Archivi tag: going-away song

South Australia sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

Under the heading Codefish shanty we have two versions, one of Cape Cod and the other of South Australia: the titles are “Cape Cod girls” and “Rolling King” or “Bound for South Australia” (or simply “South Australia”).
Which of the two versions was born before is not certain, we can only detect a great variety of texts and also the combination with different melodies. At the beginning probably a “going-away song”, one of those songs that the sailors sang only for special occasions ie when they were on the route of the return journey.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA VERSION

“As an original worksong it was sung in a variety of trades, including being used by the wool and later the wheat traders who worked the clipper ships between Australian ports and London. In adapted form, it is now a very popular song among folk music performers that is recorded by many artists and is present in many of today’s song books.In the days of sail, South Australia was a familiar going-away song, sung as the men trudged round the capstan to heave up the heavy anchor. Some say the song originated on wool-clippers, others say it was first heard on the emigrant ships. There is no special evidence to support either belief; it was sung just as readily aboard Western Ocean ships as in those of the Australian run. Laura Smith, a remarkable Victorian Lady, obtained a 14-stanza version of South Australia from a coloured seaman in the Sailors’ Home at Newcastle-on-Tyne, in the early 1880’s. The song’s first appearance in print was in Miss Smith’s Music of the Waters. Later, it was often used as a forebitter, sung off-watch, merely for fun, with any instrumentalist joining in. It is recorded in this latter-day form. The present version was learnt from an old sailing-ship sailor, Ted Howard of Barry, in South Wales. Ted told how he and a number of shellbacks were gathered round the bed of a former shipmate. The dying man remarked: “Blimey, I think I’m slipping my cable. Strike up South Australia, lads, and let me go happy.” (A.L. Lloyd in Across the Western Plains from here)

This kind of songs were a mixture of improvised verses and a series of typical verses, but generally the refrain of the chorus was standardized and univocal (even for the obvious reason that it had to be sung by sailors coming from all the countries).
The length of the song depended on the type of work to be done and could reach several strophes. The song then took on its own life as a popular song in the folk repertoire.
The first appearance in collections on sea shanties dates back to 1881.
hulllogo

The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem 1962 the version that has been the model in the folk environment

Let’s see them in a pirate version in the TV adaptation of the “Treasure Island”

Johnny Collins, from “Shanties & Songs of the Sea” 1996

The Pogues

Gaelic Storm from Herding Cats (1999) they recall the version of the Pogues. It is interesting to compare the same group that has also tried with the arrangement of  Cape Code Girls.

In South Australia(1) I was born!
Heave away! Haul away!
South Australia round Cape Horn(2)!
We’re bound for South Australia!
Heave away, you rolling king(3),
Heave away! Haul away!
All the way you’ll hear me sing
We’re bound for South Australia!

As I walked out one morning fair,
It’s there I met Miss Nancy Blair.
I shook her up, I shook her down,
I shook her round and round the town.
There ain’t but one thing grieves my mind,
It’s to leave Miss Nancy Blair behind.
And as you wallop round Cape Horn,
You’ll wish to God you’d never been born!
I wish I was on Australia’s strand
With a bottle of whiskey in my hand

NOTES
1) Land of gentlemen and not deportees, the state is considered a “province” of Great Britain
2) the ships at the time of sailing followed the oceanic routes, that is those of winds and currents: so to go to Australia starting from America it was necessary to dub Africa, but what a trip!!

3) Another reasonable explanation  fromMudcat “The chanteyman seems to be calling the sailors rolling kings rather that refering to any piece of equipment. And given that “rolling” seems to be a common metaphor for “sailing” (cf. Rolling down to old Maui, Roll the woodpile down, Roll the old chariot along, etc.) I would guess that he is calling them “sailing kings” i.e. great sailors. There are a number of chanteys which have lines expressing the idea of “What a great crew we are.” and I think this falls into that category.” (here)
Moreover every sailor fantasized about the meaning of the word, for example Russel Slye writes ” When I was in Perth (about 1970) I met an old sailor in a bar. I found he had sailed on the Moshulu (4 masted barque moored in Philly now) during the grain trade. I asked him about Rolling Kings. His reply (abridged): “We went ashore in India and other places, and heard about a wheel-rolling-king who was a big boss of everything. Well, when the crew was working hauling, those who wasn’t pulling too hard were called rolling kings because they was acting high and mighty.” So, it is a derogatory term for slackers. (from here).
And yet without going to bother ghostly Kings (in the wake of the medieval myth of King John and the fountain of eternal youth) the word could very well be a corruption of “rollikins” an old English term for “drunk”.
Among the many hilarious hypotheses this (for mockery) of Charley Noble: it could be a reference to Elvis Prisley!

There is also a MORRIS DANCE version confirming the popularity of the song

Codefish Cape Cod Girls

LINK
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

Cape Cod Girls

Leggi in italiano

Under the heading Codefish shanty we have two versions, one of Cape Cod and the other of South Australia: the titles are “Cape Cod girls” and “Rolling King” or “Bound for South Australia” (or simply “South Australia”).
Which of the two versions was born before is not certain, we can only detect a great variety of texts and also the combination with different melodies.

At the beginning probably a “going-away song”, one of those songs that the sailors sang only for special occasions ie when they were on the route of the return journey.

CAPE COD GIRLS

cape-cod-girlThe most demented version and therefore by “pirate song” that goes for the most in the Renaissance Fairs is that which comes from the peninsula of Cape Cod (State of Massachusetts).
Cape Cod was the first landing of the Mayflower – the first ship that carried the English “pilgrims” on the land overseas, the “New England”.
The activity was based on fishing for fish (especially cod) and whaling.

The climate is mild thanks to the Atlantic currents: there it is summer (warm-cool) or winter (cold-mild) and summer lasts until early December, it is the so-called Indian Summer, always due in the presence of the Atlantic Ocean, which slowly spreads the heat forfeited during the summer.

Yarmouth Shantymen

The Crew of the Mimi 1984

Baby Gramps in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys“, ANTI- 2006. The particular voice as Popeye is  a vocal style: “The style is called “vocal fry”.  It has been variously employed for effect by heavy metal artists among others.  The techniques used to achieve it are akin to those used by Central Asian throat-singers and Tibetan monks, though of a lesser order.  Its appropriateness for the singing of pirate songs will be a subject for lively debate” (Tipi Dan)

Gaelic Storm from The Boathouse, 2013


Cape Cod(1) girls
ain’t got no combs,
Heave away, haul away!
They comb their hair
with a codfish bone(2),
And we’re bound away for Australia(3)!
So heave her up, me bully bully boys,
Heave away, haul away!
Heave her up,
why don’t you make some noise?

And we’re bound away for Australia!

Cape Cod boys
ain’t got no sleds,
They ride down hills
on a codfish head.
Cape Cod mothers
don’t bake no pies,
They feed their children
codfish eyes.
Cape Cod cats
ain’t got no tails,
They got blown off
in northeast gales.

Other lines variously combined in which the cod are mentioned in all the sauces !!

Cape Cod girls
don’t wear no frills
They’re plain and skinny
like a codfish gills.
Cape Cod doctors
ain’t got no pills,
They give their patients
codfish gills.
Cape Cod folks
don’t have no ills
Them Cape Cod doctors
feed them codfish pills
Cape Cod dogs
ain’t got no bite,
They lost it barking
at the Cape Cod light.
Yankee girls
don’t sleep on beds,
They go to sleep on codfish heads.
Cape Cod girls
have got big feet,
Codfish roes is nice an’ sweet.
Cape Cod girls
they are so fine,
They know how to bait a codfish line.

 NOTES
1) the port par excellence of Cape Cod and of the fishermen of Massachusetts is the port of Provincetown
2) think about the sirens who are notoriously on the beach or a rock to comb their long hair while singing
3) the ships at the time of sailing followed the oceanic routes, that is those of winds and currents: so to go to Australia starting from America it was necessary to dub Africa, but what a trip!!

 

“South Australia” version

LINK
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

South Australia

Read the post in English

Sotto la voce Codefish shanty si classifica una serie di canti marinareschi (sea shanty) di cui si conoscono due versioni, una di Capo Cod e l’altra dell’Australia Meridionale: i titoli sono “Cape Code girls“, e “Rolling King” o “Bound for South Australia ” (o più semplicemente “South Australia”). Quale delle due versioni sia nata prima non è certo, possiamo solo rilevare una grande varietà di testi e anche l’abbinamento con melodie diverse. All’inizio probabilmente una “going-away song” ossia una di quelle canzoni che i marinai cantavano solo per le occasioni particolari cioè quando erano in ritta per il viaggio di ritorno, è poi entrata nel circuito folk e quindi standardizzata in due distinte versioni.

VERSIONE SOUTH AUSTRALIA

“Il canto di lavoro originario fu cantato in una varietà di mestieri, incluso essere usato nel commercio della lana e in seguito nel commercio del grano sui clipper tra i porti australiani e Londra. In forma adattata, è ora una canzone molto popolare tra gli artisti di musica folk, registrata da molti artisti e presente in molti dei libri di canzoni di oggi. Nei giorni della vela, Sud Australia era una canzone consueta per il going-away , cantata mentre gli uomini arrancavano intorno all’argano per sollevare la pesante ancora. Alcuni dicono che la canzone abbia avuto origine tra i tosatori della lana, altri dicono che sia stata ascoltata per la prima volta sulle navi dell’emigrante. Non ci sono prove evidenti per supportare entrambe le supposizioni; è stato cantato altrettanto prontamente a bordo delle navi dell’Oceano Occidentale come in quelle della rotta australiana. Laura Smith, una notevole donna vittoriana, ha ottenuto una versione di 14 stanze di South Australia da un marinaio di colore nella Casa del Marinaio di Newcastle-on-Tyne, nei primi anni del 1880. La prima apparizione della canzone in stampa è stata in Music of the Waters della signorina Smith. In seguito, venne spesso usata come forebitter, cantata nelle ore di riposo semplicemente per divertimento, con qualsiasi strumento si unisse al canto. È stata registrato in questa forma degli ultimi giorni. La versione attuale è stata appresa da un marinaio delle vecchie navi a vela, Ted Howard di Barry, nel Galles del sud. Ted raccontò come lui e un certo numero di mariani si erano radunati attorno al letto di un ex compagno di viaggio. Il morente ha osservato: “Blimey, penso di stare lasciando andare la mia cima. Cantate South Australia, ragazzi, e lasciami andare felice..” (A.L. Lloyd in Across the Western Plains tratto da qui)

Così questo genere di canzoni erano un misto di versi improvvisati e una serie di versi tipici , ma in genere il ritornello del coro era standardizzato e univoco (anche per l’ovvia ragione che doveva essere cantato da marinai provenienti da tutte le parti).
La lunghezza della canzone dipendeva dal tipo di lavoro da svolgere e poteva arrivare a parecchie strofe. La canzone ha poi assunto vita propria come canzone popolare nel repertorio folk.
La sua prima comparsa in raccolte sulle sea shanties risale al 1881.
hulllogo

The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem 1962 la versione che ha fatto da modello nell’ambiente folk

Vediamoli anche in una versione piratesca nell’adattamento televisivo dell'”Isola del Tesoro”

Johnny Collins, in “Shanties & Songs of the Sea” 1996

The Pogues

Gaelic Storm in Herding Cats (1999) richiamano nell’arrangiamento la versione dei Pogues. E’ interessante confrontare lo stesso gruppo che si è cimentato anche con l’arrangiamento di Cape Code Girls.


In South Australia(1) I was born!
Heave away! Haul away!
South Australia round Cape Horn(2)!
We’re bound for South Australia!
Heave away, you rolling king(3),
Heave away! Haul away!
All the way you’ll hear me sing
We’re bound for South Australia!
As I walked out one morning fair,
It’s there I met Miss Nancy Blair.
I shook her up, I shook her down,
I shook her round and round the town.
There ain’t but one thing grieves my mind,
It’s to leave Miss Nancy Blair behind.
And as you wallop round Cape Horn,
You’ll wish to God you’d never been born!
I wish I was on Australia’s strand
With a bottle of whiskey in my hand
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Sono nato in Australia Meridionale(1)
virate, alate,
Australia del Sud via Capo Horn(2)
Siamo diretti per l’Australia Meridionale
virate re dei mari(3)
virate, alate,
per tutto il tragitto si sente cantare

“Siamo diretti per l’Australia Meridionale!”
Mentre camminavo in un bel mattino
là t’incontrai la signorina Nancy Blair.
La strapazzai su
la strapazzai giù
la strapazzai in lungo e in largo per la città
e se c’e che una cosa che mi addolora
è lasciare la signorina Nancy Blair.
E mentre sei sbatacchiato a Capo Horn
vorresti per Dio non essere mai nato!
Preferirei essere su una spiaggia in Australia
con una bottiglia di whiskey in mano

NOTE
1) Terra di galantuomini e non di deportati lo stato è considerato una “provincia” della Gran Bretagna
2) le navi all’epoca dei velieri seguivano le rotte oceaniche cioè quelle dei venti e delle correnti: così per andare in Australia partendo dall’America o dall’Europa la situazione non cambiava occorreva doppiare l’Africa, ma che giro bisognava fare!!
Se prendiamo una mappa del globo notiamo subito che una rotta verso l’oriente, partendo dall’Europa, ci obbligherebbe a circumnavigare l’Africa. Lo stesso discorso vale per chi si avventura partendo dalla costa orientale dell’America del nord, a meno di volere circumnavigare l’America del sud e forzare controvento capo Horn!
A nord dell’equatore, nell’Atlantico, questi hanno un senso di rotazione orario. Quindi fin alle Canarie e Capo Verde tutto è facile. Poi, per via della forza di Coriolis, subentra la zona delle calme equatoriali con la loro quasi totale assenza di vento. Ma non basta, superate le calme nell’emisfero australe i venti dominanti hanno rotazione inversa cioè antioraria. Quindi partendo ad esempio dall’Inghilterra la rotta era la seguente : Atlantico fino a Capo Verde poi tutto ad Ovest verso i Caraibi quindi a Sud lungo il Brasile e la costa Argentina fino a riprendere i venti portanti che con rotta di nuovo verso Est portano a passare capo di Suona Speranza in Sud Africa e finalmente quella fetenzia di ostico oceano che è quello Indiano. Approssimativamente 30.000 Km quando in linea d’aria sono solo 8.000! (tratto da qui)

3) Un’altra spiegazione ragionevole sempre riportata nella discussione su Mudcat “Lo chanteyman sembra chiamare i marinai “rolling kings” piuttosto che riferirsi a una parte della nave. E dato che “rolling” sembra essere una metafora comune per “navigare” (vedi Rolling down to old Maui, Roll the woodpile down, Roll the old chariot along, ecc.) Immagino che li stia chiamando “re della vela” “cioè grandi marinai. Ci sono un certo numero di chanteys che hanno linee che esprimono l’idea di “Che grande equipaggio siamo”. e penso che questo rientri in quella categoria. “(tratto da qui)
“Quando ero a Perth (circa 1970) incontrai un vecchio marinaio in un bar e scoprii che era salpato sul Moshulu (una barca a 4 alberi ormeggiata a Philly ora) durante il commercio di cereali. Gli ho chiesto in merito a “Rolling Kings”, la sua risposta (in forma abbreviata): “Siamo andati a terra in India e in altri luoghi, e abbiamo sentito parlare di un wheel-rolling-king  che era un grande capo di tutto. Bene, quando l’equipaggio stava manovrando le vele, quelli che non stavano tirando troppo si chiamavano “rolling kings” perché si comportavano da boss. “Quindi, è un termine dispregiativo per i fannulloni.
(tratto da qui).
E tuttavia senza andare a scomodare fantomatici Re (sulla scia del mito medievale di Re Giovanni e la fontana dell’eterna giovinezza) la parola potrebbe benissimo essere una corruzione di “rollikins” un vecchio temine inglese per “ubriaco”.
Tra le tante esilaranti ipotesi anche questa (per burla) di Charley Noble: si potrebbe trattare di un riferimento ad Elvis Prisley!!

C’è anche una versione MORRIS DANCE a conferma della popolarità della canzone

continua seconda parte

FONTI
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

Codfish shanty

Read the post in English

Sotto la voce Codefish shanty si classifica una serie di canti marinareschi (sea shanty) di cui si conoscono due versioni, una di Capo Cod e l’altra dell’Australia Meridionale: i titoli sono “Cape Cod girls” e “Rolling King” o “Bound for South Australia ” (o più semplicemente “South Australia”).
Quale delle due versioni sia nata prima non è certo, possiamo solo rilevare una grande varietà di testi e anche l’abbinamento con melodie diverse.

All’inizio probabilmente una “going-away song” ossia una di quelle canzoni che i marinai cantavano solo per le occasioni particolari cioè quando erano sulla rotta del viaggio di ritorno, è poi entrata nel circuito folk e quindi standardizzata in due distinte versioni.

VERSIONE CAPE COD GIRLS

cape-cod-girlLa versione più demenziale e quindi da “pirate song” che va per la maggiore nelle Renaissance Fairs è quella che viene dalla penisola di Capo Cod (Stato del Massachusetts).
Cape Cod (traduzione letterale in italiano “Capo Merluzzo”)  è stato il primo approdo del Mayflower – la prima nave che trasportava i “pellegrini” inglesi sulla terra oltre oceano, battezzata così “New England”.
La località si è basata fin da subito sulla pesca di pesci (in particolare il merluzzo) e la caccia alle balene.
Il clima pur essendo parecchio a Nord è mite grazie alle correnti dell’Atlantico: lì è estate (caldo-fresco) o inverno (freddo-mite) e l’estate dura fino ai primi di dicembre, è la cosiddetta Estate Indiana, dovuta sempre alla presenza dell’Oceano Atlantico, che diffonde lentamente il calore incamerato durante l’estate.

Propongo per l’ascolto quattro versioni che sono anche melodie diverse o vari arrangiamenti di melodie simili, fate voi!

Yarmouth Shantymen

The Crew of the Mimi 1984

 Baby Gramps in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys“, ANTI- 2006. La voce particolare alla Popeye è nientemeno che uno stile vocale: “Lo stile è detto “vocal fry”.  Utilizzato tra l’altro per vari effetti dai cantanti heavy metal.   Le tecniche utilizzate per ottenere questo effetto sono simili a quelle usate dai cantanti di gola dell’Asia centrale e dai monaci tibetani. Se sia appropriato per i canti pirateschi sarà oggetto di un acceso dibattito” (Tipi Dan)

Gaelic Storm in The Boathouse, 2013 la versione irlandese


Cape Cod(1) girls
ain’t got no combs,
Heave away, haul away!
They comb their hair
with a codfish bone(2),
And we’re bound away for Australia(3)!
So heave her up, me bully bully boys,
Heave away, haul away!
Heave her up,
why don’t you make some noise?(4)

And we’re bound away for Australia!
Cape Cod boys
ain’t got no sleds,
They ride down hills
on a codfish head.
Cape Cod mothers
don’t bake no pies,
They feed their children
codfish eyes.
Cape Cod cats
ain’t got no tails,
They got blown off
in northeast gales.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Le ragazze di Capo Cod(1)
non hanno pettini
virate, alate,
e si pettinano i capelli
con la lisca del merluzzo (2)
e siamo diretti in Australia(3)! 
Così lasciatela andare miei bravi,
virate, alate,
lasciatela andare,

perché non vi date da fare a virare di buona lena?(4) Siamo diretti in Australia
I ragazzi di Capo Cod
non hanno slitte,
scendono giù dalle colline
sulle teste di merluzzo.
Le madri di Capo Cod
non cuociono torte,
danno da mangiare ai loro bambini
occhi di merluzzo.
I gatti di Capo Cod
non hanno code
sono volate via
con i venti di Nord-est.

ALTRE STROFE variamente combinate in cui i merluzzi sono citati in tutte le salse!!

Cape Cod girls
don’t wear no frills
They’re plain and skinny
like a codfish gills.
Cape Cod doctors
ain’t got no pills,
They give their patients
codfish gills.
Cape Cod folks
don’t have no ills
Them Cape Cod doctors
feed them codfish pills
Cape Cod dogs
ain’t got no bite,
They lost it barking
at the Cape Cod light.
Yankee girls
don’t sleep on beds,
They go to sleep on codfish heads.
Cape Cod girls
have got big feet(5),
Codfish roes is nice an’ sweet.
Cape Cod girls
they are so fine,
They know how to bait a codfish line.
Le ragazze di Capo Cod
non indossano fronzoli
sono dritte e magre
come branchie di merluzzo.
I dottori di Capo Cod
non hanno pillole
danno ai loro pazienti
branchie di merluzzo.
La gente di Capo Cod
non si ammala
i loro dottori di Cape Cod
la nutrono con pillole di merluzzo
I cani di Capo Cod
non riescono ad abbaiare,
hanno perso i loro latrati
nella luce di Capo Cod.
Le ragazze americane
non dormono nei letti
vanno a dormire sulle teste di merluzzo
Le ragazze di Capo Cod
hanno piedi grandi
le uova di merluzzo sono carine e dolci
Le ragazze di Capo Cod
sono molto belle,
sanno come adescare una fila di merluzzi.

 NOTE
1) il porto per antonomasia di Capo Cod  e dei pescatori del Massachusetts è il porto di Provincetown
2) viene da pensare alle sirene che notoriamente stanno sulla spiaggia o uno scoglio a pettinarsi i lunghi capelli mentre cantano
3) le navi all’epoca dei velieri seguivano le rotte oceaniche cioè quelle dei venti e delle correnti: così per andare in Australia partendo dall’America occorreva doppiare l’Africa, ma che giro bisognava fare!!
Se prendiamo una mappa del globo notiamo subito che una rotta verso l’oriente, partendo dall’Europa, ci obbligherebbe a circumnavigare l’Africa. Lo stesso discorso vale per chi si avventura partendo dalla costa orientale dell’America del nord, a meno di volere circumnavigare l’America del sud e forzare controvento capo Horn!
A nord dell’equatore, nell’Atlantico, questi hanno un senso di rotazione orario. Quindi fin alle Canarie e Capo Verde tutto è facile. Poi, per via della forza di Coriolis, subentra la zona delle calme equatoriali con la loro quasi totale assenza di vento. Ma non basta, superate le calme nell’emisfero australe i venti dominanti hanno rotazione inversa cioè antioraria. Quindi partendo ad esempio dall’Inghilterra la rotta era la seguente : Atlantico fino a Capo Verde poi tutto ad Ovest verso i Caraibi quindi a Sud lungo il Brasile e la costa Argentina fino a riprendere i venti portanti che con rotta di nuovo verso Est portano a passare capo di Suona Speranza in Sud Africa e finalmente quella fetenzia di ostico oceano che è quello Indiano. Approssimativamente 30.000 Km quando in linea d’aria sono solo 8.000! (tratto da qui)
4) letteralmente “Perchè non fate del rumore“: Italo Ottonello propone come traduzione pensando al trambusto che facevano i marinai battendo i piedi e dandosi la voce.: perché non vi date da fare a virare di buona lena?”
5) ancora un’allusione alle sirene e alle pinne

continua seconda versione “South Australia”

FONTI
http://www.historicalfolktoys.com/catcont/95301.html
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/cape-cod-girls.html
http://www.folkways.si.edu/paul-clayton/cape-cod-girls/american-folk/music/track/smithsonian
http://www.capecod.com/about-cape-cod/cape-cod-history/
http://www.cavolettodibruxelles.it/2014/11/cape-cod
https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/southaustralia.html
http://www.jsward.com/shanty/codfish/index.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/australia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australia_(song)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48959
http://www.abc.net.au/arts/blog/barnaby-smith/morris-dancing-broken-knuckles-bells-folk-festivals-150327/default.htm

HOMEWARD BOUND

C’erano dei canti speciali che i marinai intonavano quando levavano l’ancora per l’ultima volta prima di salpare diretti a casa! Per l’occasione si svolgeva anche una piccola cerimonia con cui la nave avvisava tutte le altre che stava per ritornare a casa!

LA CERIMONIA “SALPANCORA VERSO CASA”

..”il salpancore prende a girare sferragliando, seguendo il coro dei marinai, che cantano homeward bound. «l’ancora è a picco, signore!», grida il «primo» – «Salpa!» – «aye, aye, sir!». dopo qualche lungo e vigoroso strappo, la cicala dell’ancora appare fuori dell’acqua. «capona!». il tirante del paranco di capone è disteso in coperta e tutto l’equipaggio vi si allunga sopra. «hurrà, per l’ultima volta», grida il «primo», e l’ancora raggiunge la gru di capone sull’aria di Time for us to go!, con l’allegro accompagnamento del coro.
Appena l’ancora arriva a bordo, ogni nave, a turno, l’acclama con tre urrà, augurando un rapido viaggio, e la nave così incitata replica a ogni saluto con un solo grido. il boato degli urrà giunge sull’acqua molto allegramente, mentre la vista degli equipaggi di tante navi, in piedi sulle pazienze e sui parasartie a sventolare i cappelli mentre inneggiano, è emozionante e piacevole. Tutto è fatto in fretta, è «davvero» l’ultima volta prima del ritorno. Si avventano le vele di prora, e la nave comincia ad avanzare nell’acqua, iniziando così il suo lungo viaggio verso casa. (Italo Ottonello)

capstan_shanty

GOOD BYE, FARE THEE WELL

Un canto marinaresco mentre si lavora all’argano per far sollevare l’ancora (sea shanty). Nelle note di commento all’album “Windy Old Weather” (1960) Bob Roberts scrive “This is a capstan shanty used when getting up anchor for the last time in a foreign port. (Windlasses replaced capstans about 1860). Sometimes a ceremony rather like “The Dead Horse” was carried out the night before sailing. A blazing tar barrel was hoisted aloft and the homeward bound vessel serenaded the others with singing and cheering. The following day this shanty was sung and on a sailing ship it might be a year or more before the sailors finally reached home.”

ASCOLTA Black Flag in Assassin’s Creed

ASCOLTA Troy Banarzi (in War Thunder Pirates) una pregevole tessitura musicale con la chitarra classica (che occhieggia agli arrangiamenti barocchi per liuto) viene ripresa dal violino tra una strofa e l’altra

Hey boys! Oh, don’t yiz hear the old man(1) say?
Goodbye, fare-ye-well!
Goodbye, fare-ye-well(2)!

Oh. Don’t yiz hear the old man say?
Hoor-raw me boys! We’re homeward bound!
We’re Homeward bound to Liverpool Town,
Where all them judies(3), they will come down
An’ when we gits
to the Wallasey Gates(4)
Sally an’ Oily for their flash men do wait
An’ one to the other ye’ll hear them say,”Here comes Johnny with his fourteen mont’s pay!”
We meet these fly gals an’ well ring the ol-bel(5)
With them judies, we’l raise merry hell
We’re homeward bound to the gals o’ the tom
And stamp(6) up me bullies an’ heave it around
An’ when we gits home, boys, oh, won’t we fly round.
Well heave up the anchor to this bully sound
We’re all homeward bound for the old backyard.
Then heave, me bullies, we’re all bound homeward
Heave with a will boys, oh, heave long an’ strong.
Sing a good chorus for tis a good song
“We’re homeward bound”, well have yiz to know.
An’ over the water to England must go!
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Ehi ragazzi sentito quello che dice il vecchio capitano(1)?
arrivederci, addio(2)
arrivederci, addio
Non sentite cosa dice il vecchio?
Urrà, ragazzi, siamo facendo rotta verso casa.
Stiamo facendo rotta verso la città di Liverpool
dove tutte quelle ragazze(3) ci daranno il bentornato
e allora andremo
ai Wallasey Gates
con Sally e Oily che aspettano i loro innamorati
e l’una con l’altra le sentirete dire
“Ecco che viene Johnny con la paga di 14 mesi”
Incontreremo queste ragazze toste
e suoneremo per bene la vecchia campana(5), con quelle ragazze faremo un bel putiferio !
Stiamo facendo rotta verso le ragazze della città,
così pestate(6) e spingete in tondo miei bravi
e quando ritorniamo a casa, ragazzi non vorremo più fare vela.
Alzeremo l’ancora con questo canto da bravi.
Stiamo facendo rotta verso il vecchio cortile
così spingete ragazzi stiamo facendo rotta verso casa
spingete di buona lena, ragazzi, spingete tanto e con forza,
fate un bel coro per questa bella canzone.
‘Siamo diretti a casa’, lo abbiamo detto, e per mare dobbiamo raggiungere l’Inghilterra.

NOTE
1) il comandante della nave chiamato così nel gergo dei marinai anche se era un giovane uomo
2) oppure  “I hope you travel well
3) termine con cui erano chiamate le ragazze di Liverpool
4) oppure “we get to the old Mersey Bar” che non era un bar di Liverpool ma una serie di banchi di sabbia particolarmente insidiosi nei pressi di Liverpool
5) l’espressione to ring the old bell  assume molti significati a seconda del contesto
6) Gli shanty all’argano hanno ritmi regolari e di solito raccontano delle storie, a causa del tempo (anche ore), necessario per salpare l’ancora. i marinai riprendono slancio battendo il piede sul ponte a certe parole; da qui il nome di shanty «pesta e vai» (stamp and go).
(Italo Ottonello)

ASCOLTA Louis Killen in “Farewell Nancy: Sea Songs and Shanties” 1964 (Dave Swarbrick al violino)


Oh, we’re homeward bound to Liverpool town,
Goodbye fare the well,
goodbye fare the well,
Well them Liverpool judies they are welcome down,
Hurrah, me boys, we’re homeward bound!
Them gals there on Lime Street we soon hope to meet,
And soon we’ll be a-rolling both sides of the street.
We’ll meet those fly girls and we’ll ring the old bell,
With them judies we’ll meet there we’ll raise bloody hell.
Then I’ll tell me old women when I gets back home,
The gals there on Lime Street won’t leave me alone.
We’re homeward bound, to the gals of the town,
So stamp up, me bullies, and heave it around.
Oh, we’re homeward bound, we’ll have yiz to know,
And over the water to Liverpool we’ll go.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Stiamo facendo rotta verso la città di Liverpool
arrivederci, addio
arrivederci, addio
quelle ragazze di Liverpool ci daranno il bentornato
Urrà, ragazzi, siamo diretti verso casa.
Quelle ragazze di Lime Street speriamo di vedere presto
e presto staremo a passeggio su entrambi i lati della strada. Incontreremo quelle ragazze toste e suoneremo la vecchia campana,
con quelle ragazze ci incontreremo e faremo un putiferio!
Dirò alla mia vecchia quando sarò di ritorno a casa
che le ragazze di Lime Street non mi vogliono lasciare solo!
Siamo diretti a casa, dalle ragazze della città ,
così pestate e e spingete in tondo miei bravi
‘Siamo diretti a casa’, lo abbiamo detto, e per mare dobbiamo raggiungere Liverpool

LA VERSIONE JOHN SHORT

ASCOLTA Roger Watson in Short Sharp Shanties : Sea songs of a Watchet sailor vol 3 (su Spotify)
per il testo ho ancora delle difficoltà nel capire la pronuncia!


Hoor-raw me boys
we’re homeward bound
Goodbye fare the well,
goodbye fare the well,
Hoor-raw me boys
we’re homeward bound
Hoor-raw me boys!
We’re homeward bound!
We’re homeward bound
don’t you hear the sound
So heave on the capstan and make it spin round.
We’re homeward bound
and we’ll have you to know
it’s over the water to England we go!
Oh fare you well I wish you well
and when we’ll get back we’ll raise a bloody hell
the anchor we’ll aweigh and the sails we will set
the girls we leave we’ll never forget
We’re homeward bound
and so they’ll say
(the owner catfull runner away?)
We’re homeward bound to (?) town
where the girls where all come round
We spend the pay  (in one week?) shore
and then we’ll go to sea for more
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Urrà ragazzi,
siamo diretti verso casa
arrivederci, addio
arrivederci, addio
Urrà ragazzi,
siamo diretti verso casa
Urrà, ragazzi,
simo diretti verso casa.
Stiamo per salpare verso casa,
non senti il suono?
Cosi mettetiva all’argano e fatelo girare
Stiamo per salpare verso casa,
e ve lo facciamo sapere, andremo per mare verso l’Inghilterra!
Oh arrivederci, tanti auguri
e quando ritorneremo scateneremo il putiferio
l’ancora solleveremo e le vele alzeremo, le ragazze che lasciamo non le dimenticheremo mai
siamo diretti a casa
e così diranno
?
Siamo in partenza per ?
dove tutte le ragazze ci verrano attorno e spenderemo la paga ?
e poi andremo ancora in mare. 

continua

FONTI
http://www.shanty.org.uk/archive_songs/goodbye-fare-thee-well.html
http://www.boundingmain.com/lyrics/goodbye_farewell.htm http://mainlynorfolk.info/louis.killen/songs/goodbyefaretheewell.html