la II strofa è saltata. Ottime registrazioni anche da Anuna in Invocation, Jim McCann in Grace, ma sono tantissimi gli artisti e i gruppi che la propongono.

ASCOLTA Lisa Hannigan & The Chieftains in Voice of Ages, un’interpretazione crepuscolare da pelle d’oca (strofe I, III)

ASCOLTA Sinead O’Connor in Sean Nos Nua (strofe I, III, IV)

ASCOLTA The Corrs in Home (strofe I, III, IV)


I
Where Lagan(1) stream sings lullaby
There blows a lily fair
The twilight gleam is in her eyes
The night is on her hair
And, like a love sick lennan-shee(2)
She has my heart in thrall
No life have I, no liberty,
For love is lord of all
II
Her father sails a running-barge
‘Twixt Leamh-beag and The Druim(3);
And on the lonely river-marge
She clears his hearth for him.
When she was only fairy-high
Her gentle mother died;
But dew-Love keeps her memory
Green on the Lagan side
III
And sometimes when the beetle’s horn
Hath lulled the eve to sleep,
I steal unto her shieling(4) lorn
And through the door-ring peep,
There on the crickets’ singing-stone(5)
She spares the bogwood fire,
And hums in sad sweet and undertone,
The song of heart’s desire
IV
Her welcome, like her love for me,
Is from her heart within:
Her warm kiss is felicity
That knows no taint of sin.
And, when I stir my foot to go,
‘Tis leaving Love and light
To feel the wind of longing blow
From out the dark of night.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Là dove il fiume Lagan(1) canta una nenia, cresce un bel giglio
il riflesso del crepuscolo brilla nei suoi occhi, la notte sui suoi capelli
e come una fata (2), malata d’amore,
lei tiene il mio cuore in schiavitù
non vivo più, non sono più libero
che Amore è padrone di ogni cosa
II
Suo padre spinge le vele della chiatta
tra Lamberg e il Drum(3)
e sulla sponda del fiume solitario
lei accudisce la sua casa per lui.
Quando era solo una piccola fata
la sua buona madre morì,
ma l’amore rinverdisce il ricordo di lei con le lacrime, sulla sponda del Lagan.
III
A volte quando il corno del coleottero
ha fatto addormentare la sera cullandola,
io mi avvicino alla sua dimora(4) solitaria
attraverso la soglia sbircio,
là sul focolare dove cantano i grilli(5),
lei che alimenta il fuoco con la legna di brughiera e mormora dolcemente sottovoce la canzone che il cuore desidera
IV
Il suo benvenuto, come l’amore per
me, giunge dal più profondo:
il suo bacio caloroso è la felicità
che non conosce la macchia del peccato
e, quando riesco ad andarmene
così lascio Amore e luce
per sentir soffiare il vento della nostalgia fuori nel buio della notte

NOTE
1) Lagan: fiume che attraversa Belfast, Altri però ritengono che il fiume sia un torrente che sfocia nel Lough Swilly nella contea di Donegal, non lontano da Letterkenny, dove Herbert Hughes raccolto la canzone nel 1903.
2) Lennan-shee – Shide Leannan (lett fata bambino) leman shee  è la fata che cerca l’amore tra gli umani. La fata, che è un essere sia di genere maschile che femminile, dopo aver sedotto un mortale lo abbandona per ritornare nel suo mondo. L’amante si tormenta per l’amore perduto fino alla morte.
Gli amanti delle fate hanno una vita breve, ma intensa. La fata che prende come amante un umano e anche la musa ispiratrice dell’artista che offre il talento in cambio di un amore devoto, portando l’amante alla follia o a una morte prematura.
3) Lambeg è un villaggio tra Lisburn e Belfast e the Drum è il sito di un canale parallelo al fiume in prossimità del ponte che lo attraversa
4) shieling: riparo stagionale di pastori tipo capanno
5) Crickets’ singing-stone: I grilli sono animali portafortuna e sentire il loro canto vicino al focolare era di buon auspicio. Era consuetudine per i novelli sposi portare nella nuova casa una coppia di grilli dalla casa dei genitori.

LA VARIANTE AL FEMMINILE

Con delle lievi modifiche al testo tradizionale Caroline Lavelle ricava una canzone romantica al femminile


I
Where Lagan streams sing lullabies
Through clouds of lilies fair
The half-light gleam is in his eyes
The night is on his hair
Like a love-sick lenashee
He has my heart to call
No life have I
No liberty
For his love is lord of all
II
And often when the late birdsong
Has lulled all the world to sleep
I will steal into my lover’s arms
Our secrets there to keep
And on the cricket’s singing stone
He’ll make a drywood fire
And tell me then, sweet undertones
The song of my heart’s desire.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dove il Lagan(1) scorre e canta una ninnananna tra le nubi di bei gigli,
il riflesso del crepuscolo è nei suoi occhi, la notte sui suoi capelli
e come un usignolo (2) innamorato
prende il mio cuore da chiamare
non vivo più,
nessuna libertà, perchè il suo Amore è padrone di ogni cosa.
II
E spesso quando l’ultimo canto
ha fatto addormentare il mondo cullandolo, starò tra le braccia del mio amore, per custodire i nostri segreti
e sul focolare dove canta il grillo
lui farà un fuoco di legna secca
e mi canterà sommessamente
il canto che il mio cuore anela

NOTE
1) al plurare in inglese per indicare i rivoletti del fiume Lagan quando scende a valle
2) lenashee in questo contesto è un appellativo dell’usignolo, nel verso suggessivo dice infatti “birdsong”, il canto dell’usignolo, l’uccello che canta di notte.
L’usignolo è l’uccello che canta solo di notte e nella tradizione popolare è il simbolo degli amanti e dei loro convegni amorosi, immortalato da Shakespeare nel “Romeo e Giulietta” . Così il canto dell’usignolo ha assunto una caratteristica negativa, egli non è il cantore della gioia come l’allodola bensì della malinconia e della morte. continua

MY LAGAN LOVE BY CARDER BUSH

ASCOLTA Kate Bush (vedi Hounds of Love ristampa 1997 nelle bonus track) con l’incanto della sola voce

Il testo del fratello non tiene conto di quello di J. Campbell, ma, suggestionato della melodia, parla di Lagan come di una persona che muore ed è rimpianto dalla donna che lo amava.

TESTO DI JOHN CARDER BUSH
I
When rainy nights are soft with tears,
And Autumn leaves are falling,
I hear his voice on tumbling waves
And no one there to hold me.
At evening’s fall he watched me walk.
His heart was mine.
But my love was young, and felt
The world was not cruel, but kind.
II
Where Lagan’s light fell on the hour,
I saw him far below me-
Just as the morning calmed the storm-
With no one there to hold him.
My loves have come, my loves have gone,
And nothing’s left to warm me,
Save for a voice on the traveling wind,
And the glimpse of a face at morning.
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Quando le notti di pioggia piangono lacrime e le foglie d’autunno cadono,
sento la sua voce nelle onde agitate,
e non c’è nessuno ad abbracciarmi.
All’arrivo della sera mi guardava passeggiare, il suo cuore era il mio..
Il mio amore era giovane e credeva che il mondo non fosse crudele, ma buono.
II
Dove allo scoccare dell’ora la luce di Lagan mi apparve,
lo vidi lontano dietro di me –
proprio mentre il mattino calmava la tempesta –
e non c’è nessuno ad abbracciarlo.
I miei amanti sono venuti, i miei amanti sono andati
e niente è rimasto per riscaldarmi,
eccetto che una voce nel vento vagabondo e il lampo di un volto al mattino.

THE QUIET JOYS OF BROTHERHOOD

Canzone scritta sulla melodia popolare My Lagan Love da Richard Fariña e interpretata dalla sua compagna Mimi Baez, il brano compare nell’album “Memories” del 1968 pubblicato dopo la morte dello stesso autore in un incidente, subito ripreso dai Fairport Convention (in Liege and Lief -1969)

La poesia richiama una mitica terra dalla natura incontaminata contrapposta alla terra deturpata dalla mano dell’uomo ispirata dalla magica frase “For love is lord of all“.

ASCOLTA Mimi e Richard Fariña

ASCOLTA con la voce magica di Sandy Danny e un violino da brivido

TESTO DI RICHARD FARIÑA
I
Where gentle tides go rolling by
Along the salt-sea strand
The colours blend and roll as one
Together in the sand
And often do the winds entwine
To send their distant call
The quiet joys of brotherhood
When love is lord of all
II
Where oat and wheat together rise
Along the common ground
The mare and stallion light and dark
Have thunder in their sound
The rainbow sign, the blended flood
Still have my heart enthralled
The quiet joys of brotherhood
When love is lord of all
III
But men have come to plow the tides
The oat lies on the ground
I hear their fires in the field
They drive the stallion down
The roses bleed, both light and dark
The winds do seldom call
The running sands (1) recall the time
When love was lord of all
traduzione italiano di  Cattia Salto
I
Dove vanno e vengono liete le maree
lungo la battigia della spiaggia
i colori mescolati e confusi in uno, insieme alla sabbia
e spesso i venti si avvinghiano
per inviare il loro richiamo lontano:
la gioia e la pace della fratellanza
quando Amore è padrone di ogni cosa
II
Dove avena e grano crescono insieme,
nella stessa terra
la giumenta e lo stallone, bianco e nero,
hanno il tuono nei loro nitriti,
l’arcobaleno, il flusso delle acque, hanno sempre incantato il mio cuore.
La gioia e la pace della fratellanza
quando l’amore è padrone di ogni cosa
III
Ma uomini vennero a devastare le maree, l’avena è stesa a terra e
ho sentito i loro spari nel campo,
hanno domato lo stallone
la rose sanguinano giorno e notte,
i venti soffiano di rado
la sabbia scorre, ricorda il tempo
quando Amore era padrone di ogni cosa.

NOTE
1) la sabbia nella clessidra

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5808 http://mainlynorfolk.info/sandy.denny/songs/quietjoysofbrotherhood.html

DOWN BY THE SALLY GARDENS

Dolcissima e malinconica canzone tratta da una poesia di William Butler Yeats, dal titolo “Down by the Sally Gardens” (in italiano=Là nel giardino dei salici).
Yeats la scrisse nel 1889 pubblicandola nella raccolta giovanile “The Wanderings of Oisin and other poems” con il titolo “An Old Song Re-Sung“, ispirandosi alla ballata popolare “The Rambling Boys of Pleasure” di cui riprende alcuni versi della seconda strofa, facendoli diventare il tema principale della sua poesia, intitolata poi “The Salley Gardens” nella ristampa del 1895.

I versi popolari
She advised me to take love easy, as the leaves grew on the tree.
But I was young and foolish, with my darling could not agree.
nella mano di Yeats diventano
She bid me to take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree
But I being young and foolish, with her I did not agree

LA MELODIA

Solo nel 1909 la poesia fu messa in musica dal compositore Herbert Hughes sul brano tradizionale di “Maids of Mourne Shore”  e sebbene successivamente altri autori composero delle melodie per la canzone, quello più accreditato dagli interpreti contemporanei è rimasto proprio l’arrangiamento di Hughes.

IL VIALE DEGLI INNAMORATI

Dante Gabriel Rossetti "Water willow" 1871Ancora aperta la discussione su quale albero abbia voluto indicare Yeats con il suo Salley e le opzioni spaziano dall’eucalipto alla betulla, ma senza dubbio il salice piangente è l’albero che più rispecchia il “mood” della poesia; il protagonista, perché troppo giovane e inesperto esita nella sua prima esperienza d’amore con la sua innamorata, nonostante sia invitato a cogliere l’amore –She bid me to take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree– e l’immagine delle foglie che crescono sull’albero richiama un che di giovane virgulto, di fresco e verde germoglio che cresce secondo natura. L’attimo fuggente non colto è perduto per sempre e ciò che resta è il rimpianto (e i rami di salice sono così onnipresenti nelle ballate popolari delle cosiddette warning song sui pericoli e i dolori dell’esperienza sessuale).

Molti sono gli artisti che interpretano questa canzone e non solo nell’ambito del folk, tra tutte due gemme

Clannad in The Ultimate Collection live


Loreena McKennitt
  in The Wind That Shakes the Barley, 2010: Loreena apporta delle lievi modifiche testuali

VERSIONE CLANNAD
I
Down by the Sally Gardens,
my love and I did meet
She passed the Sally Gardens,
with little snow-white feet
She bid me to take love easy,
as the leaves grow on the tree
But I being young and foolish,
with her I did not agree
II
In a field by the river,
my love and I did stand
And on my leaning shoulder,
she laid her snow-white hand
She bid me to take life easy,
as the grass grows on the weirs
But I was young and foolish,
and now I am full of tears
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Nei Giardini dei Salici
il mio amore ed io c’incontrammo
attraversava i Giardini dei Salici
con piedini candidi come neve.
Mi pregò di prendere l’amore come viene, così come le foglie crescono sugli alberi, ma giovane e sciocco
con lei non concordavo
II
In un campo accanto al fiume
il mio amore ed io ci fermammo
e sulla mia spalla ossuta
mise la mano candida
pregandomi di prendere la vita come viene, così come l’erba cresce sulle rive
ma ero giovane e sciocco
e ora non mi restano che lacrime
TRADUZIONE di Roberto Sanesi (edizioni Mondadori)
I
Fu là nei giardini dei salici
che la mia amata ed io ci incontrammo;
Ella passava là per i giardini
con i suoi piccoli piedi di neve.
M’invito’ a prendere amore così come veniva, come le foglie crescono sull’albero;
Ma io, giovane e sciocco, non volli ubbidire al suo invito.
II
Fu in un campo sui bordi del fiume
che la mia amata ed io ci arrestammo,
E lei poso’ la sua mano di neve sulla mia spalla inclinata.
M’invito’ a prendere la vita cosi’ come veniva, come l’erba cresce sugli argini;
Ma io ero giovane e sciocco,
e ora son pieno di lacrime.
Angelo Branduardi – Nel giardino dei salici in Branduardi canta Yeats 1985 la poesia è tradotta ed adattata dalla moglie di Angelo, Luisa Zappa su musica scritta da Branduardi

I
Nel giardino dei salici
ho incontrato il mio amore
là lei camminava
con piccoli piedi bianchi di neve
là lei mi pregava
che prendessi l’amore come viene
così come le foglie crescono sugli alberi.
II
Così giovane ero
io non le diedi ascolto
così sciocco ero
io non le diedi ascolto
fu là presso il fiume che
con il mio amore mi fermai
e sulle mie spalle lei posò
la sua mano di neve.
III
Nel giardino dei salici
ho incontrato il mio amore
là lei mi pregava
che prendessi la vita così come viene
così come l’erba
che cresce sugli argini del fiume
ero giovane e sciocco
ed ora non ho che lacrime.


SALLY GARDEN REEL
Sally garden è anche il titolo di un popolare reel irlandese
ASCOLTA Comhaltas Ceoltoiri Éireann

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/you_rambling_boys_of_pleasure.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.CFM?threadID=13144
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/down-by-the-salley-gardens
http://www.debaser.it/recensionidb/ID_6756/
Angelo_Branduardi_Branduardi_canta_Yeats.htm

http://thesession.org/tunes/98
http://comhaltas.ie

She moved through the fair

Read the post in English

Il testo originale di “She Moved trough the Fair” risale ad una antica ballata irlandese del Donegal, mentre la melodia potrebbe essere di epoca medievale (per la scala musicale utilizzata che richiama quella araba). La versione standard viene dalla penna di Padraic Colum (1881-1972) che la riscrisse nel 1909. Del testo esistono molte versioni (strofe aggiuntive, riscrittura dei versi), anche in gaelico, a testimonianza della grande popolarità del brano, la canzone è stata pubblicata nella raccolta di Herbert Hughes “Irish Country Songs” (1909), e nella raccolta di Sam Henry “Songs of the People” (1979).
Nella sua essenza la storia narra di una fanciulla promessa in sposa che appare in sogno al suo innamorato. Ma i versi sono criptici, forse  perchè mancano quelli che ne avrebbero chiarito il significato; è quello che succede alla tradizione orale (chi canta non ricorda i versi o li cambia a suo piacimento) e la ballata si presta ad almeno due possibili interpretazioni.

LA MORTE

Nelle prime strofe la donna, speranzosa, rassicura l’innamorato che la sua famiglia, nonostante lui non sia ricco, ne approverà la proposta di matrimonio, e loro presto si sposeranno; i due si sono incontrati nel giorno di mercato, e lui la guarda mentre si allontana e, in un’immagine crepuscolare, la paragona ad un cigno che si muove sulle placide acque.

cigno in volo

La terza strofa è spesso omessa, ed è a prima lettura di non facile interpretazione: “La gente diceva / “Non si sposeranno mai” / ma uno era il dolore / che non fu mai detto”; il dolore inespresso potrebbe essere la malattia della ragazza (che ne causerà la morte) -data l’epoca probabilmente la tisi, ossia la morte per consunzione– per questo la gente era convinta che il matrimonio non si sarebbe celebrato.
E arriviamo all’ultima strofa, quella rarefatta e sognante in cui il fantasma di lei appare di notte (immagine rafforzata dalla aggiunta della parola dead accanto ad amore) : una figura evanescente che si muove piano senza alcun rumore e che lo chiama presto alla morte.

L’ABBANDONO

L’altra interpretazione del testo (condivisa dai più) vede l’uomo abbandonato dalla donna, perchè fuggita con un altro (o più probabilmente la sua famiglia le ha combinato un matrimonio più vantaggioso, non essendo il pretendente amato da lei abbastanza ricco). Ma l’amore che prova per lei è così grande e anche se proseguirà la sua vita sposandosi con un’altra, continuerà a sentirne la mancanza.
I versi relativi al dolore inespresso vengono quindi interpretati come la mancata confidenza alla nuova moglie di essere ancora, e per sempre, innamorato della sua prima fidanzata.
La strofa finale diventa l’epilogo della sua vita, quando vecchio e in punto di morte, vede il suo primo amore apparirgli accanto per consolarlo.

Come si vede entrambi le ricostruzioni sono adattabili ai versi, ammirevoli e affascinanti del canto, proprio per la loro scarna essenzialità (un ermetismo ante litteram?): nessuna autocommiserazione, nessun dolore sbandierato, ma la semplicità di un amore così grande, che pochi ricordi passati insieme possono bastare per riempire una vita.

Un’unica, forte, immagine elegiaca, di lei candido cigno che incede nel crepuscolo, anticipazione del suo passaggio fugace sulla terra. Il brano è un lament dalla tristezza infinita e sono moltissimi i musicisti che lo hanno interpretato, ricreando quell’atmosfera rarefatta delle parole, spesso con il delicato suono dell’arpa.

Moltissimi gli interpreti che propongono versioni diverse del testo, banco di prova per le voci femminili sebbene a cantare sia l’uomo

Loreena McKennitt  in Elemental (strofe  I, II, III, IV)

Nights from the Alhambra 2007

Moya Brennan (ossia Máire che si è decisa a inglesizzare il suo nome, visto che tutti lo pronunciavano non tenendo conto dell’accentazione gaelica) con Cormac De Barra all’arpa in Against the wind

Cara Dillon in Hills of Thieves, 2009 (nel video live con Solas)

Una giovane Sinead O’Connor  (che cambia il soggetto in chiave femminile) ha così intensamente espresso la strofa finale, quasi sussurrata
Sinead ha registrato molte versione della canzone che spesso canta anche dal vivo


I
My (young) love said to me,
“My mother(1) won’t mind
And my father won’t slight you
for your lack of kind(2)”
she stepped away from me (3)
and this she did say:
“It will not be long, love,
till our wedding day”
II
She stepped away from me (4)
and she moved through the fair (5)
And fondly I watched her
move here and move there
And then she turned homeward (6)
with one star awake(7)
like the swan (8) in the evening(9)
moves over the lake
III
The people were saying
“No two e’er were wed”
for one has the sorrow
that never was said(10)
And she smiled as she passed me
with her goods and her gear
And that was the last
that I saw of my dear.
IV (11)
Last night she came to me,
my dead(12) love came
so softly she came
that her feet made no din
and she laid her hand on me (13)
and this she did say
“It will not be long, love,
‘til our wedding day”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto*
I
La mia giovane innamorata mi disse:
“A mia madre non importerà,
e mio padre non ti disprezzerà
per la tua mancanza di proprietà”,
e si allontanò da me
ed ecco cosa mi disse,
“Non manca molto, amore
al nostro matrimonio”.
II
Si allontanò da me,
attraversando la Fiera
e con occhi amorevoli la seguii
mentre si spostava in qua e là.
Poi si diresse verso casa,
c’era una sola stella nel cielo della sera
e lei mi parve incedere come un cigno,
sulle acque del lago.
III
La gente diceva
“Non si sposeranno mai”
ma uno era il dolore
che non fu mai detto,
e lei mi sorrise mentre passava
andando con la spesa,
e fu l’ultima immagine
del mio amore che vidi
IV
L’altra notte venne da me,
il mio amore defunto,
venne da me così piano
che i suoi piedi non fecero alcun rumore,  e pose la mano su di me
ed ecco cosa mi disse,
“Non manca molto, amore
al giorno del nostro matrimonio”.

NOTE
* ho provato a rendere un po’ più fluida la precedente traduzione
1) nella poesia di Padraic Colum dice “My brothers won’t mind,
And my parents.. ”  ci sono i fratelli al posto della madre e i genitori al posto del padre
2) kind – kine: termine di difficile definizione, si può intendere come “ricchezza” o “proprietà” nel senso di beni in natura, per il tempo in questione poteva trattarsi di bestiame (kine che si scrive in modo simile) perciò the lack of kind potrebbe essere un termine colloquiale nel linguaggio anglo-irlandese per indicare “la mancanza di sostanza”. Altri interpretano la parola come “parenti” ovvero il protagonista è orfano o dalle origini oscure
3) in altre versioni she laid a hand on me (che è un gesto più intimo e diretto per salutare con un ultimo contatto)
4) oppure She went away from me
5) i giorni di fiera erano il tempo dell’amore quando i giovani avevano occasione di incontrarsi con le fanciulle in età da marito
6) Loreena McKennitt dice “And she went her way homeward
7) la stella della sera che compare prima di tutte le altre è il pianeta Venere
8) Il cigno è uno degli animali maggiormente rappresentati nella cultura celtica, effigiato su diversi oggetti e protagonista di numerosi racconti mitologici. continua
9) in the evening è riferito al momento in cui i due si separano
10) the sorrow that never was said: la donna era malata o è una mancata confidenza? Questa strofa viene oggi per lo più omessa in quanto il significato non è ben comprensibile nell’immediatezza dell’ascolto.
11) la versione di Loreena McKennitt è leggermente diversa dice:
I dreamed it last night
That my true love came in
So softly she entered
Her feet made no din
She came close beside me
(Sognai l’altra notte,  che il mio vero amore venne entrando così piano che i suoi piedi non fecero rumore. Lei mi venne accanto)
12) alcuni interpreti omettono la parola “morte” propendendo per la versione del sogno, oppure dicono “my dear love” o “my own love” o anche “my young love
13) oppure “She put her arms round me

Con un brano così popolare tra i musicisti irlandesi sono inevitabili le esclusioni però non posso tacere sulla versione dei Chieftains&Van Morrison

e ancora dei Chieftains&Sinead O’Connor
dei Fairport Convention nel lontano 1969

e del bretone Alan Stivell da “Chemíns De Terre” 1973
dopo la versione di Stivell quella che amo tra le voci maschili è quella del controtenore tedesco Andreas Scholl

E’ stata tramandata anche una versione intitolata “The Wedding Song” che sviluppa il tema dell’abbandono, e che è da ritenersi una variante seppure con diverso titolo continua nella seconda parte

FONTI
http://thesession.org/tunes/4735
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-meaning-and-interpretation-part-1/
http://knifeandforkfactory.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/she-moves-through-the-fair-modern-lyrics-and-variations/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/anne.briggs/songs/shemovesthroughthefair.html

Spanish Lady in Dublin City

“Spanish lady” is a traditional song spread in Ireland, England, and Scotland, starting from 1770 we find a series of editions printed in London and Dublin of an “erotic” song (“bawdy song”) titled “The Frisky Songster” or “The Ride in London” in which they talk about a “damsel pretty” reproducing the situation of “Madam, I am come to court you“.
Then in 1913 the Irish poet Joseph Campbell wrote a poem entitled “Spanish Lady” starting from two stanzas collected on the field in Donegal a few years before; in 1930 Herbert Hughes rewrote part of the text with a melodic arrangement for voice and piano adding a nonsense choir.
“Spanish lady” è il titolo di una canzone tradizionale diffusa in Irlanda, Inghilterra, e Scozia riconducibile sicuramente al 1700. A partire dal 1770 troviamo infatti una serie di edizioni stampate a Londra e Dublino di una canzone “erotica” (bawdy song) intitolata “The Frisky Songster” oppure “The Ride in London” in cui si parla di una procace fanciulla (“damsel pretty”) riproducente la situazione di “Madam, I am come to court you“.
Finchè nel 1913 il poeta irlandese Joseph Campbell scrisse una poesia intitolata “Spanish Lady” a partire da due strofe raccolte sul campo nel Donegal qualche anno prima; nel 1930 Herbert Hughes riscrive parte del testo facendone un arrangiamento melodico per voce e pianoforte aggiungendo un coro nonsense.

Both versions spread in the popular area and end up being mingled
Entrambi le versioni si diffondono in ambito popolare e finiscono per venire mischiate.
DaveSwarbrickMartin Carthy & Diz Disley (in “Rags, Reels & Airs” 1967) an amazing instrumental version, in which the violin seems to speak and laughing
in uno stupefacente arrangiamento strumentale in cui il violino sembra che parli e rida

A detailed analysis of the texts is reported by Richard Matteson on Bluegrass Messengers, on my blog I just identify seven major versions from the contributions of various authors between 1700 and 1970.
Un’analisi approfondita sui testi è riportata da Richard Matteson nel sito di Bluegrass Messengers, in questa trattazione mi limiterò a individuare sette principali versioni a partire dai contributi di vari autori tra il 1700 e il 1970.

Adrien Henri Tanoux (1865-1923) Spanish Lady

THE PLOT (LA TRAMA)

An old Irishman remembers the few occasions in his youth to spy a Spanish lady; so sensational was their fortuitous meeting, that just a few images of her (she who washes her feet, combs her hair, goes hunting for butterflies), were so upsetting to make him burn with passion; we can understand his feeling if we take into account that, in the male imaginary of the time, the Spanish woman embodied the ideal of a woman with an exotic and passionate beauty.
Un irlandese, ormai vecchio, ricorda le poche occasioni che ebbe in gioventù di vedere una donna spagnola; così sensazionale fu l’incontro fortuito con la bella, che poche immagini di lei sbirciate da una finestra o dalle sbarre di una cancellata (lei che si lava i piedi, si pettina i capelli, che va a caccia di farfalle), furono così conturbanti da farlo ardere dalla passione; possiamo comprendere il suo turbamento se teniamo conto che, nell’immaginario maschile del tempo, la donna spagnola incarnava l’ideale di donna dalla bellezza esotica e passionale.

FIRST VERSION (PRIMA VERSIONE): DUBLIN CITY

The song is extremely popular in Dublin and for its light-hearted and cheerful tone is a typical pub song even if you do not talk about alcohol at all!
La canzone è estremamente popolare a Dublino e per il suo tono scanzonato e allegro è una tipica canzone da pub anche se non si parla affatto di alcool!

Dominic Behan in his Topic LP “Down by the Liffeyside.” 1959 

It is the version that circulated in the British Isles in the 1960s, the verses are those of the Irish poet Joseph Campbell while the nonsense refrain is taken up by Hughes.
E’ la versione che circolò nelle Isole Britanniche negli anni del 1960, i versi sono quelli del poeta irlandese Joseph Campbell mentre il ritornello senza senso è ripreso da Hughes


Chorus 

Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay
I (1)
As I went down through Dublin City
At the hour of twelve at night
Who should I see but the Spanish lady
Washing her feet by candle light?
First she washed them, then she dried them, over a fire of angry coals
In all my life I ne’er did see
Such a maid so neat about the soles
II 
I stopped to look but the watchman(2) passed.
And said he, “Young fellow, now the night is late.
Along with you home or I will wrestle you
Straightway through the Bridewell gate (3).”
I threw a kiss to the Spanish lady,
Hot as a fire of angry coals,
In all my life I ne’er did see
Such a maid so neat about the soles.
III
Now she’s no mott(4) for a Poddle swaddy (5)
With her ivory comb and her mantle fine
But she’d make a wife for the Provost Marshall
Drunk on brandy and claret wine
I got a look from the Spanish lady,
Cold as a fire of ashy coals,
In all my life I ne’er did see
Such a maid so neat about the soles.
IV 
I’ve wandered north and I’ve wandered south
By Stonybatter(6) and Patrick’s Close(7),
up and around the Gloucester Diamond (8)
and back by Napper Tandy’s house(9).
Old age has laid her hand on me
Cold as a fire of ashy coals
But where  is the Spanish Lady,
The maid so neat about the soles?
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay

Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino,
a mezzanotte, 
chi ti trovo, se non la Dama Spagnola, 
che si lavava i piedi al lume di candela? 
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò 
su un fuoco di braci ambrate,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
II 
Mi fermai ad ammirarla ma il guardiano passò e disse: “Giovanotto, adesso si è fatto tardi
andatevene a casa vostra oppure vi sbatterò
senza indugio nella Prigione di Bridewell”.
Ho lanciato un bacio alla dama spagnola, 
caldo come un fuoco di  carbone rovente, 
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più 
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
III
Non è ciccia per l’umile Paddy
con il suo pettine d’avorio e il bel mantello
Ma sarà la moglie del Capo della polizia, 
ubriaco di brandy e di vino chiaretto;
diedi uno sguardo alla Dama Spagnola
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più 
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
IV
Ho vagato per il Nord e per il Sud
per Stonybatter e Patrick’s Close
su e in giro per Gloucester Diamond
e indietro per la casa di Napper Tandy
La vecchiaia mi ha raggiunto
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
ma dove è la Dama Spagnola
la donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso?

NOTE
1) the fragment collected on the field by Joseph Campbell in Donegal (1911) [è il frammento raccolto sul campo da Joseph Campbell nel Donegal (1911)]
2) the patrol watch? [la guardia di ronda?]
3)”The Richmond Pen” or “Richmond Gaol” was the prison where the rebel Irish were held starting from 1835 originally called Remand Prison or Bridewell. In 1893 it was transformed into the Wellington Barracks (later renamed Griffith and now home to Griffith College)
“The Richmond Pen” o “Richmond Gaol” era la prigione in cui venivano detenuti gli irlandesi ribelli a partire dal 1835 originariamente detta Remand Prison o Bridewell. Nel 1893 venne trasformata nella Wellington Barracks (poi rinominata Griffith e oggi sede del Griffith College)

4) a ‘mott’ is a girl friend or mistress
5) “Paddy Squaddy’ = a local working class lad [from Poddle, a small river in Dublin]
6) Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) is a district of Dublin on the north bank of the Lieffey river
[Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) è un quartiere di Dublino sulla riva Nord del fiume Lieffey]
7) small street near the St. Patrick’s Cathedral [stradina nei pressi della cattedrale di San Patrizio]
8) Gloucester Place and Gloucester Street were the heart of the Monto, the red light district of Dublin “which comprised the area enclosed by Summerhill in the north, Talbot Street in the South, Marlborough Street to the west and Buckingham Street / Portland Row to the east “(from here) [Gloucester Place e Gloucester Street erano il cuore del Monto, il quartiere a luci rosse di Dublino che comprendeva l’area racchiusa da Summerhill a nord, Talbot Street a sud, Marlborough Street a ovest e Buckingham Street / Portland Row a est” ]
9) Napper Tandy was an eighteenth-century Irish revolutionary, one of the founders of the “United Irishmen”, a champion of free trade and a turbulent figure who died in 1803 Napper Tandy fu un rivoluzionario irlandese del Settecento, uno dei fondatori dei “United Irishmen”, paladino del libero commercio e personaggio turbolento morto nel 1803]

SECOND VERSION [SECONDA VERSIONE]: THE DUBLINER

The Dubliners

The Kilkennys (live)

Gaelic Storm (I, II, IV, V)

Celtic Thunder in Myths & Legends (I, II, IV, V)

The three moments in which the protagonist meets the mysterious Spanish lady correspond to three phases of the male age or three times of the day: sunrise, morning and sunset.
I tre momenti in cui il protagonista incontra la misteriosa donna spagnola corrispondono a tre fasi dell’età maschile ovvero a tre momenti del giorno: l’inizio del nuovo giorno, il mattino e il tramonto.


Chorus 

Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay
I (1)
As I went down through Dublin City
At the hour of twelve at night
Who should I see but the Spanish lady
Washing her feet by candlelight
First she washed them, then she dried them, over a fire of amber coal
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so sweet about the soul
II (2)
As I went back through Dublin City
At the hour of half past eight
Who should I spy but the Spanish lady
Brushing her hair outside the gate
First she brushed it, then she combed it
On her hand was a silver comb
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so fair since I did roam
III (3)
I stopped to look but the Watchman  passed,
He said “Young fellah, now the night is late
Along with ye home or I will wrestle you
Straight back through the Bridewell gate(4)”
I threw a kiss to the Spanish lady
Hot as a fire of angry coal (5)
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so sweet about the soul.
IV (6)
As I came back through Dublin City
As the sun began to set
Who should I spy but the Spanish lady
Catching a moth in a golden net
When she saw me, then she fled me
Lifting her petticoat over her knee
In all my life I ne’er did see
A maid so shy as the Spanish Lady.
V (7)
I’ve wandered north and I’ve wandered south through Stonybatter(8) and Patrick’s Close(9), up and around the Gloucester Diamond (10)
and back by Napper Tandy’s house(11).
Old age has laid her hand on me
Cold as a fire of ashy coals
But where o where is the Spanish Lady,
Neat and sweet about the soul?
(The maid so neat about the sole?)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
CORO
Whack for the toora loora laddy
Whack for the toora loora lay
I (1)
Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino,
a mezzanotte
chi ti trovo, se non la Dama Spagnola, 
che si lavava i piedi a lume di candela? 
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò 
su un fuoco di braci ambrate
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così piacevole
II (2)
Quando ritornai a Dublino
alle otto e mezzo (di mattino)
chi osservai, se non la Dama Spagnola,
che si spazzolava i capelli fuori dal cancello? Prima li spazzolava, poi li pettinava,
tenendo nella mano un pettine d’argento,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più/ una donzella così bella per quanto abbia viaggiato.
III (3)
Mi fermai ad ammirarla ma il guardiano passò e disse: “Giovanotto, adesso si è fatto tardi
andatevene a casa vostra oppure vi risbatterò, subito nella prigione di Bridewell“.
Ho lanciato un bacio alla Dama spagnola, 
caldo come un fuoco di  carbone rovente, in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così piacevole.
IV (6)
Mentre andai di nuovo a Dublino
quando il sole incominciava a tramontare, 
chi ti trovo, se non la Dama Spagnola,
che catturava una falena in un retino d’oro?
Quando mi vide allora veloce mi scappò sollevando la veste fino al ginocchio,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più, /una donzella così timida come la Dama Spagnola
V (7)
Ho vagato a Nord e a Sud
per Stonybatter e Patrick’s Close
su e in giro per Gloucester Diamond
e indietro per la casa di Napper Tandy.
La vecchiaia mi ha raggiunto
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
ma dove, oh dov’è la Dama Spagnola
magnifica e piacevole nell’aspetto?

NOTE
1) the fragment collected on the field by Joseph Campbell in Donegal (1911) [è il frammento raccolto sul campo da Joseph Campbell nel Donegal (1911)]
2)  Joseph Campbell 
3) stanza that partly reproduces the verses of Herbert Hughes. [strofa che riprende in parte i versi di Herbert Hughes. ]
4)”The Richmond Pen” or “Richmond Gaol” was the prison where the rebel Irish were held starting from 1835 originally called Remand Prison or Bridewell. In 1893 it was transformed into the Wellington Barracks (later renamed Griffith and now home to Griffith College)
“The Richmond Pen” o “Richmond Gaol” era la prigione in cui venivano detenuti gli irlandesi ribelli a partire dal 1835 originariamente detta Remand Prison o Bridewell. Nel 1893 venne trasformata nella Wellington Barracks (poi rinominata Griffith e oggi sede del Griffith College)
5) Campbell writes instead [Campbell scrive invece]:
Hot as the fire of cramsey coals
I’ve seen dark maids though never one
So white and neat about the sole.
6)  Herbert Hughes
7) stanza written by Joseph Campbell but with the different name of some neighborhoods [strofa scritta da  Joseph Campbell però con il nome diverso di alcuni quartieri]
the second and third verse [il secondo e il terzo verso]
By Golden Lane and Patrick’s Close,
The Coombe, Smithfield and Stoneybatter,
8) Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) is a district of Dublin on the north bank of the Lieffey river
[Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) è un quartiere di Dublino sulla riva Nord del fiume Lieffey]
9) small street near the St. Patrick’s Cathedral [stradina nei pressi della cattedrale di San Patrizio]
10) Gloucester Place and Gloucester Street were the heart of the Monto, the red light district of Dublin [Gloucester Place e Gloucester Street erano il cuore del Monto, il quartiere a luci rosse di Dublino ]
11) Napper Tandy was an eighteenth-century Irish revolutionary, one of the founders of the “United Irishmen”, a champion of free trade and a turbulent figure who died in 1803 [ Napper Tandy fu un rivoluzionario irlandese del Settecento, uno dei fondatori dei “United Irishmen”, paladino del libero commercio e personaggio turbolento morto nel 1803]

THIRD VERSION [TERZA VERSIONE]: “Twenty, Eighteen”

The third version was recorded by Frank Harte in 1973, the text takes the poetry of Campbell but with the chorus “Twenty, Eighteen”; the melody has a different rythm from the one with which we usually associate the song. In all likelihood, the version derives in turn from Burl Ives‘ Dublin City, recorded in 1948 (the version circulating in America)
La terza versione fu registrata da Frank Harte nel 1973, il testo riprende la poesia di Campbell ma con il coro “Twenty, Eighteen”; la melodia ha una cadenza diversa da quella con cui siamo soliti associare il brano. Con buona probabilità la versione deriva a sua volta dalla “Dublin City” di Burl Ives registrata nel 1948 ( la versione che circolava in America )

Frank Harte in Through Dublin City 1973
He writes in the notes [Così scrive nelle note]
 For too long this fine old Dublin song has been sung mainly by choral groups and concert sopranos. I remember the song from childhood and it has grown as I heard verses of it year after year. In some versions the last verse ends—She had 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 none
She had 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3 and 1,
meaning “she had the odds and the evens of it“—in other words she had everything.
Per troppo tempo questa bella vecchia canzone di Dublino è stata cantata principalmente da gruppi corali e soprani. Ricordo la canzone fin dall’infanzia ed è cresciuta sentendone vari versi anno dopo anno. In alcune versioni l’ultimo strofa termina-
Lei aveva 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 nessuno

Lei aveva 19 17 15 13 11 9 7 5 3 e 1,
che significa “lei aveva buon gioco” – in altre parole lei aveva tutto.

Triona & Maighread ni Domhnaill in Idir An Dá Sholas, 2000 


I
As I was walking through Dublin City
About the hour of twelve at night
It was there I saw a fair pretty female
Washing her feet by candlelight
II

First she washed them, then she dried them
Over a fire of ambery coals
And in all my life I never did see
A maid so neat about the soles
Chorus(1):
She had twenty eighteen sixteen fourteen
Twelve ten eight six four two none
She had nineteen seventeen fifteen thirteen
Eleven nine seven five three and one
III
I stopped to look but the watchman passed
Says he, “Young fellow, the night is late
And along with you home or I will wrestle you
Straight away to the Bridewell gate(2)
IV

I got a look from the Spanish lady
Hot as a fire of ambery coals
And in all my life I never did see
A maid so neat about the soles
Chorus

V
As I walked back through Dublin City
As the dawn of day was o’er
Oh whom should I spy but the Spanish lady
When I was weary and footsore
VI

She had a heart so filled with loving
And her love she longed to share
And in all my life I never did meet
A maid who had so much to spare
Chorus

VII
I have wandered north and I’ve wandered south/By Stoneybatter(3) and Patrick’s Close(4)
And up and around by the Gloucester Diamond(5)/Back by Napper Tandy’s house(6)
VIII

Old age has laid her hand upon me
Cold as a fire of ashey coals
And gone is the lovely Spanish lady
Neat and sweet about the soles
Second Chorus
‘Round and around goes the wheel of fortune
Where it rests now wearies me
Oh fair young maids are so deceiving
Sad experience teaches me
Chorus
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino,
alle dodici di notte,
fu là che vidi una bella fanciulla
che si lavava i piedi a lume di candela.
II
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò
su un fuoco di braci ambrate
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
Coro (1)
Aveva 20, 18, 16, 14
12, 10, 8, 4, 2 niente
aveva 19, 17, 15, 13
11, 9, 7, 5, 3 e 1
III
Mi fermai ad ammirarla ma il guardiano passò
e disse: “Giovanotto, si è fatto tardi
andatevene a casa vostra oppure vi sbatterò immediatamente nella prigione di Bridewell
IV
Ho lanciato uno sguardo alla Dama Spagnola,
caldo come un fuoco di carbone rovente,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donzella dall’aspetto così meraviglioso
Coro
V
Mentre andai di nuovo a Dublino
quando il sole incominciava a tramontare,
chi avrei spiato, se non la Dama Spagnola,
mentre ero stanco e con il male ai piedi?
VI
lei aveva un cuore pieno d’amore
e il suo amore desiderava condividerlo,
in tutta la mia vita non incontrai mai più,
una donzella che aveva così tanto da offrire
Coro
VII
Ho vagabondato a Nord e ho vagabondato a Sud
per Stonybatter e Patrick’s Close
su e in giro per Gloucester Diamond
e indietro per la casa di Napper Tandy
VIII
La vecchiaia mi ha raggiunto
fredda come il fuoco delle braci spente
e andata è la bella Dama Spagnola
magnifica e piacevole nell’aspetto
Secondo coro
Gira e rigira la ruota della fortuna,
dove si ferma ora mi ha stancato,
oh le belle donzelle sono così ingannevoli,
come l’amara esperienza m’insegna
Coro

NOTE
1) in the refrain perhaps the woman counts the money she has earned [nel ritornello forse la donna conta i soldi che ha guadagnato]
2) “The Richmond Pen” or “Richmond Gaol” was the prison where the rebel Irish were held starting from 1835 originally called Remand Prison or Bridewell. “The Richmond Pen” o “Richmond Gaol” era la prigione in cui venivano detenuti gli irlandesi ribelli a partire dal 1835 originariamente detta Remand Prison o Bridewell.
3) Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) is a district of Dublin on the north bank of the Lieffey river
[Stonybatter (Bohernaglogh) è un quartiere di Dublino sulla riva Nord del fiume Lieffey]
4) small street near the St. Patrick’s Cathedral [stradina nei pressi della cattedrale di San Patrizio]
5) Gloucester Place and Gloucester Street were the heart of the Monto, the red light district of Dublin [Gloucester Place e Gloucester Street erano il cuore del Monto, il quartiere a luci rosse di Dublino ]
6) Napper Tandy was an eighteenth-century Irish revolutionary, one of the founders of the “United Irishmen”, a champion of free trade and a turbulent figure who died in 1803 [ Napper Tandy fu un rivoluzionario irlandese del Settecento, uno dei fondatori dei “United Irishmen”, paladino del libero commercio e personaggio turbolento morto nel 1803]


SPANISH LADY: bawdy version
[la versione malandrina]

In this version our suitor goes far beyond the simple peek!
In addition to the gallant night he must also defend himself in a duel and so warns visitors to Dublin: “Be careful not to lose your head for the beauties that are combing by staying at the window .. you could lose your life!
Una versione da “uomo di mondo” è quella in cui il nostro corteggiatore si spinge ben più in là della semplice sbirciatina!
Oltre alla notte galante il nostro “spaccone” deve anche difendersi in duello e così ammonisce i visitatori di Dublino: “Fate attenzione a non perdere la testa per le bellezze che si pettinano stando alla finestra.. potreste perdere la vita!”

 Christy Moore


I
As I went out by Dublin City
at the hour of 12 at night

Who should I see but a Spanish lady
washing her feet by candlelight

First she washed them then she dried them all by the fire of amber coal
In all my life I ne’er did see
a maid so sweet about the soul

II
I asked her would she come out walking
and went on till “the Grey cocks crew”

A coach I stopped then to instate her
and we rode on till the sky was blue

Combes of amber in her hair were
and her eyes knew every spell

In all my life I ne’re did see
a woman I could love so well

III
But when I came to where I found her
and set her down from the halted coach

Who was there with his arms folded but the fearful swordsman Tiger Roche (1)
Blades were out ‘twas thrust and cut,
never a man gave me more fright

Till I lay him dead on the floor
where she stood holding the candlelight

IV
So if you go to Dublin City
at the hour of twelve at night

Beware of the girls who sit in their windows combing their hair in the candlelight
I met one and we went walking,
I thought that she would be my wife

When I came to where I found her,
if it wasn’t for my sword I’d have lost my life.

traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Mentre me ne andavo per Dublino
a mezzanotte
chi ti trovo se non la Dama Spagnola,
che si lavava i piedi al lume di candela?
Prima li lavò e poi li asciugò
su un fuoco di braci ambrate
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai
una donzella dall’aspetto così amabile.
II
Le chiesi se voleva uscire per una passeggiata
e andare fino al ” Grey cocks crew”
fermai una carrozza davanti a lei
e noi girammo finchè il cielo divenne chiaro, aveva pettini d’ambra nei capelli
e i suoi occhi conoscevano ogni incantesimo,
in tutta la mia vita non vidi mai più
una donna che avrei potuto amare così tanto.
III
Ma quando ritornammo nel punto in cui la trovai e la feci scendere dalla carrozza,
chi c’era con le braccia conserte se non Tiger Roche, il terribile spadaccino?
Le spade furono sguainate pronte e affilate,
mai un uomo mi ha fatto più paura,
finchè lo lasciai morto sul pavimento
dove lei stava in attesa con un candeliere.
IV
Così se andate a Dublino
a mezzanotte,
attenzione alle fanciulle che siedono alla finestra pettinandosi i capelli al lume di candela, ne incontrai una mentre stavo passeggiando e pensai che sarebbe stata mia moglie, 
quando ritornai al punto in cui l’avevo trovata, se non fosse stato per la mia spada, avrei perso la vita!

NOTE
tiger-roche1) David “Tiger” Roche was a fascinating adventurer who lived in the eighteenth century. Son of a gentleman, officer at sixteen, hero of the Indian Wars, degraded with ignominy by theft, repeatedly tried for murder, chronically in debt, hunter of dowry … The prototype of Barry Lyndon so to speak.
 [Il dublinese David “Tiger” Roche era un affascinante avventuriero vissuto nel Settecento. Figlio di un gentiluomo, ufficiale a sedici anni, eroe delle Indian Wars, degradato con ignominia per furto, ripetutamente processato per omicidio, cronicamente indebitato, cacciatore di dote… Il prototipo di Barry Lyndon per intenderci.]

The song is so popular that the Spanish Lady changes address depending on the city the song comes from, we have versions from Galway, but also  Belfast, Chester– second part
La canzone è così popolare che la Dama Spagnola cambia  indirizzo a seconda della città da cui proviene la canzone, abbiamo così versioni da Galway, ma anche a Belfast, Chester continua

LINK
http://bluegrassmessengers.com/8e-the-spanish-lady.aspx
http://mainlynorfolk.info/nic.jones/songs/thespanishlady.html http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=44796 http://thesession.org/tunes/1117
http://www.christymoore.com/lyrics/spanish-lady/