Jack O’Lantern in a dress

Leggi in italiano

The theme of the Devil who tries to take a sinner to hell is a classic of the Celtic tales, made exemplary in the story of Jack O’Lantern: on the night of Halloween the Devil walks the earth to reclaim the souls of men, but Stingy Jack was able to decive him with some tricks; and for two years in a row! At last the Devil, scornfully, gives up Jack’s soul for another ten years. When Jack dies for his too many vices both the doors of Paradise and those of hell are barred for him; forced to wander in the dark, he receives as a gift from the Devil a ember to illuminate his path; since then Jack continues to roam the Limbo in search of a dwelling he will never find, with his pumpkin-shaped lantern (which originally, before the story landed in America, was a turnip (see HOP TU NAA Isle of Manx)

Devil and the Farmer’s wife

In the ballad “Devil and the Farmer’s wife” (also known as the Little Devils-Jean Ritchie) dating back to 1600, the woman deserves the hell for her spiteful and disrespectful behavior; but the devil himself cannot tame her, indeed he risks losing his tranquility. The similarity between the two stories occurs in one of the nineteenth-century versions (Macmath Manuscript 1862 cf) in which the devil says referring to the woman: “O what to do with her I cane weel tell; she’s no fit for heaven, and she’ll no bide in hell! ” just like Jack who found both the Gate of Heaven and Hell to be closed.
The ballad is probably even older, and some scholars link it to Chaucer’s Tales of Canterbury (Waltz and Engle).

LITTLE DEVILS

The ballad has spread widely in England, Ireland, Scotland and America with fairly similar text versions, albeit with melodies declined in a different way.
THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN (english version)
Lilli burlero
THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE (american version)
KILLYBURN BRAE (Irish version)
KELLYBURN BRAES (Scottish version)

THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN

The ballad appears in print in London in 1630 with the title “The Devill and the Scold” to the tune “The Seminary Priest” cf
Of this ballad there are two extant editions, the earlier being in the Roxburghe Collection. The second is in the Rawlinson Collection, No. 169, published by Coles, Vere, and other stationers– a trade edition, of the reign of Charles II. Mr. Payne Collier includes “The Devil and the Scold” in his volume of Eoxburghe Ballads, and says: “This is certainly an early ballad: the allusion, in the second room, to Tom Thumb and Robin Goodfellow (whose ‘Mad Pranks’ had been published before 1588) is highly curious, and one proof of its antiquity ..
The ballad is often printed in broadside throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and collected in two textual variants in “The English And Scottish Popular Ballads” (1882-1898) by Francis James Child  at number 278 with the title “The Farmer’s Curst Wife “.

The song was collected in 1903 by Henry Burstow, Sussex and published in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs by Ralph Vaughan Williams and A.L. Lloyd (1959). Very similar to the text version reported by James Henry Dixon in “Ancient Poems, Ballads and Song” (1846) (Child # 278 version A cf).
Thus writes A.L. Lloyd in 1960 in the liner notes of “A Selection from the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs”, echoing the notes reported by Child himself: The tale of the shrewish wife who terrifies even the demons is ancient and widespread. The Hindus have it in a sixth century fable collection, the Panchatantra. It seems to have traveled westward by Persia, and to have spread to almost every European country. In the early versions, the farmer makes a pact with his wife in return for a pair of plow oxen. Vaughan Williams got the present ballad from the Horsham shoemaker and bell-ringer, Henry Burstow. Mr Burstow whistled the refrains that in our performance are played by the concertina. Whistling was a familiar way of calling up the Devil (hence the sailors who whistling may raise a storm). (from here)

The shrewish wife is taken back to her husband who believed he had succeeded in making fun of the devil! Given the subject is among the most popular ballads in medieval festivals and pirate gatherings !!

from Kellyburn Braes, Sorche Nic Leodhas, illustrated by Evaline Ness, 1968

A.L. Lloyd

Kim Lowings & The Greenwood from This Life, 2012


There was an old farmer in Sussex did dwell/ And he’d a bad wife as many knew well(1)
To me fal-de-ral little law-day.(2)
The Devil he came to the old man at plough,
Saying. ‘One of your family I must have now.
‘Now it isn’t for you nor yet for your son,
But that scolding old wife as you’ve got at home.’
Oh take her, oh take her with all of my heart,/ And I wish she and you may never more part.’
So the devil he took the old wife on his back(3),
And lugged her along like a pedlar’s pack./
He trudged along till he reached his front gate,
Says: ‘Here, take in an old   Sussex chap’s mate.
There was thirteen imps(4) all dancing in chains;
She up with her pattens and beat out their brains.
Two more little devils jumped over the wall,
Saying: ‘Turn her out, father, she’ll murder us all.’
So he bundled her up on his back again,/ And to her old husband he took her again.
I’ve been a tormentor the whole of my life,
But I was never tormented till I met your wife.’
And now to conclude and make an end,/ You see that the women is worse than the men,
If they got sent to Hell, they get kicked back again (5)

NOTE
1) the sentence wants to underline the less than submissive character of the woman!
2) Whistling was a way to summon the devil!
3) the image of women straddling the devil is supported by a vast iconography dating back to the Middle Ages
4) the image of the devils literally massacred by the woman is very funny, unfortunately the domestic reality was very different and in general it was women who suffered mistreatment and violence.
5)  Kim edited the final verse to show the strength of women:
And now to conclude and make an end
you see that us women are strong
even when we get sent to hell,
we come  straight back again

THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE: american version

Here too we find an almost identical textual version declined however with bluegrass melodies. The ending is very hilarious and often without the moral: the old farmer, seeing his wife return, rejected by the devil himself, decides to run and never go home again!

Heather Dale from Perpetual Gift 2012.

Jean Ritchie, British Traditional Ballads in the Southern Mountains, Volume 2


Well there was an old man living up on the hill/ If he ain’t moved on, he’s a livin’ there still
CHORUS Hi diddle ai diddle hi fi, diddle ai diddle ai day
Now the Devil he came to him one day
said “One of your kin I’m gonna take away“/ He said “Oh please don’t take my only son/ There’s work on the farm that’s gotta be done.
Oh but you can have my nagging wife
I swear by God, she’s the curse of my life”
So they marched on down to the gates of hell/ He Said “Kick on the fire boys, we’ll roast her well”
Out came a little devil with a spit and chain
that she upped with her foot and knocked out his brain
Out came a dozen demons then a dozen more
But when she was done they was flat on the floor

So all those little demons went scrambling up the wall
saying “tale her back, daddy, she’ll murder us all
So the Farmer woke up and he looked out the crack/ and he saw that devil bringing her back!
He said:”Here’s your wife both sound and well/ if I kept her any longer she’d’ve tore up the hell
The old man jumped and he bit his tongue
then he ran for the hills in a flat out run
He was heard to yell, as he ran o’er the hill/ “if the devil won’t have her, ‘be damned if I will

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17306

Changeling child- il bambino scambiato dalle Fate

The rural fairies of Celtic folklore are spiteful creatures, sometimes bad or at least bizarre. The Servan of the Piedmontese valleys (related to the French Servant and the Occitan Sarvanot) occasionally abducted a human infant to replace him with a shapeshifter, an elf elder under a temporary spell, happy to be cared for by a mortal mother. Yet when the mother could notice the changing in her child, he had to mistreat him and let him cry without feeding him, because the fairies would return to take him back.
Called in the Piedmontese dialect “‘l baratà“, it kept a dowry from his stay with the fairies, usually the power of divination or the aptitude for music.
I folletti campagnoli del folklore celtico sono creature dispettose, a volte cattive o comunque dal comportamento bizzarro. I Servan (silvanotti) delle valli piemontesi (imparentati con il Servant francese e il Sarvanot occitano)  ogni tanto rapivano un neonato umano per sostituirlo con un mutaforma, un folletto anziano sotto un incantesimo temporaneo, ben felice di essere accudito da una madre mortale. Eppure quando la donna si accorgeva che quello non era più il suo bambino, doveva maltrattarlo e lasciarlo piangere senza più nutrirlo, era la sua sola speranza che le fate ritornassero a riprenderselo.
Chiamato nel dialetto piemontese “‘l baratà”, (il barattato, lo scambiato) conservava una dote dal suo soggiorno con le fate, in genere il potere della divinazione o l’attitudine per la musica.
There are some demonic and vampiresque aspects in these beliefs, abandoned dying goblins or fairy children who needed the nourishment of a mortal mother to grow, and which were then exchanged again. Scottish legends also include diabolical pacts and blood tributes to pay every seven years (see the ballad of Tam Lin). The most at risk were unbaptized (and left unnamed) children, whose parents were subjects of envy due to their prosperity; among the countermeasures were the fire tongs left beside the cradle or some branches of protective grasses.
Ci sono aspetti demoniaci e vampireschi in queste credenze, folletti morenti abbandonati o bambini fatati che avevano bisogno del nutrimento di una madre mortale per crescere, e che poi venivano riscambiati. Tra le leggende scozzese anche patti diabolici e tributi di sangue ogni sette anni (vedasi la ballata di Tam Lin). I più a rischio erano i bambini non battezzati (e lasciati senza nome), i cui genitori erano soggetti d’invidia per la loro prosperità; tra le contromisure c’erano le pinze del fuoco lasciate accanto alla culla o dei rametti di erbe protettive.

THE CHANGELING

In fairy tales and the most obscure folk ballads there are recurrent stories of infanticide or abandonment of children in the woods, see for example the Scottish ballad “Cruel Mother
A practice of “birth control” widespread in the countryside of Europe, was the abandonment of newborns in the woods , because the fairies would take care of them; a practice widespread both with illegitimates child and newborns with physical handicap or diseased appearance. The custom of “exposing” the newborn was connected with the belief that it had been “exchanged” or kidnapped by the fairies and replaced with a changeling, a shapeshifter that for a while resembles the human child, but in the end it always resumes its true appearance. The parent left the newborn in the woods or near a pool of water or an ancient stone so that the changeling would return to his kingdom and the real child was back to its rightful parents; in many cases the children were burned / drowned.
Nelle Fiabe e le ballate popolari più oscure sono ricorrenti i racconti d’infanticidio o di abbandono dei bambini nel bosco, vedasi ad esempio la ballata scozzese “Cruel Mother
Una pratica di “controllo delle nascite” diffusa nelle campagne d’Europa, era l’abbandono dei neonati  nel bosco (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi, che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. L’usanza di “esporre” il neonato era connessa con la convinzione che  fosse stato “scambiato” ovvero rapito dalle fate e sostituito con un changeling, un mutaforma il quale per un po’ assomiglia al bambino umano, ma alla fine riprende sempre il suo vero aspetto.
La madre o il padre sfortunati lasciavano il neonato nel bosco o nei pressi di una pozza d’acqua o di una pietra antica di modo che il changeling se ne ritornasse nel suo regno e il vero bambino fosse restituito ai suoi legittimi genitori; il giorno dopo riandavano a prenderlo e lo trovavano morto o scomparso perchè divorato da qualche animale selvatico. In molti casi i bambini erano bruciati/annegati.

Autism

The changeling is believed to be an attempt to “explain” autism, which has its own aetiology in fairy tales and legends prior to official recognition (autism has a name and clinical documentation only in 1943). Dr. Julie Leask of the National Center for Immunization Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases in Sydney, along with her colleagues examined the English, German and Scandinavian fairy tales. Leask was intrigued, when one day she heard a mother say, during a ministerial program on autism, “it is as if the child I brought into the world had been stolen“. And she continues: “The exchanged children are described as apathetic, impenetrable to the gestures of affection, they do not express their emotions, they shout or even do not speak“.
Si ritiene che il changeling sia un tentativo di “spiegare” l’autismo, il quale ha proprio nelle fiabe e leggende la sua eziologia prima del riconoscimento ufficiale (solo nel 1943 l’autismo ha avuto un nome e una documentazione clinica). La dottoressa Julie Leask del National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases di Sydney, insieme ai suoi colleghi ha esaminato le fiabe inglesi, tedesche e scandinave. La Leask si è incuriosita, quando un giorno ha sentito una madre dire, durante un programma ministeriale sull’autismo, “è come se la bambina che ho messo al mondo mi fosse stata rubata“. E continua: “I bambini scambiati vengono descritti come apatici, impenetrabili ai gesti d’affetto, non esprimono le proprie emozioni, urlano o addirittura non parlano“.

Boiling egg shells!
Guscio d’uovo in pentola

But there were also other less cruel methods to unmask the changeling, such as boiling egg shells! The eggs in fact contain the principle of life and by “sympathetic magic” their shell could perform a rebirth. In the folktales it is suggested to the mother to throw eggshells into the boiling water and stir them in the pot, making the vapors spread to the kitchen, a sort of “counter-spell” that would have forced the shapeshifter to reveal its true appearance.
Ma c’erano anche altri metodi meno cruenti per smascherare il changeling, come quello di mettere a bollire dei gusci d’uova! Le uova infatti contengono il principio della vita e per “magia simpatica” il loro guscio poteva compiere una rinascita. Nei racconti popolari si suggerisce alla mamma di gettare nell’acqua bollente dei gusci d’uovo e di rimestare nella pentola, facendo spandere i vapori per la cucina, una sorta di “controfattura” che avrebbe costretto il mutaforma a svelare il suo vero aspetto.

A changeling, PJ Lynch

Obviously the changelings were not always exposed, even if it was believed that they brought only misfortunes to the family, sometimes they showed particular gifts and were accepted and loved by their parents despite the adversity.
Among their talents there was a predisposition for music. As it begins to grow, the Changeling requires “adoptive” parents an instrument, often a violin, and plays it with such skill, that anyone who stops to listen to it, cannot but be fascinated.
Ovviamente non sempre i changelings venivano esposti, anche se si riteneva che portassero solo disgrazie alla famiglia, talvolta mostravano delle doti particolari ed erano accettati e amati dai loro genitori nonostante la difficoltà.
Tra le loro doti c’era la predisposizione per la musica. Come inizia a crescere, il Changeling richiede ai genitori “adottivi” uno strumento, spesso un violino, e lo suona con tale abilità, che chiunque si fermi ad ascoltarlo, non può non rimanere affascinato.
There are many stories of originating from the Boho area which tell of faeries, faerie bushes, banshees, swallow holes (potholes) and ancient stones. One recurring mention is of a changeling or faerie who has a prodigious talent for music. The author (or the teller) of the tale states that the faerie has a particular flair when it comes to musical instruments, traditionally the fiddle or the pipes. He develops such a gift that anyone who listens will be enchanted by the music (like the Greek myth of the sirens). Commenting on the appearance of the faerie, the story teller recounts that he saw him living with two old brothers beyond the “dogs well” and he looked like a “wizened wee monkey” …the story teller estimates his age to be around 10 or 11 years but it appears that he could still could not walk, rather, “bobbed”. His gift on the tin whistle was second to none, his particular penchant being long-forgotten tunes. All of a sudden he disappeared, never to be heard of by the story-teller again. (from Wiki)
Ho visto un Changeling una volta. Viveva con due vecchi fratelli, poco distante da Dog’s Well, e aveva l’aspetto di una scimmia avvizzita. Aveva circa dieci o undici anni, ma non riusciva a camminare davvero, solo ciondolare. Sapeva però suonare il flauto talmente bene che nessuno era capace di uguagliarlo. Conosceva antiche melodie, talmente vecchie che il popolo le aveva dimenticate da tanto tempo. Un giorno poi, se ne è andato, non so nulla di quello che gli è capitato…” (da un villaggio vicino a Boho, nella contea di Fermanagh)

Heather Dale in The Gabriel Hounds 2008
Composers: Heater Dale & Ben Deschamps
It tells of a woman who cannot have children despite 12 years of marriage, so she asks for help to the queen of the fairies at the stone circle. But fairies are strange creatures and you have to be very careful to ask for what you desire, the woman desperately wanted a child and a child was just what she got! So the years passed by but not for the child, the woman will continue to rock the child she had from fairies even after she is dead!
Si racconta di una donna che non riesce ad avere figli nonostante 12 anni di matrimonio, così chiede aiuto alla regina delle fate presso il cerchio delle pietre. Ma le fate sono creature strane e bisogna fare molta attenzione a chiedere ciò che si desidera, la donna voleva disperatamente un bambino e un bambino fu proprio ciò che ottenne! Così gli anni passano ma non per il figlio che resta sempre bambino, la donna continuerà a cullare il bambino avuto dalle fate anche dopo che sarà morta!


I
The wind blows low and mournful
Through the Strath of Dalnacreich (1)
Where once there lived a woman
Who would a mother be
For twelve long years a good man’s wife
But ne’er the cradle filled
A mother of a changeling child
from ‘neath the fairy hill
II
She traveled to the standing stones
And crossed into the green
Where all the host of elven folk
Were dancing there unseen
Through the night she bargained
With the Queen of fairies all
Who sent her home at dawning
with a babe beneath her shawl
III
How their home was joyful
With a son to call their own
But soon they saw the years that passed
Would never make him grow
The fairies would not answer her
The stones were dark and slept
A babe was all she asked for,
and their promises they’d kept
IV
The wind blows low and mournful
Through the Strath of Dalnacreich
Where once there lived a woman
Who would a mother be
For fifty years she rocked that babe
It’s said she rocks him still
A mother of a changeling child
from ‘neath the fairy hill
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Il vento soffia cupo e lamentoso
nella valle di Dalnacreich
dove un tempo viveva una donna
che voleva essere una madre/ per dodici lunghi anni la moglie di un brav’uomo,
ma mai la culla fu occupata.
La madre di un bambino scambiato
dentro la collina delle fate
II
Si recò al cerchio delle pietre,
attraverso il bosco,
dove tutte le creature del popolo fatato, danzavano non viste.
Per tutta la notte contrattò
con la Regina di tutte le fate
che la mandò a casa all’alba
con un bambino sotto lo scialle
III
Oh come vissero felici con un figlio che potevano dire proprio!
Presto però videro gli anni trascorrere
eppure non lo facevano mai crescere.
Le fate non le rispondevano,
le pietre erano sorde e dormienti,
un bambino era tutto ciò che chiedeva,
e loro mantennero le promesse!
IV
Il vento soffia cupo e lamentoso
nella valle di Dalnacreich
dove un tempo viveva una donna
che voleva essere una madre.
Per cinquant’anni cullò quel bambino
si dice che ancora lo culli,
la madre di un bambino scambiato
dentro la collina delle fate

NOTE
1) una valle della Scozia

LINK
http://www.fantasymagazine.it/notizie/2521/changeling-fiabe-per-capire-l-autismo/ http://mcglenmysteries.blogspot.it/2010/10/changelings.html
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bugelf.htm
https://to.kan.bzh/chant-00254.html
https://www.carolynemerick.com/archivistscorner/changeling-tales

Ireland’s most sinister superstition: The changeling

http://www.vitadiocesanapinerolese.it/cultura/tutti-i-leggendari-piemontesi
http://www.chambradoc.it/iSarvanotDalToumpi/iMarmineleDiSarvanot.page

The Holly bears a Berry

The medieval tradition of Christmas wanted the houses to be decorated with evergreen branches, in particular holly and ivy, so that the masculine and feminine principles would unite; the holly emblem of the male principle in its winter triumph is so revisited by Christianity and identified with the salvific figure of Jesus Christ.
La tradizione medievale del Natale voleva che le case fossero decorate da rami di sempreverde, in particolare agrifoglio ed edera, affinche il princio maschile e quello femminile si unissero; l’Agrifoglio emblema del principio maschile nel suo trionfo invernale è così rivisitato dal Cristianesimo e identificato con la figura salvifica di Gesù Cristo.

THE HOLLY BEARS A BERRY

Margaret Tarrant (1888-1959)

The white flowers of the holly are the purity of Jesus, its red berries are the blood shed by the Messiah, the leaf margin is sharp, as the crown of thorns of the King of the Jews.
The male holly begins to bloom “when grown up”, when he is about 20 years old and produces small and pinkish-white perfumed flowers from May to June. The berries (on the female holly) are green and in autumn they become of a glossy red similar to coral: they remain on the tree throughout the winter constituting an important source of food for the birds. Sometimes on the same tree appear both the flowers and the ovarian pistils – as for the chestnut tree – it is the nature that spontaneously provides to reproduce isolated specimens or it is the hand of the gardener who has created a graft on the same stem of a branch female and a male branch (technically the plant is called dioecious ..)
I fiori candidi dell’agrifoglio sono la purezza di Gesù, le sue bacche rosse sono il sangue versato dal Messia, il margine fogliare acuminato la corona di spine del Re dei Giudei.
L’agrifoglio maschio inizia a fiorire “da grande”, quando ha circa 20 anni e produce dei fiori piccoli e bianco-rosato profumati da maggio a giungo. Le bacche (sull’agrifoglio femmina) sono verdi e d’autunno diventano di un rosso lucido simile a corallo: restano sull’albero per tutto l’inverno costituendo una importante fonte di cibo per gli uccelli. A volte sulle stesso albero compaiono sia i fiori che i pistilli ovarici – come per l’albero del castagno- è la natura che provvede spontaneamente a far riprodurre esemplari isolati oppure è la mano del giardiniere che ha creato un innesto sullo stesso fusto di un ramo femmina e di un ramo maschile (tecnicamente la pianta si definisce dioica..) continua

agrifoglio-inverno

THE HOLLY AND THE IVY

“The Holly and the Ivy” is a Christmas hymn that appears in written form in a broadside of 1710, the melody is traced (very generically) from an ancient French carol; but we can say, according to the various references contained, that the lyrics has its roots at least in the Middle Ages. It is probably the most popular and most recorded Christmas carol in the Christmas Compilations of which there are many versions and interpretations.
“The Holly and the Ivy” è un inno natalizio che compare in forma scritta in un broadside del 1710, la melodia è fatta risalire (molto genericamente) ad un’antica carol francese; possiamo però affermare, stando ai vari riferimenti contenuti nel testo, che il brano affonda le sue radici quanto meno nel Medioevo. Probabilmente è il canto natalizio sull’agrifoglio più popolare e più registrato nelle Christmas Compilations del quale esistono tantissime versioni e interpretazioni.

English version
[ LA VERSIONE INGLESE ]

The standard tune is the one given by Cecil Sharp in his “English Folk Carols”, 1911 (collected in Gloucestershire at the beginning of the century) also reported in “Oxford Book of Carols” 1928.
In Victorian times it was a typical beggar’s chant for the wishes of Merry Christmas and Happy New Year with the moralizing stanzas on the salvific message of Jesus, the human sins and the repentance.
La melodia diventata standard è quella riportata da Cecil Sharp nel suo “English Folk Carols”, 1911 (raccolta nel Gloucestershire a inizio secolo) riportata anche in “Oxford Book of Carols” 1928 .
In epoca vittoriana era un tipico canto dei questuanti per gli auguri di Buon Natale e Felice Anno Nuovo con le strofe moraleggianti sul messaggio salvifico di Gesù, il peccato e il pentimento.

Thad Salter  arrangement for guitar

Manor House String Quartet arrangement for violins, viola and harpsichord by Vaughan Jones (arrangiamento per violini, viola e clavicembalo di Vaughan Jones)

Medieval Baebes in Mistletoe and Wine, 2003

Heather Dale in “This Endris Night” 2002


I
The holly and the ivy (1),
Now both are full well grown.
Of all the trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown.
Chorus
Oh, the rising of the sun (2),
The running of the deer (3).
The playing of the merry organ (4),
Sweet singing in the quire (5).
II
The holly bears a blossom
As white as lily flower;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To be our sweet Savior.
III
The holly bears a berry
As red as any blood;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
To do poor sinners good.
IV
The holly bears a prickle
As sharp as any thorn;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
On Christmas day in the morn.
V
The holly bears a bark
As bitter as any gall;
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ
For to redeem us all.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’agrifoglio e l’edera
quando sono entrambi adulti
di tutti gli alberi nel bosco
l’agrifoglio porta la corona.
CORO
Il sorgere del sole
il correre del cervo
il suono gaio della ghironda
è amabile cantare intorno al fuoco
II
L’agrifoglio porta un fiore
bianco come il giglio
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
per essere il nostro amato Salvatore.
III
L’agrifoglio porta una bacca
rossa come il sangue
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
per la redenzione dei peccati.
IV
L’agrifoglio porta margine acuminato
appuntito come una spina
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
il Mattino di Natale
V
L’agrifoglio porta una scorza
amara come fiele
e Maria porta l’amato Gesù Cristo
per la redenzione di noi tutti.

NOTE
1) In singing we speak only of the holly, most probably the verses that concerned the ivy (see contrasts holly-ivy) have been replaced by those on Maria and Jesus. The masculine principle is overturned and it is Maria, the plant of ‘holly (female) to be crowned Queen of Heaven.
Nella canto si parla solo dell’agrifoglio, molto probabilmente i versi che riguardavano l’edera (vedi contrasti agrifoglio-edera) sono stati sostituiti da quelli su Maria e Gesù. Così si ribalta il principio maschile ed è Maria, la pianta dell’agrifoglio (al femminile) ad essere incoronata Regina dei Cieli.
2) the rising of the sun after the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year.
il verso the rising of the sun è riferito al risorgere del sole dopo il Solstizio d’Inverno, il giorno più corto dell’anno.
hollytapestry3) Franco Cardini riassume in poche frasi tutto il ricco simbolismo riferito alla figura del cervo. “Presso i Celti, il cervo era sacro al “dio cornuto” Cernumn, identificato con l’Apollo ellenico-romano e con la luce diurna, vale a dire con l’eternamente giovane dio Lug. D’altronde, nei miti che riguardano Lug, il cervo gioca un ruolo collegato al ciclo dell’eterno ringiovanimento simboleggiato forse dalle sue corna che cadono e nascono di nuovo, e che è agevole connettere con il solstizio d’inverno e quindi con l’anno nuovo.”
The “running of the deer” : perhaps refers to the medieval custom of going hunting the day after the solstice, transformed in the Victorian era into a fowl hunt with whose meat was prepared a stuffed Christmas cake.
Il “running of the deer” nella strofa del ritornello si riferisce forse alla consuetudine medievale di andare a caccia il giorno dopo il solstizio, trasformatasi in epoca vittoriana in una caccia all’uccellagione con le cui carni si preparava una torta ripiena di Natale.
4) I believe it is the organistrum, an ancient instrument precursor of the hurdy-gurdy, with the same plaintive sound , but in the form of a rectangular box, the word is transformed into “organ”, in other versions it becomes “harp”
credo si tratti dell’organistrum, antico strumento dal suono lamentoso antenato della  ghironda, ma a forma di cassetta rettangolare, trasformato in “organ”, in altre versioni diventa “harp”
5) or “sweet singing in the choir”

OTHER MELODIES
[ALTRE MELODIE]

Magpie Lane in “Wassail! A Country Christmas” 1996

The Young Tradition, Shirley&Dolly Collins in “The Holly Bears the Crown” 1969

Loreena McKennitt in “A Midwinter Night’s Dream” 2008

Kate Rusby in Sweet Bells 2008

With a title that would seem to recall this carol, Tori Amos sings Holly, Ivy And Rose, which, however, is another song.
Similar to “The Holly and the Ivy” but known as “Sans day carol” (The holly bears a berry) is the cornic version
Con un titolo che parrebbe richiamare questa carol Tori Amos canta Holly, Ivy And Rose che tuttavia è tutta un’altra canzone.
Simile a “The Holly and the Ivy” ma nota con il titolo di “Sans day carol” (The holly bears a berry) è la versione cornica 

LINK
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=42010
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15689
https://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/Hymns_and_Carols/holly_and_the_ivy.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thehollyandtheivy.html

Cornic version

Huron or Breton Carol?

At the end of the eighteenth century it was found the transcription of a Christmas song written in the Wendat language (Amerindians who lived on the banks of Georgian Bay and Lake Simcoe – Canada), dating back to the previous century written by Jean De Brébeuf, a Jesuit missionary who from Normandy he went to bring the word of God among the Native Americans.
[Sul finire del Settecento venne ritrovata la trascrizione di un canto di Natale scritto nella lingua Wendat (Amerindi che vivevano sulle rive della Georgian Bay e del lago Simcoe – Canada), risaliva al secolo precedente dalla penna di Jean De Brébeuf, missionario gesuita che dalla Normandia andò a portare la parola di Dio tra i nativi americani.]

Jean De Brébeuf became a martyr of the faith after he was slain by an Iroquois tribe in 1649 near Lake Huron.
[Jean De Brébeuf è diventato un martire della fede dopo che fu trucidato da una tribù di Irochesi nel 1649 nei pressi del lago Huron.
Primo insediamento europeo dell’Ontario, “Santa Maria tra gli Uroni*” era un luogo fortificato del 17mo secolo e il quartiere generale della missione dei gesuiti francesi tra la popolazione degli Uroni. Nel 1639 i gesuiti e i loro cooperatori laici cominciarono la costruzione di un posto circondato da palizzate che avrebbe compreso caserme, una chiesa, botteghe, case di abitazione e un’area coperta destinata ai visitatori aborigeni. Nel 1648 Santa Maria tra gli Uroni era un rifugio lontano dalla civilizzazione per 66 francesi che rappresentavano un quinto dell’intera popolazione della Nuova Francia. La storia di Santa Maria tra gli Uroni si concluse nel 1649, quando una svolta drammatica di eventi costrinse la comunità ad abbandonare e bruciare quella che era stata la loro casa per 10 anni. (tratto da qui)
*”Urone dal francese huron, termine spregiativo per “arrogante”, “burbero”, ovvero da hure, “testa di cinghiale” (riferito alle ispide e crestate acconciature dei guerrieri Wendat)]

In the illustration that recalls that day, we see the Iroquois who slaughter the prisoners (first floor on the left) and torture father Jean, stripped and tied to a pole (first floor on the right) in the background the burning ruins of the fort. It was he who wrote a Noël in the language of the Urones (as they were called by the first missionaries the Wendat) natives of Ontario, where he lived almost uninterruptedly for about twenty years, before ending up killed in the Iroquois raid.
[Nell’illustrazione che ricorda quel giorno, vediamo gli Irochesi che macellano i prigionieri (primo piano a sinistra) e torturano padre Jean, denudato e legato a un palo (primo piano a destra) sullo sfondo le macerie brucianti del fortino. Fu lui a scrivere un Noël nella lingua degli Uroni (come vennero chiamati dai primi missionari i Wendat) nativi dell’Ontario, presso cui visse quasi ininterrottamente per una ventina d’anni circa, prima di finire ucciso nel raid degli Irochesi.]
[The methods of the Church have not changed much since the days of evangelization among the European natives!
Non voglio addentrarmi nella questione “gesuiti versus amerindi” ma posso solo osservare che i metodi della Chiesa non sono cambiati poi molto dai tempi delle evangelizzazioni presso i nativi europei.]

In a perennial tribal conflict with the Iroquois (to whose root however they descended) the Wendat were the first indios to be decimated by the epidemics, as a result of the contacts with the whites and weakened, they became easy prey of the Iroquois.
In perenne conflitto tribale con gli Irochesi (al cui ceppo tuttavia discendevano) i Wendat furono i primi a venir decimati dalle epidemie, in seguito ai contatti con i bianchi e, indeboliti, divennero facile preda degli Irochesi.


Così gli Uroni raccontano oggi le loro origini: “All’arrivo dei primi uomini bianchi venuti dall’altra riva delle grandi acque, i membri della nostra Nazione erano numerosi come le foglie degli alberi. Il grande Manitù, nella sua grande generosità, ci aveva dotati di un vasto territorio che si stendeva dai Grandi Laghi fino alle rive del San Lorenzo. Nostra madre Terra ci prodigava le sue bontà e noi avevamo abbondanti raccolti di mais, zucche e fagioli. La nostra abilità a intessere legami con le altre nazioni indiane situate ai confini del nostro territorio, ci assicurava un incontestabile potere commerciale nel Nord-Est dell’America…”
Ben presto, però, a causa dell’arrivo degli uomini bianchi, le famiglie urone furono decimate da malattie loro sconosciute (siamo all’inizio del XVII secolo). La metà della popolazione scomparve. Dato il loro indebolimento, furono poi soppiantati nel commercio delle pellicce dagli indiani Irochesi. Ma non basta, a detta degli Uroni ci si misero anche i missionari, “gli uomini dalle grandi vesti nere” che “propagarono nei nostri villaggi una nuova fede. Questo seminò grande discordia nella nostra nazione”.
Gli Uroni così si dispersero “come le foglie morte sotto il vento freddo dell’autunno”. Da allora “l’albero robusto che eravamo all’arrivo degli uomini d’altra cultura non è più che un fragile arbusto”. Per sopravvivere, gli antenati degli attuali componenti la nazione urona si stabilirono nei pressi di Québec. Nel 1697 trovarono il loro ultimo rifugio in un territorio esiguo che oggi si chiama Wendake (villaggio degli Uroni) situato alla periferia di Québec sulle rive del fiume St Charles. Il luogo fu scelto perché, data la vicinanza del fiume, i sopravvissuti potevano ancora vivere di caccia e pesca risalendolo verso il Nord. Percorrendolo verso Sud, potevano poi commerciare con i francesi. (tratto da qui)

But the story of the song with all its references between lyrics and melody is rather tangled in the folds of time, so I proceed to episodes, and only in the end we can answer the question of the title!
Siccome la storia del brano con tutti i suoi rimandi tra testi e melodia è piuttosto ingarbugliata nelle pieghe del tempo, procedo a puntate, solo alla fine riusciremo a rispondere alla domanda del titolo!

TUNE (la melodia)

Listen played with the flute of the natives
Ascoltiamola suonata con il flauto dei nativi. Ma la discussione in merito alla sua origine e le sue diramazioni è rimandata ad una prossima puntata (qui)!!

JESOUS AHATONHIA

Father John titled the Huron Carol “Jesous Ahatonhia” (“Jesus was born”). It was translated into later centuries in French by Paul Picard and in English by Jesse Edgard Middleton (1926). There are two versions of the text in wendat, the first one according to the original text, the second one with the Victorian taste (see second part).
[La Huron Carol venne intitolata da padre Giovanni “Jesous Ahatonhia” (“Gesù è nato”).  E’ stata tradotta nei secoli successivi in francese da Paul Picard e in inglese da Jesse Edgard Middleton (1926). Del testo in wendat si trovano ben due versioni, la prima quella che risale al testo originario, la seconda rimaneggiata dal gusto vittoriano (vedasi seconda parte).]

THEOLOGICAL MESSAGE
(IL MESSAGGIO TEOLOGICO)

NOEL HURON
Essential is the version of the Canadian Allan Mills (here) in “O ‘Canada: A History in Song” for the Smithsonian folkways (to be heard on Spotify or on Deezer) where the text in wendat (the only voice accompanied by the drum) is followed by French (strophe I) and English (the version ‘Twas in the Moon of Wintertime)
[Essenziale la versione del canadese Allan Mills (qui) in “O’ Canada: A History in Song” per la Smithsonian folkways (da ascoltare in versione integrale su Spotify o su Deezer) che al testo in wendat (la sola voce accompagnata dal tamburo) fa seguire quello in francese (strofa I) e in inglese (la versione ‘Twas in the Moon of Wintertime )]

Bruce Cockburn

Wendat Version (for pronunciation -per la pronuncia *)
I
Ehstehn yayau deh tsaun we yisus ahattonnia
O na wateh wado:kwi nonnwa ‘ndasqua entai
ehnau sherskwa trivota nonnwa ‘ndi yaun rashata
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia
II
Ayoki onki hm-ashe eran yayeh raunnaun
yauntaun kanntatya hm-deh ‘ndyaun sehnsatoa ronnyaun
Waria hnawakweh tond Yosehf sataunn haronnyaun
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia
III
Asheh kaunnta horraskwa deh ha tirri gwames
Tishyaun ayau ha’ndeh ta aun hwa ashya a ha trreh
aundata:kwa Tishyaun yayaun yaun n-dehta
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia
IV
Dau yishyeh sta atyaun errdautau ‘ndi Yisus
avwa tateh dn-deh Tishyaun stanshi teya wennyau
aha yaunna torrehntehn yataun katsyaun skehnn
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia
V
Eyeh kwata tehnaunnte aheh kwashyehn ayehn
kiyeh kwanaun aukwayaun dehtsaun we ‘ndeh adeh
tarrya diskwann aunkwe yishyehr eya ke naun sta
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia

English translation
I
Have courage,
you who are human beings:
Jesus, he is born
The okie spirit who enslaved us has fled
Don’t listen to him for he corrupts the spirits of our thoughts
Jesus, he is born
II
The okie spirits who live in the sky are coming with a message
They’re coming to say, “Rejoice!
Mary has given birth. Rejoice!”
III
Three men of great authority have left for the place of his birth
Tiscient, the star appearing over the horizon leads them there
That star will walk first on the bath (1) to guide them
IV
The star stopped not far from where Jesus was born
Having found the place it said,
“Come this way”
V
As they entered and saw Jesus
they praised his name
They oiled his scalp many times, anointing his head
with the oil of the sunflower
VI
They say, “Let us place his name in a position of honour
Let us act reverently towards him for he comes to show us mercy
It is the will of the spirits that you love us, Jesus,
and we wish that we may be adopted into your family
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Abbiate coraggio,
voi che siete creature umane
Gesù è nato,
lo Spirito che ci teneva prigionieri è fuggito.
Non prestategli ascolto che egli corrompe lo spirito della vostra mente.
Gesù è nato
II
Gli spiriti, che vivono in Cielo, vengono con un messaggio.
Vengono per dire “Rallegratevi
Maria ha partorito, rallegratevi!”
III
Tre uomini di grande saggezza
sono partiti verso il luogo della sua nascita, una brillante stella apparve sopra l’orizzonte per condurli là,
quella stella camminerà ..(1)
per guidarli
IV
La stella si fermò non molto lontano da dove Gesù era nato
avendo trovato il posto disse
“Venite da questa parte”
V
Appena entrarono e videro Gesù,
essi lodarono il suo nome
oliarono il suo capo molte volte,
unsero la sua testa,
con l’olio di girasole
VI
“Metteremo il suo nome in un posizione di privilegio
agiremo con rispetto verso di lui perchè è venuto per mostrarci la misericordia
è per la volontà degli Spiriti che tu ci ami Gesù,
e ci auguriamo di essere adottati nella tua famiglia”

NOTE
1) se è un modo di dire canadese non ho idea di cosa voglia dire

Heather Dale, who sings in wendat, french and english.
che canta in wendat, francese e inglese.

Wendat Version (for pronunciation -per la pronuncia *)
Ehstehn yayau deh tsaun we yisus ahattonnia
O na wateh wado:kwi nonnwa ‘ndasqua entai
Ehnau sherskwa trivota nonnwa ‘ndi yaun rashata
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia.
Ayoki onki hm-ashe eran yayeh raunnaun
Yauntaun kanntatya hm-deh ‘ndyaun sehnsatoa ronnyaun
Waria hnawakweh tond Yosehf sataunn haronnyaun
Iesus Ahattonnia, Ahattonnia, Iesus Ahattonnia.

English translation
I
Have courage,
you who are humans;
Jesus, he is born.
Behold, the spirit  who had us
as prisoners has fled.
Do not listen to it,
as it corrupts the spirits
of our minds!
CHORUS
Jesus, he is born,
he is born,
Jesus, he is born.
II
They are spirits, sky people,
coming with a message for us.
They are coming to say,
“Rejoice,
Marie, she has just given birth.
Rejoice!”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Abbiate coraggio,
voi che siete uomini
Gesù è nato,
ecco lo Spirito (3) che ci teneva prigionieri è fuggito.
Non prestategli ascolto
che egli corrompe lo spirito
della vostra mente.
CORO
Gesù è nato,
è nato
Gesù è nato
II
Sono spiriti, gente del Cielo,
che vengono con un messaggio per noi.
Vengono per dire
“Rallegratevi
Maria ha appena partorito
rallegratevi!”
French version
I
Chrétiens, prenez courage,
Jésus Sauveur est né!
Du malin les ouvrages à jamais sont ruinés.
Quand il chante merveille à ces troublants âppats
Ne prêtez plus l’oreille:
Jésus est né. Jesous ahatonhia.
II
Oyez cette nouvelle,
dont un ange est porteur!
Oyez! Âmes fidèles,
et dilatez vos coeurs.
La Vierge dans l’étable
entoure de ses bras
L’Enfant-Dieu adorable:
Jésus est né. Jesous ahatonhia.
Traduzione italiano
I
Cristiani abbiate coraggio,
Gesù il Salvatore è nato,
il Maligno è distrutto
per sempre.
Quando il suo bel ma ingannevole
canto vi attrae,
non prestate orecchio:
Gesù è nato, Jesous ahatonhia
II
Ascoltate le novelle
portate da un angelo
Ascoltate! Anime fedeli,
e aprite il vostro cuore:
la Vergine nella stalla
tiene tra le braccia
l’adorabile Bambinello divino
Gesù è nato, Jesous ahatonhia
Enghish version
I
Let Christian men take heart today
The devil’s rule is done;
Let no man heed the devil more,
For Jesus Christ is come
But hear ye all what angels sing:
How Mary Maid bore Jesus King.
Iesus Ahattonnia, Jesus is born,
Iesus Ahattonnia.
II
Three chieftains saw before Noel
A star as bright as day,
“So fair a sign,” the chieftains said,
“Shall lead us where it may.”
For Jesu told the chieftains three:
“The star will bring you here to me.”
Iesus Ahattonnia, Jesus is born,
Iesus Ahattonnia.
Traduzione italiano
I
Cristiani abbiate coraggio oggi
il Regno del Maligno è finito;
non ascoltate più il Male
perchè Gesù Cristo è venuto,
ma ascoltate tutti quegli angeli cantare di come la vergine Maria partorì Gesù il Re, Iesus Ahattonnia, Gesù è nato,
Iesus Ahattonnia
II
Tre capi videro prima della Nascita
una stella luminosa come il giorno
“Ecco il segno – dissero i capi-ci condurrà fin dove deve”
Perchè Gesù disse ai tre capi:
“La stella vi porterà qui da me”
Iesus Ahattonnia, Gesù è nato,
Iesus Ahattonnia

A FAIRY CHRISTMAS
(IL NATALE FIABESCO)

This text in wendat is the most similar version to the translation in “Victorian style” of the song (see)
Questo testo sempre in wendat è però la versione più simile alla traduzione in “stile vittoriano” del canto (vedi)

♪  Eskasoni Trio

Na kesikewiku’sitek jipji’jk (1) majita’titek
Kji-Niskam (2) petkimasnika ansale’wilitka
Kloqoejuitpa’q, Netuklijik nutua’tiji.
Se’sus eleke’wit, Se’sus pekisink, ewlite’lmin
Ula nqanikuomk etli we’ju’ss mijua’ji’j
Tel-klu’sit euli tetpoqa’tasit apli’kmujuey
L’nu’k netuklijik nutua’tiji ansale’wiliji.
Se’sus eleke’wit, Se’sus pekisink, eulite’lmin
O’ mijua’ji’jk nipuktukewe’k, O’ Niskam wunijink
Maqmikek aq Wa’so’q tley ula mijua’ji’j
Pekisink kiskuk wjit kilow, pekisitoq wantaqo’ti.
Se’sus eleke’wit, Se’sus pekisink, eulite’lmin

English translation Mildred Milliea
I
It was in the moon of the wintertime
when all the birds (1) had fled
That mighty Gitchi Manitou (2)
sent angels
On a starlit night
hunters heard
(CHORUS)
Jesus your King is born,
Jesus is born, In-ex-cel-sis-gloria

II
Within the lodge of bark
the tender Babe was found
A ragged robe of rabbit skin
enwrapped His beauty round
But as the hunter braves drew near
the angel’s song rang loud and high
III
O children of the forest free,
O God’s children
The Holy Child of Heaven and Earth
Has come today for you has brought peace
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
E’ stato nella luna d’inverno
quando tutti gli uccelli (1) erano migrati
che il potente Gran Manitù (2)
mandò gli angeli
in una notte di stelle
i cacciatori udirono
(CORO ANGELI)
Gesù il nostro Re è nato,
Gesù è nato, 
nella gloria dei cieli
II
In una capanna
il tenero bambinello fu trovato,
in una pelliccia stracciata di coniglio
la sua beltà era avviluppata
e non appena la compagnia di cacciatori si avvicinò, il canto degli angeli si innalzò forte e alto
III
O figli della foresta, o figli di Dio
il Santo Bambino del Cielo e della Terra
è venuto oggi a portare la pace per voi

NOTE
1) The Mi’kmaw word “sisipk” is preferred by many to “jipji’jk” for “birds”.
2) the Great Spirit, the Algonquin Manitù  (il Grande Spirito, il Manitù algonchino con cui si identifica a spanna l’equivalente divinità del Cielo)

LINKS
http://diversitytree.blogspot.it/2011/12/huron-carol-racist.html
http://cockburnproject.net/songs&music/ia.html

http://www.saintemarieamongthehurons.on.ca/sm/intl/index.htm?lang=it
http://www3.sympatico.ca/giorgio-lidia.zanetti/indiani/indiani_ontario.html
http://vangelodelgiorno.org/main.php?language=IT&module=saintfeast&id=1787&fd=0
http://www.santiebeati.it/dettaglio/92013

second part
(parte seconda)

HUNTING THE WREN: WREN IN THE FURZE

wrenSopravvissuta in Irlanda fino ai nostri giorni la caccia dello scricciolo è un rituale pan-celtico che si svolge il 26 dicembre: l’uccisione dello scricciolo e la distribuzione delle sue piume avrebbe portato salute e fortuna agli abitanti del villaggio.
(prima parte continua)

Seguitemi quindi in questo viaggio per la campagna irlandese!

irish_flagIRLANDA

La tradizione è ancora diffusa nelle contee di Sligo, Leitrim, Clare, Kerry (in particolare Dingle), Tipperary, Kildare..

VIDEO The West Clare Wrenboys

SECONDA MELODIA IRLANDESE:WREN IN THE FURZE

La versione proviene dalla trasmissione orale e si annovera nella tradizione delle questue rituali dell’a-souling (vedi) e del wassailing (vedi).  Nella canzone si descrive molto chiaramente il clima festoso della questua con condivisione di libagioni, raccolta di soldi “per il funerale dello scricciolo”, danze tradizionali e colossali bevute.

The Chieftains in The Bells of Dublin 1991


I
Oh the wren, oh the wren
is the king of all birds(1)
On St. Stephen’s Day he got caught in the furze
It’s up with the kettle and down with the pan
Won’t you give us a penny (2) for to bury the wren?
II
Oh, it’s Christmas time; that’s why we’re here.
Please be good enough to give us an ear.
For we’ll sing and we’ll dance if you give us a chance,
And we won’t be comin’ back for another whole year.
III
We’ll play Kerry polkas; they’re real hot stuff.
We’ll play The Mason’s Apron and The Pinch of Snuff,
Jon Maroney’s Jig and The Donegal Reel,/Music made to put a spring in your heel(3).
IV
If there’s a drink in the house, may it make itself known,
Before I sing a song called The Banks of the Lowne,
And I’ll drink with you with occasion in it,
For my poor dry throat and I’ll sing like a linnet.
V
Oh, please give us something for the little bird’s wake,
A big lump of pudding or some Christmas cake(4),
A fist full o’ goose and a hot cup o’ tay(5)
And then we’ll soon be going on our way.
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Lo scricciolo, lo scricciolo
è il re di tutti gli uccelli (1)
nel giorno di Santo Stefano si cattura tra i cespugli,
mettete su il bollitore e sotto con la padella!
Ci date un penny (2) per seppellire lo scricciolo?
II
E’ Natale, per questo
siamo qui.
Vi preghiamo di essere benevoli e porgerci un orecchio
perchè canteremo e danzeremo se ce ne darete la possibilità
e non ritorneremo che tra un altro anno.
III
Suoneremo polche del Kerry, è roba veramente forte.
Suoneremo “The Mason’s Apron” e “The Pinch of Snuff”,
“Jon Maroney’s Jig” e “The Donegal Reel” tutta musica che vi farà saltare (3).
IV
Se c’è da bere in casa
che si presenti
prima di cantare una canzone dal titolo ” The Banks of the Lowne”
e berrò con voi per l’occasione,
per la mia povera gola secca
e canterò come un fringuello.
V
Prego dateci qualcosa per il funerale del piccolo uccello,
una bella fetta di budino o un dolce di Natale (4)
un bel pezzo di oca e una tazza di tè caldo (5)
e poi ce ne andremo subito per la nostra strada

NOTE
1) Una fiaba celtica per bambini racconta la sfida tra l’aquila e lo scricciolo per contendersi l’appellativo di re degli uccelli: avrebbe vinto chi fosse riuscito a volare più in alto! Lo scricciolo partì per primo e quando la possente aquila lo superò si sistemò sul suo dorso e si fece trasportare ancora più in alto, fino a spiccare di nuovo il volo e quindi vincere la gara. (raccontata da Joe Heaney qui)
2) scopo della questua era quello di raccogliere un po’ di soldi per la veglia funebre allo scricciolo (notoriamente passata nel pub a bere alla salute del defunto, a cantare e a danzare)
3) “to put a spring in your heel” letteralmente “mettere una molla ai vostri piedi”
4) il barm brack cake un dolce tradizionale all’uvetta e canditi associato con Halloween e che si abbina anche al Natale, una specie di panettone irlandese più speziato e asciutto rispetto a quello italiano!
5) tay =tea

Ed ecco le musiche citate nella canzone che erano eseguite tradizionalmente dai questuanti
ASCOLTA Medley ‘The Wren! The Wren!’: The Dingle Set
ASCOLTA The Mason’s Apron
ASCOLTA The Pinch of Snuff
ASCOLTA The Donegal Reel

ASCOLTA Heather Dale in The Green Knight 2006 intitola il brano “Hunting the Wren” essendo il primo verso tradizionale e gli altri scritti e arrangiati da Heather M. Dale & Ben Deschamp da ascoltare nella compilation di Top Celtic Christmas Music di Marc Gun al 4:21 minuto

I
Oh the wren, oh the wren is the king of all birds(1)
On St. Stephen’s Day he got caught in the furze
It’s up with the kettle and down with the pan
Give us a penny for to bury the wren
II
Oh the wren, oh the wren is a terrible rake
Won’t you give us a penny for the little bird’s wake?
It’s up with the bottle and it’s down with the can
Give us a penny for to bury the wren
III
Oh the wren, oh the wren has the tiniest quill
Won’t you give us a penny for the little bird’s will?
It’s up with the paper and it’s down with the pen
Give us a penny for to bury the wren
TRADUZIONE  DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Lo scricciolo è il re di tutti gli uccelli(1) nel giorno di Santo Stefano si cattura tra i cespugli,
mettete su il bollitore e sotto con la padella!
Dateci un penny per seppellire lo scricciolo.
II
Lo scricciolo è un terribile setacciatore,
non volte darci un penny per la veglia dell’uccellino?
Su la bottiglia e giù il bicchiere, dateci un penny per seppellire lo scricciolo.
III
Lo scricciolo ha le più piccole piume, non volte darci un penny per il testamento dell’uccellino?
Mettete su il foglio e giù la penna, dateci un penny per seppellire lo scricciolo.

FONTI
http://piereligion.org/wrenkingsongs.html http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Wren.htm http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3289
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15132

continua

Jack O’Lantern in gonnella

Read the post in English

Il tema del Diavolo che cerca di portarsi all’inferno il peccatore è un classico dei racconti popolari di area celtica, reso esemplare nella storia di Jack O’Lantern: la notte di Halloween il Diavolo cammina sulla terra per reclamare le anime degli uomini, ma Stingy Jack riesce ad ingannarlo con dei trucchetti; e per ben due anni di seguito! Così il Diavolo, per non continuare a fare brutte figure, rinuncia all’anima di Jack per altri dieci anni. Quando Jack muore per i troppi vizi sia le porte del Paradiso che quelle dell’inferno sono sbarrate per lui; costretto a vagare nell’oscurità, riceve in dono dal Diavolo un tizzone per illuminare il suo cammino; da allora Jack continua a vagare per il Limbo in cerca di una dimora che non troverà mai, con la sua lanterna a forma di zucca (che in origine, prima che la storia sbarcasse in America, era una rapa vedi HOP TU NAA – Isola di Man).

Devil and the Farmer’s wife

Nella ballata “Devil and the Farmer’s wife” (nota anche con il titolo Little Devils- Jean Ritchie) risalente al 1600 è la donna, per il suo comportamento bisbetico e irrispettoso, a meritarsi l’inferno; ma il diavolo stesso non riesce a domarla, anzi rischia di perdere la sua tranquillità. La similitudine tra le due storie ricorre in una delle versioni ottocentesche (Macmath Manuscript 1862 vedi) in cui il diavolo dice riferendosi alla donna:”O what to do with her I canna weel tell; she’s no fit for heaven, and she’ll no bide in hell!” (in italiano: che fare di lei non so: non è adatta al Paradiso e non sopporta l’Inferno) proprio come Jack che ha trovato chiuse sia la Porta del Paradiso che quella dell’Inferno.
La ballata con tutta probabilità è ancora più antica e alcuni studiosi la ricollegano ai Racconti di Canterbury di Chaucer (Waltz e Engle).

LITTLE DEVILS

La ballata ha avuto una grande diffusione in Inghilterra, Irlanda, Scozia e America con versioni testuali abbastanza simili seppure con melodie declinate in modo diverso.
THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN (english version)
Lilli burlero
THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE (american version)
KILLYBURN BRAE (Irish version)
KELLYBURN BRAES (Scottish version)

VERSIONE INGLESE: THE DEVIL AND THE PLOWMAN

La ballata compare in stampa a Londra nel 1630 con il titolo “The Devill and the Scold” (in italiano “Il Diavolo e la Bisbetica”) abbinata alla melodia “The Seminary Priestvedi
Nelle note in accompagnamento al testo si riporta: Di questa ballata esistono due edizioni, la prima nella collezione Roxburghe. La seconda nella collezione Rawlinson, No. 169, pubblicata da Coles – un’edizione commerciale, del regno di Carlo II. Payne Collier include “The Devil and the Scold” nel suo volume delle Eoxburghe Ballads, e dice: “Questa è certamente una ballata antica: il riferimento nella seconda stanza,a Tom Thumb e a Robin Goodfellow è assai curioso, e una prova della sua vetustà..”

La ballata è spesso stampata in broadside per tutto il settecento e l’ottocento e collezionata in due varianti testuali in “The English And Scottish Popular Ballads” (1882-1898) di Francis James Child al numero 278 con il titolo di “The Farmer’s Curst Wife“.

Il brano è stato raccolto nel 1903 da Henry Burstow, Sussex e pubblicato in The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs di Ralph Vaughan Williams e A.L. Lloyd (1959). Molto simile alla versione testuale riportata da James Henry Dixon in “Ancient Poems, Ballads and Song” (1846) (Child #278 versione A vedi).
Così scrive A.L. Lloyd nel 1960 nelle note di copertina di “A Selection from the Penguin Book of English Folk Songs”, riprendendo per altro le note riportate dallo stesso Child: la storia della moglie scaltra che terrorizza anche i demoni è antica e diffusa. Gli indù ce l’hanno in una raccolta di favole del sesto secolo, il Panchatantra. Sembra che abbia viaggiato verso ovest dalla Persia e si sia diffuso in quasi tutti i paesi europei. Nelle prime versioni, il contadino fa un patto con sua moglie in cambio di un paio di buoi. Vaughan Williams ha ottenuto la ballata attuale dal calzolaio e suonatore di campane Horsham, Henry Burstow. Mr Burstow ha fischiettato i ritornelli che nella nostra esibizione sono suonati dalla concertina. Il fischio era un modo familiare di richiamare il diavolo (quindi i marinai che fischiano possono far sollevare una tempesta). (tradotto da qui)
La moglie bisbetica viene riportata indietro al marito che aveva creduto di essere riuscito a prendersi beffe del diavolo! Visto l’argomento è tra le ballate più gettonate nelle feste medievali e nei raduni pirateschi!

Kellyburn Braes
da Kellyburn Braes, di Sorche Nic Leodhas, illustrato da Evaline Ness, 1968

A.L. Lloyd

Kim Lowings & The Greenwood in This Life, 2012 l’album d’esordio.


There was an old farmer in Sussex did dwell/ And he’d a bad wife as many knew well(1)
To me fal-de-ral little law-day.(2)
The Devil he came to the old man at plough,
Saying. ‘One of your family I must have now.
‘Now it isn’t for you nor yet for your son,
But that scolding old wife as you’ve got at home.’
Oh take her, oh take her with all of my heart,/ And I wish she and you may never more part.’
So the devil he took the old wife on his back(3),
And lugged her along like a pedlar’s pack./
He trudged along till he reached his front gate,
Says: ‘Here, take in an old   Sussex chap’s mate.
There was thirteen imps(4) all dancing in chains;
She up with her pattens and beat out their brains.
Two more little devils jumped over the wall,
Saying: ‘Turn her out, father, she’ll murder us all.’
So he bundled her up on his back again,/ And to her old husband he took her again.
I’ve been a tormentor the whole of my life,
But I was never tormented till I met your wife.’
And now to conclude and make an end,/ You see that the women is worse than the men,
If they got sent to Hell, they get kicked back again (5)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era un vecchio contadino nel Sussex e aveva una pessima moglie, come tutti sanno,
To me fal-de-ral little law-day.
il diavolo venne dal vecchio mentre arava
dicendo ” Adesso mi prendo uno della famiglia!
Non sono qui per te e nemmeno per tuo figlio,
ma per quella vecchia moglie che hai a casa
Oh te la cedo con tutto il cuore
e ti auguro che non possa più separartene
Così il Diavolo prese la vecchia moglie sulla schiena e la trascinò via come un pacco postale.
La trascinò fino alla porta dell’inferno dicendo:
Ecco, prendetevi una vecchia moglie del Sussex
C’erano tredici diavoletti che ballavano in catene
e lei con i suoi zoccoli massacrava i loro crani.
Due diavoletti saltarono il muro dicendo
Riportala indietro padre, o ci ucciderà tutti
Così il Diavolo la riprese sulla sua schiena
e la riportò dal vecchio marito:
Sono stato un tormentatore per tutta la mia vita,
ma non sono mai stato tormentato,
fino a quando ho incontrato tua moglie!!”
E per concludere e arrivare alla fine,
vedete come le donne sono peggio degli uomini,
se le mandate all’inferno, ritornano subito indietro!!

NOTE
1) la frase vuole sottolineare il carattere poco remissivo della donna!
2) Fischiettare era un modo per evocare il diavolo!
3) l’immagine è supportata da una vasta iconografia risalente al medioevo di donne a cavalcioni del diavolo
4) l’immagine dei diavoletti letteralmente massacrati dalla donna è molto buffa, purtroppo la realtà domestica era ben diversa e in genere erano le donne a subire maltrattamenti e violenze.
5) Kim modifica il finale a favore della donna 

And now to conclude and make an end
you see that us women are strong
even when we get sent to hell,
we come  straight back again
E per concludere e arrivare alla fine,
vedete come noi donne siamo forti
anche quando veniamo mandate all’inferno,
ritorniamo subito indietro!!

VERSIONE AMERICANA: THE FARMER’S CURSED WIFE

Anche qui ci troviamo in una pressochè identica versione testuale declinata però con melodie bluegrass. Il finale è molto spassoso e spesso senza il predicozzo moralizzante: il vecchio contadino nel vedere ritornare la moglie, respinta nientemeno che dal diavolo stesso, decide di mettersi a correre e non ritornare più a casa!

Heather Dale in Perpetual Gift 2012.

Jean Ritchie, British Traditional Ballads in the Southern Mountains, Volume 2

TRADIZIONALE MONTI APPALACHI (versione semplificata)


Well there was an old man living up on the hill/ If he ain’t moved on, he’s a livin’ there still
CHORUS
Hi diddle ai diddle hi fi, diddle ai diddle ai day

Now the Devil he came to him one day
said “One of your kin I’m gonna take away“/ He said “Oh please don’t take my only son/ There’s work on the farm that’s gotta be done.
Oh but you can have my nagging wife
I swear by God, she’s the curse of my life”
So they marched on down to the gates of hell/ He Said “Kick on the fire boys, we’ll roast her well”
Out came a little devil with a spit and chain
that she upped with her foot and knocked out his brain
Out came a dozen demons then a dozen more
But when she was done they was flat on the floor
So all those little demons went scrambling up the wall
saying “tale her back, daddy, she’ll murder us all
So the Farmer woke up and he looked out the crack (1)/ and he saw that devil bringing her back!
He said:”Here’s your wife both sound and well/ if I kept her any longer she’d’ve tore up the hell
The old man jumped and he bit his tongue
then he ran for the hills in a flat out run
He was heard to yell, as he ran o’er the hill/ “if the devil won’t have her, ‘be damned if I will
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’era un vecchio che viveva sulla collina
e se non si è mosso ci vive ancora.
CORO 
Hi diddle ai diddle hi fi, diddle ai diddle ai day

Il diavolo andò da lui un giorno dicendo ” Adesso mi prendo uno della famiglia! “Oh per favore non prendere il mio unico figlio c’è (parecchio) lavoro nella fattoria che  deve essere fatto,
ma prenditi la mia moglie bisbetica, che giuro su Dio è la mia maledizione!!”
Così marciarono alla porta dell’inferno e il Diavolo disse “Sotto con il fuoco, ragazzi, che faremo un bell’arrosto!
Si è fatto avanti un diavoletto con uno spiedo e la catena
e lei lo ha pestato con i piedi e gli ha massacrato il cranio.
Si sono fatti avanti una dozzina di demoni e poi un’altra dozzina
ma quando lei ebbe finito erano tutti spalmati a terra!
Così i diavoletti si arrampicarono sul muro
dicendo “Riportala indietro padre, o ci ucciderà tutti”.
Così il contadino si svegliò e guardò attraverso  la crepa e vide il diavolo che la riportava indietro
dicendo: “Ecco tua moglie sana e salva, se l’avessi tenuta ancora, mi avrebbe distrutto l’inferno!”
Il vecchio fece un sobbalzo e si morse la lingua,
poi corse verso la collina a tutto gas. L’hanno sentito urlare mentre correva “Se il diavolo non la vuole, che sia dannato se me la prenderò io!”

NOTE
1) ci immaginiamo che si sia spalancata una fenditura nel terreno e che ne sia scaturito il diavolo con la donna

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=ChildRef_278
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/23/wife.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=50974
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19182
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151087
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17306
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thedevilandtheploughman.html
http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/C278.html