Follow me up to Carlow

Leggi in italiano

The text of “Follow me up to Carlow” was written in the nineteenth century by the Irish poet Patrick Joseph McCall (1861 – 1919) and published in 1899 in the “Erinn Songs” with the title “Marching Song of Feagh MacHugh”.
Referring to the Fiach McHugh O’Byrne clan chief, the song is full of characters and events that span a period of 20 years from 1572 to 1592.

McCall’s intent is to light the minds of the nationalists of his time with even too detailed historical references on a distant epoch, full of fierce opposition to English domination. 16th century Ireland was only partly under English control (the Pale around Dublin) and the power of the clans was still very strong. They were however clans of local importance who changed their covenants according to convenience by fighting each other, against or together with the British. In the Tudor era Ireland was considered a frontier land, still inhabited by exotic barbarians.
front1

FIACH MCHUGH O’BYRNE

The land of the O’Byrne clan was in a strategic position in the county of Wicklow and in particular between the mountains barricaded in strongholds and control posts from which rapid and lethal raids started in the Pale. The clan managed to survive through raids of cattle, rivalries and alliances with the other clans and acts of submission to the British crown, until Fiach assumed the command and took a close opposition to the British government with the open rebellion of 1580 that broke out throughout the Leinster . In the same period the rebellion was reignited also in the South of Munster (known as the second rebellion of Desmond)

The new Lieutenant Arthur Gray baron of Wilton that was sent to quell the rebellion with a large contingent, certainly gave no proof of intelligence: totally unprepared to face the guerrilla tactics, he decided to draw out the O’Byrne clan, marching in the heart of the county of Wicklow, the mountains! Fiach had retired to Ballinacor, in the Glenmalure valley, (the land of the Ranelaghs), and managed to ambush Gray, forcing him to a disastrous retreat to the Pale.

glenmalure

Follow me up to Carlow

The melody was taken from McCall himself by “The Firebrand of the Mountains,” a march from the O’Byrne clan heard in 1887 during a musical evening in Wexford County. It is not clear, however, if this historical memory was a reconstruction in retrospect to give a touch of color! It is very similar to the jig “Sweets of May” (first two parts) and also it is a dance codified by the Gaelic League.

“Follow me up to Carlow” (also sung as “Follow me down to Carlow”) was taken over by Christy Moore in the 1960s and re-proposed and popularized with the Irish group Planxty; recently he is played by many celtic-rock bands or “barbarian” formations with bagpipes and drums.

Planxty

Fine Crowd

The High Kings live

FOLLOW ME UP TO CARLOW
I
Lift Mac Cahir Óg(1) your face,
broodin’ o’er the old disgrace
That Black Fitzwilliam(2) stormed your place,
and drove you to the Fern(3)
Gray(4) said victory was sure,
soon the firebrand(5) he’d secure
Until he met at Glenmalure(6)
with Fiach McHugh O’Byrne
CHORUS
Curse and swear, Lord Kildare(7),
Fiach(8) will do what Fiach will dare
Now Fitzwilliam have a care,
fallen is your star low(9)
Up with halberd, out with sword,
on we go for, by the Lord
Fiach McHugh has given the word
“Follow me up to Carlow!”(10)
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies

NOTES
1) Brian MacCahir Cavanagh married Elinor sister of Feagh MacHugh. In 1572 Fiach and Brian were implicated in the murder of a landowner related to Sir Nicholas White Seneschal (military governor) of the Queen at Wexford.
2) William Fitzwilliam “Lord Deputy” of Ireland, the representative of the English Crown who left office in 1575
3) In 1572 Brian MacCahir and his family were deprived of their properties donated to supporters of the British crown
4) Arthur Gray de Wilton became in 1580 new Lieutenant of Ireland
5) appellation with which he was called Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
6) Glenmalure Valley: valley in the Wicklow mountains about twenty kilometers east of the town of Wicklow, where the battle of 1580 occurred that saw the defeat of the English: the Irish clans ambushed the English army commanded by Arthur Wilton Gray made up of 3000 men
7) In 1594 the sons of Feach attacked and burned the house of Pierce Fitzgerald sheriff of Kildare, as a result Feach was proclaimed a traitor and he become a wanted crimunal
8) Feach in Irish means Raven
9) William Fitzwilliam returned to Ireland in 1588 once again with the title of Lieutenant, but in 1592 he was accused of corruption
10) Carlow is both a city and a county: the town was chosen more to rhyme than to recall a battle that actually took place: it is more generally an exhortation to take up arms against the British. Undoubtedly, the song made her famous.
11) Glen Imael, Tassagart and Clonmore are strongholds in Wicklow County
12) English Pale are the counties around Dublin controlled by the British. The phrase “Beyond the Pale” meant a dangerous place
13) Rory the young son of Rory O’More, brother of Feagh MacHugh, killed in 1578
14) Sir Nicholas White Seneschal of Wexford fell seriously ill in the early 1590s, shortly thereafter fell into disgrace with the Queen and was executed.
15) in the original version the character referred to is Sir Ralph Lane but is more commonly replaced by Arthur Gray who had left the country in 1582
16) Elizabeth I. Actually it was Feach’s head to be sent to the queen!
The new viceroy Sir William Russell managed to capture Fiach McHugh O’Byrne in May 1597, Feach’s head remained impaled on the gates of Dublin Castle.

LINKS
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52454&page=2
http://thesession.org/tunes/1583
http://thesession.org/tunes/10645
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/follow-me-up-to-carlow
http://www.clannobyrne.com/glenmalure.html
http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/irelands-wars-the-battle-of-glenmalure/
http://www.blogofmanly.com/2012/09/17/heroes-feach-mchugh-obyrne/
http://www.doyle.com.au/chiefs.html

WHERE THE BLARNEY ROSES GROW

b-384553-antique_roses_posters (2)“Le rose di Blarney” è una canzone tradizionale irlandese che parla di una bella ragazza che ha sedotto il protagonista lasciandolo con il cuore infranto e senza soldi!
La canzone è tipica del music hall ed è stata attribuita a A. Melville su un’aria tradizionale (Folksongs & Ballads Popular in Ireland, Volume 4″) forse tale Alexander Melville di Glasgow emigrato in America e morto nel 1929; egli scrisse molte canzoni con e per lo scozzese Henry “Harry” Lauder (1870-1950), famoso cantante e attore che calcò le scene del vaudeville americano e del music hall inglese.
La prima registrazione risale al 1926 ed è interpretata dal tenore irlandese George O’Brien. Nella “Dahr” Discography of American Historical Recordings troviamo accreditati Alex Melville (lyricist) e D. Frame Flint (arranger) così la canzone di certo era tipica dei repertori dei musical halls ed è diventata ben presto per il suo tema semi-serio e la sua aria scanzonata, una canzone tradizionale irlandese da cantare nei pubs.

ASCOLTA The Willoughby Brothers in ‘The Promise’ 2011 (i sei fratelli della contea Wicklow in un video molto patinato pieno di testosterone oserei dire sciccoso!)

ASCOLTA Noel McLoughin in “Noel Mcloughlin: Ireland” 2008

ASCOLTA Fine Crowd in “Newfoundland drinking songs” 2005


CHORUS
Can anybody tell me where the blarney roses(1) grow?
Some say down in Limerick Town and more say in Mayo;
Somewhere in the Emerald Isle of this I’d like to know,
Can anybody tell me where the blarney roses grow?
I
‘Twas over in old Ireland near the town of Cushendall(2),
One morn I met a damsel there, the fairest of them all;
‘Twas by me own affections and me money she did go,
She told me she belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
II
Her cheeks were like the roses and her hair a raven hue,
Before that she had done with me, she had me raving, too;
She left me sorely stranded, not a coin she left, you know,
And she told me she belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
III
They’ve roses in Killarney and the same in County Clare,
But ‘pon my word those roses, boys, you can’t see anywhere;
She blarney’d(3) me and, by the powers, she left me broke, you know,
Did this damsel that belonged to where the blarney roses grow.
IV
A-cushla gra mo chroi(4), me boys, she wants to leave with I,
If you belong to Ireland then yourself belongs to me;
Her Donegal come-all-ye brogue, it captured me, you know,
Bad luck to her, good luck(5) to where the blarney roses grow.
Traduzione di Cattia Salto
CORO
Qualcuno può dirmi dove crescono le rose Blarney(1)?
Alcuni dicono giù nella città di Limerick e altri dicono a Mayo;
da qualche parte nell’Isola di Smeraldo, e questo che vorrei sapere,
qualcuno può dirmi dove crescono le rose Blarney?
I
Fu nella vecchia Irlanda, vicino alla città di Cushendall(2)
che una mattina incontrai una donzella, la più bella del reame;
si è presa il mio affetto e i miei soldi,
e mi ha detto che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
II
Le sue guance erano come le rose e i capelli erano corvini,
prima che avesse finito con me, mi aveva mandato fuori di testa;
e dolorosamente mi ha piantato in asso, non una moneta mi ha lasciato, sai, e mi ha detto che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
III
Ci sono rose a Killarney e anche nella Contea di Clare,
ma in fede mia quelle rose, ragazzi, non si trovano da tutte le parti;
mi ha intontito con le chiacchiere(3) e per Dio, lei mi ha lasciato al verde, sai
(così) ha fatto questa fanciulla che era di dove le rose Blarney crescono
IV
A-chusla gra mo Chroi(4), ragazzi, lei vuole lasciarmi,
se fai parte dell’Irlanda, allora tu mi appartieni;
il suo accento del Donegal mi ha catturato, sai,
sfortuna per lei, buona sorte(5) al luogo in cui le rose Blarney crescono

NOTE
1) Non esiste una varietà botanica di rose detta Blarney, la frase richiama un’altrettanto famosa canzone del circo “The garden where the praties grow” (vedi)
2) Cushendall è un villaggio nella contea di Antrim (Irlanda del Nord) in una baia ai piedi delle Glens of Antrim: sulla Antrim Coast Road il tratto che va da Cushendun a Torr Head è uno dei più suggestivi panorami della costa irlandese (muretti a secco, ginestre, greggi di pecore e ovviamente scogliere) nelle giornate limpide si riesce a vedere la costa scozzeze che dista solo 20 km. Le valli sono ben nove e Cushendall si trova tra Glenballyemon (rinomata per le sue cascate), Glenaan (dove si trova la tomba di Ossian un sito megalitico leggendario) e Glencorp (il nome significa valle dei morti ma i suoi paesaggi sono meravigliosi, in genere si consiglia di seguire la Ballybrack che passa lungo le montagne di Trostan e Lurig poi sulla collina delle fate di Tieverah e infine scendendo ripidamente a Cushendall). Ma ciascuna delle nove valli ha un fascino particolare e vanta le sue tradizioni e leggende.
3) Blarney è una cittadina irlandese nella contea di Cork, famosa per il suo castello o meglio per una magica pietra nelle mura del castello che la leggenda vuole doni l’eloquenza a chi la baci, così il verbo blarney indica una parlantina sciolta, ma anche ingannevole
4) la frase  significa”My darling, love of my heart” è tipica della canzone del music hall infarcire le strofe con almeno una citazione in gaelico
5) in altre versioni l’espressione è più cruda!

IN VIAGGIO
Cushendall è situata in una baia sabbiosa ai piedi di tre delle nove Glens of Antrim, ovvero Glenballyemon, Glenaan e Glencorp, e per questo motivo è conosciuta come “The Capital of the Glens”. Si tratta di un grazioso villaggio formato da una serie di casette colorate raggruppate su una splendida spiaggia continua

FONTI
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/03/blarney.htm
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5387
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13513
http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/translation/topic97551.html
http://adp.library.ucsb.edu/index.php/matrix/detail/800011039/BVE-36792-The_blarney_roses
http://www.irlandando.it/cosa-vedere/nord/contea-di-antrim/glens-of-antrim/
http://www.minube.it/posto-preferito/glenariff-forest-park-a117111

Follow me up to Carlow

Read the post in English

Il testo di “Follow me up to Carlow” è stato scritto nell’Ottocento dal poeta irlandese Patrick Joseph McCall (1861 – 1919) e pubblicato nel 1899 nelle “Erinn Songs” con il titolo “Marching Song of Feagh MacHugh“.
Per quanto si faccia riferimento al capo clan Fiach McHugh O’Byrne la canzone è ricca di personaggi e vicende che abbracciano un periodo di 20 anni dal 1572 al 1592.

L’intento di McCall è quello di accendere gli animi dei nazionalisti del suo tempo con riferimenti storici anche fin troppo dettagliati su un epoca lontana, ricca di fiere opposizioni al dominio inglese. L’Irlanda del XVI secolo era solo in parte sotto il controllo inglese (il cosiddetto Pale intorno a Dublino ) e il potere dei clan era ancora molto forte. Erano tuttavia clan di importanza locale che cambiavano le alleanze a seconda della convenienza combattendo tra di loro, contro o insieme gli inglesi. In epoca Tudor l’Irlanda era considerata una terra di frontiera, abitata ancora da esotici barbari.
front1

FIACH MCHUGH O’BYRNE

La terra del clan O’Byrne si trovava in una posizione strategica nella contea di Wicklow e in particolare tra le montagne asserragliata in roccaforti e postazioni di controllo dalle quali partivano rapide e letali incursioni nel Pale. Il clan riuscì a barcamenarsi tra razzie di bestiame, rivalità e alleanze con gli altri clan e atti di sottomissione alla corona britannica finchè Fiach assunse il comando e intraprese una serrata opposizione al governo inglese sfociato nell’aperta ribellione del 1580 che divampò in tutto il Leinster. Nello stesso periodo si era riaccesa la ribellione anche nel Sud del Munster (nota come la seconda ribellione del Desmond)

Il nuovo Luogotente Arthur Grey barone di Wilton mandato a sedare la ribellione con un grosso contingente, non diede certo prova di intelligenza: totalmente impreparato a fronteggiare le tattiche di guerriglia dei clan decise di snidare gli O’Byrne marciando nel cuore della contea di Wicklow, le montagne! Fiach si era ritirato a Ballinacor, nella valle di Glenmalure, (la terra dei Ranelagh) e riuscì a tendere un imboscata all’incauto Grey costringendolo a una disastrosa ritirata verso il Pale.

glenmalure

Follow me up to Carlow

La melodia è stata tratta dallo stesso McCall da “The Firebrand of the Mountains”, una marcia del clan O’Byrne sentita nel 1887 durante una serata musicale nella contea di Wexford. Non è ben chiaro tuttavia se tale memoria storica sia stata una ricostruzione a posteriori per dare un tocco di colore! E’ molto simile alla jig “Sweets of May” (prime due parti) anche danza codificata dalla Gaelic League.

“Follow me up to Carlow” (cantato anche come “Follow me down to Carlow“) è stato ripreso da Christy Moore negli anni 60 e riproposto e reso popolare con il gruppo irlandese Planxty; recentemente è interpretato da molte band celtic-rock o dalle formazioni “barbare” con cornamuse e tamburi.

Planxty

Fine Crowd

The High Kings live


I
Lift Mac Cahir Óg(1) your face,
broodin’ o’er the old disgrace
That Black Fitzwilliam(2) stormed your place,
and drove you to the Fern(3)
Gray(4) said victory was sure,
soon the firebrand(5) he’d secure
Until he met at Glenmalure(6)
with Fiach McHugh O’Byrne
CHORUS
Curse and swear, Lord Kildare(7),
Fiach(8) will do what Fiach will dare
Now Fitzwilliam have a care,
fallen is your star low(9)
Up with halberd, out with sword,
on we go for, by the Lord
Fiach McHugh has given the word
“Follow me up to Carlow!”(10)
II
See the swords at Glen Imaal (11),
flashin’ o’er the English Pale(12)
See all the children of the Gael,
beneath O’Byrne’s banner
Rooster of a fighting stock,
would you let a Saxon cock
Crow out upon an Irish Rock,
fly up and teach him manners.
III
From Tassagart (11) to Clonmore (11),
flows a stream of Saxon gore
How great is Rory Óg O’More(13)
at sending loons to Hades
White(14) is sick, Gray(15) is fled,
now for Black Fitzwilliam’s head
We’ll send it over, dripping red,
to Liza(16) and her ladies<
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Alza il viso giovane Mac Cahir e smetti di rimuginare sulla passata disgrazia,
Black Fitzwilliam ha  distrutto la tua casa
e ti ha mandato per la macchia.
Gray diceva che la vittoria era certa
e presto avrebbe tenuto a bada il “sobillatore”, finchè non s’incontrò a Glenmalure con Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
RITORNELLO: Giuri e maledici Lord Kildare, Fiach farà quello che Fiach oserà
ora Fitzwilliam devi preoccuparti
è caduta in basso la tua stella!
Su con l’alabarda, fuori la spada,
andiamo dal Lord
Fiach McHugh ha detto
“Seguitemi a Carlow”
II
Guarda le spade a Glen Imaal
lampeggiare sull’ English Pale
Guarda i figli dei Celti
sotto la bandiera di O’Byrne
Gallo di un lignaggio guerriero
vuoi che il gallo sassone
voli come un corvo sull’Irlanda?
Vola alto e insegnagli le buone maniere
III
Da Tassagart a Clonmore
scorre un fiume di sangue sassone,
che grande è il giovane Rory O’More
a mandare gli stupidi nell’Ade;
White è malato, Gray è fuggito
allora per il cranio di Black FitzWilliam,
glielo manderemo tutto inzuppato di rosso, alla Regina Lisa e alle sue damigelle

NOTE
1) Brian MacCahir Cavanagh ha sposato Elinor sorella di Feagh MacHugh. Nel 1572 Fiach e Brian sono stati implicati nell’omicidio di un proprietario terriero imparentato con Sir Nicholas White siniscalco (governatore militare) della Regina a Wexford.
2) William Fitzwilliam “Lord Deputy” d’Irlanda ovvero il rappresentante della Corona Inglese che lasciò la carica nel 1575
3) Nel 1572 Brian MacCahir e la sua famiglia sono stati privati delle loro proprietà donate ai sostenitori della corona britannica
4) Arthur Grey de Wilton diventato nel 1580 nuovo Luogotenente d’Irlanda
5) appellativo con cui veniva chiamato Feach MacHugh O’Byrne
6) Glenmalure Valley: vallata tra i monti Wicklow a una ventina di kilometri a est della cittè di Wicklow, in cui avvenne la battaglia del 1580 che vide la sconfitta degli Inglesi: i clan irlandesi tesero un’imboscata all’esercito inglese comandato da Arthur Grey di Wilton composta da ben 3000 uomini
7) Nel 1594 i figli di Feach hanno attaccato e dato alle fiamme la casa di Pierce Fitzgerald sceriffo di Kildare, come conseguenza Feach venne proclamato traditore e fu messa una taglia sulla sua testa.
8) Feach che in irlandese significa Corvo
9) William Fitzwilliam ritornò in Irlanda nel 1588 ancora una volta con il titolo di Luogotenente, ma nel 1592 venne accusato di corruzione
10) Carlow è sia una città che una contea: la cittadina è stata scelta più per fare rima che per richiamare una battaglia effettivamente svoltasi: è in senso più generale un’esortazione a prendere le armi contro gli inglesi. Indubbiamente la canzone l’ha resa famosa.
11) Glen Imael, Tassagart e Clonmore sono roccaforti nella contea di Wicklow
12) English Pale sono le contee intorno a Dublino controllate dagli inglesi. La frase “Beyond the Pale” stava a indicare un luogo pericoloso
13) Rory il giovane figlio di Rory O’More cognato di Feagh MacHugh ucciso nel 1578
14) Sir Nicholas White siniscalco di Wexford si ammalò gravemente nei primi anni del 1590, poco dopo cadde in disgrazia presso la regina e venne giustiziato.
15) nella versione originale il personaggio a cui si fa riferimento è Sir Ralph Lane ma più comunemente viene sostituito da Arthur Grey che aveva lasciato il paese nel 1582
16) Elisabetta I. In realtà fu la testa mozza di Feach a essere mandata alla regina
Il nuovo vicerè Sir William Russell riuscì a catturare Fiach McHugh O’Byrne nel maggio del 1597, la testa di Feach rimase impalata sui cancelli del castello di Dublino.

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=52454&page=2
http://thesession.org/tunes/1583
http://thesession.org/tunes/10645
http://www.irishmusicdaily.com/follow-me-up-to-carlow
http://www.clannobyrne.com/glenmalure.html
http://neverfeltbetter.wordpress.com/2012/09/25/irelands-wars-the-battle-of-glenmalure/
http://www.blogofmanly.com/2012/09/17/heroes-feach-mchugh-obyrne/
http://www.doyle.com.au/chiefs.html