Good luck to the barley mow

Leggi in italiano

A popular drinking song from rural England, Ireland and Scotland (and the Americas) that could not miss after the “crying of the neck” or during a “Harvest supper“; this auspicious song is also a tavern game: the most common form of the game sees only one singer, while the audience lifts the glass to drink twice in the refrain responding to the auspicious verse with a joyful “Good luck!”; in the second version a soloist intones the first stanza and all the participants sing in chorus the progressive refrain, whom that mistakes the words, or takes a breath to sing, must drink. Obviously the goal of the game is to drink more and more, as you make mistakes!

Harvest-Scene-Barrow-Trent-1881
Harvest Scene, Barrow-on-Trent, Derbyshire, George Turner II 1881

GIVE US ONCE A DRINKE

The song is very ancient as the rituals inherent to the harvest of wheat / barley are ancient (see traditional methods); the first known publication dates back to 1609, in the Deuteromelia by Thomas Ravenscroft, with the title “Give Us Once A Drinke” is transcribed as it was sung in the Elizabethan taverns.

The song started with:
“Give us once a drink for and the black bole(1)
Sing gentle Butler(2) “balla moy”(3)
For and the black bole,
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”
and it ended with:
“Give us once a drink for and the tunne
Sing gentle Butler balla moy
The tunne, the butt The pipe, the hogshead The barrel, the kilderkin The verkin, the gallon pot The pottle pot, the quart pot, The pint pot,
for and the black bole
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”

NOTES
1) What were the beer glass like in medieval taverns? The three most common materials at the time were metal (pewter), glass and ceramics. In Italy in the fourteenth century, for example in the taverns, glass was more common. Here we quote a black bowl that makes one think more properly of a dark bowl or cup, perhaps made of wood? In the wassaling songs, which are also very old, the material of the toast cups carved in the wood is often described. Later, the use of pewter is more likely.
2) bottler
3) the scholars believe it could be for ‘Bell Ami’, only later the song became part of the songs during the Harvest festival and the verse was changed to ‘Barley Mow’, others believe that it is a Mondegreen.

BARLEY MOW

Over time, new strophes have been added and especially in the nineteenth century there are many transcriptions in the collections of old traditional songs such as in “Songs of the Peasantry of England”, by Robert Bell 1857 : This song is sung at country meetings in Devon and Cornwall, particularly on completing the carrying of the barley, when the rick, or mow of barley, is finished. On putting up the last sheaf, which is called the craw (or crow) sheaf, the man who has it cries out ‘I have it, I have it, I have it;’ another demands, ‘What have ’ee, what have ’ee, what have ’ee?’ and the answer is, ‘A craw! a craw! a craw!’ upon which there is some cheering,& c., and a supper afterwards. The effect of the Barley-mow Song cannot be given in words; it should be heard, to be appreciated properly, – particularly with the West-country dialect.
Robert Bell transcribes the widespread version in West England and also the variant sung in Suffolk

Here’s a health to the barley mow!
Here’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both harrow and plow and sow!
When it is well sown
See it is well mown,
Both raked and gavelled clean,
And a barn to lay it in.
He’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both thrash (1) and fan it clean!
NOTES
1) in the Middle Ages there were two ways to separate the wheat grains from the ear: the farmer beat the sheaves with a stick or a whip or they were trampled by the draft animals.
The sifting: wheat and chaff were separated first by placing them in a sieve and then throwing them in the air (it must of course be a breezy day) the chaff flew away and the grain returned to the sieve.

 

maste-drinking
The master of drinking Adriaen Brouwer (1606-1638)

The Barley Mow is one of the best-known cumulative songs from the English folk repertoire and was usually sung at harvest suppers, often as a test of sobriety. Alfred Williams, who noted a splendid set in the Wiltshire village of Inglesham some time prior to the Great War, wrote that he was “unable to fix its age, or even to suggest it, though doubtless the piece has existed for several centuries.” Robert Bell found the song being sung in Devon and Cornwall during the middle part of the 19th century, especially after “completing the carrying of the barley, when the rick, or mow, of barley is finished.” Bell’s comment that “the effect of The Barley Mow cannot be given in words; it should be heard, to be appreciated properly” is certainly true, and most singers who know the song pride themselves on being able to get through it without making a mistake.(Mike Yates)

So we toast to all the dimensions in which beer is marketed (and are indicated in all the existing measures in the past times from the barrel  to the “bowl” and to the health of all those who “manipulate” the beer and of all the “merry brigade” who drinks it!

Arthur Smith in’The Barley Mow’ (1955)  a typical pub in Suffolk in the fifties.See VIDEO: 

Irish Rovers


Here’s good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow, (1)
Jolly good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the pint pot, half a pint, gill, (2) half a gill, quarter gill
Nipperkin (3) and a round bowl(4)
Here’s good luck, (5)
good luck, good luck
to the barley mow.
Here’s good luck to the half gallon, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the half gallon,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill, half a gill …
Here’s good luck to the gallon,
Here’s good luck to the half barrel,
Here’s good luck to the barrel,
Here’s good luck to the daughter(6),
Here’s good luck to the landlord,
Here’s good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the brewer, (7)
Here’s good luck to the company, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the company,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the company, brewer, landlady, landlord, daughter, barrel,
Half barrel, gallon, half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill,
Half a gill, quarter gill, nipperkin and a round bowl,
Here’s good luck, good luck,
good luck to the barley mow.

NOTES
1) [shout GOOD LUCK and drink a sip!]
2) they are all units of measure ordered by the largest (barrel) to the smallest (round bowl).
But as for all units of measurement of the peasant tradition there are local differences in the measured quantity
a gill is a half-pint in a northern pub, but a quarter-pint down south“.
3) “The nipperkin is a unit of measurement of volume, equal to one-half of a quarter-gill, one-eighth of a gill, or one thirty-second of an English pint.
In other estimations, one nip (an abbreviation that originated in 1796) is either one-third of a pint, or any amount less than or equal to half a pint
“.[wiki] “A nip was also used by brewers to refer to a small bottle of ale (usually a strong one such as Barley Wine or Russian Stout) which was sold in 1/3 pint bottles“.
4) “The round bowl” sometimes also “hand-around bowl”, “brown bowl” or “bonny bowl” could be the typical cup with which toasted in the wassailing evidently a unit of measure that has been lost over time.
5) [shout GOOD LUCK, drinking is optional!]
6) the daughter of the tavern owner or more generally she is a waitress serving at the tables
7) there are those who add “the slavey” and “the drayer” to the list; “slavery” means a servant and “the draye” is the one who pulls (or guides) the cart that is the man of deliveries that in fact supplies the tavern with beer. The name derives from the fact that once such a cart was wheelless and was dragged like a sled.

slavery

HOW MUCH DOES A PINT?
therightglass

The draft beer is marketed in the Anglo-Saxon countries starting from the pint that in England and Ireland corresponds to 20 ounces (568 ml ie roughly 50cl). The American pint instead corresponds to 16 ounces; so the standard glass for beer contains exactly a pint (as we call Italian “big beer”); the shapes vary according to the time and the fashions, but the capacity of the glass is always a pint! A law by the British parliament in 1698 stated that “ale and beer” (ie beer without hops and beer with hops) must be served in public only in “pints, full quarts (two pints) * or multiples thereof”. The rule was further reiterated in 1824 by imposing the imperial unit as a unit of measure for all beverages. * The glass that contains 2 imperial pints (1.14 liters) is the yard or a narrow and long glass just a yard. Today with the adaptation to European regulations the British government has “restricted” the pint to “schooner” (as it is called in Australia, but we are still waiting for the nickname that will be given in England to the new measure!) The glass equal to 2/3 pint (400 ml)

THE BARLEY MOW (ROUD 10722)

A variant always from Suffolk

I
Well we ploughed the land and we planted it,
and we watched the barley grow.
We rolled it and we harrowed it
and we cleaned it with a hoe.(1)
Then we waited ‘til the farmer said,
“It’s time for harvest now.
Get out your axes and sharpen, boys,
it’s time for barley mow.”
Chorus
Well, here’s luck to barley mow
and the land that makes it grow.
We’ll drink to old John Barleycorn(2),
here’s luck to barley mow.
So fill up all the glasses, lads,
and stand them in a row:
A gill, a half a pint, a pint, a pint and a quart and here’s luck to barley mow.
II
Well we went and mowed the barley
and we left it on the ground.
We left it in the sun and rain ‘til it was nicely brown.
Then one day off to the maltsters,
then John Barleycorn did go.
The day he went away, we all did say,
“Here’s luck to barley mow.”
III
Have no fear of old John Barleycorn
when he’s as green as grass.
But old John Barleycorn is strong enough
to sit you on your arse.
But there’s nothing better ever brewed
than we are drinking now,
Fill them up: we’ll have another round,
here’s good luck to barley mow.

NOTES
1) weeding: cutting and shuffling of the ground for the most superficial part
2) John Barleycorn is the spirit of beer 

LINK
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/the-barley-mow/
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/oleng10h.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/barley.htm http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/barleymow.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/barleymow.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151726
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3873 http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1540-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-barley-mow http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/barlymow.htm

Alla salute del covone d’orzo

Read the post in English

Una drinking song diffusa nell’Inghilterra rurale, Irlanda e Scozia (e Americhe) che non poteva mancare dopo il “crying of the neck” o durante una “Harvest supper“; questa canzone benaugurale è anche un gioco da taverna: la forma più comune del gioco vede un solo cantante, mentre il pubblico alza il calice per bere due volte nel ritornello rispondendo alla strofa benaugurale con un gioioso “Good luck!“; nella seconda versione un solista intona la prima strofa e tutti i partecipanti cantano in coro il ritornello progressivo, chi sbaglia le parole, o prende fiato per cantare, deve bere. Ovviamente lo scopo del gioco è quello di bere sempre di più, man mano che si sbaglia!

Harvest-Scene-Barrow-Trent-1881
Harvest Scene, Barrow-on-Trent, Derbyshire, George Turner II 1881

GIVE US ONCE A DRINKE

La canzone è molto antica così come sono antichi i rituali inerenti alla raccolta del grano/orzo (vedi i metodi tradizionali); la prima pubblicazione conosciuta risale al 1609, nel Deuteromelia di Thomas Ravenscroft, con il titolo “Give Us Once A Drinke” viene trascritta così come era cantata nelle taverne elisabettiane.

La canzone iniziava con:
“Give us once a drink for and the black bole(1)
Sing gentle Butler(2) “balla moy”(3)
For and the black bole,
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”
e finiva con:
“Give us once a drink for and the tunne
Sing gentle Butler balla moy
The tunne, the butt The pipe, the hogshead The barrel, the kilderkin The verkin, the gallon pot The pottle pot, the quart pot, The pint pot,
for and the black bole
Sing gentle Butler balla moy”

NOTE
1) Com’erano i bicchieri da birra nelle taverne medievali? I tre materiali più diffusi al tempo erano il metallo (peltro), il vetro e la ceramica. In Italia nel Trecento, ad esempio nelle taverne era più diffuso per i bicchieri l’uso del vetro, e per i contenitori di servizio la ceramica (terra cotta invetriata internamente). Qui si cita una black bowl che fa pensare più propriamente a una ciotola o coppa scura, forse in legno? Nelle canzoni del wassaling, esse pure molto antiche, si descrive spesso il materiale delle coppe per il brindisi intagliate nel legno. Successivamente è più probabile l’uso del peltro.
2) bottler
3) gli studiosi ritengono che potrebbe stare per ‘Bell Ami’, solo in un secondo tempo la canzone è entrata a far parte dei canti durante la festa del Raccolto e il verso si è modificato in ‘Barley Mow’, altri ritengono che si tratti di un mondegreen.

BARLEY MOW

Nel tempo si sono aggiunte nuove strofe e soprattutto nell’Ottocento si hanno molte trascrizioni nelle raccolte di vecchie canzoni tradizionali come ad esempio in “Songs of the Peasantry of England”, di Robert Bell 1857 che così scrive: “Questa canzone è cantata durante le riunioni di paese nel Devon e in Cornovaglia, in particolare per completare il trasporto dell’orzo, quando il rick, o la falciatura dell’orzo, è finito. Prendendo l’ultimo covone, che è chiamato the craw (o crow), l’uomo che lo tiene grida “Ce l’ho, ce l’ho, ce l’ho”, un altro chiede: “Che cosa hai? ‘e la risposta è, ‘ Un crow con una cosa allegra ecc”, dopo c’è una cena. L’effetto della Canzone d’orzo non può essere dato a parole; dovrebbe essere ascoltato, per essere apprezzato correttamente, in particolare con il dialetto del Paese Occidentale
Robert Bell riporta la versione diffusa nell’Inghilterra Ovest e anche la variante cantata nel Suffolk

Here’s a health to the barley mow!
Here’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both harrow and plow and sow!
When it is well sown
See it is well mown,
Both raked and gavelled clean,
And a barn to lay it in.
He’s a health to the man
Who very well can
Both thrash (1) and fan it clean!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Alla salute del covone d’orzo
alla salute dell’uomo
che con perizia sa come usare l’erpice, l’aratro e seminare!
Quando è tutto seminato
si vedrà ben falciato
e raccolto e legato bene
e portato in un fienile.
Alla salute dell’uomo
che con perizia lo trebbia (1) e vaglia bene

NOTE
1) La Trebbiatura: nel medioevo esistevano due modi per separare i chicchi di grano dalla spiga: il contadino batteva i covoni con un bastone o una frusta (detto correggiato) oppure li faceva calpestare dagli animali da tiro.
La Vagliatura: chicchi di grano e pula erano separati prima mettendoli in un setaccio e poi gettandoli in aria (doveva ovviamente essere una giornata ventilata) la pula volava via e il chicco tornava nel setaccio.

maste-drinking
The master of drinking Adriaen Brouwer (1606-1638)

The Barley Mow è una delle canzoni cumulative più conosciute del repertorio folk inglese e veniva solitamente cantata nelle cene della vendemmia, spesso come prova di sobrietà. Alfred Williams, che annotò uno splendido set nel villaggio di Inglesham nel Wiltshire qualche tempo prima della Grande Guerra, scrisse che era “incapace di definire la sua età, e nemmeno suggerirla, anche se senza dubbio il pezzo esiste da diversi secoli”. Robert Bell ha trovato la canzone cantata nel Devon e in Cornovaglia durante la metà del XIX secolo, specialmente dopo “aver completato il trasporto dell’orzo, quando la falciatura dell’orzo è finita”. Bell commenta che “l’effetto della ” Barley Mow” non può essere reso a parole; dovrebbe essere ascoltato, per essere apprezzato correttamente ” è certamente vero, e la maggior parte dei cantanti che conoscono la canzone si vantano di poterla superare senza commettere errori.(Mike Yates)

Così si brinda a tutte le dimensioni in cui viene commercializzata la birra (e sono indicati in tutte le misure esistenti nei tempi passati dal fusto (barrel) alla “bowl” e alla salute di tutti coloro che “manipolano” la birra per arrivare fino alla “allegra brigata” che la beve!

Arthur Smith nel film ; ‘The Barley Mow’ (1955) un tipico pub a Suffolk negli anni cinquanta. VIDEO

Irish Rovers


Here’s good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow, (1)
Jolly good luck to the pint pot,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the pint pot, half a pint, gill, (2) half a gill, quarter gill
Nipperkin (3) and a round bowl(4)
Here’s good luck, (5)
good luck, good luck
to the barley mow.
Here’s good luck to the half gallon, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the half gallon,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill, half a gill …
Here’s good luck to the gallon,
Here’s good luck to the half barrel,
Here’s good luck to the barrel,
Here’s good luck to the daughter(6),
Here’s good luck to the landlord,
Here’s good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the landlady,
Jolly good luck to the brewer, (7)
Here’s good luck to the company, good luck to the barley mow,
Jolly good luck to the company,
good luck to the barley mow;
Oh, the company, brewer, landlady, landlord, daughter, barrel,
Half barrel, gallon, half gallon, pint pot, half a pint, gill,
Half a gill, quarter gill, nipperkin and a round bowl,
Here’s good luck, good luck,
good luck to the barley mow.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ecco alla salute della pinta
alla salute del covone d’orzo
Alla salute della pinta
alla salute del covone d’orzo
la pinta, la mezza pinta, un quarto di pinta, metà gill, un quarto di gill
nippekin e la grolla
Ecco alla salute
alla salute
del covone d’orzo
Ecco alla salute del mezzo gallone
alla salute del covone d’orzo
alla salute del mezzo gallone
alla salute del covone d’orzo
il mezzo gallone, la pinta, la mezza pinta, il gill, il mezzo gill..
Ecco alla salute del gallone
Ecco alla salute del mezzo barrel
Ecco alla salute della figlia
Ecco alla salute della padrone
Ecco alla salute della padrona
buona salute della padrona
buona salute al birraio
ecco alla salute della compagnia
alla salute del covone d’orzo
ecco alla salute della compagnia
alla salute del covone d’orzo
oh la compagnia, il birrario, la padrona, il padrone, la figlia, il barile
etc

NOTE
1) [gridare GOOD LUCK e bere un sorso!]
2) sono tutte unità di misura in volume ordinate dalla più grande (barrel) alla più piccola (round bowl).
Le misure di capacità inglesi sono le seguenti:
gallone, detto anche imperial gallon, (abbreviato con la sigla gall) che equivale a l 4,545.
Il gallone si divide in 4 quarti (abbreviato con la sigla qt). Un quarto è pari a l 1,136.
Il quarto si divide in 2 pinte (abbreviate con la sigla pt). Una pinta è pari a l 0,568.
Il quarto si divide in 4 gills (abbreviato con la sigla gill). Un gill è pari a 0,142.
Ma come per tutte le unità di misura della tradizione contadina ci sono differenze locali nella quantità misurata
a gill is a half-pint in a northern pub, but a quarter-pint down south“.
3) “The nipperkin is a unit of measurement of volume, equal to one-half of a quarter-gill, one-eighth of a gill, or one thirty-second of an English pint.
In other estimations, one nip (an abbreviation that originated in 1796) is either one-third of a pint, or any amount less than or equal to half a pint
“.[wiki] “A nip was also used by brewers to refer to a small bottle of ale (usually a strong one such as Barley Wine or Russian Stout) which was sold in 1/3 pint bottles“.
4) “The round bowl” a volte anche “hand-around bowl”, “brown bowl” oppure “bonny bowl” potrebbe essere la coppa tipica con la quale si brindava nel wassailing evidentemente un’unità di misura che si è andata persa nel tempo.
5) [gridare GOOD LUCK, bere è opzionale!]
6) è la figlia del proprietario della taverna oppure più genericamente una cameriera che serve ai tavoli
7) c’è chi aggiunge nell’elenco anche “the slavey” e “the drayer“; per “slavery” si intende una servetta e “the draye” è colui che tira (o guida) il carretto cioè l’uomo delle consegne che appunto rifornisce di birra la taverna. Il nome deriva dal fatto che un tempo tale carretto era senza ruote e veniva trascinato come una slitta.

slavery

QUANTO MISURA UNA PINTA?
therightglass

La birra alla spina viene commercializzata nei paesi anglosassoni a partire dalla pinta che in Inghilterra e Irlanda corrisponde a 20 once (568 ml cioè grosso modo 50cl). La pinta americana invece corrisponde a 16 once; così il bicchiere standard con in cui si spilla la birra contiene esattamente una pinta (come viene detta da noi italiani “la birra grande”); le forma variano a seconda del tempo e delle mode, ma la capacità del bicchiere resta sempre di una pinta! Una legge dal parlamento inglese nel 1698 ha dichiarato che “ale and beer” (cioè la birra senza luppolo e la birra con il luppolo) devono essere servite in pubblico solo in “pints, full quarts (two pints)* or multiples thereof”. La regola venne ulteriormente ribadita nel 1824 imponendo come unità di misura per tutte le bevande quella imperiale. *Il bicchiere che contiene 2 pinte imperiali (1,14 lt) è lo yard ossia un bicchiere stretto e lungo appunto una iarda. Oggi con l’adeguamento alle normative europee anche il governo inglese ha “ristretto” la pinta allo “schooner” (come viene chiamata in Australia, ma siamo ancora in attesa del nomignolo che verrà data in Inghilterra alla nuova misura!) il bicchiere pari a 2/3 di pinta (400 ml)

THE BARLEY MOW (ROUD 10722)

Una variante sempre dal Suffolk


I
Well we ploughed the land and we planted it,
and we watched the barley grow.
We rolled it and we harrowed it
and we cleaned it with a hoe.(1)
Then we waited ‘til the farmer said,
“It’s time for harvest now.
Get out your axes and sharpen, boys,
it’s time for barley mow.”
Chorus
Well, here’s luck to barley mow
and the land that makes it grow.
We’ll drink to old John Barleycorn(2),
here’s luck to barley mow.
So fill up all the glasses, lads,
and stand them in a row:
A gill, a half a pint, a pint, a pint and a quart and here’s luck to barley mow.
II
Well we went and mowed the barley
and we left it on the ground.
We left it in the sun and rain ‘til it was nicely brown.
Then one day off to the maltsters,
then John Barleycorn did go.
The day he went away, we all did say,
“Here’s luck to barley mow.”
III
Have no fear of old John Barleycorn
when he’s as green as grass.
But old John Barleycorn is strong enough
to sit you on your arse.
But there’s nothing better ever brewed
than we are drinking now,
Fill them up: we’ll have another round,
here’s good luck to barley mow.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Abbiamo arato la terra e abbiamo seminato, e poi abbiamo guardato l’orzo crescere.
L’abbiamo sarchiato con la zappa
e poi abbiamo aspettato fino a quando il contadino diceva
“E’ il tempo del raccolto.
Prendete le vostre falci e affilatele ragazzi, è il tempo per i covoni d’orzo”
CORO:
Alla salute dei covoni d’orzo
e della terra che li fa crescere,
berremo al vecchio John Barleycorn
alla salute del covone d’orzo.
Così riempite tutti i bicchieri, ragazzi,
e metteteli in fila: un quarto di pinta, mezza pinta, una pinta, una pinta e un quarto e alla salute del covone d’orzo.
II
Siamo andati a falciare l’orzo
e l’abbiamo lasciato a terra,
sotto il sole e la pioggia affinchè diventasse bello scuro. Poi dopo un giorno di riposo dai produttori di malto John Barleycorn è andato.
Il giorno che andò via tutti dicemmo
“Alla salute del covone d’orzo”
III
Non abbiamo paura del vecchio John Barleycorn quando è verde come l’erba, ma il vecchio John Barleycorn è forte abbastanza
da farti sedere con il culo per terra,
eppure non c’è niente di meglio mai birrificato di quanto stiamo bevendo adesso,
riempiteli di nuovo: faremo un altro giro alla salute del covone di d’orzo

NOTE
1) lavori sarchiatura: taglio e rimescolamento del terreno per la parte più superficiale
2) John Barleycorn è lo spirito della birra vedi

FONTI
https://anglofolksongs.wordpress.com/2015/09/14/the-barley-mow/
http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext96/oleng10h.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/27/barley.htm http://www.chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/barleymow.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/tony.rose/songs/barleymow.html http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=151726
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3873 http://www.efdss.org/component/content/article/45-efdss-site/learning-resources/1540-efdss-resource-bank-chorus-barley-mow http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/english/barlymow.htm

Harvest Supper: bevete ragazzi!

Nella tradizione contadina si svolgeva una grande festa nella domenica più prossima alla Harvest Moon che è la luna piena più vicina all‘equinozio d’autunno; si tratta di una festa andata perduta con il disgregarsi della comunità contadina in seguito al sopravvento nei campi delle macchine e della chimica.

Ancora nel 1800 quando l’ultimo covone di grano era portato alla fattoria si brindava con la birra alla salute del “Maister” e “Dame” (i proprietari della fattoria ), ma solo quando tutto il grano era stato portato nel granaio si concludevano i lavori del raccolto, con una cena offerta dall’agricoltore ai suoi lavoranti, l’Harvest Supper, che in Scozia era detta Kirn o Kirn Supper.
Era ovviamente un classico condiviso in tutte le comunità rurali  che il padrone della fattoria, dopo un grande sforzo di lavoro collettivo, offrisse un pranzo o una cena ai suoi lavoranti e braccianti stagionali che avevano appena concluso il lavoro, per ringraziarli dell’impegno, per sancire un legame fatto anche di condivisione e non solo di sfruttamento. Ma l’harvest supper si distingueva da questi banchetti per la sua abbondanza pari a una festa natalizia continua

DRINK, BOYS, DRINK!

Detta anche “Harvest Supper (or Home) Song” la canzone si cantava immancabilmente durante la cena offerta dall’agricoltore ai suoi braccianti stagionali, una cena ricca come un pranzo di Natale con grande quantità di cibo e birra a volontà.

autumn-food“Mutton, veal, and bacon, which makes full the meal, With several dishes standing by, As here a custard, there a pie, And here all-tempting frumenty..” (The Hock-cart, or Harvest Home di Robert Herrick tratto da qui).

Lucy Broadwood, che ha raccolto queste canzoni (in “English County Songs” 1893) , dice che la prima strofa e il ritornello dovevano essere cantati più e più volte, finché a tutti i commensali della tavola non fosse stato riempito il bicchiere per il brindisi. Poi il secondo verso sarebbe cantato nello stesso modo. E così via.

The youths and maidens dance their country dances, as an old writer, who lived in the reign of Charles II., tells us:—”The lad and the lass will have no lead on their heels. O, ‘tis the merry time wherein honest neighbours make good cheer, and God is glorified in His blessings on the earth.” When the feast is over, the company retire to some near hillock, and make the welkin ring with their shouts, “Holla, holla, holla, largess!”—largess being the presents of money and good things which the farmer had bestowed. (tratto da qui)

John Kirkpatrick in God Speed The Plough – 2011 (strofe da I a IV) ♪


I
Here’s an health unto the master,
he’s the founder of the feast
We hope to God with all our hearts
that his soul in heaven do rest
Here’s hoping that he prospers,
whatever he takes in hand
For we are all his servants
and all at his command.
Chorus:
So drink boys, drink,
and see that you do not spill
If you do you shall drink two,
for that is our master’s will.
II
Here’s an health unto the master
and all upon this farm
and all who live in … (1)
to keep his corn from home
.. oats and barley  and every kind of brain
.. a harvest plenty to drink and all again
III
And now we’ve drunk to the master’s health,
why shouldn’t the Missus go free
Why shouldn’t she go up to heaven,
up to heaven as well as he
she is a good provider,
abroad as well as at home
So fill your cup and drink it up,
for ‘tis our harvest-home.
IV
Now harvest it is ended
and  we brought it home at last
so it’s a health of .. all in a flowing glass,
to all in our good company,
we wish you all good cheer
come one come all .. ,
and bravely drink  your beer.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Ecco alla salute del padrone
che è il patrocinatore della festa
speriamo in Dio con tutti i nostri cuori
che la sua anima riposi in pace,
speriamo che lui abbia successo,
in qualunque impresa si accinga
perchè siamo tutti suoi servitori
al suo comando
CORO
Così bevete ragazzi, bevete,
attenti a non versare
se lo fate dovrete bere due volte
che questo e il volere del padrone
II
Ecco alla salute del nostro padrone
e di tutto su questa fattoria
e di tutti coloro che vivono in..
per riportare il grano a casa
.. avena e orzo e ogni tipo di cereale
.. l’abbondanza del raccolto beviamo tutti di nuovo
III
E ora che abbiamo bevuto alla salute del padrone
perchè non si dovrebbe farlo per la signora?
Perchè non dovrebbe andare in cielo
dritta in cielo come lui?
Lei è una buona lavoratrice,
sia fuori che dentro casa
così riempite la vostra coppa e bevete
perchè è la nostra festa del raccolto
IV
Ora il raccolto è finito
e lo abbiamo portato a casa finalmente
quindi alla salute di .. un bicchiere bello pieno,
e tutti nella nostra buona compagnia
vi auguriamo ogni bene
venite tutti ..
e bevete forza la vostra birra

NOTE
1) dice il nome di una località
al momento non sono riuscita a trovare il testo cantato da  John Kirkpatrick perciò ho riportato ad orecchio quanto ascoltato nella II e IV strofa, qualcuno è in grado di completare il testo?

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/equinozio-autunno.htm
http://piereligion.org/hslyrics.html
http://piereligion.org/harvestsongs.html
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Harvest-Supper_Song.htm
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/sept/24.htm
http://www.fullbooks.com/Ancient-Poems-Ballads-and-Songs-of-England4.html http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/sheepshearing.html http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1721 http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2525 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=121538
http://sniff.numachi.com/~rickheit/dtrad/pages/ttHRVSTAWA.html