Archivi tag: Gruagach

Amhrán Na Craoibhe

Leggi in italiano

Amhrán Na Craoibhe (in englishThe Garland Song)  is the processional song in Irish Gaelic of the women who carry the May branch (May garland) in the ritual celebrations for the festival of Beltane, still widespread at the beginning of the twentieth century in Northern Ireland (Oriel region).

The song comes from Mrs. Sarah Humphreys who lived in the county of Armagh and was collected in the early twentieth century, erroneously called ‘Lá Fhéile Blinne‘ (The Feast of St Blinne) because it was singed in Killeavy for the Feast of St Moninne, affectionately called “Blinne“, a clear graft of pre-Christian traditions in the Catholic rituals.
The song is unique to the south-east Ulster area and was collected from Sarah Humphreys who lived in Lislea in the vacinity of Mullaghban in Co. Armagh. The air of the song from Cooley in Co. Louth survived in the oral tradition from my father Pádraig. It was mistakenly called ‘Lá Fhéile Blinne’ (The Feast of St Blinne) by one collector. Though it was sung as part of the celebrations of Killeavy Pattern it had no connection with Blinne or Moninne, a native saint of South Armagh, but rather the old surviving pre-Christian traditions had been incorporated into Christian celebrations. The district of ‘Bealtaine’ is to be found within a few miles of Killeavy where this song was traditionally sung, though the placename has been forgotten since Irish ceased to be the vernacular of the community within this last century. Other place names nearby associated with May festivities are: Gróbh na Carraibhe; The Grove of the Branch/Garland (now Carrive Grove) Cnoc a’ Damhsa; The Hill of Dancing (now Crockadownsa).” (Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin, 2002, A Hidden Ulster)
St Moninna of Killeavy died in 517-518, follower of St Brigid of Kildare, her names “Blinne” or “Moblinne” mean “little” or “sister” (“Mo-ninne” could be a version of Niniane, the “Lady of the Lake” of the Arthurian cycle); according to scholars her name was Darerca and her (alleged) tomb is located in the cemetery of Killeavy on the slopes of Slieve Gullion where it was originally located her monastery of nuns, become a place of pilgrimage throughout the Middle Ages along with her sacred well, St Bline’s Well.

ST DARERCA (MONENNA) OF KILLEAVY

It seems that the name of Baptism of this virgin, commemorated in the Irish martyrologists on July 6th, was Darerca, and that Moninna is instead a term of endearment of obscure origin. We have her Acta, but her life was confused with the English saint Modwenna, venerated at Burton-on-Trent. Darerca was the foundress and first abbess of one of Ireland’s oldest and most important female monasteries, built in Killeavy (county of Armagh), where the ruins of a church dedicated to her are still visible. He died in 517. Killeavy remained an important center of religious life, until it was destroyed by the Scandinavian marauders in 923; Darerca continued to be widely revered especially in the northern region of Ireland (translated from  here)

AN ANCIENT GODDESS

The Slieve Gullion Cairns

Slieve Gullion ( Sliabh gCuillinn ) is a place of worship in prehistoric times on the top of which a chamber tomb was built with the sunlit entrance at the winter solstice. (see).
According to legend, the “Old Witch” lives on its top, the Cailleach Biorar (‘Old woman of the waters’) and the ‘South Cairn’ is her home also called ‘Cailleach Beara’s House‘.
the site with virtual reality
On the top of the mountain a small lake and the second smaller burial mound built in the Bronze Age. In the lake, according to local evidence, lives a kelpie or a sea monster and it’s hid the passage to the King’s Stables. (Navan, Co. Armagh)

Cailleach Beara by Cheryl Rose-Hall

The Hunt of Slieve Cuilinn

The goddess, a Great Mother of Ireland, Cailleach Biorar (Bhearra) -the Veiled is called Milucradh / Miluchradh, described as the sister of the goddess Aine in the story of “Fionn mac Cumhaill and the Old Witch“, we discover that the nickname of Fionn (Finn MacColl) “the blond”, “the white” comes from a tale of the cycle of the Fianna: everything begins with a bet between two sisters Aine (the goddess of love) and Moninne (the old goddess), Aine boasted that he would never have slept with a gray-haired man, so the first sister brought Fionn to the Slieve Gullion (in the form of a gray fawn she made Fionn pursue her in the heat of hunting by separating himself from the rest of his warriors), then turned into a beautiful girl in tears sitting by the lake to convince Fionn to dive and retrieve her ring. But the waters of the lake had been enchanted by the goddess to bring old age to those who immersed themselves (working in reverse of the sacred wells), so Fionn came out of the lake old and decrepit,and obviously with white hair. His companions, after having reached and recognized him, succeed in getting Cailleach to give him a magic potion that restores vigor to Fionn but leaves him with white hair! (see)

The Cailleach and Bride are probably the same goddess or the different manifestations of the same goddess, the old woman of the Winter and the Spring Maid in the cycle of death-rebirth-life of the ancient religion.

The ancient path to St Bline’s Well.

On the occasion of the patronal feast (pattern celebrations) of the Holy Moninna (July 6) a procession was held in Killeavy that started from St Blinne grave, headed to the sacred well along an ancient path, and then returned to the cemetery. A competition was held between teams of young people from various villages to make the most beautiful effigy of the Goddess, a faded memory of Beltane’s festivities to elect their own May Queen. During the procession the young people sang Amhrán Na Craoibhe accompanied by a dance, whose choreography was lost, each sentence is sung by the soloist to whom the choir responds. The melody is a variant of Cuacha Lán de Bhuí on the structure of an ancient carola (see)

One of the most spectacular high-level views in Ireland.
On a clear day, it’s possible to see from the peak (573 mt) as far as Lough Neagh, west of Belfast, and the Wicklow Mountains, south of Dublin.

Páidraigín Ní Uallacháin from“An Dealg  Óir” 2010

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin & Sylvia Crawford live 2016 

AMHRÁN NA CRAOIBHE

English translation P.Ní Uallacháin*
My branch is the branch
of the fairy women,
Hey to him who takes her home,
hey to her;

The branch of the lasses
and the branch of the lads;
Hey to him who takes her home,
hey to her;

The branch of the maidens
made with pride;
Hey, young girls,
where will we get her a spouse?
We will get a lad
in the town for the bride (1),
A dauntless, swift, strong lad,
Who will bring this branch (2)
through the three nations,
From town to town
and back home to this place?
Two hundred horses
with gold bridles on their foreheads,
And two hundred cattle
on the side of each mountain,
And an equal amount
of sheep and of herds (3),
O, young girls, silver
and dowry for her,
We will carry her with us,
up to the roadway,
Where we will meet
two hundred young men,
They will meet us with their
caps in their fists,
Where we will have pleasure,
drink and sport (4),
Your branch is like
a pig in her sack (5),
Or like an old broken ship
would come into Carlingford (6),
We can return now
and the branch with us,
We can return since
we have joyfully won the day,
We won it last year
and we won it this year,
And as far as I hear
we have always won it.
Irish gaelic
‘S í mo chraobhsa
craobh na mban uasal
(Haigh dó a bheir i’ bhaile í
‘s a haigh di)

Craobh na gcailín is
craobh na mbuachaill;
(Haigh dó a bheir i’ bhaile í
‘s a haigh di).

Craobh na ngirseach
a rinneadh le huabhar,
Maise hóigh, a chaillíní,
cá bhfaigh’ muinn di nuachar?
Gheobh’ muinn buachaill
sa mbaile don bhanóig;
Buachaill urrúnta , lúdasach, láidir
A bhéarfas a ‘ghéag
seo di na trí náisiún,
Ó bhaile go baile è ar
ais go dtí an áit seo
Dhá chéad eachaí
è sriantaí óir ‘na n-éadan,
Is dhá chéad eallaigh
ar thaobh gach sléibhe,
È un oiread sin eile
de mholtaí de thréadtaí,
Óró, a chailíní, airgead
is spré di,
Tógfa ‘muinn linn í suas’
un a ‘bhóthair,
An áit a gcasfaidh
dúinn dhá chéad ógfhear,
Casfa ‘siad orainn’ sa gcuid
hataí ‘na ndorn leo,
An áit a mbeidh aiteas,
ól is spóirse,
È cosúil mbur gcraobh-na
le muc ina mála,
Nó le seanlong bhriste thiocfadh ‘steach i mBaile Chairlinn,
Féada ‘muinn tilleadh anois
è un’ chraobh linn,
Féada ‘muinn tilleadh,
tá an lá bainte go haoibhinn,
Bhain muinn anuraidh é
è bhain muinn i mbliana é,
è mar chluinimse bhain
muinn ariamh é.
May Garland

Notes
1) it is the May doll, but also the Queen of May personification of the female principle of fertility
2) the may garland made by women
3) heads of cattle in dowry that is the animals of the village that will be smashed by the fires of Beltane
4) after the procession the feast ended with a dance
5) derogatory sentences against other garlands carried by rival teams “a pig in a poke” is a careless purchase, instead of a pig in the bag could be a cat!
6) Lough Carlingford The name is derived from the Old Norse and in irsih is “Lough Cailleach”

7005638-albero-di-biancospino-sulla-strada-rurale-contro-il-cielo-bluThe hawthorn is the tree of Beltane, beloved to Belisama, grows as a shrub or as a tree of small size (only reaches 7 meters in height) widening the branches in all the directions, in search of the light upwards.
The branch of hawthorn and its flowers were used in the Celtic wedding rituals and in the ancient Greece and also for the ancient Romans it was the flower of marriage, a wish for happiness and prosperity.
The healing virtues of hawthorn were known since the Middle Ages: it is called the “valerian of the heart” because it acts on the blood flow improving its circulation and it is also used to counteract insomnia and states of anguish. see

HAWTHORN OR BLACKTHORN?

The flowers are small, white and with delicate pinkish hues, sweetly scented. In areas with late blooms for Beltane the “mayers” use the branch of blackthorn,same family as the Rosaceae but with flowering already in March-April.

 

Amhrad Na Beltaine

LINK
https://www.catholicireland.net/saintoftheday/st-moninne-of-killeavy-d-c-518-virgin-and-foundress/
http://www.killeavy.com/stmon.htm
http://www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Moninna’s%20Holy%20Well.html
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=28400
http://irishantiquities.bravehost.com/armagh/killevy/killevy.html
http://www.nicsramblers.co.uk/p240213.html
http://irelandsholywells.blogspot.it/2012/06/saint-monninas-well-killeavy-county.html
http://www.megalithicireland.com/Killeavy%20Churches.html
http://omniumsanctorumhiberniae.blogspot.it/2015/07/saint-moninne-july-6.html
https://atlanticreligion.com/tag/moninne/
http://www.newgrange.com/slieve-gullion.htm
https://voicesfromthedawn.com/slieve-gullion/

https://www.independent.ie/life/travel/ireland/walk-of-the-week-slieve-gullion-co-armagh-26543944.html
http://geographical.co.uk/uk/aonb/item/559-the-ring-of-gullion

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59221
https://www.orielarts.com/songs/amhran-na-craoibhe/
http://journalofmusic.com/focus/breathing-embers

LA “MERLA” IRLANDESE

Anche nella tradizione delle Isole Britanniche esiste una versione degli italici giorni della merla, ma spostati di un mese (paese che vai usanza che trovi): i primi tre giorni di  Aprile sono giorni di brutto tempo, freddi e tempestosi e sono chiamati i Borrowed o Borrowing Day, perchè Marzo ha chieso in prestito ulteriori tre giorni.

Una poesia irlandese così recita

The first of them was wind and wet,
The second of them was snow and sleet,
The third of them was such a freeze,
It froze the birds’ claws to the trees

Il primo giorno fu ventoso e umido,
il secondo fu neve e nevischio,
il terzo giorno fu talmente gelido che congelò le zampe degli uccelli sugli alberi

In Inghilterra non ci sono di mezzo le mucche e una filastrocca dello Staffordshire recita

March borrowed of April,
Three days, they say;
One rained, the other snowed,
And the other was the worst day that ever blowed
Marzo chiese in prestito ad Aprile tre giorni, così dicono;
uno pioveva, l’altro nevicava
e il terzo fu il peggiore giorno a sferzare (con il vento)

I GIORNI DELLA MUCCA TIGRATA

Mucca tigrata irlandese: Bo Riabhach  è una mucca autoctona irlandese abbastanza rara che prende il nome dal mantello bruno a strisce proprio come la tigre.

IRLANDA: The Old Cows Days/The Days of the Brindled Cow (in gaelico “An tSean-bho Riabhach)

La leggenda irlandese narra che una mucca dal manto striato molto testarda, si lamentava con i suoi amici bovidi dei rigori di Marzo, e alla fine del mese si vantò di essere sopravvissuta alle raffiche gelide del vento marzolino. Queste affermazioni indispettirono Marzo che prese in prestito tre giorni da Aprile per continuare a tormentare la mucca: e la mucca morì!
In all mountainous districts here as elsewhere in Ireland March is the severest month for cattle: “an old cow on the 31st March began to curse and swear at April, tossing her tail in the air, and saying to the devil, I pitch you – you are gone and April has come, and now I will have grass. March, however, was too much for her, and he borrowed three days from April, during which time he made such bad weather the old cow died.’ (Folklore- Journal  1885. tratto da qui)

In alcune parti dell’Irlanda del Nord, la storia è più elaborata e entrano in scena anche il merlo e il saltimpalo oltre che la vecchia vacca: così i giorni di maltempo diventano nove (tre per ogni animale che si fece beffe di Marzo)

Trí lá lomartha an loinn
Trí lá sgiuthanta an chlaibhreáin
Agus trí lá na bó riabhaighte
Three days for fleecing the black-bird,
Three days of punishment for the stone chatter,
And three days for the grey cow.

Come per il mito della merla bianca siamo in presenza della punizione divina per l’hybris: per citare ancora Antonia Bertocchi nella sua ricerca etno-storica “… risate e schiamazzi che suonano molesti all’orecchio mistico dei saggi e degli iniziati che hanno imparato a non recare disturbo al lavorio delle forze sacre immanenti nella natura, mentre si sacrificano e si trasformano. La hybris, secondo le categorie del pensiero magico – religioso, è un sentimento di tracotanza, misto ad ingordigia. E’ il più grave peccato che l’umanità possa compiere. E’ un atteggiamento interiore, non è un elenco di prescrizioni e divieti, come ad esempio i tabù, la cui trasgressione può venir punita con la morte. Ma la società totemica non ha interesse ad autodistruggersi, per questo si educano le persone fin dalla prima infanzia, in modo che ogn’uno diventi capace di controllare sé stesso fin dal primo insorgere della hybris, perché è il prerequisito di qualunque tipo di infrazione a qualunque norma morale.” (tratto da qui)

La mucca tigrata è chiaramente uno spirito guardiano, sappiamo infatti che era una delle sembianze di Cailleach, la velata, così come si manifestava la Dea durante l’Inverno la “Vecchia Donna”, che colpiva con il suo martello la terra e la rendeva dura fino a Imbolc, la festa del risveglio della Primavera. E’ la gruagach, la vacca sacra giunta dal mare di cui troviamo disseminate per i campi la pietra coppellata per le offerte di latte, una creatura soprannaturale in origine sicuramente di genere femminile  guardiana del bestiame di un determinato territorio.
Alcune ipotesi non ritengono che il culto sia originario delle isole, ma che arrivi dal continente e per la precisione dalla Spagna
Lo storico greco Erodoto nel  secolo A.C. ci parla di una tribù celtica in Spagna che chiama “Kallaikoi“.
L’autore romano Plinio parla del popolo dei 
Callaeci, tribù da cui deriva il nome Gallaecia (Galizia) e Portus Cale (Portogallo). Il nome Callaeci viene fatto risalire ad “adoratori della Cailleach“. …Non si sa se era già una Dea Anziana o se venne trasformata in Vecchia Saggia dalle nuove popolazioni per indicare la sua antichità. L’ Irlanda e la Scozia sono costellate da luoghi che ne riprendono il nome o che ricordano vicende che la vedevano protagonista. Sembra quasi che la Cailleach sia onnipresente in quelle terre, che permei tutto il territorio, che ne sia la vera incarnazione. (Claudia Falcone tratto da:ilcerchiodellaluna.it)

Guarda caso la stessa leggenda viene raccontata sia in Scozia che in Spagna: un pastore, per proteggere il suo gregge, promise di sacrificare un agnello a Marzo se avesse ridotto la forza dei suoi venti. Ma quando Marzo finì il pastore si rimangiò la promessa. Per vendicarsi, Marzo prese in prestito tre giorni ad Aprile e scatenò i suoi venti con più ferocia per punire il pastore del suo inganno.
Marzo dice ad Aprile
I see 3 hoggs (hoggets, sheep) upon a hill; 
And if you’ll lend me dayes 3 
I’ll find a way to make them dee (die). 
The first o’ them wus wind and weet, 
The second o’ them wus snaw and sleet, 
The third o’ them wus sic a freeze 
It froze the birds’ nebs (noses) to the trees. 
When the 3 days were past and gane 
The 3 silly hoggs came hirpling (limping) hame.

Ma non finisce qui, ulteriori analogie con i giorni della merla si possono ritrovare nel “Blackthorn winter“, una sorta di incantesimo sul freddo che fa fiorire il prugnolo, il delicato fiore bianco con il cuore illuminato dai gialli pistilli si apre prima delle foglie, e lo vediamo fare capolino tra la neve o la brina che riveste i campi. Sono un breve periodo di giornate insolitamente calde a fine marzo-inizio d’aprile, ma dannose per gli alberi da frutto perchè ci sono sempre i Borrowing Days in agguato che faranno gelare i boccioli sugli alberi!

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/poor-horse.htm
http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/ACalend/BorrowedDays.html
http://thewidowsweeds.blogspot.it/2012/03/borrowing-days.html

CAILIN DEAS CRUITE NA MBO

Mungere il latte era un’incombenza svolta dalle donne che solitamente cantavano una ninna-nanna alle mucche per tenerle tranquille, ma anche un incantesimo  per allontanare il malocchio e ottenere una produzione abbondante e salutare.
La Chiesa è stata spesso diffidente verso i canti delle belle fanciulle intente a mungere le mucche, considerandoli dei rituali magici o preghiere verso gli antichi dei.
Adriaen_van_de_VeldeE infatti un aneddoto annovera la canzone “Cailín Deas Cruíte na mBó” tra le canzoni irlandesi porta sfortuna: si dice che un sacerdote stesse recandosi al capezzale di un uomo morente per prestagli l’estrema unzione, ma si attardò ad ascoltare il canto di una contadinella; così arrivò a destinazione quando oramai l’uomo era già morto. La “bella fanciulla” altri non era che il diavolo che era riuscito a impedire al sacerdote di portate il conforto della confessione al moribondo. In effetti la melodia è considerata un canto delle fate, non essendo insolito nel folklore irlandese il racconto di fanciulle rapite e messe a guardia di bovini o cervidi.. (vedi)
La figura di una fanciulla che munge una mucca si ritrova scolpita sulle mura di molte chiese medievali ed è una presenza molto antica in terra d’Irlanda e più in generale lungo le coste delle isole britanniche e d’ Europa, così si trova sempre negli alpeggi una “milking stone” coppellata in cui le donne lasciavano offerte di latte allo spirito guardiano del luogo denominato spesso  gruagach (e in origine sicuramente di genere femminile) associato ad una vacca sacra giunta dal mare e ad una pietra coppellata . Potrebbe essere il ricordo di antichissimi rituali celebrati da sacerdotesse della Dea Madre e in seguito trasformate in creature fatate. continua

PASTORAL LOVE SONG

Un innamorato respinto spasima per la bella lattaia e vorrebbe prenderla in moglie preferendola alla figlia del Re.

ASCOLTA Danu

I
Tá blian nó níos mó ‘gam ag éisteacht
Le cogar doilíosach mo mheoin,
Ó casadh liom grá geal mo chléibhe
Tráthnóna brea gréine san fhómhar.
Bhí an bhó bhainne chumhra ag géimneach
Is na h-éanlaith go meidhreach ag ceol,
Is ar bhruach an tsruthán ar leathaobh dhom
Bhí cailín deas crúite na mbó.
II
Tá a súile mar lonradh na gréine,
Ag scaipeadh trí spéartha gan cheo,
‘s is deirge a grua ná na caora
Ar lasadh measc craobha na gcnó.
Tá a béilin níos dílse na sméara,
‘s is gile ná leamhnacht a snó,
Níl ógbhean níos deise san saol seo
Ná cailín deas crúite na mbó.
III
Dá bhfaighinnse árd Tiarnas na hÉireann
Éadacha, síoda is sróil
Dá bhfaighinnse an bhanríon is airde
Dá bhfuil ar an dtalamh so beo
Dá bhfaighinnse céad loingis mar spré dhom
Píoláidi, caisleáin is ór
Bfhearr liom bheith fán ar na sléibhte
Lem chailín deas crúite na mbó
IV
Muna bhfuil sé i ndán dom bheith in éineacht
Leis an spéirbhean ró-dhílis úd fós
Is daoirseach, dubhrónach mo shaolsa
Gan suaimhneas, gan éifeacht, gan treo
Ní bheidh sólás im chroí ná im intinn
Ná suaimhneas orm oíche ná ló
Nó bhfeice mé taobh liom óna muintir
Mo cailín deas crúite na mbó

I
I am listening for more than a year
To my mind’s melancholy whispering
Since I met the bright love of my heart
One evening late in autumn
The cow of the fragrant-smelling milk was lowing
And the birds were merry with song
And on the bank of the stream by my side/Was the pretty milkmaid
II
Her eyes are like the shining sun
Dispersing the mist through the skies
And her cheeks are redder than the rowan trees/ Alight among the branches on the hill
Her mouth is sweeter than blackberries/ And her complexion brighter than new milk/There is not a lovelier young woman in the world/Than the pretty milkmaid
III
If I were to receive High Lordship of Ireland
Clothing of silk or satin
Or the highest queen that there is
Alive in this world
If I received a hundred ships as a dowry
Palaces, castles and gold
I would prefer to be wandering the hillsides
With my pretty milkmaid
IV
If it is not in store for me to be together
With that too-faithful beauty as yet
It is limited and sad my life will be
Without peace, without merit, without direction
There will be no consolation in my heart or my mind
I will have no rest by night or day
Until I see by my side from her people
My pretty milkmaid
Tradotto da Cattia Salto
I
Ascolto da più di un anno
i sospiri malinconici del mio cuore
da quando incontrai il mio luminoso amore una sera tardi d’autunno
la mucca dal latte profumato d’erbe mungeva
e gli uccelli cantavano allegri e sulla riva del ruscello accanto a me
c’era la bella lattaia
II
Gli occhi come il sole splendente
fugavano la nebbia nel cielo
le guance più rosse del sorbo
tra i rami sulla collina;
la sua bocca è più dolce delle more
e la sua carnagione più luminosa del latte fresco, non c’è fanciulla più amabile al mondo della graziosa lattaia.
III
Se dovessi ricevere dall’Alto Luogotenente d’Irlanda vestiti di seta e di raso
o dalla regina più maestosa che esista al mondo, se anche ricevessi un centinaio di navi come dote
palazzi, castelli e oro, preferirei piuttosto vagare per le colline
con la mia bella lattaia
IV
Se non è destino per me stare insieme
con quella bellezza così leale,
limitata e triste sarà la mia vita,
senza pace, merito e guida.
Non ci sarà consolazione nel mio cuore o nella mia mente
non ci sarà riposo notte e giorno
finchè non vedrò al mio fianco
la mia bella lattaia

continua versione inglese

FONTI
http://www.irishpage.com/songs/cailinbo.htm
http://songsinirish.com/cailin-deas-cruite-na-mbo-lyrics/

CRONAN CUALLAICH, CATTLE CROON

“Cronan Cuallaich” è una canzone in gaelico scozzese raccolta nell’isola di Benbecula (isole Ebridi) e trascritta anche da Alexander Carmicheal nel suo “Carmina Gadelica” Vol I # 105. “La canzone del mandriano” (in inglese “hearding croon”) è una preghiera di protezione, cantata al bestiame al pascolo per tenerlo tranquillo. La struttura però è quella della waulking song e come tale tramandata nelle isole Ebridi come canto delle lavoratrici del tweed.

Russet Highland Cattle, Uig Beach, Isle of Lewis. © J. Lynn Stapleton, 1st August 2013

La vacca delle Highland  ha un aspetto molto buffo, sembra quasi uno jak dell’Himalaya, è una razza bovina originaria dalla Scozia, nota anche come Hebridean breed, Hairy CooHeilan Coo o Kyloe. Di pelo lungo, folto e ispido, con corna fino a un metro e mezzo è docile di carattere, vive all’aperto tutto l’anno  e si ammala di rado. La sua particolare costituzione fisica è dovuta all’adattamento ai climi freddi e persino glaciali. Per quanto si consideri un’unica razza due sono i progenitori: uno di colore nero e di taglia più piccola, l’altro di colore rossastro e di taglia più grande. La razza è molto apprezzata per la sua carne (magra e senza colesterolo), ed è stata esportata in varie parti del mondo in America, Australia e Europa, in Italia la troviamo in Alto Adige, Veneto, Liguria e Lombardia.

ASCOLTA  Distant Oaks in “Gach Là agus Oidhche: Music of Carmina Gadelica” 2003 (su spotify) -Crònan Cuallaich

An crodh an diugh a dol imirig,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
Ho ro la ill o,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
Dol a dh’ itheadh feur na cille,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
Am buachaille fein ann ’g an iomain,
Ho ro la ill o,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
’G an cuallach, ’g an cuart, ’g an tilleadh,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
Bride bhith-gheal bhi ’g am blighinn,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
Muire mhin-gheal bhi ’g an glidheadh,
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o,
’S Iosa Criosda air chinn an slighe,
Iosa Criosda air chinn an slighe.
Hill-i-ruin is o h-ug o.

TRADUZIONE INGLESE
The cattle are today going a-flitting(1),/Going to eat the grass of the burial place,(2)
Their own herdsman there to tend them,/Tending them, fending them, turning them,
Be the gentle Bride(3) milking them,
Be the lovely Mary keeping them,
And Jesu Christ at the end of their journey.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Le mucche sono fuggite(1)oggi
per andare a mangiare l’erba sul tumulo(2)
il loro guardiano è là a sorvegliarle
a sorvegliarle, difenderle e riportale.
Sarà la dolce Bride(3) a mungerle
sarà la bella Maria a prendersene cura
e ci sarà Gesù Cristo alla fine del loro viaggio

NOTE
1) “volate via”, “fuggite alla chetichella”
2) secondo la testimonianza di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser la località di riferimento è Grimnis (Griminish) in particolare una collina delle fate ovvero un tumulo sepolcrale
3) la dea Bride è sincreticamente accostata a Gesù Cristo e alla Vergine Maria. Inevitabile il richiamo alla Gruagach, la fanciulla del mare sorta di spirito guardiano della casa e del bestiame

LA VERSIONE INGLESE: UIST CATTLE CROON

La canzone è tra quelle raccolte da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser nel suo viaggio nelle isole Ebridi e confluita nel libro “Songs of the Hebrides”. La melodia è riportata anche da Frances Tolmie che la collezionò a Kilmaluagon nell’isola di Skye.
ASCOLTA Alison Pearce in Land of Hearts Desire – Songs of the Hebrides. La versione è quella “classica” (voce soprano e arpa) con l’arrangiamento di Kennedy-Fraser


I
Today the kye win to hill pasture,
Sweet the grass of cool hill pastures
Breedja(3) fair white be at their milking,
Lead the kye to the hill pastures
II
Today the kye “flit”(1) to hill pastures
There to graze on sweet hill grasses
Mary(3), gentle be at their keeping,
Keeping all out on hill pastures
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Oggi il bestiame andrà a pascolare sulla collina(2), dolce l’erba del fresco pascolo collinare, Bride(3) la luminosa le mungerà, conduce(i) il bestiame a pascolare sulla collina
II
Oggi il bestiame andrà segretamente(1) a pascolare sulla collina, là a pascolare sulla dolce erba della collina, sarà la bella Maria(3) a prendersene cura, a tenere tutti lontano dai pascoli sulla collina

NOTE
3) Bride e la vergine Maria sono confuse in un unica divinità protettrice, oppure in questa versione del rev Kenneth Macleod Mary è più prosaicamente una bella mandriana. Il compito di sorvegliare il bestiame nei pascoli era un tempo riservato per lo più a ragazzi e fanciulle.

Ed ecco l’effetto che queste antiche invocazioni fanno sul bestiame: il kulning di Jonna Jinton

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cg1/cg1114.htm
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/imbolc.htm
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/gruagach-mhara-a-gruagach-or-a-selkie/
https://jlstapletonphotography.me/2013/08/

GRUAGACH-MHARA: A GRUAGACH OR A SELKIE?

Sebbene il termine gaelico Gruagach si traduca con “fanciulla“, il Gruagach del folklore scozzese è diventato più simile ad un folletto tipo Brownie che una fanciulla del Mare.

SPIRITO TUTELARE

Khatarine Briggs nel suo “Dizionario di fate, gnomi e folletti” parla dei Gruagach maschi delle Highlands scozzesi paragonandoli ai Brownie, belli e slanciati, elegantemente vestiti di rosso e dotati di capelli biondi, dediti alla sorveglianza del bestiame. La maggior parte però sono brutti e trasandati e come i Brownie aiutano gli uomini nei lavori domestici e agricoli.

Sorta di spirito tutelare della casa e del bestiame la gruagach è considerata un folletto da rabbonire con offerte di latte lasciate nelle coppelle dei massi erratici. Stuart McHardy ritiene tuttavia che la gruagach sia stata una divinità più potente e antica decaduta nel tempo al rango di guardiano. J.A. McCulloch (The religion of the ancient Celts, 1911) had this to say: “Until recently milk was poured on ‘Gruagach stones’ in the Hebrides, as an offering to the Gruagach, a brownie who watched over herds, and who had taken the place of a god”. Evans-Wentz in The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries (1911) also describes the Gruagach, again stressing the link with cattle: “The fairy queen who watches over cows is called Gruagach in the islands, and she is often seen. In pouring libations to her and her fairies, various kinds of stones, usually with hollows in them, are used. In many parts of the Highlands, where the same deity is known, the stone into which women poured the libation is called Leac na Gruagaich, ‘Flag-stone of the Gruagach’. If the libation was omitted in the evening, the best cow in the fold would be found dead in the morning”. (tratto da qui)

LA FANCIULLA DEL MARE

John Gregorson Campbell nel suo “Superstitions of the Highlands and Islands of Scotland”, 1900 descrive il Gruagach come una fanciulla del mare dai capelli biondi: “A Gruagach haunted the ‘Island House’ (Tigh an Eilein, so called from being at first surrounded with water), the principal residence in the island, from time immemorial till within the present century. She was never called Glaistig, but Gruagach and Gruagach mhara (sea-maid) by the islanders. Tradition represents her as a little woman with long yellow hair, but a sight of her was rarely obtained. She staid in the attics, and the doors of the rooms in which she was heard working were locked at the time. She was heard putting the house in order when strangers were to come, however unexpected otherwise their arrival might be. She pounded the servants when they neglected their work.”

LA DEA DEL MARE

Così nella tradizione la gruagach è associata ad una vacca sacra giunta dal mare e ad una pietra coppellata per le offerte di libagioni (ovvero latte), una creatura soprannaturale in origine sicuramente di genere femminile  guardiana del bestiame di un determinato territorio. Potrebbe essere il ricordo di antichissimi rituali celebrati da sacerdotesse della Dea Madre e in seguito trasformate in creature fatate.

Stuart McHardy prosegue nel suo saggio: ‘Gruagach’ may mean “the long-haired one” and be derived from gruag = a wig, and is a common Gaelic name for a maiden, or a young woman. In A Midsummer Eve’s Dream (1971) Alexander Hope analyses16thC Scots poems by Dunbar. In the poem the Golden Targe Dunbar’s goddesses wear green kirtles under their green mantles and with their long hair hanging loose they are also presented as fairies in their appearance. The belief in a “fairy-cult” which Hope discerns in these and other works is quite clearly a remnant of an earlier pagan religion. .. Gruagach may be related to the Breton words Groac’h or Grac’h, a name given to the Druidesses or Priestesses, who had colleges on the Isle de Sein, off the NW coast of Brittany. These Groac’h were known for being involved in divination, healing and shape-shifting, and P.F.Anson (Fisher Folk Lore, 1965) says of them: “On the intensely Catholic Isle de Sein there used to be the conviction that certain women had what was known as ‘le don de vouer’, i.e. the power of communicating with the Devil or his emissaries, in other words that they were witches. Fishermen alleged that they had seen these women on dark nights launching mysterious boats (bag-sorcérs) to enable them to take part in a witches’ Sabbath or coven known as groach’hed”. (sempre tratto da qui)

Quindi la Gruagach è un altro nome della Cailleach, la dea primigenia della creazione come viene chiamata in Scozia, il cui ricordo ha lasciato una traccia nel folklore celtico e ci parla di un culto primordiale conservatosi pressoché immutato anche durante l’affermarsi del Cristianesimo e praticato soprattutto dalle donne con poteri sciamanici, ben presto demonizzate e declassate al rango di streghe.

La Giumenta Bianca era una delle sembianze di Cailleach, la velata, così come si manifestava la Dea durante l’Inverno la “Vecchia Donna”, lei colpiva con il suo martello la terra e la rendeva dura fino a Imbolc, la festa del risveglio della Primavera.
Questa antichissima Dea Anziana che controlla le forze della natura e plasma la terra con il suo potere ha forse origini lontane dalle Isole Britanniche. Lo storico greco Erodoto nel V° secolo A.C. ci parla di una tribù celtica in Spagna che chiama “Kallaikoi”. L’autore romano Plinio parla del popolo dei Callaeci, tribù da cui deriva il nome Gallaecia (Galizia) e Portus Cale (Portogallo). Il nome Callaeci viene fatto risalire ad “adoratori della Cailleach”. …Numerose sono le leggende [scozzesi] che ci parlano di questa Dea e analizzandole possiamo evidenziare delle caratteristiche ricorrenti: – La Cailleach dà forma alla terra sia in modo volontario che involontario (il suo grembiule carico di pietre ritorna in moltissime leggende celtiche) creando laghi, colline, isole e costruzioni megalitiche. – Una costante associazione con l’acqua attraverso pozzi, laghi e fiumi di cui è spesso guardiana. – L’associazione con la stagione invernale. – La sua mole gigantesca. – La sua antichissima età, essendo fatta risalire a uno dei primi esseri presenti sulla terra. – La sua funzione di guardiana di particolari animali come il cervo e l’airone. – La sua capacità di trasformarsi ed assumere diverse forme come quella di fanciulla, airone e pietra… In Irlanda l’animale sacro alla dea è la mucca. La dea stessa si occupava del suo bestiame e mungeva le sue mucche fatate ricavandone del latte magico che usava per ridare la vita ai morti. La Dea appare quindi sia come signora della morte che della vita. (Claudia Falcone tratto da: ilcerchiodellaluna.it)

Una creatura che si può associare alla Gruagach è il folletto-capra presente sia nel folklore irlandese con il nome di bocánach sia in quello delle Highlands scozzesi con il nome di Glaistig (metà donna e metà capra):  dai lunghi capelli biondi e bellissima nasconde la sua parte inferiore animale sotto una lunga veste verde. Nella sua versione  maligna la fanciulla è una sorta di sirena che attira l’uomo con un canto o una danza e poi si nutre del suo sangue. Al contrario nella sua versione benigna è considerata una protettrici del bestiame e dei pastori, oltre che dei bambini lasciati soli dalle madri per sorvegliare gli animali al pascolo.

La fanciulla del Mare continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/poor-horse.htm
https://listserv.heanet.ie/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind9311&L=celtic-l&D=0&P=13250
http://www.goddessalive.co.uk/index.php/issues-21-25/issue-21/gruagach

Amhrán Na Craoibhe la ghirlanda di Beltane

Read the post in English

Amhrán Na Craoibhe (in inglese The Garland Song)  è il canto processionale  in gaelico irlandese delle donne che portano il ramo del Maggio (May garland) nelle celebrazioni rituali per la  festa di Beltane, diffuso ancora agli inizi del Novecento nell’Irlanda del Nord (regione di Oriel).

La canzone proviene dalla signora Sarah Humphreys  che viveva nella contea di Armagh ed è stata raccolta agli inizi del Novecento, erroneamente chiamata  ‘Lá Fhéile Blinne‘ (The Feast of St Blinne) perchè era cantanta nella festa della santa locale di Killeavy  Moninne, detta affettuosamente  “Blinne“, un evidente innesto delle tradizioni pre-cristiane nel solco dei rituali cattolici.
Santa Moninna di Killeavy morì nel 517-518, seguace di Santa Brigida di Kildare  i suoi nomi  “Blinne” o “Moblinne” sono più che altro vezzeggiativi per “piccola” o “sorella” (“Mo-ninne”  potrebbe essere una versione di Niniane, la “Signora del lago” del ciclo arturiano) secondo gli studiosi il suo nome era Darerca e la sua (presunta) tomba si trova nel cimitero di Killeavy sulle pendici del Slieve Gullion dove era originariamente situato il suo monastero, diventato luogo di pellegrinaggio per tutto il  Medioevo insieme al suo pozzo sacro, St Bline’s Well.

SANTA DARERCA (MONENNA) DI KILLEAVY

Sembra che il nome di Battesimo di questa vergine, commemorata nei martirologi irlandesi al 6 luglio, sia stato Darerca, e che Moninna sia invece un vezzeggiativo di origine oscura. A noi sono pervenuti i suoi Acta, ma essi presentano notevoli difficoltà dal momento che la santa è stata confusa con l’inglese santa Modwenna, venerata a Burton-on-Trent. Darerca fu la fondatrice e la prima badessa di uno dei più antichi e importanti monasteri femminili di Irlanda, sorto a Killeavy (contea di Armagh), ove sono ancora visibili le rovine di una chiesa a lei dedicata. Morì nel 517. Killeavy rimase un importante centro di vita religiosa, finché fu distrutto dai predoni scandinavi nel 923; Darerca continuò ad essere largamente venerata specialmente nella regione settentrionale dell’Irlanda. (tratto da qui)

UN’ANTICA DEA

The Slieve Gullion Cairns

Slieve Gullion ( Sliabh gCuillinn ) è in realtà un luogo di culto in epoca preistorica sulla sulla cui cima è stata costruita una tomba a camera con l’ingresso orientato  con il sorgere del sole al solstizio d’inverno. (vedi fenomeno).
Secondo la leggenda sulla sua cima vive la Vecchia Strega, la Cailleach Biorar (‘Old woman of the waters’) e il ‘South Cairn’ è la sua casa detto anche ‘Cailleach Beara‘s House’.
Per eslporare il sito con la reatà virtuale!
Sulla cima un piccolo lago e il secondo tumulo sepolcrare più piccolo costruito nell’età del bronzo. Nel lago vive, stando alle testimonianze locali, un kelpie o un mostro marino e si cela il passaggio per le Stalle del Re (the King’s Stables) Navan, Co. Armagh
Tutt’intorno alla montagna un anello di basse colline (il Ring of Gullion)

Cailleach Beara dipinto di Cheryl Rose-Hall

The Hunt of Slieve Cuilinn

La dea, una dea madre dell’Irlanda, Cailleach Biorar (Bhearra) -la Velata è chiamata  Milucradh / Miluchradh, descritta come sorella della dea Aine nel racconto di “Fionn mac Cumhaill e la  Vecchia Strega”, scopriamo così che il soprannone di Fionn (Finn MacColl) “il biondo”, “il bianco” viene da un racconto del ciclo dei Fianna: tutto ha inizio con una scommessa tra due sorelle Aine (la dea dell’amore) e Moninne (la vecchia dea), Aine si vantava che non avrebbe mai giaciuto con un uomo dai capelli grigi, così la sorella prima portò  Fionn sullo Slieve Gullion (sotto forma di grigio cerbiatto fece in modo che Fionn la inseguisse nella foga della caccia separandosi dal resto dei suoi guerrieri) poi si trasformò in una bellissima fanciulla in lacrime seduta accanto al lago per convinvere Fionn a tuffarsi e ripescare il suo anello. Ma le acque del lago erano state incantate dalla dea per portare la vecchiaia a coloro che vi si immergevano (operando all’inverso dei pozzi sacri), così Fionn uscì dal lago vecchio e decrepito e ovviamente con i capelli bianchi. I suoi compagni dopo averlo raggiunto e riconosciuto riescono a farsi dare dalla Cailleach una pozione magica che ridà il vigore a Fionn ma lo lascia con i capelli bianchi! (vedi)

La Cailleach e Bride sono probabilmente la stessa dea ossia le diverse manifestazioni della stessa dea , la vecchia dell’Inverno e la Fanciulla della Primavera nel ciclo di morte-rinascita-vita dell’antica religione.

il sentiero che porta al pozzo sacro

In occasione della festa patronale della Santa Moninna  (il 6 luglio) si svolgeva a Killeavy una processione che partiva dalla sua tomba, si dirigeva fino al pozzo sacro percorrendo un antico sentiero, e poi ritornava al cimitero. Si svolgeva una gara tra squadre di giovani dei vari villaggi nel confezionare l’effigie più bella della Dea, uno sbiadito ricordo dei festeggiamenti di Beltane per eleggere la propria Regina del Maggio. Durante la processione i giovani cantavano Amhrán Na Craoibhe accompagnandosi ad una  danza, la cui coreografia è andata perduta, ogni frase è intonata dal solista a cui risponde il coro benaugurale. La melodia è una variante di Cuacha Lán de Bhuí sulla struttura di un’antica carola (vedi)

Uno dei panorami più spettacolrari d’Irlanda
In una giornata limpida, è possibile vedere dalla vetta (573 metri) fino a Lough Neagh, a ovest di Belfast, e le montagne di Wicklow, a sud di Dublino

Páidraigín Ní Uallacháin in “An Dealg  Óir” 2010

Pádraigín Ní Uallacháin & Sylvia Crawford live 2016 in questa seconda versione è aggiunto un coro

Gaelico irlandese
AMHRÁN NA CRAOIBHE ‘S í mo chraobhsa craobh na mban uasal
(Haigh dó a bheir i’ bhaile í ‘s a haigh di)
Craobh na gcailín is craobh na mbuachaill;
(Haigh dó a bheir i’ bhaile í ‘s a haigh di).
Craobh na ngirseach a rinneadh le huabhar,
Maise hóigh, a chaillíní, cá bhfaigh’ muinn di nuachar?
Gheobh’ muinn buachaill sa mbaile don bhanóig;
Buachaill urrúnta , lúdasach, láidir
A bhéarfas a ‘ghéag seo di na trí náisiún,
Ó bhaile go baile è ar ais go dtí an áit seo
Dhá chéad eachaí è sriantaí óir ‘na n-éadan,
Is dhá chéad eallaigh ar thaobh gach sléibhe,
È un oiread sin eile de mholtaí de thréadtaí,
Óró, a chailíní, airgead is spré di,
Tógfa ‘muinn linn í suas’ un a ‘bhóthair,
An áit a gcasfaidh dúinn dhá chéad ógfhear,
Casfa ‘siad orainn’ sa gcuid hataí ‘na ndorn leo,
An áit a mbeidh aiteas, ól is spóirse,
È cosúil mbur gcraobh-na le muc ina mála,
Nó le seanlong bhriste thiocfadh ‘steach i mBaile Chairlinn,
Féada ‘muinn tilleadh anois è un’ chraobh linn,
Féada ‘muinn tilleadh, tá an lá bainte go haoibhinn,
Bhain muinn anuraidh é è bhain muinn i mbliana é,
è mar chluinimse bhain muinn ariamh é.
traduzione inglese di P.Ní Uallacháin*
My branch is the branch
of the fairy women,
Hey to him who takes her home,
hey to her;

The branch of the lasses
and the branch of the lads;
Hey to him who takes her home,
hey to her;

The branch of the maidens
made with pride;
Hey, young girls,
where will we get her a spouse?
We will get a lad
in the town for the bride (1),
A dauntless, swift, strong lad,
Who will bring this branch (2)
through the three nations,
From town to town
and back home to this place?
Two hundred horses
with gold bridles on their foreheads,
And two hundred cattle
on the side of each mountain,
And an equal amount
of sheep and of herds (3),
O, young girls, silver
and dowry for her,
We will carry her with us,
up to the roadway,
Where we will meet
two hundred young men,
They will meet us with their
caps in their fists,
Where we will have pleasure,
drink and sport (4),
Your branch is like
a pig in her sack (5),
Or like an old broken ship
would come into Carlingford (6),
We can return now
and the branch with us,
We can return since
we have joyfully won the day,
We won it last year
and we won it this year,
And as far as I hear
we have always won it.
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
Il mio ramo è il ramo
delle nobildonne.
Salute a colui che la sposa,
salute a lei;

il ramo delle ragazze
e  il ramo dei ragazzi;
Salute a colui che la sposa,
salute a lei;

il ramo delle fanciulle
fatto con orgoglio.
Salute, giovanette,
dove le prenderemo uno sposo? Prenderemo un ragazzo
di città per la sposa,
un ragazzo intrepido,  svelto e forte.
Chi porterà la ghirlanda
per le tre nazioni
di paese in pese
e ritornerà in questo luogo?
200 cavalli
con briglie dorate sulla fronte
e 200 bovini
sul lato di ogni montagna
e una pari quantità
di pecore e agnelli.
O giovani fanciulle, argento
e dote per lei.
La porteremo con noi
fino alla carreggiata
dove incontreremo
200 giovanotti
Li incontreremo con i loro
berretti in testa
dove ci divertiremo
con bevute e danze.
La vostra ghirlanda è come
un maiale nel sacco
o come una vecchia nave sfasciata
che arriva a Carlingford
Possiamo tornare ora
con la nostra ghirlanda
possiamo tornare
perchè abbiamo vinto
abbiamo vinto lo scorso anno
e abbiamo vinto quest’anno,
da quanto ho sentito
abbiamo sempre vinto noi

Note
1) è la May doll, ma anche la Regina del Maggio personificazione del principio femminile della fertilità
2) è la ghirlanda del maggio confezionata dalle donne
3) sono i capi di bestiame in dote ossia gli animali del villaggio che saranno pufificati dai fuochi di Beltane
4) dopo la processione la festa si concludeva con un ballo
5) sono le frasi denigratorie nei confronti delle altre ghirlande portate dalle squadre rivali: “a pig in a poke” è un incauto acquisto, invece di un maialino nel sacco potrebbe esserci un gatto!
6) Lough Carlingford  deriva dal vecchio norvegese e si traduce in irlandese come “Lough Cailleach”

7005638-albero-di-biancospino-sulla-strada-rurale-contro-il-cielo-bluIl biancospino è l’albero della festa di Beltane caro a Belisama, la splendente, cresce come arbusto o come albero di dimensioni ridotte (arriva solo ai 7 mt di altezza) allargando la chioma in tutte le direzioni possibili, per i molti rametti che si formano intrecciandosi sulle strutture più vecchie, alla ricerca della luce verso l’alto.
Il ramo di biancospino e i suoi fiori si utilizzavano nei rituali nunziali celtici e dell’antica Grecia e anche per gli antichi Romani era il fiore del matrimonio, augurio di felicità e prosperità.
Le virtù curative del biancospino erano conosciute fin dal Medioevo: è chiamato la “valeriana del cuore” perché agisce sul flusso sanguineo migliorandone la circolazione ed è inoltre utilizzato per contrastare l’insonnia e gli stati di angoscia. continua

BIANCOSPINO O PRUGNOLO?

fiori sono piccoli, bianchi e con delle delicate sfumature rosacee, dolcemente profumati. In zone dalle fioriture tardive per la festa di Beltane o per le questue rituali dei maggianti (i “mayers”),  si utilizza però il ramo di prugnolo (stessa famiglia delle Rosaceae  ma con fioritura già a marzo-aprile)

 

Il Maggio in Irlanda: il canto di Beltane

FONTI
https://www.catholicireland.net/saintoftheday/st-moninne-of-killeavy-d-c-518-virgin-and-foundress/
http://www.killeavy.com/stmon.htm
http://www.megalithicireland.com/St%20Moninna’s%20Holy%20Well.html
http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=28400
http://irishantiquities.bravehost.com/armagh/killevy/killevy.html
http://www.nicsramblers.co.uk/p240213.html
http://irelandsholywells.blogspot.it/2012/06/saint-monninas-well-killeavy-county.html
http://www.megalithicireland.com/Killeavy%20Churches.html
http://omniumsanctorumhiberniae.blogspot.it/2015/07/saint-moninne-july-6.html
https://atlanticreligion.com/tag/moninne/
http://www.newgrange.com/slieve-gullion.htm
https://voicesfromthedawn.com/slieve-gullion/

https://www.independent.ie/life/travel/ireland/walk-of-the-week-slieve-gullion-co-armagh-26543944.html
http://geographical.co.uk/uk/aonb/item/559-the-ring-of-gullion

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59221
https://www.orielarts.com/songs/amhran-na-craoibhe/
http://journalofmusic.com/focus/breathing-embers