Ciod è a ghaoil a tha ort: A Soothing Croon from Eigg

This sweet lullaby is actually a fragment in Scottish Gaelic of Lord Randal ballad. The song was collected on the Isle of Eigg (Hebrides) by Frances Tolmie and Marjory Kennedy-Fraser who called it “Soothing Croon from Eigg”
Questa dolce ninna nanna è in realtà un frammento in gaelico scozzese della ballata di Lord Randal. La canzone è stata raccolta nell’isola di Eigg (Isole Ebridi) da Frances Tolmie e da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser che la intitolò “Soothing Croon from Eigg”

Mor Carmi, Eyal Freed-Man, Idan Armoni in Between East and West 2018

Jean-Luc Lenoir in Old Celtic & Nordic Lullabies” 2016

Ciod è a ghaoil a tha ort
An è do cheann a bhi goirt?
An è do mathair a ghabh ort?
O cha’n fhios a’m
ach cha’n ith mi mir an nochal!

 

English translation
What is it, love?
Oh I do not know,
But I do not eat the morning in the evening!
Is your head being sore?
Oh I do not know,
But I do not eat the morning in the evening!
Is it your mother?
Oh I do not know,
But I do not eat the morning in the evening!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Che ti è capitato caro?
Non lo so
ma sto male
E’ la testa che ti duole?
Non lo so
ma sto male!
E’ stata tua madre?
Non lo so 
ma sto male

NOTE
Una traduzione in italiano non proprio letterale

 

LINK
https://www.sheetmusicnow.com/products/soothing-croon-from-eigg-ciod-e-a-ghaoil-a-tha-ort-p261903

Morag and the Kelpie

Leggi in italiano

In the most placid rivers of Ireland and in the dark depths of the Scottish lakes live water demons, fairy creatures, that feed on human flesh: they are “kelpie”, “each uisge” (in English water-horse), “eich- mhara “(in English sea horse); to want to be picky kelpie lives preferably near the rapids of the rivers, fords and waterfalls, while each uisge prefers the lakes and the sea, but kelpie is the most used word for both. Similar creatures are also told in Norse legends (Bäckahästen, the river horse) – and Germanic (nix in the form of fish or frog). (first part)

MORAG AND THE KELPIE

At the summer pastures of the Highlands they are still told of the beautiful Morag (Marion) seduced by a kelpie in human form; she, while noticing the strangeness of her husband, did not understand his true nature, if not after the birth of their child and … she decided to abandoning baby in swaddling clothes and husband shapeshifter!

On the Isle of Skye they still sing a song in Gaelic, ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ or ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) the “Lullaby of the kelpie” a melancholy air with which the kelpie cradled his child without a mother, and at the same time a plea to Morag to return to them, both he and the child needed her.
Of this lament we know several textual versions handed down to today in the Hebrides. The melodies revolve around an old Scottish aria entitled “Crodh Chailein” (in English “Colin’s cattle) evidently considered a melody of the fairies.
Another song, sweet and melancholic at the same time, is entitled Song of the Kelpie or even ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

So translates from Scottish Gaelic Tom Thomson “I got up early, it would have been better not to” (see)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Scottish gaelic
Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
English translation *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
NOTE
English translation also here
1)  the kelpie, suffering from loneliness, leaves the lake early in the morning and takes on human form
2) the shapeshifter promises food and comfort to the girl to convince her to follow him, but he warns her, he is a nocturnal creature and will not wake up with her in the morning!
3) gamhna = cattle between 1 year and 2 years translates Tom Thomson stitks; that is heifer, the cow that has not yet given birth, the verse in addition to qualifying the work of the girl (herdswoman) also wants to be a compliment, in Italian “bella manza” as a busty woman, with abundant and seductive shapes
4) the kelpie remembers the night meeting when they had sex (and obviously nine months later their son was born)
5) after the good memories of the past it comes the present, the woman has discovered the true nature of her companion and she dislikes their child
6) continuing in the comparison the kelpie calls “calf” its baby, that is “small child”
7) A typical “exposition” of fairy children is described. A practice of “birth control” widespread in the countryside of Europe, was the abandonment of newborns in the forest, so that fairies would take care of them; once the practice was widespread both against illegitimate people, and newborns with obvious physical deformations or ill-looking. The custom of “exposing” the baby was connected with the belief that he was “swapped” or kidnapped by the fairies and replaced with a changeling, a shapeshifter who for a while resembles the human child, but ultimately always takes its true appearance.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson translates = speckled band (of withy). I searched the dictionary: it is a crown made by intertwining the branches of willow; it reminds me of the Celtic crowns of flowers and leaves

 

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald recorded it under the title “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” in 2001 (from Colla Mo Rùn) following the collection of Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

english translation *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II and IV
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
scottish gaelic
I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà

NOTE
1) The kelpie sings the lullaby to its child abandoned by the human mother and comforts him by telling him that when he grows up he’ll be a little heartbreaker

With the title of ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan the same story is present in the archives of Tobar an Dualchais, from the voice of three witnesses of the Isle of Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

A similar story is told in the island of Benbecula with the title of Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg see


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 sings another fragment with the title “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (see the version of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser below)

English translation *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling! Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.

NOTE
1) Mhórag or Mór is the name of the maiden loved by the kelpie
2) it is the incessant cry of the child abandoned by his human mother in the cold and without food
3) mountain between Gesture and Portree on the Isle of Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

With the title “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, the same fragment sung by Caera is also reported in the book of Marjory Kennedy-Fraser and Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (page 94)

Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Scottish gaelic
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh
thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa
ri sgath chnocain.
II
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh,
is tu sìor chòineadh.
III
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri
do bheul beag baoth
is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVE
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

Sources
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg

Gruagach-Mhara: Oran mu’n Gruagaich (a song about the Gruagach)

In the Hebrides there are several songs that contain the term “Gruagach“, a sea maiden who could be a selkie or perhaps a mermaid.
Ultimately the Gruagach is another name of the Cailleach, the primeval goddess of creation as it is called in Scotland, whose memory has left a trace in Celtic folklore and speaks of a primordial cult preserved almost unchanged even during the rise of Christianity and practiced above all by women with shamanic powers (see introduction)
Nelle Isole Ebridi si trovano diverse canzoni che contengono il termine Gruagach, una fanciulla del mare che potrebbe essere una selkie o forse una sirena.
La Gruagach è un altro nome della Cailleach, la dea primigenia della creazione come viene chiamata in Scozia, il cui ricordo ha lasciato una traccia nel folklore celtico e ci parla di un culto primordiale conservatosi pressoché immutato anche durante l’affermarsi del Cristianesimo e praticato soprattutto dalle donne con poteri sciamanici (vedi prima parte)

Hill ò ho, Hù ill ò ho – Oran Luadhaidh

I found this text in Scottish Gaelic (although not yet an audio documentation) transcribed with musical line in the “Puirt-A-Beul” by Keith Norman MacDonald (1901) – the second great source for songs in Scottish Gaelic next to the collection of Frances Tolmie: the song is classified as a waulking song titled ORAN MU’N GHRUAGAICH (A SONG ABOUT THE GRUAGACH), or “Hill ò ho, Hù ill ò ho – Oran Luadhaidh”
Ho trovato il testo originario in gaelico scozzese (sebbene non ancora una documentazione audio) trascritto con rigo musicale nel “Puirt-A-Beul” di Keith Norman MacDonald (1901) -la seconda grande fonte per i canti in gaelico scozzese accanto alla raccolta di Frances Tolmie: la canzone è classificata come una waulking song dal titolo ORAN MU’N GHRUAGAICH (A SONG ABOUT THE GRUAGACH), sottotitolata “Hill ò ho, Hù ill ò ho – Oran Luadhaidh” 

The *Gruagach* here is a female.  Although a ‘maid of the sea’, she must not be pictured as the conventional golden-haired nude terminating in a fish’s tail.  The spectator, while searching for sheep, sees a grey-robed maiden sitting on a distant rock.  Raising her head, she stretches herself and assumes the form of the ‘animal without horns’.  Then ‘she went cleaving the sea on every side…towards the spacious region of the bountiful ones’.  Although the literal word ‘seal’ is not used, ‘the hornless animal’ whose form the mermaid took, one may suppose to be a seal.  The ‘grey robe’ of the maiden further points to her seal character, the seal being often described as ‘grey’.  ‘In the superstitious belief of the North,’ says Mr W.T. Dennison in his *Orcadian Sketch-book*, the seal held a far higher place than any of the lower animals, and had the power of assuming human form and faculties …  every true descendent of the Norseman looks upon the seal as a kind of second-cousin in disgrace.” ( Ethel Bassin “The Old Songs of Skye: Frances Tolmie and her Circle”, 1997 )
Così scrive Ethel BassinIl Gruagach qui è una femmina, sebbene sia una “fanciulla del mare” non la si deve immaginare come la solita donna nuda dai capelli biondi con la coda di pesce. Lo spettatore mentre bada alla pecore vede una fanciulla dal mantello grigio seduta su uno scoglio al largo. Nell’alzare la testa si allunga e prende la forma di  “un animale senza le corna”.  Poi “Fendette il mare da ogni lato .. verso l’immensità dell’oceano”. Sebbene non si usi il termine “seal” si suppone che ‘the hornless animal’ dalla coda di sirena potrebbe essere una foca. L’abito grigio è un ulteriore aggiunta alla sua caratteristica di foca grigia, il cui nome è spesso abbreviato in “grey”. ‘Nelle credenze del Nord- scrive  W.T. Dennison nel suo *Orcadian Sketch-book*- la foca occupava un posto privilegiato rispetto ad ogni altro animale inferiore e aveva il potere di assumere sembianze umane.. ogni vero discendete dai Norvegesi considera la foca come una specie di cugino di secondo grado caduto in disgrazia”

John Duncan (1866-1945), “The Kelpie”

Hill ò ho, Hù ill ò ho
‘S mis’ a chunnaic,
Hù ill ò ho
I
An diugh an t-iongnadh,
‘Sa ‘mhadainn mhoich ‘s mi
‘G irraidh chaorach!
Chunnacas Gruagach,
Chuailein chraobhaich
‘S i ‘na suidh air
Sgeir ‘na h-aonar,
Trusgan glas oirr’
Airson aodaich
II
Cha b’ fhad a bha
Sud a’ caochladh,
Thog i ‘ceann ‘s gu’n
D’ rinn i straoinadh,
‘S chaidh i ‘n riochd na
Béisde maoile (1).
III
Sgoltadh i ‘n cuan
Aig gach taobh dhi (2),
Troimh chaol Mhuile,
Troimh chaol Ile,
Troimh chaol Othasaidh
Mhic-a-Fitheadh
Gu tir fharsuinn
Nam fear fialaidh


Hill ò ho, Hù ill ò ho
‘Twas I who beheld
Hù ill ò ho
I
Today the wonder
In the morning early
When seeking sheep
A maiden was seen
Of flowing hair
And she was sitting
On a rock alone
A grey robe on her
For her clothing
II
‘Twas not long
Before that changed
She raised her head
And stretching herself
She took the form of
A hornless brute (1)
III
She clove the sea
Upon each side (2)
Thro’ the Sound of Mull
Thro’ the Sound of Islay
Thro’ the Sound of Oransay
Of MacPhee!
To the wide territory
of the munificent ones
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Hill ò ho, Hù ill ò ho
‘sono io il testimone
Hù ill ò ho
I
Oggi un evento meraviglioso
all’alba
mentre cercavo le pecore
vidi una fanciulla
dai capelli fluenti
che era seduta
su una roccia solitaria
con un manto grigio
come vestito
II
Non ci volle molto
prima che mutasse
alzò la testa
e si allungò
e prese la forma di 
un animale senza le corna
III
Fendeva il mare
con la pinna della coda
dallo stretto di Mull
dallo stretto di Islay
dallo stretto di Oransay
di MacPhee!
all’immensità
dell’oceano

NOTE
Puirt-A-Beul “Mouth-tunes,” or “Songs for Dancing.” By Dr. Keith N. MacDonald
1) in the popular tradition the gruagach is associated with a sacred cow from the sea and with a hollowed-out stones, a supernatural creature originally surely of female gender, guardian of the cattle of a given territory, its shape when it dives into the sea is however shrouded in mystery.
nella tradizione popolare la gruagach è associata ad una vacca sacra giunta dal mare e ad una pietra coppellata, una creatura soprannaturale in origine sicuramente di genere femminile,  guardiana del bestiame di un determinato territorio, la sua forma quando si getta in mare è tuttavia avvolta nel mistero. 
2) probable reference to the typical seal swimming which gives its movement with the short and webbed front legs to form a single “fin”
letteralmente “da ogni lato” probabile riferimento al tipico nuoto della foca che imprime il suo movimento con le zampe corte e palmate anteriori a formare un’unica “pinna”

The Seal-Maiden (Gruagach-Mhara): Ho eel yo

The English version of the previous song is arranged by Marjory Kennedy-Fraser in her “Songs of the Hebrides”. In this context the term “Gruagach” coupled with “mhara” means a sea maiden, a selkie.
La versione in inglese del precedente canto è arrangiata da Marjory Kennedy-Fraser nel suo “Songs of the Hebrides“. In questo contesto il termine “Gruagach” accoppiato a “mhara” è usato nel senso di fanciulla del mare che sta a indicare una selkie
A shepherd has the good fortune to witness the mutation of a black-haired girl: in a moment she wears the gray coat and turns into a seal and throws herself into the sea to swim towards the wild sea. The musical structure is derived from a waulking song, in which the part of the choir is mostly formed by nonsense phrases that are transcribed phonetically.

Un pastore ha la ventura di assistere alla trasformazione di una fanciulla dai capelli neri: in un attimo ella indossa il grigio manto mutandosi in foca e si getta nel mare per nuotare verso il vasto oceano. La struttura musicale è derivata da una waulking song, in cui la parte del coro è formata per lo più da frasi non-sense che vengono trascritte foneticamente.


Early one morning Ho eel yo
stray sheep a seeking Ho eel yo
Great wonder saw I Ho eel yo
fair seal-maiden Ho eel yo
Glossy her dark hair Ho eel yo
Veiling her fair form Ho eel yo
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
lone on sea-rock sat the maiden.
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
Grey her long robe closely clinging
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
When great wonder! Ho eel yo
Suddendly changed she Ho eel yo
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
raised her head she,
stretched she outward
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
Diving seaward Ho eel yo
Smooth seal-headed she Ho eel yo
Out by the teal-tracks Ho eel yo
Cleaving the sea-waves Ho eel yo
Heel yo heel yo rova ho

Through Chaol Mhuille
Through Chaol Ile
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
To the far blue bounteous ocean!
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Al mattino presto
in cerca di una pecora smarrita
vidi con grande stupore
una bella fanciulla-foca.
Lucidi i suoi neri capelli
che coprivano il suo bel corpo,
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
da sola sulla roccia sedeva la fanciulla.
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
Grigia la sua lunga veste aderente,
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
quando oh meraviglia!
All’improvviso lei è cambiata
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
rialzando la testa
si protese in avanti
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
verso il mare
la levigata testa di foca
sulle tracce dell’alzavola
a fendere le onde del mare
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
per l’Isola di Mull,
per l’Isola di Isla
Heel yo heel yo rova ho
verso il lontano oceano meravigliosamente blu!

ORAN MU’N GHRUAGAICH (A SONG ABOUT THE GRUAGACH)

But with the same title, and always in the waulking songs, another song has also been handed down, in which, however, the gruagach is of male gender. Frances Tolmie writes “The subject of this song is the lamentation of a mother over her daughter, who had died in a strange manner when they were staying together at a sheiling in a lonely part of Glen Macaskill- One evening when gathering the cows into the fold, a cow becoming restive, the young woman drove her in with rude words and blows. But the Friend of the Cattle, know as the Gruagach (occasionally assuming the appeareance of a beautiful youth with long golden hair and a wonderfully white bosom) was at that moment, though invisible, standing near, and on his smiting the girl with a rod which always had in his hand, she straightway fell down dead. Her mother was mourning iver her all night, and the Gruagach, leaning against the upper beam of the dwelling, gazed at her till break of day, when he vanished.”
Ma con lo stesso titolo, e sempre nelle waulking song si è tramandata anche un’altra canzone, in cui però il gruagach è di genere maschile. Scrive Frances Tolmie“L’argomento di questa canzone è il lamento di una madre per la figlia,  morta in uno strano modo quando erano insieme ai pascoli in una parte solitaria del Glen Macaskill. Una sera mentre radunavano le mucche nel recinto, la giovane spinse una mucca ritrosa colpendola con male parole. Ma il Protettore del bestiame, noto come il Gruagach (che assume occasionalmente l’apparenza di una bella fanciulla con lunghi capelli dorati e un seno meravigliosamente bianco) si trovava in quel momento, anche se invisibile, in piedi vicino e lei e con un bastone che aveva sempre in mano colpì la ragazza , che cadde immediatamente a terra morta. La madre la pianse per tutta la notte, e il Gruagach, appoggiato alla trave del capanno, la fissò fino allo spuntar del giorno, e poi scomparve

Jo Morrison in “A Waulking Tour of Scotland” 2000

Christine Primrose in “Gun Sireadh, Gun Iarraidh‘ (‘Without Seeking, Without Asking’) 2001 

♪ (Spotify)

I
Chaor-ain nach deàn thu sol us dhomh
E-hò hi ri, rith ibh ò hò
Gus am faic mi fear àrd a bhroill-ich ghil!
E-hò hi ri, rith ibh ò hò, hi rì, hò rionn ò
II
Buachaille luaineach mu bhruachan a’ ghlinne-s’ thu,
Air an d’ fbàs a’ ghruag ‘na clannaoibh air
III
‘S mis a’ bhean bhochd tha gu brònach
‘S mis a’ ghleannan so ‘nam ònar (sonar)
IV
‘S mis a’ bhean bhochd tha gu cràidhteach,
‘S mi ‘gad cbàradh, laoigh do mhàthar.
V
‘S mi gun phiuthar! ‘S mi gun bhràthair.
Rìgh nan dùl! Bi teachd làimh rium


I
O Ember , do you give me light
so that I may behold him
who is of lofty stature and white bosom (1)
II
Swift-footed herdsman (2) on the slopes of the glen, on whose head the hair has grown in curling locks
III
Oh a sorrowful woman am I,
mouring solitary in this glen
IV
Sorely afflicted and in anguish,
laying thee out, thou darling of thy mother
V
Having no sister nor a brother,
King of Nature, be thou near me! (3)
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
O fiammella, fammi luce
affinchè io possa vederlo
colui che è alto potente e dal petto chiaro
II
Custode del gregge dal rapido piè sui pendii della valle, dal capo su cui crescono capelli lunghi e fluenti
III
Che donna trista sono
piangente sola in questa forra
IV
Tanto afflitta e angosciata
ti sto accanto, caro tesoro di mamma,
V
senza sorella o fratello;
Re della Natura, stammi vicino

NOTE
from the testimony of Effie Ross (Cottar) of Bracadale, Skye 1861
dalla testimonianza di Effie Ross (Cottar) di Bracadale, Skye 1861
1) the mother is alone in the hut of the mountain pasture to watch over the body of the dead daughter because struck by the staff of the gruagach, and looking through the embers of the semi-extinguished fire she invokes the vision
la madre si trova sola nel capanno dell’alpeggio a vegliare il corpo della figlia morta perchè colpita dal bastone del gruagach, e guardando tra la brace del fuoco semi spento ne invoca la visione 
2) the gruagach is a tutelary deity, the protector of the cattle that in the background of history has crushed the life of a young (and inexperienced) girl who went with her mother on the high pastures with the cattle, the girl has abused a cow reluctant to return into the fence for the night and she is killed by the gruagach
il gruagach è il nume tutelare protettore del bestiame che nell’antefatto della storia ha stroncato la vita di una giovane (e inesperta) fanciulla andata con la madre sui pascoli alti con il bestiame, la fanciulla ha maltrattato una mucca riluttante a rientrare nel recinto per la notte ed è punita con la morta dal gruagach 
3) Just as it protects the cattle, the gruagach also protects the shepherds and in particular the children left alone by their mothers to watch over the grazing animals. The mother, though saddened by the death of her only daughter, is not embittered towards the gruagach who has done nothing but act according to his inscrutable divine nature
Così come protegge il bestiame il gruagach protegge anche i pastori e in particolare i bambini lasciati soli dalle madri per sorvegliare gli animali al pascolo. La madre pur addolorata per la morte dell’unica figlia non è amareggiata verso il gruagach che non ha fatto altro che agire secondo la sua natura divina imperscrutabile

LINK
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=51669
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/cormack/gruagach.htm
http://www.booksfromscotland.com/Authors/Stuart-McHardy
http://www.aniodhlann.org.uk/documents/t1999-157-3d.html?CFID=24022064&CFTOKEN=66534791
http://www.templerecords.co.uk/products/christine-primrose-gun-sireadh-gun-iarraidh
http://pmjohngrant.com/2018/02/ot-2-march-1901-keith-n-macdonald-puirt-a-beul-mouth-tunes-or-songs-for-dancing-mus/

GRIOGAL CRIDHE: A HIGHLAND AFFAIR

05185-dante_gabriel_rossetti_lady_anne_bothwells_lamentNel saggio “‘Griogal Cridhe’ Aspects of Transmission in the Lament for Griogair Ruadh Mac Griogair of Glen StraeVirginia Blankenhorn esplora in modo esaustivo la storia del brano. Si tramanda che la melodia fosse inizialmente un lament (canto funebre) scritto da Marion Campbell (in gaelico Mór Chaimbeul), figlia di Colin “Grey” Campbell di Glenorchy, vedova di Gregor MacGregor, Griogair Ruadh –Gregor il rosso di Glen Strae decapitato nel 1570; così la ricerca di Martin MacGregor (The Lament for Griogair Ruadh MacGregor of Glen Strae and its Historical Background’ 1999) approfondisce il contesto storico: per un secolo i due clan erano stati alleati ma nel 1563 al momento dell’ascesa come capo clan di Griogair Ruadh, lo strapotere dei Campbell di Glenorchy con le loro pretese di vassallaggio incondizionato, lo portarono alla ribellione e al conflitto, vivendo per lo più nascosto in alta valle per compiere razzie di bestiame nelle terre dei rivali.

La canzone è un poemetto di diciassette strofe pubblicato nel 1813 in “Comhchruinneacha do dh’ Orain Taghta, Ghaidhealach” dal collezionista Patrick Turner (Padruig Mac an Tuairneir), ma è anche tramandata oralmente nelle Isole Ebridi seppure in modo parziale a volte con sole tre o quattro strofe; al di là del dato storico quello che prevale è l’immagine della vedova che probabilmente assiste alla decapitazione del marito (per mano del suo stesso padre), Marion è sicuramente una donna di carattere, innamorata di Griogar al punto da andare contro al suo stesso clan per condividere la vita da “bandito” del marito; alla fine comunque fu costretta nel suo ruolo di moglie e madre così come si addiceva a una figlia di un capo clan: venne subito risposata al rispettabile e aristocratico Raibeart Menzies di Comrie. Così il suo dolore per l’amore perduto e la nostalgia per la precedente vita da “ribelle”, trovavano il solo sbocco nella ninna-nanna cantata ai due figli Alastair Ruadh (Alastair il rosso) e Iain Dubh (Iain il moro) in realtà  il lamento funebre composto per il loro padre. Del resto non erano insolite nelle ninne-nanne del Border scozzese descrizioni di morti violente, maledizioni e richieste di vendetta: l’ultima strofa in Patrick Turner recita: Ba hu, ba hu, àsrain bhig, Chan eil thu fhathast ach tlath; ’S eagal leam nach tig an latha Gu ’n diol thu t-athair gu brath
traduzione inglese (Ba hu, ba hu, little orphan, you are only  young yet;  But I fear the day will never come that  you will avenge your father).

Virginia Blankenhorn conclude nel suo saggio “While we have been at pains here to point out the differences between the various versions of Griogal Cridhe – text and music, published and unpublished, northern Hebridean variants and southern ones – the clearest impression overall must remain one not of difference, but of similarity.  None of the versions we have encountered here truly stands at odds with the others. Even Finlay Dun’s romantic inflation of the melody does not wholly obscure its traditional origins; even the severe truncation of the text over the course of four centuries – only a few of our twentieth-century informants recorded more than four stanzas – does not disguise the fact that Cumha Ghriogair  Ruaidh continued to hold an important place in the Gaelic repertoire some four centuries after its composition“.

LE TRE VERSIONI

Si riprende la schematizzazione proposta da Virginia Blankenhorn per un confronto tra le varie versioni riconducibili per lo più a due tradizioni, la prima proveniente dall’isola di Skye e l’altra dall’isola di Uist: sono così classificate le strofe con le seguenti sigle
T per Patrick Turner 1813 con la melodia intitolata Moch air maduinn latha Lunaisd (‘Early on Lammas day morning’).
G per Gesto (Frances Tolmie -Skye) 1895 e
M per MacDonald collection 1911

Così osserva Virginia Blankenhorn “Judging from the published evidence of Miss Tolmie’s version (Skye) and that collected by the MacDonalds (Uist), it is clear that over 70 percent of the stanzas – or important elements of them –  published by Turner in 1813 were still preserved in oral memory at the end of the nineteenth century, more than three hundred years after their composition… Variants included in Group 2 clearly support the notion that a distinct version of Griogal Cridhe predominated in the Uists, Eriskay and Barra, while those in Group 1 suggest that the versions collected in Skye, Harris and Lewis have features in common with Frances Tolmie’s Skye version as given in Gesto. Tolmie learned Griogal Cridhe as a child growing up near Dunvegan, home of the MacLeods, whose clan alliances in Harris and Lewis were manifold and of long standing. Granted the fact that by Tolmie’s time the MacLeods of Skye/Harris and the MacLeods of Lewis were politically independent of each other, it nonetheless stands to reason that such relationships could account for the similarity between the version sung in the northernmost Outer Hebrides and the one Tolmie learned in childhood.

PRIMA VERSIONE (isole Skye, Harris, e Lewis)

La versione di Frances Tolmie contiene tre strofe (G2, G3 e G5) che non compaiono nella versione MacDonald

ASCOLTA Mac-Talla in Mairidh Gaol Is Ceol 1994 il super-gruppo composto da Arthur Cormack, Eilidh Mackenzie, Christine Primrose, Alison Kinnaird and Blair Douglas


I (T1)
Moch maduinn air La(tha) Lunasd’
bha mi sugradh mar ri m’ghradh
Ach mu’n d’ tainig meadhon latha
Bha mo chridhe air a chradh
Sèist (T2, G2) (2)
Obhan, obhan, obhan iri
Obhan iri o
Obhan, obhan, obhan iri
‘S mòr mo mhulad, ‘s mòr
II (T16, G1, M2) (3)
‘S iomadh oidhche fhliuch is thioram
Sìde nan seachd sian
Gheibheadh Griogal dhòmhsa creagan
Ris an gabhainn dian
III (T12, G8, M3)(4)
Nuair bhios mnathan òg a’ bhaile
Nochd ‘nan cadal sèimh
‘S ann bhios mise air bruaich do lice(5)
Bualadh mo dhà làimh
IV (T11, G7, M4) (6)
Chan eil ùbhlan idir agam
‘S ùbhlan uil’ aig càch
‘S ann tha m’ubhal cùbhraidh caineal
‘Cùl a’ chinn ri làr


Traduzione inglese
I
Early morning on the first of August(1)
I was sporting with my love
But before midday had come
My heart was left in ruins
Chorus (after each verse):
Obhan, obhan, obhan iri
Obhan iri o
Obhan, obhan, obhan iri
Great is my sorrow, great
II
Many a night both wet and dry
Weather of the seven elements
Gregor would find for me a rocky shelter
Where I would take refuge
III
While the young wives of the town
Serenely sleep tonight
I will be at the edge of your gravestone
Beating my two hands
IV
I do not have any apples at all
While others have all the apples
But my apple is fragrant, spicy
The back of his head to the floor

Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Un mattino presto del primo di agosto
mi stavo allietando con il mio amore,
ma prima che arrivasse mezzogiorno
il mio cuore è stato fatto a pezzi.
CORO
Ahimè, ahimè
Ahimè
Ahimè, ahimè
grande è il mio dolore
II
Per molte notti, sotto l’acqua e all’asciutto
anche con il tempo peggiore
Gregor mi troverebbe un riparo sotto la roccia
dove potrei trovare rifugio.
III
Mentre le mogli degli altri
dormono tranquille stanotte,
io sarò accanto alla tua tomba
a torcermi le mani.
IV
Così non ho mele
e gli altri le hanno tutte:
la mia mela fragrante e bella
è la sua testa spiccata per terra

NOTE
1) Gregor fu catturato il 1° agosto 1569 e fu processato e condannato a morte il 7 aprile 1570, giustiziato per mano dello stesso Gray Colin nella sua tenuta di Balloch, Perthshire all’estremità orientale del Loch Tay (l’attuale Taymouth Castle)
2) il ritornello riportato da Turner (T2) Ochain, ochain, ochain uiridh, S goirt mo chridhe laoigh, Ochain, ochain, ochain uiridh, Cha chluinn t-athair ar caoidh (solo l’ultimo verso ha un significato in inglese: your  father won’t hear our cries)
3) la strofa riportata da Turner (T16) Ged bhiodh cur a’s cathadh ann,  A’s latha nan seachd sion; Gheibheadh Griogair domh-sa cnagan ’Sa ’n caidlimid fo dhìon (traduzione inglese Although there would be storm and snow-drift, a day of seven gales, Gregor would find me a little nook where we would sleep in shelter.)
4) la strofa riportata da Turner (T12)” Ged tha mnaithibh chaich aig baile,  Na ’n luidhe ’s na ’n cadal seimh ’S ann bhios mis’ aig bruaich mo leapa,  A’ bualadh mo dha laimh. (traduzione inglese Though other men’s wives are at home, sleeping sweetly, Here am I at the edge of my bed, beating my hands in grief.)
5) un’altra differenza di questa versione rispetto a quella di Uist è che nel verso la donna piange accanto alla tomba del marito, invece che nel suo letto. L’immagine è molto più “esagerata” dal gusto melodrammatico vittoriano che predilige tombe e sepolcri 6) la strofa riportata da Turner (T11) ’S ged tha mi gun ubhlan agam, ’S ubhlan uil’ aig cach; ’S ann tha m’ ubhal cùraidh grinn,  A’s cul a chinn ri lar. (traduzione inglese Though now I have no apples, and others have them all: My own apple, fragrant, handsome – and the  back of his head on the ground.)


ASCOLTA Glen Lyon (Margaret e Martyn Bennett)

La versione testuale è più simile a quella riportata da Frances Tolmie (isola di Skye) nella Gesto Collection of Highland Music (Keith Norman MacDonald, 1895) comprensiva di 8 strofe


I (G1, T16, M2)
´Sioma hoidhche fhliuch is thioram
Side na seachd sian
Gheibheadh Griogal dhomhsa creagan
Risan gabhainn dion
Chorus: (G2, T2)
Obhan obhan obhan iri
Obhan iri, o!
Obhan obhan obhan iri
Smor mo mhulad smor
II (G4, T5, M5)
Eudail mhóir, a shlaugh an Domhain,
Dhòirt iad t´ fhuil o ´n dé (7)
´S chuir iad do cheann air stob daraich
Tacan beag bho d´ chré.
III (G6, T14/15, M8)
B ´annsa bhi le Griogal cridhe
Teàrnadh chruidh le gleann,
Na le Baran mór na Dalach,
Sìoda geal(8)mu m´ cheann.
IV (G8, T12, M3)
´Nuair a bhois mnàthan òg a´ bhaile,
´Nochd nan cadal sèimh,
´S ann bhios mis´ air bruaich do lice(5),
´Bualadh mo dhà làimh.
V (G3) (9)
Dhìrich mi dh ´an t-seòmar mhullaich,
´S theirinn mi ´n tigh-làir,
´S cha d ´fhuair mise Griogal cridhe
´Na shuidhe mu ´n chlàr.


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
I
Many a night both wet and dry
Weather of the seven elements
Gregor would find for me a rocky shelter
Where I would take refuge.
Chorus:
Obhan, Obhan, Obhan iri
Obhan iri O!
Obhan Obhan Obhan iri,
Great is my sorrow, great.
II
Great darling from all the world’s people
They split your blood yesterday
And they put your head on an oaken stake,
Near where your body lay.
III
I would be glad to be with dear Gregor
Guarding cattle in the glen
Instead of with the big Baron of Dall
White silk around my head.
IV
While the young wives of the town
Serenely sleep tonight
I will be at the edge of your gravestone
Beating my two hands.
V
I ascended to the uppermost room
and descended to the lowest,
But I did not find dear Gregor
seated at the table

Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Per molte notti, sotto l’acqua e all’asciutto
anche con il tempo peggiore
Gregor mi troverebbe un riparo sotto la roccia
dove potrei trovare rifugio.
CORO
Ahimè, ahimè
Ahimè
Ahimè, ahimè
grande è il mio dolore
II
Grande tesoro di tutti gli abitanti della terra,
hanno versato il tuo sangue ieri
e hanno messo la tua testa su un palo di quercia
poco distante dal resto del tuo corpo.
III
Avrei preferito stare con il caro Gregor
a condurre il bestiame per la valle
che essere con il grande Barone di Dall
con un copricapo bianco in testa.
IV
Mentre le mogli degli altri
dormono tranquille stanotte,
io sarò accanto alla tua tomba
a torcermi le mani.
V
Salii alle stanza superiore
e scesi dabbasso,
ma non trovai il caro Gregor
seduto a tavola

NOTE
7) qui si accenna ad un antico rituale celtico consistente nel bere il sangue di un amico in segno di affetto (il patto di sangue), usanza citata anche da Shakespeare; non è insolito nei lamenti funebri trovare la descrizione delle vedove intente a leccare il sangue dalle ferite del morto o a bere il suo sangue da una coppa. La versione in T5 dice: Chuir iad a cheann air ploc daraich, ’S dhoirt iad fhuil mu lar  Na ’m biodh agam-sa ’n sin cupan,  Dh’ olainn d’i mo shadh. (in inglese They put his head on an oaken block and spilled his blood on the ground, If I had had a cup there, I’d have drunk my fill of it)
8) un’altra differenza con la versione di Uist è che in questa il copricapo è bianco (invece di nero)
9) la strofa viene definita come una rann fuadain (migratory stanza) strofe tipiche nei canti in gaelico, una specie di versi improvvisati e “riempitivi” ricorrenti in varie ballate

SECONDA VERSIONE (Uists e Barra)

La versione testuale è più simile a quella di The MacDonald Collection of Gaelic Poetry A. and A. MacDonald (1911), ‘taken down in Uist’ riportata con il titolo generico di “Taladh” (lullaby): comprensiva di 8 strofe.

ASCOLTA William Jackson & Mackenzie in From A Hebridean Island 2001

Il testo presenta alcune variazioni rispetto alla versione MacDonald


Sèist(M1, T17):
O ba ba mo leanabh
Ba mo leanabh, ba
O ba ba mo leanabh
Nì mo leanabhs’ an ba ba(10)
I (M4, T11, G1) (11)
Ged tha mi gun chaoraich agam
‘S caoraich uil’ aig càch
Ged tha mi gun chaoraich agam
Dèan a leanabh an ba ba
II (M5, T5, G4) (12)
Eudail mhòir a shluaigh an dòmhain
Dhòirt iad d’fhuil an dé (7)
‘S chuir iad do cheann air stob daraich
Tacan beag bho do chré
III (M6, T8) (13)
Dhìrich mi bheinn mhòr gun anal
Dhìrich agus thearn
Chuirinn falt mo chinn fo d’ chasan
Agus craicionn mo dhà làimh


TRADUZIONE INGLESE:
Chorus:
Oh hush-a-bye, my little baby
Hush, my little baby, hush
Oh hush-a-bye, my little baby
My own little baby will go to sleep
I
Though I am without a flock of sheep
And the others all have sheep
Though I am without a flock of sheep
You, little baby, can go to sleep
II
Darling, of the people of the great world
They spilt your blood yesterday
They put your head on an oaken post
A little way from your corpse
III
I breathlessly climbed the great mountain
I climbed and I descended
I would put the hair of my head under your feet,
And the skin of my two hands

Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
CORO
Zitto, piccolino
zitto mio piccolo bambino, zitto
Zitto, piccolino
proprio il mio piccolo bambino si metterà a dormire
I
Anche se sono senza gregge
e tutti gli altri invece hanno le pecore,
anche se sono senza gregge
tu piccolo mio ti puoi addormentare.
II
Amato grandemente da tutte le persone del mondo, hanno versato il tuo sangue ieri
e hanno messo la tua testa su un palo di quercia
poco distante dal resto del corpo.
III
Ho scalato la grande montagna senza fiato
salita e discesa
avrei lasciato i capelli della mia testa ai tuoi piedi
con la pelle delle mie due mani

NOTE
10) la versione MacDonald dice Cha ’n ’eil thu ach bà (You are only bà) la versione T17 dice Ba hu, ba hu, àsrain bhig, Chan eil thu fhathast ach tlath; ’S eagal leam nach tig an latha Gu ’n diol thu t-athair gu brath (traduzione inglese Ba hu, ba hu, little orphan, you are only  young yet;  But I fear the day will never come that  you will avenge your father.
11) la versione MacDonald dice Ged tha mi gun ùbhlan agam, ’S m’ ùbhlan uil’ aig càch, ’S ann tha m’ ulaidh, cùbhraidh, caineal, ’S cùl a chinn ri làr (Although I have no apples – my apples gone to others, My treasure, fragrant and cinnamon-scented, lies with his head on the ground)
12) la versione MacDonald dice Fheudail a dh’ fhearaibh an domhain,  Dhòirt iad t’ fhuil an de; Chuir iad do cheann air stob daraich, Tacan beag uam fein. 13) la versione MacDonald dice Dhìrich mi ’bheinn mhòr gun anail,  Mu ’n do ghlas an là, Chuir mi gruag mo chinn ri talamh ’S craicionn mo dha làmh. (traduzione I climbed the big mountain  breathlessly before the sun arose; The hair of my head I left on the ground, along with the skin of my two hands)


BA BA MO LEANABH

La stessa melodia viene abbinata a metà ottocento con un altro testo, una triste ninna-nanna, tramandata tradizionalmente nell’isola di South Uist; che i più collegano alla carestia di patate del 1848 la quale anche in Scozia portò molta sofferenza tra i piccoli contadini che si nutrivano quasi esclusivamente di patate

ASCOLTA Christina Stewart & Jo Baird

Bà bà mo leanabh beag
Bidh thu mòr ged tha thu beag
Bà bà mo leanabh beag
Chan urrainn mi gad thàladh.Gur dè a ghaoil a nì mi dhut
Gun bhainne cìoch agam dhut
An t-eagal orm gun gabh thu ‘n chrup
le buige a’ bhuntàta.


TRADUZIONE INGLESE
Bà Bà my little baby
You will grow big
although you’re small
Bà Bà my little baby
I cannot settle you
What can I with you my darling
I haven’t enough milk for you
I’m worried you will become ill
Because of the potato famine

Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
ninna nanna bimbo mio
crescerai forte
anche se sei piccolo
ninna nanna bimbo mio
non posso sostenerti
cosa devo fare di te mio caro?
Non ho abbastanza latte per tee temo che ti ammalerai
a causa della carestia

 

continua Bheir mi ò 
continua Eriskay Love Lilt

FONTI
http://www.academia.edu/6713649/ Griogal_Cridhe_Aspects_of_transmission_ in_the_Lament_for_Griogair_Ruadh_Mac_Griogair_of_Glen_Strae http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/divinity/ research/resources/breadalbane/historical-background/ clan-campbell/macgregor-feud
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/divinity/research/resources/breadalbane/historical-background/clan-campbell/macgregor-feud http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandssongs/ primary/babamoleanabh.asp
http://www.bletherskite.net/2013/12/06/griogal-cridhe-beloved-gregor/http://www.darachweb.net/SongLyrics/GriogalCridhe.html http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/mactalla/griogal.htm http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/lamond/baba.htm http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/54954/2 http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/43639/2 http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/42291/2 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46062
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=40322785

Morag e il Kelpie

Read the post in English

Nei fiumi più placidi d’Irlanda e nelle profondità oscure dei laghi scozzesi vivono dei demoni acquatici, creature fatate mutaforma, che si nutrono di carne umana: sono “kelpie“, “each uisge” (in inglese water-horse),  “eich-mhara” (in inglese sea horse), cavalli d’acqua e del mare; a voler essere pignoli il kelpie vive preferibilmente nei pressi delle rapide dei fiumi, dei guadi e delle cascate, mentre l’each uisge preferisce i laghi e il mare, ma kelpie è la parola più usata per entrambi. (prima parte)

MORAG E IL KELPIE

Ai pascoli estivi delle Highlands ancora si narra della bella Morag (Marion) sedotta da un kelpie in forma umana; la fanciulla pur notando delle stranezze del marito non si accorse della sua vera natura, se non dopo la nascita del loro bambino e … se la diede a gambe abbandonando bambino in fasce e marito mutaforma!

Nell’isola di Skye  si canta ancora un canto in gaelico,  ‘Oran-tàlaidh an eich-uisge’ oppure ‘Oran each-uisge’ (The water kelpie’s song) la “Ninna nanna del kelpie” una nenia malinconica con cui il kelpie cerca di far addormentare il bambino rimasto senza mamma, e nello stesso tempo una supplica verso Morag perchè ritorni da loro, sia lui che il bambino hanno bisogno di lei.
Di questo lamento si conoscono diverse versioni testuali tramandate fino a oggi nelle Isole Ebridi. Le melodie girano intorno ad una vecchia aria scozzese dal titolo “Crodh Chailein” (in inglese “Colin’s cattle) evidentemente considerata una melodia delle fate (qui)
Un’altra melodia dolce e malinconica nello stesso tempo è intitolata Song of The Kelpie o anche ARRANE GHELBY

Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich

Così traduce Tom Thomson (vedi)”I got up early, it would have been better not to” (mi sono alzato presto ma era meglio se non lo facevo)

Julie Fowlis in Alterum 2017

Dh’èirich mi moch, dh’èirich mi moch, B’fheàrr nach d’ dh’èirich
Mo chreach lèir na chuir a-mach mi.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Bha ceò sa bheinn, Bha ceò sa bheinn, is uisge frasach
’s thachair orms’ a’ ghruagach thlachdmhor.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò
Bheir mi dhut fìon, Bheir mi dhut fìon, ‘S gach nì a b’ ait leat,
Ach nach èirinn leat sa mhadainn,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
’Nighean nan gamhna, ’Nighean nan gamhna, Bha mi ma’ riut,
Anns a’ chrò is càch nan cadal
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
An daoidh gheal donn, An daoidh gheal donn, Rug i mac dhomh.
Ged is fuar a rinn i altram,
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
[instrumental]

Bha laogh mo laoidh, Bha laogh mo laoidh, ri taobh cnocan
gun teine, gun sgàth, gun fhasgadh.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
A Mhòr a ghaoil, A Mhòr, a ghaoil, Till ri d’ mhacan,
’S bheir mi goidean breagha breac dhut.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Traduzione inglese *
I arose early
I arose early –
would that I hadn’t.
I was distressed by what sent me out (1).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
There was mist on the hill
There was mist on the hill
and showers of rain
and I came across a pleasant maiden
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
I’ll give you wine
I’ll give you wine
and all that will please you
but I won’t arise with you in the morning (2).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Girl of the calves (3)
Girl of the calves
I was with you in the cattle-fold (4)
and the rest were asleep.
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The fine brown wicked one (5)
The fine brown wicked one
bore me a son
although coldly did she nurse him
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
The calf (6) of my song
The calf of my song
was beside a hillock
without fire, protection or shelter (7).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Mòr, my love
Mòr, my love, return to your little son
and I’ll give you a beautiful speckled withes (8).
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Mi sono alzato presto,
mi sono alzato presto
non l’avrei fatto,
ma fu l’angoscia che mi mandò fuori
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
C’era nebbia sulla collina,
nebbia sulla collina
e piovigginava
e mi sono imbattuto in una graziosa fanciulla
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Ti darò del vino
ti darò del vino
e ogni cosa che vorrai
ma non mi alzerò con te al mattino
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
bella manza
bella manza
ero insieme a te al pascolo
mentre gli altri dormivano
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
la bella moretta malvagia
la bella moretta malvagia
che mi ha dato un figlio
anche se lo ha allevato con freddezza
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
il bimbo della mia canzone
il bimbo della mia canzone
era accanto a una collinetta,
senza fuoco, protezione o riparo
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
Morag amore mio
Morag amore mio, ritorna dal tuo piccino
e ti darò una bella ghirlanda variopinta
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.

NOTE
si veda anche la traduzione qui
1)  il kelpie, soffrendo di solitudine, esce dal lago di mattina presto e prende forma umana
2) il mutaforma promette cibo e agiatezze alla fanciulla per convincerlo a seguirlo, però l’avvisa, è una creatura notturna e non si sveglierà con lei al mattino!
3) gamhna= cattle between 1 year and 2 years traduce Tom Thomson stitks; in italiano= giovenca, la mucca che non ha ancora partorito, il verso oltre a qualificare il lavoro della fanciulla (mandriana) vuole essere anche un complimento, per dirla in italiano “bella manza” come donna procace, dalle forme abbondanti e seducenti
4) il kelpie ricorda l’incontro notturno quando i due hanno fatto sesso (e ovviamente nove mesi dopo è nato il loro figlioletto)
5) ecco che dopo i bei ricordi del passato arriva il presente, la donna ha scoperto la vera natura del compagno e ha voluto meno bene al bambino generato con lui
6) proseguendo nel paragone il kelpie chiama “vitellino” il suo bambino, un termine vezzeggiativo per small child
7) Morag nel fuggire ha abbandonato il bambino sotto una balma al freddo e senza protezione. Si descrive una tipica “esposizione” dei bambini delle fate. Una pratica di “controllo delle nascite” diffusa nelle campagne d’Europa, era l’abbandono dei neonati  nel bosco (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi, che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. L’usanza di “esporre” il neonato era connessa con la convinzione che  fosse stato “scambiato” ovvero rapito dalle fate e sostituito con un changeling, un mutaforma il quale per un po’ assomiglia al bambino umano, ma alla fine riprende sempre il suo vero aspetto.
8) breagha breac dhut. Tom Thomson traduce= speckled band (of withy). Ho cercato sul dizionario: si tratta di una corona fatta intrecciando i rami di salice; in italiano = coroncina di vimini, mi richiama le coroncine celtiche di fiori e foglie

Margaret Stewart & Allan MacDonald la registrano con il titolo di “Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge” nel 2001(in Colla Mo Rùn) dalla collezione di Frances Tolmie (‘Cumha an EichUisge’ vol I)

I
O hó bà a leinibh hó, O hó bà a leinibh hà
Bà a leinibh hó bha hó, Hó bà a leinibh hao i hà
(chorus)
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
‘S luath dha d’ chois thu, hó bha hó
‘S mór nad each thu, hao i hà
II
O hó m’eudail a mac hó
O hó m’eachan sgèimheach hà
‘S fhad ‘n ‘n bhail’ thu, hò bha hò
Nìtear d’iarraidh, hao i hà
III=I
IV=II
Traduzione inglese *
I and III
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Sleep my child, Sleep my child
Chorus
Hì hó, hó bha hó, Hì hó, hao i hà
Fast of foot you are
Great as a horse you are
II
My darling son
Oh my lovely little horse
You are far from the township
You will be sought after (1)
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Dormi bambino mio
Dormi bambino mio
Coro
Hill ò bha hò, Hill ò bha hò.
piè veloce
come un grande cavallo sei tu
II
Caro figlio mio
mio bel cavallino
sei lontano dalla cittadina
sarai il più rinomato

NOTE
1) Il kelpie canta la ninna-nanna al figlioletto abbandonato dalla madre umana e lo conforta dicendogli che da grande sarà un ruba-cuori

Con il titolo di ‘A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan la stessa storia è presente negli archivi di Tobar an Dualchais, dalla voce di tre testimoni dell’isola di Skye
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99707/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99703/1
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/99714/1

Una storia analoga è raccontata nell’isola di Benbecula con il titolo di Bheirinn Dhut Iasg, Bheirinn Dhut Iasg vedi


Caera
in Suantraighe, A Collection of Celtic Lullabies 2006 ne riporta un altro frammento con il titolo di “The Skye Water Kelpie’s lullaby” (vedasi la versione di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser più sotto)

GAELICO SCOZZESE
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Till gu d’mhacan is gheabh thu’m bradan breac o’n loch.
A Mhór a shògh! Tha’n oiche nochd
Gu fliuch frasach aig mo mhacsa ri sgath chnocain.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Gun teine, gun tuar, gun fhasgadh, is tu sìor chòineadh.
A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh!
Mo sheana-chab liath ri do bheul beag baoth is mi seinn phort dhuit am Beinn Frochdaidh.
 

Traduzione inglese *
Mór (1), my love! Mór, my treasure!
Come back to your little son
and you will get a speckled trout from the lake.
Mór, my darling!
Tonight the night
Is wetly showering my son
on the shelter of a knoll.
Mór, my love! Mór, my treasure!
Lacking fire, lacking food, lacking shelter,
and you continually lamenting (2).
Mór, my love! Mór, my darling!
My gray, old, toothless mouth
to your silly little mouth,
and me singing  tunes by Ben Frochkie. (3)
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara,
ritorna dal tuo piccolo bambino
e avrai una trota maculata dal lago!
Morag mia cara,
questa notte è umida
e piovosa per mio figlio
in una balma della collinetta,
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
Lasciato senza fuoco, senza cibo e rifugio,
ti lamenti senza sosta.
Morag amore mio, Morag mia cara!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio sdentato
alla tua sciocca bocca,
e io che canto ninnananne sul Monte Frochkie

NOTE
1) Mhórag o Mór è il nome della fanciulla amata dal kelpie è anche scritto A Mhór a ghaoil! A Mhór a shògh (Mhor mia, amore, mia gioia)
2) è il pianto incessante del bambino che ha freddo e fame, abbandonato dalla mamma umana. Anche se non esplicitato presumo che la madre abbia “esposto” il figlio, cioè l’abbia abbandonato all’aperto (senza cibo e al freddo) affinchè se ne prendessero cura le fate o il kelpie; la pratica era diffusa un tempo sia nei confronti degli illegittimi che dei neonati con evidenti deformazioni fisiche o dall’aspetto malato. vedi
3) montagna tra Gesto e Portree sull’isola di Skye

Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby

Con il titolo di “Cronan na Eich-mhara”, lo stesso frammento cantato da Caera è riportato anche nel libro di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser e Kenneth MacLeod “Songs of the Hebrides” 1909 (pag 94)

ASCOLTA la versione classica nell’arrangiamento di Marjory Kennedy-Fraser

trasposizione inglese Kenneth MacLeod
I
Avore, my love, my joy
To thy baby come
And troutlings you’ll get out of the loch
Avore, my heart, the night is dark,
wet and dreary.
Here’s your bairnie neath the rock
II
Avore, my love, my joy,
wanting fire here,
wanting shelter, wanting comfort
our babe is crying by the loch
III
Avore, my heart, my bridet
My gray old mouth
touching thy sweet lips,
and me singing Old songs to thee,
by Ben Frochkie (1)
NOTE
1) between Gesto and Portree in Skye
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Amore mio, mia gioia
vieni dal tuo bimbo,
e le trote guizzeranno dal lago in abbondanza
Cuore mio, la notte è buia,
umida e piovosa.
Ecco il tuo bambino nella balma
II
Suvvia, amore mio, mia gioia,
c’è bisogno di fuoco qui,
bisogno di riparo e conforto
il nostro bambino sta piangendo accanto al  lago.
III
Sposa mia, cuore mio!
La mia bocca grigia da vecchio
che bacia le tue dolci labbra
e io che canto vecchie canzoni per te
sul Monte Frochkie
Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Nøkken_som_hvit_hestARCHIVIO CANTI
Skye Water Kelpie’s Lullaby
Dh’èirich mi moch, b’ fheàrr nach do dh’èirich
Òran Tàlaidh An Eich-Uisge
A Mhór, a Mhór, till ri d’ mhacan
Cronan na Eich-mhara
Song of the Kelpie
Up, ride with the kelpie

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4374 http://mudcat.org/detail_pf.cfm?messages__Message_ID=48242 http://www.kidssongsmp3.twinkletrax.com/kids-song.php?c=C02T12&kids-song=O,%20Can%20Ye%20Sew%20Cushions http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/stewart/orantalaidh.htm
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stromkarlen_1884.jpg