Archivi tag: Fermanagh

Lark in the Morning

Leggi in italiano

The irish song “The Lark in the Morning” is mainly found in the county of Fermanagh (Northern Ireland): the image is rural, portrayed by an idyllic vision of healthy and simple country life; a young farmer who plows the fields to prepare them for spring sowing, is the paradigm of youthful exaltation, its exuberance and joie de vivre, is compared to the lark as it sails flying high in the sky in the morning. Like many songs from Northern Ireland it is equally popular also in Scotland.
The point of view is masculine, with a final toast to the health of all the “plowmen” (or of the horsebacks, a task that in a large farm more generally indicated those who took care of the horses) that they have fun rolling around in the hay with some beautiful girls, and so they demonstrate their virility with the ability to reproduce.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners

Alex Beaton with a lovely Scottish accent

The Quilty (Swedes with an Irish heart)

CHORUS
The lark in the morning, she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy, she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening, with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy, he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing, over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,, she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing, then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home, from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green, and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble, all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”,  this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks, they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice, how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble, all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy as a prince or a king
NOTES
1) The lark is a melodious sparrow that sings from the first days of spring and already at the first light of dawn; it is a terrestrial bird which, however, once safely in flight, rises almost vertically into the sky, launching a cascade of sounds similar to a musical crescendo.
Then, closed the wings, he lets himself fall like a dead body until he touches the ground and immediately rises again, starting to sing again . see more
2) blade= boy, term used in ancient ballads to indicate a skilled swordsman
3) The story’s backgroung is that of the season of haymaking, starting in May, when farmers went to make hay, that is to cut the tall grass, with the scythe, putting it aside as fodder for livestock and courtyard’s animals . While hay cutting was a mostly masculine task, women and children used the rake to collect grass in large piles, which were then loaded onto the cart through the use of pitchforks.. see more

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp from Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, from Paddy Tunney (only I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), the most extensive version comes from the Sussex Copper family, but Lisa further changes some verses.

I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may

 

THE ENGLISH VERSION

This version was collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1904 as heard by Ms. Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, Horsham in Sussex, but already circulated in the nineteenth-century broadsides and then reported in Roy Palmer’s book “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Became into the English folk music circuit in the 60s the song was recorded in 1971 by the English folk rock group Steeleye Span with the voice of Maddy Prior.

The refrain is similar to that of the previous irish version, but here the situation is even more pastoral and almost Shakespearean with the shepherdess and the plowman who are surprised by the morning song of the lark, but with the reversed parts: he who tells her to stay in his arms, because there is still the evening dew, but she who replies that the sun is now shining and even the lark has risen in flight. The name of the peasant is Floro and derives from the Latin Fiore.

Steeleye Span from Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior  from Arthur The King – 2001

I
“Lay still my fond shepherd and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro, it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows where the grass is all cut down.

NOTES
1)plow the field but also plow a complacent girl

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

“Lark in the morning” is a jig mostly performed with banjo or bouzouki or mandolin or guitar, but also with pipes, whistles or flutes, fiddles ..
An anecdote reported by Peter Cooper says that two violinists had challenged one evening to see who was the best, only at dawn when they heard the song of the lark, they agreed that the sweetest music was that of the morning lark. Same story told by the piper Seamus Ennis but with the The Lark’s March tune

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely uilleann pipes with Alan Murray guitar

Peter Browne uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

LINK
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62

L’allodola e il cavallante nel mese di Maggio

Read the post in English

La irish song “The Lark in the Morning”  è diffusa principalmente nella contea di Fermanagh (Irlanda del Nord): l’immagine è agreste, ritratto di una visione idilliaca della sana e semplice vita di campagna; un giovane contadino che ara i campi per prepararli alla semina primaverile, è il paradigma dell’esaltazione giovanile, la sua esuberanza e gioia di vivere, viene paragonata all’allodola mentre s’invola cantando alta nel cielo al mattino. Come molte canzoni del Nord Irlanda è altrettanto popolare anche in Scozia.
Il punto di vista è maschile, con tanto di brindisi finale alla salute di tutti gli “aratori” (o dei cavallanti, mansione che in una grande fattoria indicava più genericamente coloro che si prendevano cura dei cavalli) che se la spassano rotolandosi nel fieno con le belle ragazze, e così dimostrano la loro virilità con la capacità di procreare.

Ploughman_Wheelwright
The Plougman – Rowland Wheelwright (1870-1955)

The Dubliners dalla melodia gioiosa e allegra in sintonia con il testo

Alex Beaton (con un adorrrabile accento scozzese)

ASCOLTA The Quilty (svedesi con il cuore irlandese!)


CHORUS
The lark in the morning
she rises off her nest(1)
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her breast
And like the jolly ploughboy
she whistles and she sings
She goes home in the evening
with the dew all on her wings
I
Oh, Roger the ploughboy
he is a dashing blade (2)
He goes whistling and singing
over yonder leafy shade
He met with pretty Susan,
she’s handsome I declare
She is far more enticing
then the birds all in the air
II
One evening coming home
from the rakes of the town
The meadows been all green
and the grass had been cut down
As I should chance to tumble
all in the new-mown hay (3)
“Oh, it’s kiss me now or never love”, this bonnie lass did say
III
When twenty long weeks
they were over and were past
Her mommy chanced to notice
how she thickened round the waist
“It was the handsome ploughboy,
-the maiden she did say-
For he caused for to tumble
all in the new-mown hay”
IV
Here’s a health to y’all ploughboys wherever you may be
That likes to have a bonnie lass
a sitting on his knee
With a jug of good strong porter you’ll whistle and you’ll sing
For a ploughboy is as happy
as a prince or a king
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
Ritornello
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore
lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera
con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
I
O Roger l’aratore
è un ragazzo affascinante
fischiettando e cantando si avvicina laggiù all’ombra delle fronde
e s’incontra con la dolce Susan,
che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente
di tutti gli uccelli del cielo
II
Una sera tornando a casa
dalle taverne della città
essendo tutti i prati verdi
e l’erba essendo stata appena falciata
ebbi l’occasione di rotolare
in tutto il fieno appena tagliato
“Oh baciami ora o mai più amore”,
disse questa bella fanciulla.
III
Quando venti lunghe settimane
erano finite e passate
sua madre iniziò a notare
come lei si arrotondasse in vita
“E’ stato il bell’aratore”,
le disse la ragazza
“che ci fece cadere in tutto il fieno appena falciato.”
IV
Ecco alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che amano avere una graziosa fanciulla
seduta sulle ginocchia
con un boccale di buona e forte birra scura, fischiettate e cantate
perché un aratore è felice
proprio come un principe o un re

NOTE
1) L’allodola è un passerotto dal canto melodioso che risuona nell’aria fin dai primi giorni della primavera e già alle prime luci dell’alba; è un uccello terricolo che però una volta sicuro nel volo si innalza quasi verticalmente nell’alto del cielo lanciando una cascata di suoni simili a un crescendo musicale.
Poi, chiuse le ali, si lascia cadere come corpo morto fino a sfiorare la terra e subito risorge ricominciando a cantare. continua
2) blade= boy, termine usato nelle antiche ballate per indicare un abile spadaccino
3) il contasto dell’amoreggiamento è quello della stagione della fienagione, a partire da maggio, quando si andava a fare il fieno, cioè a tagliare l’erba alta con la falce, per metterla da parte come foraggio per il bestiame e gli animali da cortile. Mentre il taglio del fieno era un compito per lo più maschile, le donne e i fanciulli utilizzavano il rastrello per raccogliere l’erba in grossi mucchi, che venivano poi caricati sul carro mediante l’uso dei forconi. continua

George Stubbs – Haymakers 1785 (Wikimedia)

Lisa Knapp in Till April Is Dead ≈ A Garland of May 2017, dalla registrazione di Paddy Tunney di cui però abbiamo solo due strofe (I, II) (Paddy Tunney The Lark in the Morning 1995  ♪), la versione più estesa viene dalla famiglia Copper del Sussex, ma Lisa modifica ulteriormente alcuni versi.

Trascrizione di Cattia Salto
I
The lark in the morning she rises off her nest
And goes whistling and singing, with the dew all on her breast
Like a jolly ploughboy she whistles and she sings
she comes home in the evening with the dew all on her wings
II
Roger the ploughboy he is a bonny blade.
He goes whistling and singing down by yon green glade.
He met with dark-eyed Susan, she’s handsome I declare,
she’s far more enticing than the birds on the air.
III
This eve he was coming home, from the rakes in town
with meadows been all green and the grass just cut down
she is chanced to tumble all in the new-mown hay
“It’s loving me now or never”, this bonnie lass did say
IV
So good luck to the ploughboys wherever they may be,
They will take a sweet maiden to sit along their knee,
Of all the gay callings
There’s no life like the ploughboy in the merry month of may
(traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
L’allodola al mattino si alza dal nido
e fischietta e canta,con tutta la rugiada sul petto
e come l’allegro aratore lei fischietta e canta,
ritorna a casa a sera con tutta la rugiada tra le ali
II
Roger l’aratore è un bel ragazzo
va fischiettando e cantando per quella verde radura
e s’incontra con  Susan dagli occhi scuri, che acclamo la bella,
ella è molto più seducente degli uccelli nel cielo
III
Una sera tornando a casa dalle taverne della città
con i prati verdi che erano tutti verdi e l’erba appena tagliata
lei si rotolò  nel  fieno appena falciato
“Amami adesso o mai più”, disse questa bella fanciulla.
IV
Quindi alla salute di tutti gli aratori ovunque voi siate
che prenderanno  una graziosa fanciulla per farla sedere sulle ginocchia
..
non c’è vita migliore di quella dell’aratore nel bel mese di Maggio

 

LA VERSIONE INGLESE

Questa versione invece è stata collezionata da Ralph Vaughan Williams nel 1904 come ascoltata dalla signora Harriet Verrall di Monk’s Gate, Horsham nel Sussex, ma circolava già nei broadsides ottocenteschi e quindi riportata nel libro di Roy Palmer “Folk Songs collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams”. Entrata nel circuito della musica folk inglese negli anni ’60 è stata registrata nel 1971 dal gruppo inglese folk rock Steeleye Span con la voce di Maddy Prior.

Il ritornello è simile a quello della versione precedente, ma qui la situazione è ancora più pastorale e quasi shakespeariana con la pastorella e l’aratore che sono sorpresi dal canto mattutino dell’allodola ma con le parti invertite: lui che dice a lei di restare ancora tra le sue braccia, perché c’è ancora la rugiada della sera, ma lei gli risponde che il sole ormai risplende e anche l’allodola si è alzata in volo. Il nome del contadinello è Floro e deriva dal latino Fiore.

Steeleye Span in Please to See the King – 1971

Maddy Prior nel Cd “Arthur The King” – 2001


I
“Lay still my fond shepherd
and don’t you rise yet
It’s a fine dewy morning and besides, my love, it is wet.”
“Oh let it be wet my love
and ever so cold
I will rise my fond Floro
and away to my fold.
Oh no, my bright Floro,
it is no such thing
It’s a bright sun a-shining
and the lark is on the wing.”
II
Oh the lark in the morning
she rises from her nest
And she mounts in the air
with the dew on her breast
And like the pretty ploughboy
she’ll whistle and sing
And at night she will return
to her own nest again
When the ploughboy has done
all he’s got for to do
He trips down to the meadows
where the grass is all cut down.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
“Giaci ancora mia appassionata pastorella e non alzarti
è una bella mattina fresca ma, amore mio, c’è la rugiada”
“Non è poi così umido, amore mio,
e nemmeno così freddo,
mi alzerò mio amato Fiore
e andrò via con il gregge.
Oh no mio bel Fiore,
non è cosa da niente
c’è il sole luminoso che risplende
e l’allodola è in  volo”
II
L’allodola al mattino
si alza dal nido
e s’innalza in aria
con la rugiada sul petto
e come il bell’aratore
lei fischietterà e canterà
e la sera ritornerà
di nuovo nel suo nido
Quando l’aratore ha fatto
tutto quanto doveva fare (1),
balla nei prati
dove l’erba è tutta falciata.

NOTE
1) frase a doppio senso: arare il campo ma anche arare una fanciulla compiacente

LARK IN THE MORNING JIG

La melodia “Lark in the morning” è una jig per lo più eseguita con il banjo o il bouzouki o il mandolino o la chitarra, ma anche con le pipes, i whistles o i flutes, i fiddles..
Un aneddoto riportato da Peter Cooper racconta che due violinisti si erano sfidati una sera per vedere chi fosse il migliore, solo all’alba nel sentire il canto dell’allodola, convennero che la musica più dolce fosse quella dell’allodola del mattino. Stessa storiella raccontata dal piper Seamus Ennis ma con la melodia The Lark’s March

Moving Hearts The Lark in the Morning (Trad. Arr. Spillane, Lunny, O’Neill)

Cillian Vallely alla uilleann pipes accompagnato alla chitarra da Alan Murray

Peter Browne alla uilleann pipes in Lark’s march

FONTI
https://www.mustrad.org.uk/songbook/larkmorn.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/steeleye.span/songs/thelarkinthemorning.html
http://thesession.org/tunes/62