Archivi tag: Felix White

Joan to the Maypole

Leggi in italiano

The song “John (Joan) to the Maypole” dates back at least to 1600, we know several text versions with the same title but also with different titles, (to “May-day Country Mirth”, “The Young Lads and Lasses”, ” Innocent Recreation “,” The Disappointment “) the first printed version dates back to 1630 when the melody is attributed to Felix White, and we find it in the collection” The Pills to Purge Melancholy “by Thomas D’Urfey c. 1720.

17th-century woodblock from the ballad sheet ‘The May Day Country Mirth’

The song describes a typical May Day on the lawn: couples dance around the May Pole to contend for the coveted award, the May garland. The winning couple will become King and Queen of May.
To organize May Day feast we need just a green, that is an open space outside the village, a well planted pole in the middle of the lawn, decorated with flower garlands, some “summer houses” where to sit in the shade and refresh with drinks.
In the painting by Charles Robert Leslie we see a scene celebrating the May with Queen Elizabeth depicted on the right in the foreground while being entertained by a jester. On the expanse of the second floor stands the May pole decorated with green garlands; around the pole the dances are taking place and the characters dressed by Robin Hood, Lady Marian, Fra Tack, but also a seahorse, a dragon and a buffoon (the classic characters of mummers and Morris) are well distinguishable.

MayDay_Leslie
Charles Robert Leslie – May Day in the reign of Queen Elizabeth

In the Victorian painting by William Powell Frith we find again the same situation described in the late medieval period: in the distance on the left stands out the profile of a church, not by chance: it was in fact the church that financed the May celebrations; with the beer sold, the parish church was maintained or the alms were distributed to the poor.

William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration Oil on canvas 40 x 56 inches (101.6 x 142.3 cm) Private collection
William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration

It is not even so strange that Beltane feast has merged under the control of the Catholic Church, but the Puritans were horrified by all May customs, thus May Pole and related celebrations see moments of obscurantism alternated with moments of tolerance (see more)

The tune is from “Margaret Board Lute Book” (here) the manuscript in the private collection of Robert Spencer, has been dated c1620 up to 1636 (it seems that lady Margaret took lessons from John Dowland).

Toronto Consort  from O Lusty May 1996 
in “The new standard song book”- (J.E.Carpenter) – 1866 with the title: “very popular at the time of Charles I”. A version of nine verses is featured in the broadside titled “The May-Day Country Mirth Or, The Young Lads and Lasses’ Innocent Recreation, Which is to be priz’d before Courtly Pomp and Pastime.” Bodleian collection, Douce Ballads 2 (152a ) and The Roxburghe Ballads: Illustrating the Last Years of the Stuarts Vol. 7, Part 1, edited by J. Woodfall Ebsworth (Hertford: Ballad Society, 1890) (see)

JOAN TO THE MAYPOLE
Chorus
Joan to the Maypole away, let us on,
The time is swift and will be gone;
There go the lasses away to the green,
Where their beauties may be seen
I
Bess, Moll, Kate, Doll,
All the gay lasses
have lads to attend them,
Hodge, Nick, Tom, Dick,
Jolly brave dancers,
and who can mend them?
[Chorus]
II
Did you not see the Lord of the May
Walk along in his rich array?
There goes the lass that is only his,
See how they meet and how they kiss.
Come Will, run Gill,
Or dost thou list to lose thy labour(1);
Kit Crowd scrape loud,
Tickle her, Tom, with a pipe and tabor!(2).
[Chorus]
III
There is not any that shall out-vie
My little pretty Joan and I,
For I’m sure I can dance as well
As Robin, Jenny, Tom, or Nell.
Last year, we were here,
When Ruff Ralph he played us a bourée,
And we, merrily
Thumped it about and gained the glory.
IV
Now, if we hold out
as we do begin,
Joan and I the prize shall win(3);
Nay, if we live till another day (4),
I’ll make thee lady of the May.
Dance round, skip, bound,
Turn and kiss, and then for a greeting.
Now, Joan, we’ve done,
Fare thee well
till the next merry meeting.
[Chorus]

NOTES
1) the exhortation refers to the musicians who are not yet ready with their instruments to kick off the dance.
2) Pipe and tabor or tabor-pipe is the three-hole flute associated with the tambourine, the flute is played with one hand and with the other one it is accompanied by a tambourine  (see more)
3) the May garland at stake
4) it is not clear whether the election dethroned the previous couple immediately or is the title valid for the following year.

second part

LINK
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html
http://www.maymorning.co.uk/426023492
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Joan_to_the_Maypole
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Board.htm

http://cbladey.com/mayjack/maysong.html#JOAN%20TO%20THE%20MAYPOLE

Joan al Palo del Maggio

Read the post in English

Il brano “John (Joan) to the Maypole” risale quantomeno al 1600, si conoscono varie versioni testuali con lo stesso titolo ma anche con titoli diversi, (a “May-day Country Mirth”, “The Young Lads and Lasses”, “Innocent Recreation”, “The Disappointment”)  la prima versione stampata risale al 1630 in cui si attribuisce la melodia a Felix White, e lo ritroviamo nella raccolta “The Pills to Purge Melancholy” di Thomas D’Urfey c. 1720.

Xilografia del XVII secolo tratta dalla ballata “The May Day Country Mirth”

Nella canzone si descrive una tipica Festa del Maggio sul prato: le coppie danzano intorno al Palo del Maggio per contendersi l’ambito premio, la ghirlanda del Maggio. La coppia vincente diventerà Re e Regina del Maggio.
Per organizzare la festa del Maggio basta un green, cioè uno spiazzo all’aperto appena fuori dal paese, un palo ben piantato al centro del prato e decorato con ghirlande fiorite, qualche pergolato o “summer houses” dove sedersi all’ombra e rifocillarsi con bevande fresche.
Nel dipinto di Charles Robert Leslie vediamo proprio una scena celebrativa del Maggio con la Regina Elisabetta raffigurata sulla destra in primo piano nel mentre è intrattenuta da un giullare. Sulla distesa in secondo piano si staglia il palo del maggio impavesato e decorato con ghirlande verdi; attorno al palo si stanno svolgendo le danze e sono ben distinguibili i personaggi vestiti da Robin Hood, Lady Marian, Fra Tack, ma anche un cavalluccio, un drago e un buffone ( i personaggi classici dei mummers e dei Morris).

MayDay_Leslie
Charles Robert Leslie – May Day in the reign of Queen Elizabeth

Nel dipinto vittoriano di William Powell Frith ritroviamo praticamente descritta la stessa situazione tardo-medievale: in lontananza sulla sinistra si staglia il profilo di una chiesa, non a caso: era infatti la chiesa a finanziare il divertimento del Maggio; con la birra venduta si provvedeva al mantenimento della chiesa parrocchiale o si distribuivano le elemosine ai poveri.

William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration Oil on canvas 40 x 56 inches (101.6 x 142.3 cm) Private collection
William Powell Frith (1819-1909) A May Day Celebration

Non è poi nemmeno tanto strano che l’usanza prescristiana della festa di Beltane sia confluita sotto il controllo della chiesa cattolica, sono piuttosto i puritani ad accanirsi contro il clima festaiolo di certe ricorrenze religiose. Così Pali del Maggio e festeggiamenti relativi vedono momenti di oscurantismo alternati a momenti di tolleranza (continua)

ASCOLTA la melodia con il liuto tratta dal “Margaret Board Lute Book” (qui) il manoscritto nella collezione  privata di Robert Spencer, è stato datato  c1620 fino a 1636 (pare che la signora prendesse lezioni da John Dowland).

Toronto Consort  in O Lusty May 1996 
Testo in “The new standard song book”- (J.E.Carpenter) – 1866. Sotto il titolo è classificato come “Molto popolare all’epoca di Carlo I”. Una versione di nove strofe è roportata nella broadside dal titolo “The May-Day Country Mirth Or, The Young Lads and Lasses’ Innocent Recreation, Which is to be priz’d before Courtly Pomp and Pastime. Bodleian collection, Douce Ballads 2(152a) e The Roxburghe Ballads: Illustrating the Last Years of the Stuarts Vol. 7, Part 1, edited by J. Woodfall Ebsworth (Hertford: Ballad Society, 1890) (vedi)


Chorus
Joan to the Maypole away,
let us on,
The time is swift and will be gone;
There go the lasses
away to the green,
Where their beauties
may be seen
I
Bess, Moll, Kate, Doll,
All the gay lasses
have lads to attend them,
Hodge, Nick, Tom, Dick,
Jolly brave dancers,
and who can mend them?
[Chorus]
II
Did you not see the Lord of the May
Walk along in his rich array?
There goes the lass that is only his,
See how they meet
and how they kiss.
Come Will, run Gill,
Or dost thou list to lose thy labour(1);
Kit Crowd scrape loud,
Tickle her, Tom, with a pipe and tabor! (2).
[Chorus]
III
There is not any that shall out-vie
My little pretty Joan and I,
For I’m sure I can dance as well
As Robin, Jenny, Tom, or Nell.
Last year, we were here,
When Ruff Ralph he played us a bourée,
And we, merrily
Thumped it about and gained the glory.
IV
Now, if we hold out
as we do begin,
Joan and I the prize shall win(3);
Nay, if we live till another day (4),
I’ll make thee lady of the May.
Dance round, skip, bound,
Turn and kiss, and then for a greeting.
Now, Joan, we’ve done,
Fare thee well
till the next merry meeting.
traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
Coro
Joan se ne va al Palo di Maggio,
andiamo anche noi,
che il tempo fugge veloce;
là le fanciulle vanno
nel prato,
dove le loro grazie
si possano ammirare.
I
Bess, Moll, Kate, Doll
ogni fanciulla allegra
ha il suo ragazzo ad attenderla
Hodge, Nick, Tom, Dick,
bravi e allegri ballerini,
chi potrebbe fare di meglio?
Coro
II
Non vedete come il re del Maggio
passeggia in pompa magna?
Lo raggiunge la sua ragazza,
vedete come si salutano
e si baciano!
Forza Will, corri Gill,
o rischiate di perdere il lavoro
Kit Crowd sfrega forte,
stuzzicala Tom con il flauto e
il tamburo.
Coro
III
Non c’è nessuno che possa superare
la mia piccola Joan e me, perchè sono certo di poter ballare altrettanto bene di Robin, Jenny, Tom, o Nell.
L’anno scorso, eravamo qui,
quando Ruff Ralph ha suonato una bourée,
e noi allegramente
battevamo (il tempo) e abbiamo guadagnato la gloria
IV
Ora se continuiamo
come abbiamo cominciato,
Joan ed io vinceremo il premio;
anzi se viviamo ancora un altro giorno
ti farò regina del Maggio.
Gira, saltella e zompa
voltati e bacia, e poi saluta.
Ora Joan è finito,
addio
fino alla prossima festa.

NOTE
1) l’esortazione si riferisce ai musicisti che non sono ancora pronti con i loro strumenti per dare il via al ballo.
2) Pipe and tabor o anche Tabor-pipe è il flauto a tre buchi associato al tamburino, il flauto si suona con una mano sola e con l’altra ci si accompagna con un tamburino a tracolla (vedi)
3) la ghirlanda del maggio in palio
4) l’aver vinto la ghirlanda del Maggio li incorona a nuovo re e regina del Maggio del relativo prato; non è chiaro se l’elezione detronizzi la precedente coppia fin da subito o sia il titolo valido per l’anno successivo.

continua

FONTI
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/intorno-al-palo-del-maggio.html
http://www.maymorning.co.uk/426023492
http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Joan_to_the_Maypole
http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/julia/ap1/Board.htm