Lady Greensleeves

Leggi in italiano

Greensleeves is a song coming from the English Renaissance (with undeniable Italian musical influences) that tells us about the courtship of a very rich gentleman and a Lady who rejects him, despite the generous gifts.

It was the year 1580 when Richard Jones and Edward White competed for prints of a fashion song, Jones with “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” and White with “A ballad, being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his frende “, then after a few days, White again with another version:” Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves “and a few months later Jones with the publication of” A merry newe “Northern Songe of Greene Sleeves” ; this time the reply came from William Elderton, who wrote the “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” in February 1581.
Finally, the revised and expanded version by Richard Jones with the title “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” included in the collection ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites‘ of 1584, was the one that became the final version, still performed today (at least as regards the melody and for most of the text with 17 stanzas).

The Melody

The melody is born for lute, the instrument par excellence of Renaissance (and baroque) music that has seen in England a fine flowering with the likes of John Jonson and John Dowland. As evidenced in the in-depth study of Ian Pittaway the ancestor of Greensleeves is the old Passamezzo.
By the late 15th century, plucked instruments such as the lute were just beginning to develop a new technique to add to their repertoire of playing styles, chordal playing, leading the way for grounds to be chordal rather than the single notes of the mediaeval period. One of the chordal grounds that developed was the passamezzo antico, meaning old passamezzo (there was also the passamezzo moderno), which began in Italy in the early 16th century before it spread through Europe. It’s a little like the blues today in that you have a basic, unchanging chord sequence and, on top of that, a melody is added. (from here)
The chorus of Greensleeves however follows the melodic trend of a  Romanesca which in turn is a variant of the passamezzo.

lute melody in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” written by Adriaen Smout for the Netherlands in 1595

Baltimore Consort  instrumental version in Renaissance style for dancing

We find a choreography of the dance  only in later times, in the “English Dancing Master” by John Playford (both in the edition of 1686 and then published several times in the eighteenth century) as an English country dance

The Legend

anne-boleyn-roseIn 1526 Henry VIII wrote “Greensleeves” for Anna Bolena, right at the beginning of their relationship.
A suggestive hypothesis because both the melody that the text well suited to the character, that of his own he wrote several piece still today in the repertoire of many artists of ancient music; however the poem was not transcribed in any manuscript of the time and therefore we can not be certain of this attribution.
The misunderstanding was generated by William Chappell who in his “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (London: Chappell & Co, 1859) attributes the melody to the king, misinterpreting a quote by Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th ‘Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.” (In Skialethia, or Shadow of Truth, 1598: the ballad “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” dates back to time of Henry VIII (King Harries) and, according to Chappell has always been sung on the melody Greensleeves.

The Tudor serie + The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Gregorian“,  ( I, III, VIII, IX)

Irish origins!?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1905) was the first to assume (without giving evidence) the irish origins. “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.
Since then the idea of Irish paternity has become more and more vigorous so much so that this song is present in the compilations of Celtic music labeled as irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

A courting song or a dirty trick?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-S
Roberto Venturi observes in his essay
Already at the time of Geoffrey Chaucer and the Tales of Canterbury (remember that Chaucer lived from 1343 to 1400) the green dress was considered typical of a “light woman”, that is a prostitute. She would therefore be a young woman of promiscuous customs; Nevill Coghill, the famous and heroic modern English translator of the Canterbury Tales, explains – referring to an interpretation of a Chaucerian step – that, at the time, the green color had precise sexual connotations, particularly in the phrase A green gown. It was the dress of a woman with some grass spots, who practiced (or suffered) a sexual intercourse in a meadow. If a woman was said to have “the green skirt”, in practice it was a whore.
The song would then be the lamentation of a betrayed and abandoned lover, or of a rejected customer; in short, you know, something far from regal (although in every age the kings were generally the first whoremongers of the Kingdom). Another possible interpretation is that the lover betrayed, or rejected, has wanted to revenge on the poor woman by devoting to her a delicious little song in which he calls her a whore through the metaphor of the “green sleeves” (translated from here)

Many interpreters, with versions both in ancient than modern style (also Yngwie Malmsteen plays it with his guitar and Leonard Cohen proposes a rewrite in 1974)
Today the text is rarely performed and only for two or four stanzas, but it is a song loved by choral groups that sing it more extensively.

In ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, from the collection of Israel G. Young (about twenty strophe see) all the gifts that the nobleman makes to his Lady to court her:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” with “sleeves of satin”, but also “men clothed all in green” and “dainties”!

So many versions (see) and a difficult choice, but here is:

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The Visit 1991 (I, III) interpreted “as if she were singing Tom Waits

Jethro Tull  in Christmas Album 2003 (instrumental version)

David Nevue amazing piano version!


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
NOTE
1) the first two sentences are sometimes reversed and start in the opposite direction
2) In the Middle Ages the green color was the symbol of regeneration and therefore of youth and physical vigor, meant “fertility” but also “hope” and with gold indicating pleasure. It was the color of medicine for its revitalizing powers. Color of love in the nascent stage, in the Renaissance it was the color used by the young especially in May; in women it was also the color of chastity.
But the other more promiscuous meaning is of “light woman always ready to roll in the grass”. And the charm of the ballad lies in its ambiguity!
Green is also the color that in fairy tales / ballads connotes a fairy creature.
The Gaelic words “Grian Sliabh” (literally translated as “sun mountain” or a “mountain exposed to the south, sunny”) are pronounced Green Sleeve (the song is also very popular in Ireland especially as slow air). Grian is also the name of a river that flows from Sliabh Aughty (County Clare and Galway)
3) the expressions are proper to the courtly lyric
4) sendal= light silk material

in the extended version the gifts of the suitor are many and expensive and it is all a complaint about “oh how much you costs me my dear!”

“Extended version
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

SOURCE
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm

Yonder comes a courteous knight (The Baffled knight ballad)

Leggi in italiano

John Byam Liston Shaw: “The Baffled Knight”

A young knight strolls through the countryside meets a girl (sometimes he surprises her while she is intent on bathing in a river) and asks her to have sex. In truth, the approaches in secluded places between noblemen and curvy country girls even if paludated with bucolic verses, they ended much more prosaically with rape (if the gentleman “stung vagueness”)

But in this ballad the girl is a lady, and the dialogue between the two protagonists becomes rather a gallant skirmish of love, a game of love to make it more appetizing; the knight, however, does not yet know the rules because of his young age and is therefore mocked by the lady, courtesan much more experienced and cynical, skilled maneuverer of her lovers!

VERSION A: YONDER COMES A COURTEOUS KNIGHT

Child ballad #112
The gallant knight is called “Baffled knight” as usual term in the Scottish dialect of 1540-1550: “bauchle”, here in the meaning of “bewildered”, “perplexed” but also “juggled”. Originally the ballad is transcribed in Deuteromelia (1609) by Thomas Ravenscroft with a melody that he attributes to the reign of Henry VIII.

CARPE DIEM

The song is an exhortation to draw pleasure when the opportunity arises: the lady (as an expert courtesan) puts the young knight to the test by presenting the comforts of a bed that awaits them in the paternal home; so she enters first at home and closes off the naive (and inexperienced) knight. The lady does not hide her disdain for the knight who did not dare to get some among the branches!

Custer LaRue & Baltimore Consort from “Ladyes Delight: Entertainment Music of Elizabethan England”, 1998 ♪.
The Baltimore Consort give us a little musical jewel: the melody is performed in a cadenced manner and vaguely refers to the Dargason jig, as also reported in the first edition of “The Dancing Master” by John Playford (1651).

Lucie Skeaping & City Waits from” Lusty Broadside Ballads & Palyford Dances” 2011.
Sparkling and playful interpretation that I imagine salaciously mimed in the most fashionable living rooms of the time. A couple of verses are omitted from the original version. (they skip II, IV and VII )

Joel Frederiksen & Ensemble Phoenix Munich from “The Elfin Knight: Balads and Dances”

I
Yonder comes a courteous knight,
Lustely raking ouer the lay(1);
He was well ware of a bonny lasse,
As she came wandring ouer the way.
CHORUS
Then she sang downe a downe,
hey downe derry (bis)(2)
II
‘Ioue(3) you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
‘Among the leaues that be so greene;
If I were a king, and wore a crowne,
Full soone, fair lady,
shouldst thou be a queen.
III
‘Also Ioue saue you, faire lady(4),
Among the roses that be so red;
If I haue not my will of you,
Full soone, faire lady,
shall I be dead.’
IV
Then he lookt east,
then hee lookt west,
Hee lookt north, so did he south;
He could not finde a priuy place,
For all lay in the diuel’s mouth.
V
‘If you will carry me, gentle sir,
A mayde(5) vnto my father’s hall,
Then you shall haue your will of me,
Vnder purple and vnder paule(6).’
VI
He set her vp vpon a steed,
And him selfe vpon another,
And all the day he rode her by,
As though they had been sister and brother.
VII
When she came to her father’s hall,
It was well walled round about;
She yode(7) in at the wicket-gate,
And shut the foure-eard(8) foole without.
VIII
‘You had me,’ quoth she, ‘abroad in the field,
Among the corne, amidst the hay,
Where you might had your will of mee,
For, in good faith, sir, I neuer said nay.
IX
‘Ye had me also amid the field(9)
Among the rushes that were so browne,
Where you might had your will of me,
But you had not the face to lay me downe.'(10)
X
He pulled out
his nut-browne(11) sword,
And wipt the rust off with his sleeue,
And said, “Ioue’s curse
come to his heart
That any woman would beleeue(12)!
XI
When you haue you owne true-loue
A mile or twaine out of the towne,
Spare not for her gay clothing,
But lay her body flat on the ground.

NOTE
1) ‘lay’ = lea, meadow-land
2)interlayer onomatopoeic and apparently non-sense of some ballads; also in the ballad The Three Ravens always reported by Ravenscoft this time in his Melismata. Vernon Chatman proposes as a translation for a sentence in the finished sense: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected. Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
3) Ioue = Jove; Jove you speed it is a kind of invocation of the type “Jupiter you assist”, but also a way of greeting. Jupiter is also the god famous for his love adventures and lust: in short, he did not miss one.
4) Lucie Skeaping sing ‘Ioue you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
5) maid
6) purple and paule =  pomp and circumstance
7) ‘yode’ = went.
8) ‘foure-ear’d’ = ‘as denoting a double ass?’ (Child)
9) Lucie Skeaping sings’You had me, abroad in the field,
10) once safe, the lady mocks the inexperienced knight!
11)  the image is burlesque: the young man with a rusty sword because he never got to use it (swordsman inexperienced or clumsy as in the love duels) raises it to the sky pointing to Jupiter to attract lightning!
12) believe

ARCHIVE
TITLES: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow away the morning dew, Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11201

GREEN GROW’TH THE HOLLY

Green groweth the Holly” è un madrigale rinascimentale attribuito a Enrico VIII. Una trentina di composizioni gli sono state attribuite  e compaiono nell'”Henry VIII Manuscript” (Add. MS 31922) compilato da un anonimo cortigiano coevo.
Un brano con lo stesso nome e con la stessa prima strofa che si sviluppa poi con versi differenti sulla stessa melodia rinascimentale, è stato scritto da Percy Dearmer (1867-1936), egli raccolse molti inni religiosi per reintrodurre la tradizione musicale e la musica medievale inglese nella Chiesa d’Inghilterra

LA VERSIONE RINASCIMENTALE

Enrico VIII, diventato re d’Inghilterra a 18 anni, parlava 4 lingue, suonava 3 strumenti musicali, cantava e componeva brani musicali. Nei primi anni del suo regno si comportava in effetti più come un principe dedito ai piaceri che un re preoccupato dagli affari del suo regno.
“Green grows the holly” (in italiano Verde cresce l’agrifoglio) è stato pubblicato nel 1522 come madrigale a 3 voci.
Nell’affermare la forza maschia e vigorosa dell’agrifoglio, il poeta dichiara la propria fedeltà all’amata: lei è l’edera che gli cresce attorno, e mentre nel rigore dell’inverno tutti gli altri alberi sono spogli, solo il re agrifoglio e la regina edera crescono verdeggianti e rigogliosi, così solo a lei, cortesemente, egli affida il suo cuore; anche che la poesia d’amore del tempo era espressa nelle forme convenzionali dell’amor cortese,  molto probabilmente, l’amore era sentito veramente dal poeta.
L’intreccio tra i due sempreverdi richiama il Nodo d’Amore celtico tra il rovo e la rosa già lungamente trattato nella categoria delle ballate celtiche e europee (vedi) in cui corollario all’amore romantico ma non socialmente approvato, è il nodo d’amore tra rovo e rosa, che cresciuti dalle rispettive tombe degli amanti si congiungono e intrecciano tra loro.

Enrico vide per la prima volta Anna nel marzo del 1522 che partecipava, assieme a sua sorella Maria, a un ballo organizzato da Wolsey in onore degli ambasciatori imperiali. Era un ballo in maschera sul tema dell’assalto al castello d’Amore dal titolo Chateau Vert.

IL CASTELLO D’AMORE CORTESE

Un castello in miniatura era stato allestito nella sala del ricevimento con alti bastioni e torri merlate, l’impalcatura di legno era strata rivestita con carta verde, per un effetto spettrale la carta era stata tinteggiata con il verderame. Abbiamo un resoconto scritto dal cronista di corte Edward Hall, che descrive tutto lo svolgimento del balletto, ma guardiamolo nella trasposizione della Serie Tv I Tudors (vedi).


E’ il momento dell’Assalto dei cavalieri Amorosità, Nobiltà, Giovinezza, Assistenza, Lealtà, Piacere, Garbo e Libertà che gettano sui difensori arance e datteri contro ai petali di rose e confetti lanciati dalle dame. Subito le protettrici del castello, (nel video indossano abiti neri) cioè i sentimenti più ostili all’amore, fuggono e i cavalieri possono scalare le mura del castello per avventarsi sulle otto ragazze biancovestite: Bellezza, Onore, Perseveranza, Costanza, Cortesia, Generosità, Misericordia e Pietà. Anna impersonava la Perseveranza e fu subito notata dal re che si mise a corteggiarla durante il ballo per festeggiare la  conquista del Castello Verde. O almeno è così che potrebbe essere andata…

Pare che lei gli avesse sussurrato “Seducetemi, scrivetemi lettere, poesie! Io adoro le poesieIncantatemi con le parole, seducetemi.. ” e la “Grene growth the holy” potrebbe essere proprio una di queste poesie messe in musica per meglio aiutare il Re nel suo corteggiamento..

I Fagiolini: Grene growth the holy madrigale a 3 voci “Henry VIII Manuscript” (Add. MS 31922 British Library, Londra)

Anonymous 4

Henry VIII
I
Green groweth the holly,
so doth the ivy.
Though winter blasts
blow never so high,

Green groweth the holly.
II
As the holly groweth green
And never changeth hue,
So I am, and ever hath been,
Unto my lady true.
III
As the holly groweth green,
With ivy all alone,
When flowerys cannot be seen
And green-wood leaves be gone,
IV
Now unto my lady
Promise to her I make:
From all other only
To her I me betake.
V
Adieu, mine own lady,
Adieu, my specïal,
Who hath my heart truly,
Be sure, and ever shall.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Verde cresce l’agrifoglio,
così pure l’edera,
sebbene le raffiche invernali non abbiamo mai colpito così forte,
verde cresce l’agrifoglio.
II
Come l’agrifoglio cresce verde
e mai cambia tono,
così io, mai son cambiato
verso la mia amata Signora.
III
Come l’agrifoglio cresce verde
con l’edera, tutto solo,
quando i fiori non ci son più
e le foglie del bosco sono cadute.
IV
Ora innanzi alla mia Signora
una promessa faccio:
fra tutti gli altri,
solo a lei, mi affiderò.
V
Addio, mia Signora.
Addio mia favorita,
colei che tiene il mio cuore,
ora e per sempre
Enrico VIII e Anna Bolena nella serie I Tudors

LA VERSIONE VITTORIANA

Percy Dearmer prende spunto dal madrigale rinascimentale per modificare il testo in chiave salvifica ma anche per celebrare il ciclo agrario e il lavoro dei campi.
Susan McKeown & Lindsey Horner

Barry&Beth Hall

Percy Dearmer
I
Green grow’th the holly
So doth the ivy
Though winter blasts blow na’er so high
Green grow’th the holly
II
Gay are the flowers
Hedgerows and ploughlands
The days grow longer in the sun
Soft fall the showers
III
Full gold the harvest
Grain for thy labor
With God must work for daily bread
Else, man, thou starvest
IV
Fast fall the shed leaves
Russet and yellow
But resting buds are smug and safe
Where swung the dead leaves
V
Green grow’th the holly
So doth the ivy
The God of life can never die
Hope! Saith the holly
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Verde cresce l’agrifoglio,
così pure l’edera,
sebbene le raffiche invernali
non abbiamo mai colpito così forte,
verde cresce l’agrifoglio.
II
Gai sono i fiori
le siepi e i campi arati
i giorni si snodano lenti nel sole,
piano cadono le piogge.
III
L’oro accende il raccolto
del grano per il tuo lavoro,
in Dio si lavora per il pane quotidiano altrimenti, uomo, tu morirai di fame
IV
Presto cadono le foglie
rossicce e gialle
ma i germogli riposano sani e salvi
dove giacciono le foglie morte.
V
Verde cresce l’agrifoglio,
così pure l’edera
il Dio della Vita non può mai morire
Speranza! Dice l’agrifoglio!

FONTI
http://www.thetudorswiki.com/page/MASQUERADES+on+The+Tudors
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/holly.htm
http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/greengroweth.htm
http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/
Hymns_and_Carols/grene_growith_the_holy.htm

http://www.hymnsandcarolsofchristmas.com/
Hymns_and_Carols/green_growth_the_holly.htm

DEATH OF QUEEN JANE

Forse la regina più amata da Enrico VIII e senza dubbio, la più remissiva, Jane Seymour regnò un anno appena al fianco del consorte, per morire di parto (1537) dopo aver dato alla luce il tanto sospirato erede maschio. Un Edoardo VI che, di salute cagionevole, morirà 15 enne.
La ballata popolare “Death of the Queen Jane” sembra descrivere proprio il  parto della regina e intavola un dialogo  privato e intimo tra le due Maestà.

dalla serie televisiva “I Tudors” terza stagione

Della ballata il professor Child riporta una ventina di versioni: si descrive il momento in cui la Regina Jane chiede a varie persone di tagliarle il fianco per far uscire il bambino, ma di volta in volta tutti rifiutano per timore di nuocerle. In alcune versioni alla fine il re cede ed esegue l’operazione, la donna muore ma il bambino è salvo. Nel finale la gioia per la nascita del tanto atteso erede si accompagna al dolore per il lutto della regina.

Molto probabilmente la ballata è stata scritta poco dopo l’avvenimento, anche se si rintraccia  solo qualche secolo più tardi nei manoscritti di Thomas Percy (1776): ecco un resoconto “ufficiale” dell’avvenimento con il  titolo ‘The Wofull Death of Queene Jane‘ (in “A Crowne-Garland of Golden Roses” 1612-1692) attribuito a  Richard Johnson (1592-1622).

E’ nella versione riportata da Agnes Strickland (1796-1874) che leggiamo  la ballata nella forma più condensata, attribuita dallo studioso al poeta di corte Thomas Churchyard (1523?-1604): con buona probabilità  è proprio questa la versione più antica riadattata a in parte ampliata da Richard Johnston per la sua Crowne-Garland (vedi)

I
When as king Henry ruled this land
He had a queen, I understand,
Lord Seymour’s daughter, fur and bright;
Yet death, by his remorseless power,
Did blast the bloom of this fair flower.
Oh! mourn, mourn, mourn, fair ladies,
Your queen, the flower of England’s dead
II
The queen in travail pained sore,
Full thirty woeful hours and more;
And no ways could relieved be,
As all her ladies wished to see;
Wherefore the king made greater moan
Than ever yet his grace had done.
III
Then, being something eased in mind,
His eyes a troubled sleep did find;
Where, dreaming he had lost a rose,
But which he could not well suppose:
A ship he had, a Rose by name,
Oh no, it was his royal Jane!
IV
Being thus perplexed with grief and care,
A lady to him did repair,
And said, ‘0 King, show us thy will,
The queen’s sweet life to save or spill?’
Then, as she cannot saved be,
0, save the flower though not the tree.’
Oh! mourn, mourn, mourn, fair ladies,
Your queen, the flower of England’s dead.

La trasmissione orale della ballata ha però fatto emergere dei punti salienti della vicenda, non necessariamente veritieri quanto piuttosto ritenuti tali, come il parto con il taglio cesareo e la morte della regina subito dopo.

QUESTIONE DI PROPAGANDA

Cosa sia realmente accaduto nella stanza della partoriente  si presta a varie ipotesi, ben più significativo è l’uso propagandistico dei fatti: sembrerebbe che a diffondere le voci di un avvenuto taglio cesareo sia stata una cospirazione cattolica allo scopo di screditare il Re. Ma quando si tratta di trame a così alti livelli non è nemmeno azzardata l’ipotesi che sia stata la propaganda anti-cattolica ad attribuire ai cattolici la propalazione del fatto come bugia.

La pratica del taglio cesareo era già nota ai medici medievali (e  praticata sporadicamente nei tempi più antichi come estrema ratio per salvare il bambino quando la madre era impossibilitata a partorire naturalmente); la mancata applicazione nel Medioevo riguardava più una questione morale che di tecnica (anche se gli esiti erano decisamente mortali per la donna): “The sixteenth-century French doctor Ambroise Pare criticized attempts to undertake surgery on living mothers because he thought that it could not succeed, after which the practice became increasingly taboo across Europe.  It was also widely considered to be immoral, and superstition held it to be a bad omen that could bring curses upon those who employed it.  But it did occur, and it is documented that as early as 1500, thirty-seven years before the birth of Prince Edward, the operation was undertaken successfully by a Swiss piggelder on his own wife.  A sixteenth-century surgeon in Bruges is also reported to have performed the operation seven times, again on his wife.”  (tratto da qui)

Significativo l’epitaffio sulla tomba di Edoardo che accredita la madre come fenice immolatasi per la dinastia 

Here a Phoenix lieth, 
whose death
To another Phoenix gave breath:
It is to be lamented much,
The World at once ne'er knew two such.

Così tirando le somme ecco come è andata: Enrico VIII per garantirsi l’erede maschio tanto atteso costringe Jane  a partorire con il taglio cesareo (ben consapevole che l’operazione portava normalmente alla morte della madre) e infatti la donna muore dopo dodici giorni dal parto.
Nel Medioevo davanti alla scelta tra la vita della madre e quella del bambino si propendeva 1) a non fare niente perchè quella era la volontà di Dio 2) a salvare la madre, in quanto “maior ius“.
Nel caso di Jane prevale la ragion di stato.
Da notare che la Chiesa cattolica era nel Medioevo contraria al parto cesareo e lo riteneva necessario solo post mortem per la salvezza spirituale del feto; muta opinione però a partire dal 1600 -vedasi il trattato “De ortu infantium contra naturam per sectionem caesaream tractatio” del gesuita francese Theophile Raynaud – solo da allora vige l’obbligo morale della madre in virtù dei principi di carità e amore, di offrire la propria vita in cambio di quella del figlio: “A favore della madre, rifacendosi alla classica teoria di Tertulliano (160ca-†220), egli [Theophile Raynaud] scriveva di un feto aggressore il cui sacrificio doveva essere interpretato come azione di legittima difesa da parte della donna, iscrivibile sul piano della giustizia. Accanto a questa riproposizione del principio di giustizia, egli inseriva, però, quello di carità: se la giustizia poteva consentire che si sacrificasse il feto, la carità, al contrario, chiedeva che si privilegiasse la sua vita e sebbene la madre potesse, senza commettere ingiustizia, preferire se stessa, essa non poteva farlo senza mancare al comandamento più importante: quello dell’amore.” (Carmen Trimarchi tratto da qui)

LE MELODIE

La ballata circolò in molte versioni nelle isole Britanniche e in America con vari testi e melodie.
ASCOLTA Peggy Seeger 1962

ASCOLTA Joan Baez 1964 (I, IV, VI, VII, VIII, IX, XI)


I
Queen Jane lay in labor
For six weeks and more
her women grew weary
And the midwife gave o’er
II
O, women, kind women,
as I know you to be;
Pray cut my side open
and save my baby.
III
“O, no,” said the women,
“That never might be,
We’ll send for King Henry
in the hour of your need.
IV
King Henry, he was sent for
On horse back and speed
King Henry came to her
In the time of her need
V
King Henry he come in
and stood by her bed;
What ails my pretty flower,
her eyes look so red.
VI
Oh Henry, good King Henry
If that you do be (1)
Please pierce (2) my side open
And save my baby
VII
Oh no Jane, good Queen Jane (3)
That never could be
I’d lose my sweet flower
To save my baby
VIII
Queen Jane she turned over
She fell all in a swoon
Her side was pierced open
And the baby was found
IX (4)
How bright was the morning
How yellow was the moon
How costly the white coat
Queen Jane was wrapped in
X
Six followed after,
six bore her along,
King Henry come after,
his head hanging down.
XI
King Henry he weeped
He wrung his hands ‘til they’re sore
The flower of England
Will never be (5) no more
XII
The baby was christened
the very next day,
His mother’s poor body
lay moldering away.
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
La Regina Giovanna era in travaglio
da più di sei giorni
le ancelle erano stanche,
e l’ostetrica si arrese.
II
“O donne, buone donne,
se siete delle buone ancelle
vi prego di aprire il mio fianco destro
e salvare il mio bambino”
III
“Oh no,” esclamarono le donne,
“non è cosa da farsi
Manderemo a cercare re Enrico
nel momento del bisogno”
IV
Mandarono a cercare Re Enrico
di gran corsa a cavallo
Re Enrico arrivò
nel momento del bisogno
V
Re Enrico arrivò
e si mise accanto al letto
“Cosa ti fa soffrire mio bel fiore?
I tuoi occhi sembrano così arrossati”
VI
“Oh Enrico, buon re Enrico,
faresti una cosa per me?
Taglia il mio fianco destro
e salva il bambino “
VII
“Oh no Giovanna, buona regina Giovanna, non è cosa da farsi
perderei il mio dolce fiore,
per salvare il mio bambino”
VIII
La Regina Giovanna si voltò
e cadde in deliquio
e il suo fianco destro fu aperto
e il bambino trovato
IX
Che chiaro era il mattino
e che gialla era la luna
e che prezioso era il bianco drappo
in cui la regina Giovanna fu avvolta
X
Sei uomini andarono davanti
e sei la portavano a fianco
re Enrico veniva dietro
con il capo piegato
XI
Re Enrico pianse
e si torse le mani fino a farsi male
” il fiore d’Inghilterra,
non fiorirà più”
XII
Il bambino venne battezzato
il giorno dopo
mente il cadavere della sua povera madre stava a decomporsi

NOTE
1) Peggy dice: pray listen to me
2) Peggy dice cut
3) Peggy dice “O, no!” said King Henry
4) Peggy dice “How black was the mourning, how yellow her bed,
How white the bright shroud Queen Jane was laid in” in una frase che ha molto più senso di quella di Baez: che nero era il lutto e che giallo il letto,  che bianco il sudario in cui la regina fu avvolta
5) Peggy dice “is blooming”

Andreas Scholl
: “King Henry”


I
King Henry, was sent for
all in the time of her need
King Henry he came
In the time of her need
II
King Henry he stooped
and kissed her on her lips;
What’s the matter with my flower,
makes her eyes look so red?.
III
King Henry King Henry
will you take me to thee
to pierce  my side open
And  to save my baby?
IV
Oh no Queen Jane
such thing shall never be
to lose my sweet flower
for to save my baby
V
Queen Jane she turned over
and fell in a swound
Her side it was pierced
And her baby was found
VI
How bright was the morning
How yellow her bed
How costly was the shroud
Queen Jane was wrapped in
X
There’s six followed after,
and six carried her along,
King Henry be followed,
with his blak mourning on.
XI
King Henry he wept
and wrung his hands ‘til they’re sore
The flower of England
shall never be  no more
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
Mandarono a cercare Re Enrico
nel momento del bisogno
Re Enrico arrivò
nel momento del bisogno
V
Re Enrico si fermò
e le baciò le labbra
“Che succede al mio fiore?
I tuoi occhi sembrano così arrossati”
VI
“ re Enrico, re Enrico
faresti una cosa per me?
Taglia il mio fianco destro
e salva il bambino “
VII
“Oh no regina Giovanna,
non è cosa da farsi
perderei il mio dolce fiore,
per salvare il mio bambino”
VIII
La Regina Giovanna si voltò
e cadde in deliquio
e il suo fianco destro fu aperto
e il bambino trovato
IX
Che chiaro era il mattino
e che giallo il letto
e che prezioso era il drappo
in cui la regina Giovanna fu avvolta
X
Sei uomini andarono davanti
e sei la portavano a fianco
re Enrico veniva dietro
nel suo lutto
XI
Re Enrico pianse
e si torse le mani fino a farsi male
” il fiore d’Inghilterra,
non fiorirà più”

LA MELODIA STANDARD

Il chitarrista e cantante irlandese Dáithí Sproule nel 1971 ha composto la melodia che è diventata quella standard, la prima registrazione è dei Bothy Band  in After Hours (1979)

ASCOLTA Oscar Isaac nel film “A proposito di Davis” 2013.
Il successo del film ha rinverdito la canzone presso gli interpreti folk contemporanei. Nella scena del film Davis si esibisce con la chitarra davanti ad un importante agente musicale, la scelta cade su “The death of Queen Jane”, un brano che gli lacera l’anima dato che Jean, la madre di suo figlio, ha appena deciso di abortire. (L’incongruenza balza subito all’occhio come poteva LLewyn Davis cantare nel 1961  una melodia scritta nel 1971?)

ASCOLTA Méav arrangia la melodia in chiave rinascimentale con tanto di clavicembalo e liuto

Anche Loreena McKennitt registra il brano in “The wind that shakes the barley” (da ascoltare su Spotify)


I
Queen Jane lay in labor
full nine days or more
‘Til her women grew so tired,
they could no longer there
They could no longer there
II
“Good women, good women,
good women that you may be
Will you open my right side
and find my baby?”
III
“Oh no,” cried the women,
“That’s a thing that can never be
We will call on King Henry
and hear what he may say”
IV
King Henry was sent for,
King Henry did come
Saying, “What does ail you my lady?
Your eyes, they look so dim”
V
“King Henry, King Henry,
will you do one thing for me?
That’s to open my right side
And find my baby”
VI
“Oh no”, cried King Henry,
“That’s a thing I never can do
If I lose the flower of England,
I shall lose the branch too”
VII
There was fiddling, aye,and dancing
on the day the babe was born
But poor Queen Jane beloved
lay cold as the stone
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
La Regina Giovanna era in travaglio
da più di nove giorni (1)
e anche le sue ancelle erano stanche,
da non resistere più
da non resistere più
II
“Buone donne, buone donne,
se siete delle buone ancelle
aprirete il mio fianco destro
per prendere il bambino?”
III
“Oh no,” esclamarono le donne,
“non è cosa da farsi
Manderemo a cercare re Enrico
e sentiremo la sua opinione”
IV
Re Enrico fu mandato a chiamare,
Re Enrico arrivò dicendo: “Cosa ti fa soffrire mia signora?
I tuoi occhi sembrano così appannati”
V
“Re Enrico, Re Enrico,
farai una cosa per me (2)?
Aprimi il  fianco destro
e prendi il bambino “
VI
“Oh no”, esclamò il re Enrico,
”non è cosa da farsi
Se perdo il fiore d’Inghilterra (3),
perderò l’intero ramo”
VII
C’era musica, sì, e danza
il giorno in cui il bambino nacque, ma la povera Regina Giovanna beneamata
era stesa fredda come la pietra (4)

NOTE
1) il periodo del travaglio varia nelle varie lezioni da alcune ore a parecchi giorni
2) la fantasia popolare è rimasta colpita dall’esecuzione della procedura chirurgica, e la trasforma in un atto di supremo sacrificio per amore del bambino, l’interesse dinastico non viene quindi assunto come prioritario (scagionando così l’esecutore materiale della procedura da ogni colpa o interesse). La responsabilità della scelta per l’operazione chirurgica (che a quei tempi significava per lo più la morte della partoriente) viene trasferita in toto alla volontà di Jane (in alcune versioni Enrico afferma che piuttosto preferisce perdere il bambino che la sua regina o che il taglio avrebbe causato la morte del bambino) e alla fine l’operazione viene eseguita quando Jane è praticamente moribonda.
3) qui Jane è il fiore del Regno (per descriverne la bellezza) e il bambino il ramo mentre nelle versioni “ufficiali” la regina è l’albero da cui sboccia il virgulto o fiore. Viene espresso l’antico principio della “priorità dell’albero sul frutto”
4) nelle versioni popolari della ballata la morte della regina è concomitante al parto: la regina però morì dodici giorni dopo il parto. In alcune versioni della ballata viene descritto il corteo funebre della regina (Child 170 B, C e D)

Ancora un’altra versione testuale e un’altra melodia
ASCOLTA Karine Polwart in “Fairest Floo’er”  2007


I
Queen Jane lay in labor full
six days or more
While the women grew weary
and the midwives gave o’er
And they sent for King Henry
to come with great speed
To be with Queen Jane
in her hour of need
II
King Henry came to her
and he sat by her bedside
Saying, “What ails thee, my Jeannie?
What ails thee, my bride?”
“Oh Henry, oh Henry,
do this one thing for me
Rip open my right side
and find my baby”
III
“Oh Jeannie, oh Jeannie,
that never will do
It would lease thy sweet life
and thy young baby, too”
Well, she wept and she wailed
‘til she fell into a swoon
And her right side was opened
and her baby was found
IV
Well, that baby was christened
the very next day
While his poor dead mother
a-mouldering lay
And six men went before her
and four more travelled on
While loyal King Henry
stood mourning alone
V
He wept and he wailed
until he was sore
Saying, “The flower of all England
shall flourish no more”
He sat by the river
with his head in his hands
Saying, “My merry England
is a sorrowful land”
(Traduzione di Cattia Salto)
I
La Regina Giovanna era in travaglio
da sei giorni o più
anche le sue ancelle erano esauste
e le ostetriche impotenti
così mandarono a cercare
re Enrico con grande premura
perchè fosse con la Regina Giovanna
nel momento del bisogno
II
Re Enrico arrivò
e le si sedette accanto:
“Cosa ti fa soffrire mia Gianna?
Cosa ti fa soffrire moglie mia”
“Oh Enrico, oh Enrico,
faresti una cosa per me?
Taglia il mio fianco destro, apri
e prendi bambino “
III
“Oh Gianna, Gianna
non è cosa da farsi
potrebbe ipotecare la tua cara vita
e anche quella del tuo bambino”
Beh lei pianse e si lamentò
fino a cadere in deliquio
e il suo fianco destro fu aperto (1)
e il bambino preso
IV
Beh quel bambino venne battezzato
il giorno dopo
mente la sua povera madre morta
stava a decomporsi
e sei uomini andarono davanti
e altri quattro dietro
mentre re Enrico
stava solo in lutto
VII
Pianse e si lamentò
fino a starci male
Dicendo ” il fiore d’Inghilterra,
non fiorirà più”
Si sedette accanto al fiume
con la testa tra le mani
dicendo “La mia bella Inghilterra
è la terra del dolore”

NOTE
1) in questa versione  l’operazione si presume sia affidata ad un chirurgo

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch170.htm
https://www.thefreelibrary.com/The+death+of+Queen+Jane%3a+ballad%2c+history%2c+and+propaganda-a0321683005
https://motherhoodinprehistory.wordpress.com/2015/10/16/the-gruesome-origins-of-the-c-section/
http://ww2.unime.it/donne.politica/materialedidattico/02_03_04ottobre/saggio_trimarchi.pdf
http://venividigossip.blogspot.it/2014/10/jane-seymour-la-moglie-noiosa-di-enrico.html
https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/deathofqueenjane.html
https://kimtrainorblog.wordpress.com/2014/04/15/the-death-of-queen-jane-2/
http://folksongcollector.com/kinghenry.html
http://www.lizlyle.lofgrens.org/RmOlSngs/RTOS-QueenJane.html
http://www.ilsussidiario.net/News/Cinema-Televisione-e-Media/2014/2/6/A-PROPOSITO-DI-DAVIS-L-arte-controcorrente-in-un-film-dall-anima-musicale/464382/
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/polwart/death.htm
https://tudorstuff.wordpress.com/2009/03/21/the-death-of-jane-seymour-a-midwifes-view/
http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=1326
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17304
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=4836

Yonder comes a courteous knight (The Baffled knight)

John Byam Liston Shaw: “The Baffled Knight”

Read the post in English

Un giovane cavaliere a spasso per la campagna incontra una  fanciulla (a volte la sorprende mentre è intenta a farsi il bagno in un fiume) e le chiede di fare sesso. Per la verità gli approcci in luoghi appartati tra nobiluomini e procaci contadinelle (o pastorelle) anche se paludati con versi bucolici, si concludevano molto più prosaicamente con lo stupro (se al gentiluomo “pungeva vaghezza” cioè se gli veniva voglia!).

Ma in questa ballata la fanciulla è una lady, e il dialogo tra i due protagonisti diventa piuttosto una galante schermaglia d’amore, un gioco d’amore per renderlo più stuzzicante; il cavaliere tuttavia non ne conosce ancora le regole a causa della sua giovane età ed è perciò preso in giro dalla dama, cortigiana molto più esperta e cinica, abile manovratrice dei suoi amanti!

VERSIONE A: YONDER COMES A COURTEOUS KNIGHT

Child ballad #112
Il cavaliere galante è etichettato come “Baffled knight” termine usuale nel dialetto scozzese del 1540-1550: bauchle“, qui nel significato di “sconcertato”, “perplesso” ma anche “raggirato”. In origine la ballata è trascritta nel Deuteromelia (1609) di Thomas Ravenscroft con una melodia che egli attribuisce al regno di Enrico VIII.

CARPE DIEM

La canzone è un’esortazione a trarre il piacere quando se ne ha l’opportunità: la dama (da esperta cortigiana) mette alla prova il giovane cavaliere prospettando gli agi del comodo letto che li aspetta nella casa paterna; così entra per prima in casa e chiude fuori l’ingenuo (e inesperto) cavaliere. La dama non nasconde il disprezzo verso il cavaliere che non ha osato prenderla tra le verdi frasche!!
Custer LaRue & Baltimore Consort in “Ladyes Delight: Entertainment Music of Elizabethan England”, 1998 ♪.
Come sempre i Baltimore Consort ci regalano un piccolo gioiello musicale: la melodia è eseguita in modo cadenzato e richiama vagamente la Dargason jig, come riportata anche nella prima edizione del “The Dancing Master” di John Playford (1651).

Lucie Skeaping & City Waits in” Lusty Broadside Ballads & Palyford Dances” 2011.
Le parti dialogate sono a due voci: interpretazione frizzante e scherzosa che mi immagino mimata salacemente nei salotti più alla moda del tempo. Sono omesse un paio di strofe rispetto alla versione originale. (saltano le strofe II, IV e VII)

Joel Frederiksen & Ensemble Phoenix Munich in “The Elfin Knight: Balads and Dances”


I
Yonder comes a courteous knight,
Lustely raking ouer the lay(1);
He was well ware of a bonny lasse,
As she came wandring ouer the way.
CHORUS
Then she sang downe a downe,
hey downe derry (bis)(2)
II
‘Ioue(3) you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
‘Among the leaues that be so greene;
If I were a king, and wore a crowne,
Full soone, fair lady,
shouldst thou be a queen.
III
‘Also Ioue saue you, faire lady(4),
Among the roses that be so red;
If I haue not my will of you,
Full soone, faire lady,
shall I be dead.’
IV
Then he lookt east,
then hee lookt west,
Hee lookt north, so did he south;
He could not finde a priuy place,
For all lay in the diuel’s mouth.
V
‘If you will carry me, gentle sir,
A mayde(5) vnto my father’s hall,
Then you shall haue your will of me,
Vnder purple and vnder paule(6).’
VI
He set her vp vpon a steed,
And him selfe vpon another,
And all the day he rode her by,
As though they had been sister and brother.
VII
When she came to her father’s hall,
It was well walled round about;
She yode(7) in at the wicket-gate,
And shut the foure-eard(8) foole without.
VIII
‘You had me,’ quoth she, ‘abroad in the field,
Among the corne, amidst the hay,
Where you might had your will of mee,
For, in good faith, sir, I neuer said nay.
IX
‘Ye had me also amid the field(9)
Among the rushes that were so browne,
Where you might had your will of me,
But you had not the face to lay me downe.'(10)
X
He pulled out
his nut-browne(11) sword,
And wipt the rust off with his sleeue,
And said, “Ioue’s curse
come to his heart
That any woman would beleeue(12)!
XI
When you haue you owne true-loue(13)
A mile or twaine out of the towne,
Spare not for her gay clothing,
But lay her body flat on the ground.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Da lungi giunse un cavaliere cortese,
che razzolava lussurioso per i campi;
si accorse di una bella fanciulla,
mentre arrivava a passeggio per la via.
CORO
downe a downe,
hey downe derry
II
“Per Giove bella dama che andate spedita tra le foglie rigogliose,
se fossi re con indosso la corona, tosto bella dama,
voi sareste la mia regina.
III
Che Giove vi preservi bella dama,
tra le rose sì rosse,
se  non vi farò mia,
tosto bella dama
io morirò.”
IV
Così guardò a Est
e poi guardò a Ovest,
guardò a Nord e anche a Sud,
ma non riusciva a trovare un posto appartato che fosse nelle fauci del diavolo.
V
“Se condurrete me, gentile signore
una fanciulla, fino alla dimora paterna, allora potrete fare di me ciò che vorrete
tra gli agi e il lusso”.
VI
Egli la accomodò sul destriero
e lui ne montò un altro per sè
e per tutto il giorno le cavalcò accanto, proprio come se fossero sorella e fratello.
VII
Quando giunsero alla dimora paterna
si era ormai a buon punto,
ma ella entrò nel portone
e chiuse fuori lo sciocco asino.
VIII
“Potevate avermi – disse lei – fuori nei campi, tra il grano e l’avena, dove avreste potuto fare di me secondo la vostra volontà, perchè in verità Signore, non vi avrei detto di no.
IX
Potevate avermi anche in mezzo alla brughiera tra i giunchi maturi,
dove avreste avreste potuto fare di me secondo la vostra volontà,
ma non avete avuto il coraggio di stendermi a terra”
X
Egli sguainò
la spada arrugginita ,
la pulì sulla manica,
e disse”La maledizione di Giove
scenda su questo mio cuore
che crede ad ogni donna”.
XI
Quando hai la tua femmina innamorata
a un miglio o due fuori dalla città,
non risparmiare le sue gaie vesti,
ma appiattisci il suo corpo a terra!

NOTE
1) ‘lay’ = lea, meadow-land: il giovanotto è infoiato, gli basta vedere una dama sola per la campagna!
2) intercalare onomatopeico e apparentemente non-sense proprio di alcune ballate; anche nella ballata The Three Ravens sempre riportata da Ravenscoft questa volta nel suo Melismata. Vernon Chatman propende come traduzione per una frase in senso compiuto: We find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary (1955) that ‘down’ can be used as an adverb either attributively or by ellipsis of some participial word in the sense of “dejected.”” Also, we find that ‘a’ can be used as a preposition as in ‘a live’ or as an adjective in the sense of “all.” Further, we find that ‘hay’ can be used as an interjection in the sense of “thou hast (it)” and that it occurs in the phrase ‘to make hay’ this phrase meaning “to make confusion.” Thus, the sense of line two is something like the following: 1) Dejected all dejected, thou hast dejection [thou art dejected?], thou hast dejection; or 2) Dejected all dejected, confused and dejected, confused and dejected. Relative to line four we find in the Oxford Universal Dictionary that ‘with’ can be used to form adverb phrases denoting “to the fullest extent.” Thus, the sense of the fourth line is something like the following: Utterly (completely) dejected. Line seven presents the gravest difficulty; however, it can be surmounted. The problem here centers upon ‘derrie.’ Checking this time with Encyclopaedia Britannica (1956) we find that Londonderry was once named ‘Derry.’ Derry is an appropriate locale for the scene depicted in “The Three Ravens:” the Scandinavians plundered the city, and it is said to have been burned down at least seven times before 1200; it thus is a site of many battles. Line seven now “means” something like the following: Utterly dejected in Derry, in Derry, dejected, dejected.
3) Ioue = Jove; Jove you speed è una specie d’invocazione del tipo “Giove ti assista”, ma anche un modo di salutare. Giove è anche il dio famoso per le sue avventure amorose e la lussuria: insomma non se ne faceva scappare una.
4) Lucie Skeaping dice ‘Ioue you speed, fayre lady,’ he said,
5) maid
6) purple and paule = pompa magna, ossia tra gli agi e il lusso
7) ‘yode’ = went.
8) ‘foure-ear’d’ = così commenta il professor Child: ‘as denoting a double ass?’
9) Lucie Skeaping dice ‘You had me, abroad in the field,
10) una volta al sicuro la dama sbeffeggia il cavaliere inesperto!
11)  l’immagine è burlesca: il giovanotto con una spada arrugginita perchè non ha mai avuto modo di usarla (spadaccino inesperto o maldestro come nei duelli amorosi) la alza al cielo puntandola su Giove pluvio per attirarne i fulmini!!( uno spasso)
12) believe
13) nelle ballate non si andava tanto per il sottile, ogni femmina era una true-love ovvero il vero-amore

ARCHIVIO
TITOLI: The Baffled Lover (knight),  Yonder comes a courteous knight, The Lady’s Policy, The Disappointed Lover, The (Bonny) Shepherd Lad (laddie), Blow Ye Winds High-O, Clear Away the Morning Dew
Child #112 A (Tudor Ballad): yonder comes a courteous knight
Child #112 B
Child #112 D ( Cecil Sharp)
Child #112 D (Sheperd Lad)
Blow Away The Morning Dew (sea shanty)

FONTI
http://71.174.62.16/Demo/LongerHarvest?Text=Child_d11201

KING HENRY’S MADRIGAL: PAST TIME IN GOOD COMPANY WITH TUDORS

Henry-VIII-Young-KingEnrico VIII scrisse questa “The King’s Ballad” (“The Kynges Balade“) nel 1509 appena dopo la sua incoronazione a re d’Inghilterra (quando era diciottenne): erano i tempi della gioventù e dei divertimenti a corte, un susseguirsi di feste, banchetti, passatempi e sport all’aria aperta! La prima versione giunge dal “Henry VIII Manuscript” (c. 1513) in cui sono raccolte 14 composizioni di suo pugno “By the King’s Hand”. Sebbene la canzone sia nata come composizione cortese, si è subito diffusa tra il popolo a causa della sua aria orecchiabile, e non si contano poi varianti e arrangiamenti lungo i vari secoli e fino ai giorni nostri.

Il brano è l’esaltazione della gioia di vivere in “allegra brigata” passando il tempo in “sane e aristocratiche” attività “sportive” che all’epoca erano la caccia, il gioco del tennis, i tornei cavallereschi e le danze (il re si è dimenticato di annoverare il sesso, ma è nei sottotitoli), così il re nei primi anni del regno si comporta più da principe e si lascia guidare dalla passione e dagli ardori giovanili e chi oserebbe contraddirlo?

GUIDA ALL’ASCOLTO
Sebbene sia uno tra i brani documentati “By the King’s Hand” nella Serie-Tv-cult “The Tudor” si preferisce ritrarre il re mentre compone “Lady Greensleeves” (vedi) (ma l’attribuzione e solo un aneddoto).

Per ascoltare la melodia come doveva essere eseguita in epoca elisabettiana:
ASCOLTA Tom Hines in “Songs from Shakespeare’s Plays, and Songs of His Time.” 1961

Il brano è ancora nel repertorio dei gruppi di musica antica interpretato spesso a tre voci (ASCOLTA King Singers), e tuttavia preferisco ascoltare queste versioni più contemporanee: la prima magistrale di Ian Anderson il menestrello del rock-prog:
ASCOLTA Jethro Tull in Stormywatch 1979 (titolo “King Henry’s Madrigal”) un “madrigal-prog” del XVI secolo o come dice Ian Anderson “Un rock’n’roll del XVI secolo ispirato da quel figlio di puttana di Enrico VIII

Poi un altro menestrello (insossidabile) del rock che alla veneranda età di cinquant’anni è passato al Renaissance rock: alcuni dicono che se Dio volesse mettersi a suonare la chitarra si incarnerebbe in Ritchie Blackmore
ASCOLTA Blackmore’s night in Under a violet moon 1999 il secondo cd del gruppo: il brano inizia con un eco di trombe lontane sostenute da un ritmo del rullante al “galoppo” ad evocare la caccia e lo sport all’aria aperta tra i quali si insinuano i raffinati e discreti fraseggi di chitarra
ASCOLTA Nox Arcana in Winter’s Knight 2005 la interpretano come un gotico valzer portato dal tappeto delle tastiere quasi come un carillon

Pastime with good company
I love and shall unto I die;
Grudge who list(1), but none deny,
So God be pleased thus live will I.
For my pastance(2),
Hunt, song, and dance.
My heart is set: All goodly sport
For my comfort, Who shall me let?(3)Youth must have some dalliance,
Of good or illé(4) some pastance;
Company methinks(5) then best
All thoughts and fancies to dejest(6):
For idleness, Is chief mistress Of vices all. Then who can say
But mirth and play Is best of all?

Company with honesty
Is virtue vices to flee:
Company is good and ill
But every man hath his free will.
The best ensue, The worst eschew,
My mind shall be: Virtue to use,
Vice to refuse, Shall I use me.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
Il tempo libero in buona compagnia amo e amerò fino alla morte; si lamenti chi vuole(1), ma nessuno me lo neghi, così a Dio piacendo io vivrò. Per il mio tempo libero, caccio, canto e danzo, il mio cuore è pronto: tutto il buon tempo (è) per il mio benessere, chi mi ostacolerà(3)?I giovani devono avere qualche frivolezza un passatempo nel bene o nel male credo che la compagnia sia il meglio per superare tutti i pensieri e le fantasie: che la pigrizia è la signora somma di tutti i vizi. Allora chi può dire tuttavia che l’allegria e il divertimento non siano il meglio di tutto?

Un’onesta compagnia è la virtù, che fugge i vizi: la compagnia è buona o cattiva ma ogni uomo ha il suo libero arbitrio. Il meglio seguire, il peggio evitare sarà mio intento: la virtù ad usare, il vizio a rifiutare, (così) mi adopererò

NOTE
1) il motto «Qui qu’en groigne, ainsi sera, car tel est mon plaisir» = Grumble all you like this is how it is going to be”. in italiano “Anche se qualcuno si lamenta, così sarà, poiché questa è la mia volontà” era tra le affermazioni preferite di Anna Bolena
2) pastance= pastime
3) Who’s going to stop me? The question of why Henry chose shall over other modal verbs is trickier. Whenever modal verbs are used in English, an abundance of possible meanings and nuances arises. I would say that this is a possible interpretation. – Who will me let? (focuses on the will (intentions, mind-set) of the subject of the sentence, – Shall is about determined futures rather than futures intended by the subject of the sentence or merely predicted on the balance of probabilities. Shall may hint that that the subject of the sentence might feel an obligation, possibly a moral obligation, to stop Henry enjoying himself (shall in a sense relating to the modern use of should to express expectations). Alternatively, I shall let you! might imply It is my will to stop you, and furthermore my will has the power to affect the future. (tratto da qui)
4) illè=ill
5) me thinks= I believe
6) dejest= digest

FONTI
http://www.academia.edu/2990225/Henry_VIIIs_Lyrics_from_the_Henry_VIII_ MS_London_British_Library_Additional_Manuscript_31 http://noxarcana.com/wintersknight.html
(Cattia Salto ottobre 2014)

SIR ANDREW BARTON

111Sir Andrew Barton –o Bartin – (1466-1511) fu alto Ammiraglio di Scozia e Corsaro per incarico di Giacomo IV re di Scozia. I mari solcati dalle sue nave però non erano quelli caraibici o dell’Oceano Indiano bensì quelli più domestici attorno alle coste atlantiche e del Nord d’Europa. La sua storia in mare e in particolare la sua morte viene narrata in una ballata molto lunga di origine seicentesca riportata anche in Child ballad#167 dal titolo Andrew Barton.
Un’altra ballata (Child ballad #250) dal titolo
Henry Martin, con molte meno strofe,  ci parla dello stesso personaggio, soffermandosi nella descrizione dell’arrembaggio perpetrata dalla nave scozzese nei confronti di “ricco mercantile diretto verso Londra“. Questa seconda ballata è una probabile stilizzazione della prima, anche se altri studiosi per esempio Cecil Sharp, ritengono al contrario che la ballata Andrew Barton sia stata scritta in seguito.
La ballata fu diffusa per tutto l’Ottocento nei broadsides anche in America e comparve nelle principali collezioni del tempo.

HENRY MARTIN

Nella ballata si narra di tre fratelli di cui il più giovane Henry si è dato alla pirateria per “mantenere la famiglia” (la storia però ci dice che era il più anziano dei tre). Secondo la ricostruzione di Thomas Percy nel suo Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765) il padre, John Barton era un ricco mercante che venne ucciso in mare da una nave portoghese nel 1476 durante il saccheggio della sua nave, così i figli ottennero dal Re, come risarcimento, una lettera di corsa che li autorizzava ad abbordare e depredare le navi portoghesi. In realtà si trattava di “una lettera di rappresaglia” di memoria medievale, un tipo di documento che rimase in uso in Scozia per risarcire coloro che subivano un torto da parte di un debitore straniero: ci si poteva rivalere su nave e carico del paese incriminato sia in tempo di guerra che di pace. (in questo modo la famiglia Barton rimase in guerra contro il Portogallo dal 1470 al 1563)

538px-The_Yellow_Carvel_in_action,_detail_from_an_illustration_in_a_children's_history_book

La storia lo riconosce come “corsaro” scozzese e ci riporta solo una aggressione controversa, nel 1509, contro una nave portoghese che trasportava un carico inglese. In effetti nella ballata la nave attaccata da Martin non è identificata espressamente come una “nave mercantile inglese” bensì come “rich merchant ship bound for fair London town“, da intendersi perciò non come un semplice giro di parole ma in senso letterale ovvero come “ricco mercantile con carico per Londra” (ovvero carico inglese). Una sottigliezza interpretativa, (come quella di carico portoghese ma su navi di altra nazionalità) ma spesso invocata come pretesto, che … costò a Martin la sospensione della lettera di corsa per la durata di un anno. Per quanto in seguito Martin abbia compiuto delle irregolarità non sono stati segnalati altri episodi di pirateria e non in ogni caso verso le navi inglesi.

Ci sono diverse melodie abbinate alla ballata che si diffuse anche nel Nuovo Mondo con il titolo di “Andy Bardan” (Andrew Bordeen)

PRIMA VERSIONE

Dal punto di vista compositivo nella ballata si fa uso di una tecnica tipica di questo genere: la ripetizione di parole e frasi per sottolineare e nello stesso tempo accrescere la tensione emotiva. Qui la tecnica è applicata alle parole finali del terzo verso di ogni strofa ed ha anche una funzione ritmica.

ASCOLTA Jimmie MacGregor 1960 (strofe da I a V, VII e IX) la
Una versione pulita della melodia con voce (scottish of course!) e chitarra

ASCOLTA Joan Baez la sua versione ha fatto da modello per molti degli arrangiamenti dopo il revival degli anni 60-70

ASCOLTA Figgy Duff, strepitosa versione folk-rock

ASCOLTA Banshee, una versione un po’ più barocca


I
There were three brothers in merry Scotland (1)
In merry Scotland they were three
And they did cast lots which of them should go,
should go, should go
and to turn robber all on the salt sea
II
The lot it fell first upon Henry Martin
The youngest of all the three
That he should turn robber all on the salt sea,
the salt sea, the salt sea,
For to maintain his two brothers and he
III
He had not been sailing but a long winter’s night (2)
And part of a short winter’s day
When he espied a rich lofty ship
lofty ship, lofty ship
Come a bibbing down him straight away
IV
“Hullo, Hullo!”, cried Henry Martin
“What makes you sail so nigh?”
“I’m a rich merchant ship bound for fair London(3) town, London town, London town
Would you please for to let me pass by?”
V
“O no, o no”, cried Henry Martin
“That thing it never could be;
For I have turned robber all on the salt sea,
the salt sea, the salt sea,
For to maintain my two brothers and me.”
VI
“So lower your topsail and brail up your mizzen
Bring yourself under my lee
Or I shall give you a full cannonball,
cannonball, cannonball,
And your dear bodies drown in the salt sea.”
VII
Then broadside and broadside and at it they went
For fully two hours or three
Till Henry Martin gave to her the death shot,
the death shot, the death shot,
Heavily listing to starboard went she
VIII
The rich merchant vessel was wounded full sore
Straight to the bottom went she
And Henry Martin he sailed away
sailed away, sailed away,
straight and proudly all on the salt sea
IX
Sad news, sad news to old England came
Sad news to fair London town
There was a rich vessel and she’s cast away,
cast away, cast away,
And all of her merry men drown’d.
Traduz. italiano Riccardo Venturi
I
C’eran tre fratelli nell’allegra Scozia (1),
in Scozia ce n’eran proprio tre
e tirarono a sorte chi di loro dovesse partire,
dovesse partire, partire
e diventare un pirata sul mare salato.
II
Per primo fu tirato a sorte Henry Martin,
che era il più giovane dei tre,
perché diventasse un pirata sul mare salato,
sul mare salato, salato
per mantenere i suoi due fratelli e sé.
III
Non aveva navigato che una lunga notte (2)
e una parte di un breve giorno d’inverno
quando si accorse d’una ricca e altera nave,
ricca e altera nave, altera nave
che gli veniva incontro rollando.
IV
«Ehi, ehi ! », gridò Henry Martin,
«Come mai ci navigate così dappresso?»
«Siamo un ricco mercantile diretto alla bella Londra (3),
bella Londra, bella Londra,
volete esser così gentili da farci passare?»
V
«Eh no, eh no !», gridò Henry Martin,
«’Sta cosa proprio non s’ha da fare,
perché son diventato pirata sul mare salato,
sul mare salato, mare salato
per mantenere i miei due fratelli e me.»
VI
«Quindi ammainate la vela di gabbia e la mezzana,
e mettetevi sottovento ;
oppure vi beccate una bella cannonata,
cannonata, cannonata,
e i vostri amati corpi affogheranno nel mare salato.»
VII
E allora si affiancarono buttandosi all’arrembaggio
per due ore buone o forse tre,
finché Henry Martin non le diede un colpo mortale,
un colpo mortale, mortale,
e la nave s’inclinò pesantemente a dritta.
VIII
Il ricco mercantile ricevette una grave ferita,
colando dritto a picco,
mentre Henry Martin se ne ripartiva
se ne ripartiva, se ne ripartiva
fiero e in avanti, sul mare salato.
IX
Tristi notizie, tristi notizie nella vecchia Inghilterra,
tristi notizie giunsero alla bella Londra.
C’era una ricca nave, e ora è andata perduta,
andata perduta, perduta,
e tutti gli uomini a bordo sono annegati.

NOTE di Riccardo Venturi
(1) Le ballate popolari sono ricchissime di tali denominazioni standardizzate, dei veri e propri luoghi comuni del tutto privi di senso. Così, ad esempio, la Scozia è sempre “allegra” (merry Scotland).
(2) Altro tipico “topos” stilistico delle ballate che intende rendere lo svolgimento di un viaggio, per terra o per mare. Fa parte del “tessuto connettivo” tipico di ogni componimento popolare.
(3) Altra denominazione standardizzata: la “bella Londra” (fair London, fair London town). Qui l’aggettivo “fair” ha ancora l’antico significato di “bello”

SECONDA VERSIONE

Una melodia diversa è abbinata alla versione Child ballad#250(E).
Questa versione, dalla più marcata impronta anti-inglese, si discosta dalla precedente a partire dalla V strofa, infatti non è descritta la battaglia tra le due navi, ma si passa subito alla notizia arrivata a Londra dell’affondamento della nave mercantile (questa volta espressamente attribuita sia come nave che come carico all’Inghilterra).
E’ la volta del capitano inglese Charles Howard (storpiato come Stewart) ad andare in mare alla ricerca del pirata, e la ballata segue puntualmente e ripete la sequenza dalla III alla V strofa, (i giorni di navigazione, lo scambio di presentazione tra le due navi e la dichiarazione di guerra) questa volta però “a bordo” della nave inglese.
Alla fine la nave inglese fugge e Andrew Barton gli urla dietro”vattene a casa e informa il tuo Enrico che lui potrà essere il re della terra ferma ma io sono il re dei mari!”
ASCOLTA James Kelly & Paddy O’Brien in Last River vol 1 anche su Spotify (open.spotify.com)  per l’ascolto integrale

VERSIONE di James Kelly in parte tratta da Child ballad#250(E)
I
Three loving brothers in merry Scotland,
And three loving brothers were they,
And they did cast lots to see which all the three,
would sail robbing away the salt sea;
II
The lot it fell upon Andrew Bartin,
The youngest one of the three,
That he should go robbing away the salt sea,
To maintain his two brothers and he.
III
They had not sailed more than three long winter nights,
Untill the ship they espied
a-sailing far off and sailing far on,
that the length she  came sailing on side.
IV
‘Who’s there? who’s there?’ says Andrew Bartin,
‘Who’s there that sailing so nigh?’
‘it’s three merchant vessel above England shore,
would you please for to let us pass by.’
V
Oh no, oh no – says Andrew Bartin
that thing it never could be
Your ship and your cargo I’ll gave my brave boys
and your bodies I was sinking in the sea
VI
When this news reached old England
King Henry he wore his crown
that his ship and his cargo were taken away,
And his merry men they were all died.
VII
‘Oh build me a boat,’ says Captain Charles Stewart,
‘oh build it for safe and sure,
And if I don’t bring you young Andrew Bartin,
My life I will never endure.’
VIII
The boat was built at as command
that was able for safe and sure
and Captain Charles Stewart,
..
to take off the all command
IX
They had not sailed more than three long winter nights,
Untill the ship they espied
a-sailing far off and sailing far on,
that the length she came sailing on side.
X
‘Who’s there? who’s there?’ says Captain Charles Stewart,
‘Who’s there that sailing so nigh?’
‘That’s scot brothers of merry Scotland,
would you please for to let us pass by.’
XI
Oh no, oh no – says Captain Charles Stewart,
that thing it never can be
Your ships and your cargos I’ll gave my brave boys
and your bodies I was sinking in the sea
XII
‘Come on! come on!’ says Andrew Bartin,
‘I value you not a pin;
For if you can show fine brass with fight
I’ll show you good steel within’
XIII
And now the battle it has begun
……………….
They fought for four hours, four hours or more,
till Captain Charles Stewart gave over.
XIV
Go back! go back!’ says Andrew Bartin,
And tell your king Henry for me,
That he can reign king over all the dry land,
But I will reign king of the sea.’

LA MORTE DI SIR ANDREW BARTON

bartonNel 1511 Barton stava incrociando la costa inglese in cerca di navi portoghesi quando le sue navi Lion e Jenny Pirwyn furono catturate da Sir Edward e Thomas Howard, terzo Duca di Norfolk. (in alcune versioni della ballata i due fratelli sono sostituiti impropriamente da Charles Howard, l’Alto Ammiraglio che comandò la flotta inglese contro l’invincibile Armata spagnola, nato però una ventina di anni più tardi).
I due agivano su incarico di Enrico VIII, che per opportunismo politico, stava appoggiando il Portogallo e la supplica dei mercanti portoghesi, che vedevano disturbati i loro traffici dal terribile corsaro.

La ballata viene spesso citata e ricordata per una strofa, quella in cui sono riferite le ultime, eroiche, parole del corsaro scozzese, ferito a morte da una freccia scagliata dall’arciere Horsley:
Fight on my men, sayes Sir Andrew Barton,
I am hurt, but I am not slaine;
I’le lay me down and bleed a-while,
And then I’le rise and ffight againe.

[Traduzione in italiano: “Combattete, su combattete, miei uomini, sono ferito ma non ancora morto; mi sdraierò a sanguinare un po’, e poi mi alzerò per combattere ancora“]

Una frase retorica, in cui il corsaro incita i suoi uomini a combattere fino all’ultimo e che probabilmente  non ha mai detto, ma che ce lo restituisce come un fiero personaggio al quale il re d’Inghilterra, sebbene davanti alla testa mozzata esibita a corte, riserva gli onori.

FONTI
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch250.htm
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/henrymartin.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/peter.bellamy/songs/sirandrewbarton.html
http://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=3270
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=66363
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5366

Lady Greensleeves

Read the post in English

Il brano Greensleeves giunge dal rinascimento inglese (con innegabili influenze musicali italiane) e ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo molto ricco e di una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i  generosi regali.

Era l’anno 1580 che vide un susseguirsi di pubblicazioni  di un canto d’amore di un gentiluomo alla sua Lady Greensleeves,  [in italiano la Signora dalle Maniche Verdi]; Richard Jones e Edward White si contendevano  le stampe di una canzone di gran moda, nel mese di settembre, lo stesso giorno Jones con  “A new Northern Dittye of the Lady Greene Sleeves” e White con “A ballad,  being the Ladie Greene Sleeves Answere to Donkyn his   frende“, poi dopo pochi giorni, ancora White con  un’altra versione: “Greene Sleeves and Countenance, in Countenance is Greene Sleeves” e  qualche mese dopo Jones  con la pubblicazione di “A merry newe Northern   Songe of Greene Sleeves“; questa volta la replica venne da William Elderton,  che, nel febbraio del 1581, scrisse la “Reprehension against Greene Sleeves” .
In ultimo la versione riveduta e ampliata da Richard Jones  con il titolo “A New Courtly Sonnet of the Lady Green Sleeves” inclusa nella collezione ‘A Handeful of Pleasant Delites’  del 1584, fu quella che diventò la versione finale, ancora oggi eseguita  (almeno per quanto riguarda la melodia e per buona parte del testo con ben 17  strofe).

LA MELODIA

La melodia nasce per liuto, lo strumento per eccellenza della musica  rinascimentale (e barocca) che ha visto in Inghilterra una pregevole fioritura con autori del calibro di John Jonson e di John Dowland (consiglio l’ascolto del Cd di Sting Labirinth). Come evidenziato nello studio approfondito di Ian Pittaway l’antenato di Greensleeves è il Passamezzo antico.
Verso la fine del XV secolo, gli strumenti a pizzico come il liuto stavano appena iniziando a sviluppare una nuova tecnica da aggiungere al loro repertorio espressivo, suonando corde per accordi piuttosto che suonando le note del periodo medievale. Uno degli accordi che si sviluppò fu il passamezzo antico (c’era anche il passamezzo moderno), che nacque in Italia all’inizio del XVI secolo prima di diffondersi in tutta Europa. Oggi è un po’ come il blues, ci sono una prefissara sequenza di accordi di base sulla quale viene aggiunta una melodia. (tradotto da qui)
Il coro però di Greensleeves segue l’andamento melodico di una Romanesca che a sua volta è stata una variante del passamezzo.

Melodia per liuto in “Het Luitboek van Thysius” scritto da Adriaen Smout per i Paesi Bassi  nel 1595

Baltimore Consort nella versione strumentale in stile  rinascimentale con andamento a ballo

Una coreografia della danza la ritroviamo solo  in epoca più tarda, nell'”English Dancing Master” di John Playford (sia nell’edizione del 1686 e poi pubblicata a più riprese nel Settecento) come english country dance

LA LEGGENDA

anne-boleyn-roseLa leggenda  vuole che sia stato Enrico VIII, nel 1526, a  scrivere “Greensleeves”  per Anna Bolena, proprio  all’inizio della loro relazione, quando lei lo faceva sospirare (e gli anni  furono sette prima che i due si sposassero).
Un’ipotesi suggestiva in quanto sia la melodia che il testo ben si adattano al personaggio, che di suo ha scritto svariati brani ancora oggi nel repertorio  di molti artisti di musica antica; tuttavia la  poesia non è stata trascritta in nessun manoscritto dell’epoca e quindi non possiamo essere certi dell’attribuzione.
L’equivoco è stato generato da William Chappell che nel suo “Popular Music of the Olden Time” (Londra: Chappell & Co, 1859) attribuisce la melodia al re, mal interpretando una citazione di Edward Guilpin. “Yet like th’ Olde ballad of the Lord of Lorne, Whose last line in King Harries dayes was borne.”(in Skialethia, or a Shadow of Truth, 1598: la ballata “The Lord of Lorne and the False Steward” risale al tempo di Enrico VIII (King Harries) e, secondo Chappell è sempre stata cantata sulla melodia Greensleeves.

Così nella Serie Tv “The Tudors” si segue la leggenda e noi possiamo ammirare Jonathan Rhys Meyers tutto assorto mentre “trova” la melodia sul liuto…
The Broadside Band & Jeremy Barlow

Per restare in tema il gruppo tedesco  “Gregorian“, con le immagini del film “The Tudors” (strofe I, III, VIII, IX)

L’ORIGINE IRLANDESE?

William Henry Grattan Flood in A History of Irish Music (Dublino: Browne e Nolan, 1905) è stato il primo a presumere (senza addurre prove) l’irlandesità della melodia.  “In a manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin … Under date of 1566, there is a manuscript Love Song (without music however), written by Donal, first Earl of Clancarty. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves.”
Da allora l’idea della paternità irlandese ha preso sempre più vigore tant’è che il brano è presente nelle compilations di musica celtica  etichettato come irish traditional.

lady-greensleeves

Lirica cortese o uno scherzo pesante?

Walter+Crane-My+Lady+Greensleeves+-+(1)-SIl testo ci narra del corteggiamento di un gentiluomo verso una Lady un po’ ritrosa che lo respinge, nonostante i suoi generosi e principeschi regali; più ironicamente, si può interpretare come il lamento di un gentiluomo verso la moglie o l’amante bisbetica!
Roberto Venturi propende per un contesto un po’ più piccante
Già ai tempi di Geoffrey Chaucer e dei Racconti di Canterbury (ricordiamo che Chaucer visse dal 1343 al 1400) l’abito verde era considerato tipico di una “donna leggera”, leggasi di una prostituta. Si tratterebbe quindi di una giovane donna di promiscui costumi; Nevill Coghill, il celebre ed eroico traduttore in inglese moderno dei Canterbury Tales, spiega -in riferimento ad un’interpretazione di un passo chauceriano- che, all’epoca, il colore verde aveva precise connotazioni sessuali, particolarmente nella frase A green gown, una gonna verde. Si trattava, in estrema pratica, delle macchie d’erba sul vestito di una donna che praticava (o subiva) un rapporto sessuale all’esterno, in un prato, “in camporella” come si direbbe oggigiorno. Se di una donna si diceva che aveva “la gonna verde”, in pratica era un pesante ammiccamento e le si dava di leggera se non tout court della puttana.
La canzone sarebbe quindi la lamentazione di un amante tradito e abbandonato, o di un cliente respinto; insomma, come dire, qualcosa di tutt’altro che regale (sebbene in ogni epoca i re siano stati generalmente i primi puttanieri del Regno). Un’altra possibile interpretazione è che l’amante tradito, o respinto, si sia voluto come vendicare sulla poveretta indirizzandole una deliziosa canzoncina in cui le dà della puttana mediante la metafora delle “maniche verdi”.” (Riccardo Venturi da qui)

Moltissimi gli interpreti, con versioni in stile antico e moderno (anche Yngwie Malmsteen la suona con la sua chitarra e Leonard Cohen ne propone una riscrittura nel 1974 ) di una melodia antica che non ha mai perso il suo fascino e popolarità.
Oggi il testo viene raramente eseguito e  solo per due o quattro strofe, ma è un brano amato dai gruppi corali che lo cantano più estesamente.

Nella versione in ‘A Handful of Pleasant Delites’, 1584, dalla raccolta di Israel G. Young (una ventina di strofe vedi testo qui) ci si dilunga sui regali che il nobiluomo fa alla sua bella per vezzeggiarla:  “kerchers to thy head”, “board and bed”, “petticoats of the best”, “jewels to thy chest”, “smock of silk”, “girdle of gold”, “pearls”, “purse”, “guilt knives”, “pin case”, “crimson stockings all of silk”, “pumps as white as was the milk”, “gown of the grassy green” con “sleeves of satin”, che la fanno essere “our harvest queen”, “garters” decorate d’oro e d’argento, “gelding”, e servitori “men clothed all in green”, e non ultimo tante leccornie ( “dainties”).

Le proposte per l’ascolto sono veramente tante e fare una cernita è ardua impresa (vedi qui), così mi limiterò a un paio di suggerimenti (il primo di parte!)

Alice Castle live 2005

 Loreena  McKennitt in The   Visit 1991 (strofe I, III)
Jethro Tull in Christmas Album 2003 versione strumentale

David Nevue un arrangiamento per pianoforte stupefacente!

Da non perdere la traduzione di Riccardo Venturi (sommo poeta e traduttore) (qui) del Nouo Sonetto Cortese su la Signora da le Verdi Maniche. Su la noua Melodia di Verdi Maniche.
Verdi Maniche era ogni mia Gioja,
Verdi Maniche, la mia Delizia.
Verdi Maniche, lo mio Cor d’Oro;
Chi altra, se non la Signora da le Verdi Maniche?


chorus (1)
Greensleeves(2) was all my joy
Greensleeves was my delight,
Greensleeves my heart of gold
And who but my lady Greensleeves.
I
Alas, my love, you do me wrong,
To cast me off discourteously(3).
For I have loved you well and long,
Delighting in your company.
II
Your vows you’ve  broken, like my heart,
Oh, why did you so enrapture me?
Now I remain in a world apart
But my heart remains in captivity.
III
I have been ready at  your hand,
To grant whatever you would crave,
I have both wagered life and land,
Your love and good-will for to have.
IV
Thy petticoat of sendle(4) white
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of silk and white
And these I bought gladly.
V
If you intend thus to  disdain,
It does the more enrapture me,
And even so, I still remain
A lover in captivity.
VI
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen,
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VII
Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,
but still thou hadst it readily.
Thy music still to play and sing;
And yet thou wouldst not love me.
VIII
Well, I will pray to God on high,
that thou my constancy mayst see,
And that yet once before I die,
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.
IX
Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,
To God I pray to prosper thee,
For I am still thy lover true,
Come once again and love me
Traduzione italiano
coro(1)
Greensleeves era la gioia mia
Greensleeves era la mia delizia,
Greensleeves era il mio cuore d’oro,
chi se non la mia Signora dalle Maniche Verdi?(2)
I
Ahimè amore mio, non mi rendete giustizia, a respingermi con scortesia
vi ho amata per tanto tempo
deliziandomi della vostra compagnia.
II
I vostri voti avete spezzato,
come il mio cuore.
Oh perché così mi  avete rapito?
Ora resto in un mondo a parte
e il mio cuore resta in prigione
III
Ero pronto al vostro fianco, a concedervi ciò che bramavate e avevo impegnato vita e terre, per restare nelle vostre buone grazie.
IV
La gonna di zendalo bianco(4)
con sfarzosi ricami d’oro,
la gonna di seta bianca
vi ho comprato con gioia.
V
Se così intendete disprezzarmi,
ancor più m’incantate
e anche così, continuo a rimanere
un amante in prigionia
VI
I miei uomini erano tutti di verde vestiti , ed erano al vostro servizio
tutto ciò era galante da vedersi
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VII
Voi non potreste desiderare cosa terrena senza che l’abbiate prontamente, la vostra musica sempre suonerò e canterò
e tuttavia voi non vorreste amarmi
VIII
Pregherò Iddio lassù
che voi possiate accorgervi della mia costanza e che una volta prima
che io  muoia voi possiate infine amarmi
IX
Ed ora Greensleeves  vi saluto, addio
Pregherò Iddio che voi prosperiate
sono ancora il vostro fedele amante
venite ancora da me ed amatemi

NOTE
1) l’ordine in cui sono cantate le prime due frasi del coro a volte sono  invertite e iniziano in senso contrario
2) Nel medioevo il colore verde era il simbolo  della rigenerazione e quindi della giovinezza e del vigore fisico, significava “fertilità” ma anche “speranza” e accostato  all’oro indicava il piacere. Era il colore della medicina per i suoi poteri  rivitalizzanti. Colore dell’amore allo stadio nascente, nel  Rinascimento era il colore usato dai giovani specialmente a Maggio; nelle donne  era anche il colore della castità. E tale attribuzione mal si accosta all’altro significato più promiscuo  di “donnina sempre pronta a rotolarsi nell’erba”. E il fascino della ballata sta proprio nella sua ambiguità!
Il verde è anche il colore che nelle fiabe/ballate connota una creatura fatata.
Le parole gaeliche “Grian Sliabh” (letteralmente tradotte come “sole montagna” ovvero una “montagna esposta a sud, soleggiata”)  si pronunciano Green Sleeve (il brano è peraltro molto popolare in Irlanda soprattutto come slow air). Grian è anche il nome di un fiume che scorre dalle Sliabh Aughty (contea Clare e Galway)
3) le espressioni sono proprie della lirica cortese
4) lo zendalo è un velo di seta

Nella versione estesa i regali dello spasimante sono molti e costosi assai ed è tutto un lagnarsi di “oh quanto mi costi bella mia!”
IV
I bought three kerchers to thy head,
That were wrought fine and gallantly;
I kept them both at board and bed,
Which cost my purse well-favour’dly.
V
I bought thee petticoats of the best,
The cloth so fine as fine might be:
I gave thee jewels for thy chest;
And all this cost I spent on thee.
VI
Thy smock of silk both fair and white,
With gold embroidered gorgeously;
Thy petticoat of sendall right;
And this I bought thee gladly.
VII
Thy girdle of gold so red,
With pearls bedecked sumptously,
The like no other lasses had;
And yet you do not love me!
VIII
Thy purse, and eke thy gay gilt knives,
Thy pin-case, gallant to the eye;
No better wore the burgess’ wives;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
IX
Thy gown was of the grassy green,
The sleeves of satin hanging by;
Which made thee be our harvest queen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
X
Thy garters fringed with the gold,
And silver aglets hanging by;
Which made thee blithe for to behold;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XI
My gayest gelding thee I gave,
To ride wherever liked thee;
No lady ever was so brave;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XII
My men were clothed all in green,
And they did ever wait on thee;
All this was gallant to be seen;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIII
They set thee up, they took thee down,
They served thee with humility;
Thy foot might not once touch the ground;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!
XIV
For every morning, when thou rose,
I sent thee dainties, orderly,
To cheer thy stomach from all woes;
And yet thou wouldst not love me!

FONTI
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?id=53904&lang=it
http://greensleeves-hubs.hubpages.com/hub/FolkSongGreensleeves-Greensleeves   http://thesession.org/tunes/1598
http://ingeb.org/songs/alasmylo.html
http://tudorhistory.org/topics/music/greensleeves.html
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves1of3mythology/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves2of3history/
http://earlymusicmuse.com/greensleeves3of3music/
http://ontanomagico.altervista.org/alas-madame.htm