Archivi tag: drinking song

Little Billee sea shanty

Leggi in italiano

A sea song with caustic humorism also entitled “Three Sailors from Bristol City” or “Little Boy Billee”, which deals with a disturbing subject for our civilization, but always around the corner: cannibalism!
The sea is a place of pitfalls and jokes of fate, a storm can take you off course, on a boat or raft, without food and water, it’s a subject also treated in great painting (Theodore Gericault, The raft of the Medusa see): human life poised between hope and despair.

The three sailors

The maritime songs can express the biggest fears with a good laugh! This song was born in 1863 with the title “The three sailors” written by William Makepeace Thackeray as a parody of “La Courte Paille” (= short straw) – that later became “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) as a nursery rhyme.(see first part): cases of cannibalism at sea as an extreme resource for survival were much debated by public opinion and the courts themselves were inclined to commute death sentences in detention.
The murder by necessity (or the sacrifice of one for the good of others) finds a justification in the terrible experience of death by starvation that pushes the human mind to despair and madness, but in 1884 the case of the sinking of Mignonette broke public opinion and the same home secretary Sir William Harcourt had to say “if these men are not condemned for the murder, we are giving carte blanche to the captain of any ship to eat the cabin boy every time the food is scarce “. (translated from here).
The ruling stands as a leading case and puts life as a supreme good by not admitting murder for necessity as self-defense

Little Billee
Bernard Partridge Cartoons

From notes of “Penguin Book” (1959):
The Portugese Ballad  A Nau Caterineta  and the French ballad  La Courte Paille  tell much the same story.  The ship has been long at sea, and food has given out.  Lots are drawn to see who shall be eaten, and the captain is left with the shortest straw.  The cabin boy offers to be sacrificed in his stead, but begs first to be allowed to keep lookout till the next day.  In the nick of time he sees land (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) and the men are saved.  Thackeray burlesqued this song in his  Little Billee.  It is likely that the French ballad gave rise to The Ship in Distress, which appeared on 19th. century broadsides.  George Butterworth obtained four versions in Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [issue 17] pp.320-2) and Sharp printed one from James Bishop of Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) with “in many respects the grandest air” which he had found in that county.  The text comes partly from Mr. Bishop’s version, and partly from a broadside.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Ralph Steadman from “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.(1)”

“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(2)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(3) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (4)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.

NOTES
Thackeray lyrics here
1) from french chemise
2) or top fore-gallant
2) his companions did not have to be very attached to the Bible (and probably Billy would have invented new ones to save time!)
4)  “Knight Commander of the Bath”, the chivalrous military order founded by George I in 1725

SEA SHANTY VERSION

According to Stan Hugill “Little Billee” was a sea shanty for pump work, a boring and monotonous job that could certainly be “cheered up” by this little song! Hugill only reports the text saying that the melody is like the French “The était a Petit Navire”, so the adaptation of Hulton Clint  has the performance of a lullaby.

I
There were three sailors of Bristol City;
They stole a boat and went to sea.
But first with beef and hardtack biscuits
And pickled pork they loaded she.
And pickled pork they loaded she
II
There was gorging Jack and guzzling Jimmy,
And likewise there was little Billee.
but when they got to the Equator
They’d only left but one split pea.
III
Then gorging Jack to guzzling Jimmy,
“I am confounded hungaree.”
Says guzzling Jimmy to gorging Jacky
“We’ve no wittles (1), so we must eat we.”
IV
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“Oh Guzzling Jim what a fool you be..
There’s little Billy, who’s young and tender,
We’re old and tough, so let’s eat he.”
V
“Make haste, make haste” then say Guzzling Jimmy
as he drew his snickher snee (2)
“O Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
undo the collar of your chemie.”
VI
When William heard this information
he drope down on bended knee
“O let me say my catechism
which my dear mom taught to me”
VII
So up he went to the maintop-gallant
and he drope down on his bended knee
and than he said  all his catechism
which his dear mamy once taught to he
VIII
He scarce had said his catechism
when up he jumps “There’s land I see
Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
IX
“Jerusalem and Madagascar,
And North and South Amerikee;
There’s the British fleet a-riding at anchor,
With Admiral Napier, K.C.B.”
X
When they bordered to Admiral’s vessel,
He hanged fat Jack (3) and flogged Jimmee;
as for little Bill they make him
The Captain of a Seventy-three (4).

NOTES
1)  It’s a mispronunciation of “vittles,” which is a corrupted form of “victuals,” which means “food.”
2) a particularly lethal big knife used as a weapon
3)in some versions the degree of guilt between the two sailors is distinguished, so only one is hanged
4) 73 cannon war vessel

And for corollary here is the French version “Un Petit Navire”

LINK
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872

Barnacle Bill the Sailor

Una drinking song popolare in America variamente intitolata “Barnacle Bill ( o Bollocky Bill- Abraham Brown), the Sailor ”
Il contesto è quella di una night visiting song con botta e risposta tra la fanciulla e il marinaio, inevitabili le versioni pecorecce e anche nelle versioni “pulite” non mancano i doppi sensi.
La situazione è ripresa anche nei cartoons, vediamola nel triangolo Olivia, Bracio di Ferro e Bluto (nei panni di Barnacle Bill)!

ASCOLTA Kembra Phaler w/ Antony/Joseph Arthur/Foetus Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013 (su Spotify) nella versione  la leggiadra fanciulla è un uomo che canta in farsetto e la voce del vecchio sporco marinaio infoiato è di Kembra Phaler -con effetto esilarante

Testo nella versione di Kembra Phaler
I
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Who’s that knocking at my door?
Cried the fair young maiden!
II
I’ll come down and let you in
I’ll come down and let you in
I’ll come down and let you in
Cried the fair young maiden
III
Well, it’s only me from over the sea
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
I’m hard to windward and hard a-lee,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
I’ve newly come upon the shore,
And this is what I’m looking for,
A jade (1), a maid, or even a whore
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
IV
Are you young and handsome, sir
Are you young and handsome, sir
Are you young and handsome, sir
Cried the fair young maiden
V
I’m old and rough and dirty and tough
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
I never can get drunk enough,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor,
I drinks my whiskey when I can
Drinks it from an old tin can,
For whiskey is the life of man,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
VI
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Tell me when we soon shall wed
Cried the fair young maiden
VII
You foolish girl, it’s nothing but sport,
Says Barnacle Bill the Sailor
The handsome gals is what I court
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
With my false heart and flatterin’ tongue
I courts ‘em all both old and young
I courts ‘em all, but marries none
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
VIII
When will I see you again
When will I see you again
When will I see you again
Cried the fair young maiden
IX
Never no more you fucking whore,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor.
Tonite I’m sailin’ from the shore
Said Barnacle Bill the sailor.
I’m sailing away in another track
To give other maid a crack,
But keep it oiled till I come back,
Said Barnacle Bill the Sailor
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I LEI
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Chi è che bussa alla mia porta?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
II LEI
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Scendo e ti farò entrare
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
III LUI
Beh, sono solo io da oltre il mare
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
Ce l’ho duro controvento e sottovento
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
sono appena sbarcato a terra
e questo è quanto cerco: una cavallona, una fanciulla o anche una puttana -disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
IV LEI
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Siete giovane e bello, signore?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
V LUI
Sono un vecchio sporco brutto ceffo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
e non mi ubriaco mai abbastanza
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
bevo whiskey quando posso
lo bevo da una vecchia lattina
perchè il whiskey è la vita di un uomo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
VI LEI
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo ?
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo ?
Dimmi quando presto ci sposeremo?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
VII LUI
Sei pazza, non è altro che divertimento
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
alle belle ragazze faccio la corte
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
con cuore falso e lingua
ingannevole
le corteggio tutte, vecchie e giovani
le corteggio tutte, ma nessuna sposo
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
VIII LEI
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Quando ci incontreremo di nuovo?
Gridò la leggiadra fanciulla!
IX LUI
Mai più fottuta puttana
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
stanotte sto salpando da terra
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
in partenza per un’altra scia
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio
ma tienila oliata finchè non torno
-disse Barnacle Bill il marinaio

NOTE
1) jade arriva dai tempi di Shakespeare per indicare una ragazza che vale poco perchè consumata proprio come ol termine spregiativo per indicare una “giumenta” (jade)

FONTI
http://www.musicanet.org/robokopp/shanty/whosthat.htm
http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs/b/barnaclebillthesailor.html
https://perfect-beaker.livejournal.com/175213.html

MARY MAC

Una vecchia canzone scozzese Up Amang The Heather o “The Hill of Bennachie” potrebbe essere benissimo la matrice della versione attuale di Mary Mac una scanzonata e popolare drinking song, che è iniziata a circolare anche in Irlanda intorno agli anni 60-70.
La particolarità di questa versione della melodia è che il tempo diventa sempre più veloce, e le parole sono scandite sempre più velocemente in una specie di scioglilingua. Qui sembra quasi la parte seconda della storia raccontata in “Up among the heather”: dopo che il nostro galletto si è divertito a rotolarsi nell’erica con la ragazza (c’è chi preferisce la ginestra o il fieno..) è  costretto ad affrontare un matrimonio riparatore!

Il testo è stato accreditato a Tommy Makem che registrò per primo la canzone nel 1977 con il titolo di “Mary Mac”.
ASCOLTA Tommy Makem & Clancy Brothers (strofe I, II, III, VI e VII)
un vero scioglilingua che arrotola le “erre”

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea (strofe I e da III a VII), la IV e la V strofa sono chiaramente estrapolate da “Up among the heather.”

ASCOLTA Carbon Leaf ci sono delle leggere variazioni testuali riportate nelle note


I
There’s a neat(1) little lass
and her name is Mari Mac,
Make no mistake, she’s the girl
I’m gonna track;
Lots of other fellas
try to get her on her back,
But I’m thinking that
they’ll have to get up early(2).
Mari Mac’s mother’s
making Mari Mac marry me,
My mother’s making me
marry Mari Mac;
Well I’m going to marry Mari
for when Mari’s taking care of me,
We’ll all be feeling merry
when I marry Mari Mac.
Kaiyut-little-ottle-eetle-ottle-eetle-um(3)
II
Now this wee lass,
she has a lot of class.
She has a lot of brass
and her mother thinks I’m a gas(4).
So I’d be a silly ass
if I let the matter pass,
for my mother thinks
she suits me rather fairly
III
Now Mari and her mother
are an awful lot together,
In fact, you hardly see the one
or the one without the other;
And people(5) often wonder
if it’s Mari or her mother,
Or the both of them together
I am courting.
IV
Well up among the heather
in the hills of Benifee (6)
Well I had a bonnie lass
sitting on me knee
A bumble bee stung me
right above me knee
Up among the heather
in the hills of Benifee
V
Well I said, “Wee bonnie lassie,
where you going to spend the day?”
She said, “Among the heather
in the hills of Benifee;
Where all the boys and girls
are making out so free(7),
Up among the heather
in the hills of Benifee.”
VI
The wedding’s on Wednesday,
everything’s arranged,
Soon her name will be changed to mine
unless her mind be changed;
And making the arrangements,
I’m feeling quite deranged(8),
Marriage is an awful undertaking.
VII
(It’s) Sure to be a grand affair,
grander than a fair,
going to be a fork and plate
for every man that’s there(9);
And I’ll be a bugger
if I don’t get my share(10),
If I don’t, we’ll be very much mistaken.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’è una ragazzina fantastica
e si chiama Mary Mac,
nessun errore, lei è la ragazza
che ho preso di mira.
Un sacco di altri ragazzi
cercano di andarle dietro
ma credo che
dovevano svegliarsi prima!
La madre di Mary Mac
sta facendo Mary Mac sposare con me,
mia madre mi sta facendo
sposare con Mary Mac
Beh io mi vado a sposare Mary
che quando Mary si prenderà cura di me,
saremo tutti allegri,
quando mi sposerò Mary Mac
Kaiyut-little-ottle-eetle-ottle-eetle-um!

II
Questa ragazzina
ha un sacco di classe
ha un sacco di gingilli
e sua madre pensa che io sia uno sbruffone. Così sarei un asino sciocco
se lasciassi cadere la faccenda
perchè mia madre pensa
che sia quella giusta per me.
III
Ora Maria e sua madre
stanno un sacco di tempo insieme,
infatti difficilmente vedrete
l’una senza l’altra
e la gente si chiede spesso
se è Mari o sua madre
o entrambe insieme
che sto corteggiando.
IV
Su tra l’erica
sulle colline del Benifee,
avevo una bella ragazza
seduta sulle mie ginocchia
un calabrone mi punse
proprio sopra il ginocchio
lassù tra l’edera
sulle colline del Benifee.
V
Ho detto, “bene bella ragazza, dove hai intenzione di trascorrere la giornata?”
dice: “Tra l’erica sulle
colline di Benifee;
dove tutti i ragazzi e le ragazze
se la spassano,
lassù tra l’erica
sulle colline di Benifee!”
VI
Il matrimonio è per mercoledì,
tutto è organizzato,
presto il suo nome cambierà nel mio
a meno che lei cambi intenzione;
prendere gli accordi (per la festa di nozze)
mi fa sentire un po’ folle,
il matrimonio è un impegno terribile.
VII
Sarà di certo una grande festa
più grandiosa di una fiera
ci sarà una forchetta e un piatto
per ogni uomo presente;
e io sarei uno stronzetto
se non mettessi la mia parte,
se non lo facessi, sarebbe molto sbagliato

NOTE
1) i Carbon Leaf dicono wee Makem dice little
2) letterlamente “alzarsi per tempo”
3) abbellimento non sense. Il coro è evidentemente uno scioglilingua
4) Makem dice “There a little lass and she has a lot of brass, has a lot of gas and her father thinks I’m gas”
5) i Carbon Leaf dicono lads
6) le  hill o’ Bennachie sono storpiate in colline di Benifee (vedi)
7) i Carbon Leaf dicono “where all the boys and girls are makin’ it for free”
8) i Carbon Leaf dicono “We’re makin’ the arrangements and I’m just a bit deranged”.
9) Makem e i Carbon Leaf dicono “There’s gonna be a coach and pair for every couple there.”
10) Makem e i Carbon Leaf dicono “We’ll dine upon the finest fare. I’m sure to get my share”.

FONTI
http://chivalry.com/cantaria/lyrics/marymac.html
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/04/marymack.htm

COME LANDLORD FILL THE FLOWING BOWL

“Landlord, fill the flowing bowl” anche conosciuta con il titolo di “The Jolly Fellow” o “Three Jolly Coachmen” è una canzone gogliardica già cantata all’epoca di Shakespeare, è annotata parzialmente da John Fletcher nel suo “The Bloody other, or Robert, Duke of Normandy” del 1610.
Compare in diverse broadside ballads del 1800 ed è diventata la canzone conosciuta da tutti gli studenti inglesi. La versione riportata è quella “pulita” rispetto alle versioni in circolazione con strofe ben più volgari.
In Scozia è conosciuta come “For tonight we’ll merry merry be” classificata come melodia per Country Dance (in “Collection of Merry Melodies” vol 3 James S Kerr, 1870). Su Contemplator.com il brano è intitolato “Farewell to Grog“. Ed è così riportato: “Caspar Schenk, USN composed the tune and it was accordingly sung the night of August 31, 1862 in the wardroom of the U.S.S. Portsmouth.”

Three Jolly Coachmen

ASCOLTA The Kingston Trio 1958 (invertono le strofe III e II)


I
One, two, and three jolly coachmen sat at an English tavern.
Three jolly coachmen sat at an English(1) tavern,
And they deci-ided, and they deci-ided, and they deci-ided
To have another flagon.
CHORUS
Landlord(2), fill the flowing bowl
until it doth run over. (Repeat)

For tonight we merr-I be, (Repeat twice)
Tomorrow we’ll be sober. (What!)
II
Here’s to the man drinks water pure(3) and goes to bed quite sober.
He falls as the leaves do fall,
He’ll die before October! (Ho Ho Ho!)
III
Here’s to the man who drinks dark ale(4) and goes to bed quite mellow!
He lives as he ought to live
For he’s a jolly good fellow (Ha Ha Ha)
IV
Here’s to the maid who steals a kiss and runs to tell her mother.
She’s a foolish, foolish thing.
For she’ll not get another. (Pity!)
V
Here’s to the maid who steals a kiss and stays to steal another.
She’s a boon to all man kind.
For soon she’ll be a mother!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Uno due e tre allegri  vetturini seduti in una taverna inglese
tre allegri  vetturini seduti in una taverna inglese(1).
E decisero, essi decisero, decisero,
essi decisero
di prendere un’altra caraffa
CORO
“Oste (2) riempi la boccia
fino a farla traboccare!

Perchè stasera staremo allegri
e domani saremo sobri!
II
Ecco l’uomo che beve acqua pura (3)
e va a letto decisamente sobrio.
Cade come fanno le foglie caduche e morirà prima di ottobre.
III
Ecco l’uomo che beve birra scura (4)
e va a letto bello pieno!
Vive come si deve vivere
perchè lui è un bravo ragazzo!
IV
Ecco la fanciulla che ruba un bacio
e corre a dirlo alla madre!
Si comporta da sciocca
e non otterrà altro!
V
Ecco la fanciulla che ruba un bacio
e resta a prenderne un altro.
E’ una manna per il genere umano.
Perchè presto sarà madre!

NOTE
1) in alcune versioni è Bristol
2) Landlord si traduce sia come “taverniere, oste” che come “padrone di casa”
3) in altre versioni dice “The man that drinketh small beer” che è una frase più logica con il resto del verso: chi beve una birra leggera è più sobrio di chi beve birra scura ad alta gradazione alcolica.
4) in altre versioni anche “whiskey clear

Le varianti sono infinite (si veda ad esempio qui)anche in chiave natalizia come wassail song!

ASCOLTA in versione rock

ASCOLTA Madrigals

da qui  (vedi)
I
(Come) Landlord, fill the flowing bowl,
Until it doth flow over;
(Come) Landlord, fill the flowing bowl,
Until it doth flow over.
II (chorus)
For tonight we’ll merry, merry be
For tonight we’ll merry, merry be,
For tonight we’ll merry, merry be,
Tomorrow we’ll be sober.
III
The man who drinketh little beer,
And goes to bed quite sober,
Fades as the autumn leaves do fade,
That drop off in October.
IV
The man who drinketh lots of beer,
And goes to bed quite mellow,
Liveth as a drinker ought to live,
And dies a jolly good fellow
And dies a jolly good fellow.
And so say all of us!
V
For tonight we’ll merry, merry be,
For tonight we’ll merry, merry be,
For tonight we’ll merry, merry be,
Tomorrow we’ll be sober.
VI
Remember: He who drinks just what he likes,
And gets himself hung over
Will live until he die perhaps,
And then lie down in clover.
VII
For tonight we’ll *hick* shh!
For tonight we’ll *hick* shh!
For tonight we’ll *hick* ssshh!
Tomorrow we’ll be sober.
At least that’s what we’re hoping!
VIII
And so we wish you lots of cheer
And lots of merry meetings.
And now that Christmas time is here
We send you all our greetings.
IX
For tonight we’ll *whistling*
For tonight we’ll *whistling*
For tonight we’ll *whistling*
Tomorrow we’ll be very very sober,
very very sober!
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
(Vieni) Oste riempi la boccia
fino a farla traboccare!
(Vieni) Oste riempi la boccia
fino a farla traboccare!
II
Perchè stasera staremo allegri
perchè stasera staremo allegri
perchè stasera staremo allegri
e domani saremo sobri!
III
L’uomo che beve poca birra
va a letto decisamente sobrio.
Muore come fanno le foglie d’autunno che cadono in ottobre.
IV
L’uomo che beve tanta birra
e va a letto bello pieno!
Vive come un bevitore deve vivere
e muore da allegro bravo ragazzo
e muore da allegro bravo ragazzo
e così diciamo per noi!
V
Perchè stasera staremo allegri
perchè stasera staremo allegri
perchè stasera staremo allegri
e domani saremo sobri!
VI
Ricorda colui che beve solo ciò che gli piace
e si sbronza fino a scoppiare
forse vivrà fino a morire
e poi si riposerà sul trifoglio (1)
VII
Perchè stasera staremo (singhiozzo)
perchè stasera staremo (singhiozzo)
perchè stasera staremo (singhiozzo)
e domani saremo sobri!
Perlomeno è quello che speriamo!
VIII
E così vi facciamo tanti auguri
un sacco di felici incontri
e ora che Natale è arrivato
vi mandiamo in nostri auguri
IX
Perchè stasera staremo (fischiettare)
perchè stasera staremo (fischiettare)
perchè stasera staremo (fischiettare)
e domani saremo molto, molto sobri
molto, molto sobri!

NOTE
1) credo voglia alludere ai “verdi pascoli” del Paradiso

FONTI
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/c/comeland.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=66904
http://songschool.villagequire.org.uk/songs/
come_landlord_fill_the_flowing_bowl.pdf

http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/title/Landlord%20fill%20a%20flowing%20bowl
http://www.contemplator.com/sea/grog.html

Little Boy Billy

Read the post in English

Una canzone del mare umoristica (del tipo caustico)  intitolata anche “Three Sailors from Bristol City” o “Little Boy Billee”, che tratta un argomento inquietante per la nostra civiltà, ma sempre dietro l’angolo: il cannibalismo!
Il mare è un luogo d’insidie e di scherzi del fato, una tempesta ti può portare fuori rotta, su una barcaccia di fortuna o una zattera, senza cibo e acqua, un tema trattato anche nella grande pittura ( Theodore Gericault, La zattera della Medusa vedi): la vita umana in bilico tra speranza e disperazione.

The three sailors

Nelle canzoni marinaresche si finisce per esprimere le paure più grandi con una bella risata! Il brano nasce nel 1863 con il titolo “The three sailors” scritto da William Makepeace Thackeray come parodia di una canzone marinaresca francese dal titolo “La Courte Paille” (=la paglia corta)– diventata in seguito “Le Petit Navire” (The Little Corvette) e finita nelle canzoncine per bambini. (vedi prima parte): i casi di cannibalismo in mare come estrema risorsa per la sopravvivenza erano molto dibattiti dall’opinione pubblica e gli stessi tribunali erano inclini a commutare le sentenze di morte in detenzione.
L’omicidio per necessità (o il sacrificio di uno per il bene degli altri) trova una giustificazione nella terribile esperienza della morte per fame che spinge la mente umana alla disperazione e alla pazzia, ma nel 1884 il caso del naufragio del Mignonette  spaccò l’opinione pubblica e lo stesso ministro dell’interno dell’epoca Sir William Harcourt, ebbe a dire “se questi uomini non vengono condannati per l’omicidio, stiamo dando carta bianca al capitano di qualsiasi nave di mangiare il mozzo ogni volta che scarseggiano i viveri”. (tratto da qui).
La sentenza si pone come caso leader e mette la vita come bene supremo non ammettendo l’omicidio per necessità come autodifesa

Little Billee
Bernard Partridge Cartoons

Dalle note del “Penguin Book” (1959):
La ballata portoghese A Nau Caterineta e la ballata francese La Courte Paille raccontano la stessa storia. La nave è stata a lungo in mare e il cibo e vinito. Le pagliuzze sono pescate per vedere chi deve essere mangiato, e il capitano rimane con la cannuccia più corta. Il mozzo si offre per essere sacrificato al suo posto, ma chiede di poter restare di vedetta fino al giorno successivo. In breve tempo vede la terra (“Je vois la tour de Babylone, Barbarie de l’autre côté”) e gli uomini vengono salvati. Thackeray ha parodiato questa canzone nel suo Little Billee. È probabile che la ballata francese abbia dato origine a The Ship in Distress, apparsa nei fogli volanti dell’Ottocento. George Butterworth si è procurato quattro versioni nel Sussex (FSJ vol.IV [numero 17] pp.320-2) e Sharp ne ha stampato una da James Bishop di Priddy, Somerset (Folk Songs from Somerset, vol.III, p.64) con “per molti versi una melodia più grandiosa “che aveva trovato in quella contea. Il testo proviene in parte dalla versione di Bishop, e in parte da un foglio volante.”  -R.V.W./A.L.L.

Ralph Steadman in “Rogue’s Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs, and Chanteys, ANTI- 2006″.


There were three men of Bristol City;
They stole a ship and went to sea.
There was Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
And also Little Boy Billee.
They stole a tin of captain’s biscuits
And one large bottle of whiskee.
But when they reached the broad Atlantic
They had nothing left but one split pea.
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“We’ve nothing to eat so I’m going to eat thee.”
Said Guzzling Jimmy, “I’m old and toughest,
So let’s eat Little Boy Billee.”
“O Little Boy Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
So undo the top button of your little chemie.(1)”
“O may I say my catechism
That my dear mother taught to me?”
He climbed up to the main topgallant(2)
And there he fell upon his knee.
But when he reached the Eleventh(3) Commandment,
He cried “Yo Ho! for land I see.”
“I see Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
“I see the British fleet at anchor
And Admiral Nelson, K.C.B. (4)”
They hung Gorging Jack and Guzzling Jimmy
But they made an admiral of Little Boy Billee.
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
C’erano tre uomini di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare.
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e anche il giovane Billy.
Rubarono una lattina di biscotti al capitano
e una grande bottiglia di whisky.
Ma quando raggiunsero il mare aperto
non era avanzato che un pisello
secco.
Disse Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Non abbiamo niente da mangiare così ti mangerò”
disse Jimmy il Trinca “Sono vecchio e rinsecchito,
è meglio mangiare il giovane Billy”
“Oh Giovane Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti
così sbottona il primo bottone della tua camiciola”
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti come la mia cara mamma mi ha raccomandato?”
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro
e poi si inginocchiò (sulla crocetta).
Ma quando arrivò all’11° comandamento
gridò “Yo Ho! Terra”.
“Vedo Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
Vedo la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B.”
Impiccarono Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
ma fecero ammiraglio il Giovane Billy.

NOTE
La versione di Thackeray qui
1) dal francese chemise
2) scritto anche come top fore-gallant
2) i suoi compagni non dovevano essere molto ferrati con la Bibbia (e probabilmente Billy ne avrebbe inventati di nuovi per guadagnare tempo!)
4) sigla di “Knight Commander of the Bath” = Cavaliere Commendatore del Bagno, l’ordine militare cavalleresco fondato da Giorgio I nel 1725

LA VERSIONE SEA SHANTY

Secondo Stan Hugill “Little Billee” era una sea shanty per il lavoro alle pompe, un lavoro noioso e monotono che poteva senz’altro essere “rallegrato” da questa canzoncina! Hugill riporta solo il testo dicendo che la melodia è come la francese “Il était un Petit Navire”, così l’adattamento di Hulton Clint ha l’andamento di una ninna-nanna.


I
There were three sailors of Bristol City;
They stole a boat and went to sea.
But first with beef and hardtack biscuits
And pickled pork they loaded she.
And pickled pork they loaded she
II
There was gorging Jack and guzzling Jimmy,
And likewise there was little Billee.
but when they got to the Equator
They’d only left but one split pea.
III
Then gorging Jack to guzzling Jimmy,
“I am confounded hungaree.”
Says guzzling Jimmy to gorging Jacky
“We’ve no wittles (1), so we must eat we.”
IV
Said Gorging Jack to Guzzling Jimmy,
“Oh Guzzling Jim what a fool you be..
There’s little Billy, who’s young and tender,
We’re old and tough, so let’s eat he.”
V
“Make haste, make haste” then say Guzzling Jimmy
as he drew his snickher snee (2)
“O Billy, we’re going to kill and eat you,
undo the collar of your chemie.”
VI
When William heard this information
he drope down on bended knee
“O let me say my catechism
which my dear mom taught to me”
VII
So up he went to the maintop-gallant
and he drope down on his bended knee
and than he said  all his catechism
which his dear mamy once taught to he
VIII
He scarce had said his catechism
when up he jumps “There’s land I see
Jerusalem and Madagascaar
And North and South Amerikee.”
IX
“Jerusalem and Madagascar,
And North and South Amerikee;
There’s the British fleet a-riding at anchor,
With Admiral Napier, K.C.B.”
X
When they bordered to Admiral’s vessel,
He hanged fat Jack (3) and flogged Jimmee;
as for little Bill they make him
The Captain of a Seventy-three (4).
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
C’erano tre marinai della città di Bristol
che rubarono una nave ed andarono per mare, ma prima la caricarono di manzo e gallette
e di maiale sotto sale
di maiale sotto sale
II
C’erano Jack il Gordo e Jimmy il Trinca
e c’era anche il giovane Billy.
Ma quando raggiunsero l’Equatore
era avanzato solo un pisello.
III
Jack il Gordo a Jimmy il Trinca
“Sono terribilmente affamato”
dice Jimmy il Trinca a  Jack il Gordo “Non abbiamo cibo, così ci mangeremo”
IV
Disse Jack il Gordo  a Jimmy il Trinca “Oh Jim il trinca, che sciocco sei,
c’è il piccolo Billy, che è giovane e tenero, noi siamo vecchi e duri, meglio mangiare lui”
V
“Sbrigati, sbrigati ” allora dice Jimmy il Trinca mentre estrae il suo snickher snee
“Oh  Billy stiamo per ucciderti e mangiarti,  disfa il nodo della camicia”
VI
Quando William udì questa notizia
si gettò in ginocchio
“Oh posso dire i comandamenti che la mia cara mamma mi ha insegnato?”
VII
S’arrampicò sulla cima dell’albero maestro e poi si inginocchiò per recitare i comandamenti che sua madre gli aveva un tempo insegnato
VII
Non aveva finito di dirli
quando si rizzò con un balzo ” Vedo terra, Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America.
IX
Gerusalemme e Madagascar
e il Nord e il Sud dell’America
c’è la flotta britannica all’ancora
e l’Ammiraglio Nelson K.C.B.”
X
Quando salirono a bordo del vascello dell’ammiraglio
Impiccarono il grasso Jack e
frustarono Jimmy
ma fecero il giovane Billy
capitano di un 73

NOTE
1)  storpiatura di “vittles,”che sta per “victuals,”= “food.”
2) un grande coltello particolarmente letale usato come arma, non c’è un equivalente italiano
3) in alcune versioni si distingue il grado di colpa tra i due marinai, così uno solo è impiccato
4) vascello da guerra di 73 cannoni

E per corollario ecco la versione francese “Un Petit Navire”
FONTI
http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=139
http://www.bartleby.com/360/9/84.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Il_%C3%A9tait_un_petit_navire
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8278
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=22872

I’M A ROVER AND SELDOM SOBER

Nella tradizione popolare sono assai numerose le ballate dette “night-visiting song” in cui l’amante (un vagabondo, un soldato o un marinaio, ma anche un bracciante agricolo o un giovane apprendista) bussa di notte alla finestra (porta) della fidanzata e viene fatto entrare nella camera da letto. Alcune sono collegate al tema dell’emigrazione, l’innamorato chiede un ultimo intimo incontro prima di partire per l’America, altre aggiungono un tocco “macabro” alla storia, trattandosi della visita di un revenant ossia di un fantasma fin troppo in carne!! Questa variante irlandese prende le mosse dalla ballata “The Grey Cock“, ma il gallo qui che canta è solo uno dei tanti uccelli che saluta il sorgere del sole per avvisare il “rover” che è tempo di andare al lavoro!
The cocks were waking the birds were whistling;
the streams they ran free about the brae
“Remember lass I’m a ploughman’s laddie
and the farmer I must obey.”

ASCOLTA The Dubliners che ne fanno un classico

ASCOLTA Great Big Sea 


I (1)
There’s ne’er a nicht I’m gane to ramble, there’s ne’er a nicht I’m gane to roam There’s ne’er a nicht I’m gane to ramble, intae the erms of me ain true love
CHORUS
I’m a rover (2), seldom sober,
I’m a rover of high degree
It’s when I’m drinking
I’m always thinking
how to gain my love’s company
II
Though the night be
as dark as dungeon,
not a star can be seen above
I will be guided without a stumble (3),
into the arms of the one I love
III
He stepped up to her bedroom window,
kneeling gently upon a stone
And he tapped at the bedroom window (4); “My darling dear
do you lie alone?”
IV
She raised her heid on her snaw-white pillow wi’ her arms around her breast,
“Wha’ is that at my bedroom window disturbin’ me at my lang night’s rest?”
V
“It’s only me your own true lover;
open the door (6) and let me in
For I have travelled a weary journey (7) and I’m near drenched to my skin (8).”
VI (9)
She opened the door with the greatest pleasure,/she opened the door and she let him in/They both shook hands and embraced each other, until the morning they lay as one
VII
Says I: “My love I must go and leave you, to climb the hills they are far above
But I will climb with the greatest pleasure, since I’ve been in the arms of my love”
Traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Non c’è notte in cui non vada a zonzo, non c’è  notte in cui non vada a bighellonare, non c’è notte in cui non vada a zonzo, tra le braccia del mio vero amore
CORO
“Sono un libertino (2) raramente sobrio, sono un libertino d’alta classe
e quando bevo,
penso sempre a ottenere
la compagnia del mio amore.”

II
“Sebbene la notte sia
più buia di una prigione,
e nemmeno una stella si riesce a vedere in cielo, 
sarò guidato senza passi falsi (3)
nelle braccia del mio unico vero amore”
III
Si presentò alla finestra della sua stanza da letto,
inginocchiandosi piano sulla pietra
bussò alla finestra della camera (4):
Mio caro amore,
dormi sola?
IV
Lei sollevò la testa dal soffice e candido cuscino con le braccia intorno al seno
Chi è che alla finestra disturba il mio riposo in questa lunga notte (5)?
V
Sono solo io,  proprio il tuo vero amore, apri la porta (6) e fammi entrare
poiché ho viaggiato a lungo e sono bagnato quasi fino al midollo (8)”
VI
Lei aprì la porta con gran piacere,
aprì la porta e lo fece entrare
si strinsero le mani e si abbracciarono l’un l’altra,
e fino al mattino furono una cosa sola
VII
dico io: “Amore mio debbo lasciarti,
per scalare le colline che sono molto distanti

ma le scalerò con gran piacere
visto che sono stato tra le braccia
del mio amore

NOTE
1) strofa aggiuntiva dei Dubliners
2) rover in questo contesto significa più propriamente “viveur” cioè un festaiolo, compagno di bisbocce, ossia un gaudente che passa le notti a bere, giocare d’azzardo e andare a donne. In italiano un termine che potrebbe racchiudere questi significati è “libertino”
3) il verso viene dalla versione revenant ballad “Senza posare piede” sono espressioni che stanno a indicare una vecchia credenza popolare: coloro che vengono in visita dall’Altro Mondo Celtico (dove hanno vissuto secondo lo scorrere del tempo fatato – un giorno presso Fairy corrisponde ad un anno terrestre) non devono posare i piedi sul suolo perchè altrimenti vengono raggiunti dall’età terrestre
4) oppure “He whispers through her bedroom window” (in italiano: sussurra alla finestra della camera)
5) la lunga notte è molto probabilmente quella del Solstizio d’Inverno
6) open up please
7) I hae come on a lang journey
8)  ho tradotto l’espressione secondo l’equivalente frase idiomatica in italiano: nella ballata “The Grey Cock” William è bagnato perchè presumibilmente è morto annegato, qui si suppone che si tratti del cattivo tempo: uno dei pretesti condivisi nelle night songs per far aprire la porta alla fanciulla dormiente è proprio quello della notte fredda e piovosa. (vedi)
9) She opened up with the greatest pleasure,
unlocked the door and she let him in
They both embraced and kissed each other;
till the morning they lay as one

Un’ulteriore variante viene dalla Scozia (vedi)
ASCOLTA The Corrie Folk Trio

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/this-ae-nicht/
http://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/iamarover.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/imoftendrunkandimseldomsober.html
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/thegreycock.html
http://sangstories.webs.com/imarover.htm
http://www.springthyme.co.uk/ah07/ah07_05.htm

JOIN THE BRITISH ARMY

Charles Green: la ragazza lasciata indietro 1880 Soldati che si imbarcano per le guerre napoleoniche
Charles Green: la ragazza lasciata indietro 1880
Soldati che si imbarcano per le guerre napoleoniche

Tra le irish rebel song di non precisata data che viene fatta risalire all’epoca vittoriana e alle barrak songs (i canti da caserma) “Join the British Army”, lungi dall’essere un’esortazione all’arruolamento, è stata riportata in auge nel canto folk di protesta degli anni 60 da Ewan McColl, il quale ne fece una popolare versione ripresa dagli interpreti successivi.
La canzone è irriverente e accosta i bravi soldatini inglesi a tante scimmie ammaestrate
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano le scimmie dello zoo…

E ognuno che la canta ci mette del suo..

La melodia è ripresa  da un titolo scozzese “The Lass O’ Killiecrankie” con la quale condivide  la prima strofa e parte del ritornello
La Lass O’ Killiecrankie inizia con:
When I was young I used to be
As fine as a lad as you could see
the Prince of Wales invited me
To come and join his army
Il ritornello però non fa menzione delle scimmie allo zoo
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo
She’s as sweet as honeydew
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo
The Lass from Killiecrankie

Il testo prosegue poi con tutte altre amenità rivolte alla bella in questione. Da ascoltare in una versione che più vintage non si può Harry Lauder – The Lass O’ Killiecrankie (1904)

Ma ritorniamo alla irish rebel song , volendo tracciare un percorso possiamo considerarla il contro altare della canzone “Over the Hills and Far Away” pubblicata da Thomas D’Urfey nella sua raccolta “Pills to Purge Melancholy” (1706) (canzone che circolava già alla fine del 1600..) e di strada ne ha fatta parecchia per finire rimaneggiata anche ai giorni nostri.. con il titolo US ARMY

THE BRITISH ARMY

ASCOLTA Ronnie Drew


I
When I was young I used to be
As fine a man as ever you’d see
Til the Prince of Wales he said to me:
“Come and join the British army”
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo,
they’re looking for monkeys up at the zoo
And I: “If I had a face like you,
I’d join the British army”
II
Sarah Conlon baked a cake,
‘twas all for poor oul Slattery’s sake
She threw herself into the lake,
pretending she was barmy
III
Corporal Daly went away,
his wife got in the family way
And the only thing that she could say,
was: “BIP the British army”
IV
Corporal Kelly’s a terrible drought,
just give him a couple of jars of stout
And he’ll beat the enemy with his mouth and save the British army
V
Kilted soldiers wear no drawers,
won’t you kindly lend them yours
The rich must always help the poor
to save the British army
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto, come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il principe del Galles mi disse:
‘Vieni ed unisciti all’Esercito inglese’
CORO
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano le scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’Esercito inglese!”.

II
Sara Conlon preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero vecchio Slattery
che si gettò nel lago
immaginando di essere impazzita
III
Caporale Daly (1) se ne andò
sua moglie restò incinta (2)
e la sola cosa che potesse dire
era “BIP l’Esercito inglese”
IV
Caporale Kelly ha una sete terribile
dategli solo un paio di bicchieri di stout
e sconfiggerà il nemico a morsi
per salvare l’Esercito inglese
V
I soldati in kilt non hanno le mutande
vorreste gentilmente prestargli le vostre?
I ricchi devono sempre aiutare i poveri
per salvare l’esercito inglese

NOTE
1) i soldati che la cantavano mettevano i nomi dei loro sottoufficiali da prendere in giro
2) espressione idiomatica

COME AND JOIN THE BRITISH ARMY

ASCOLTA i Dubliners (voce Luke Kelly) in More of the Hard Stuff 1967 con delle strofe leggermente diverse


I
When I was young I used to be
As fine a man as ever you’d see
Til the Prince of Wales he said to me:
“Come and join the British army”
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo,
they’re looking for monkeys up at the zoo
“If I had a face like you,
I’d join the British army”

II
Sarah Comden baked a cake,
‘twas all for poor oul Slattery’s sake
She threw meself into the lake,
pretending I was barmy
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo
What make me mind up what to do?
Now I’ll work me ticket home to you
And …. the British army

III
Sergent Heeley went away,
his wife got in the family way
And the only words that she could say,
was: “Blame the British army”
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo
Me curse upon the Labour too (blu) (3)
That took me darling boy from me
To join the British army
IV
Corporal Sheen’s a turn o’ the ‘bout,
just give him a couple of jars of stout
He’ll bake the enemy with his mouth
and save the British army
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto,
come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il principe del Galles mi disse:
‘Vieni ed unisciti all’esercito inglese’
CORO
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano delle scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’Esercito inglese!”.
II
Sara Comden preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero vecchio Slattery
lei mi gettò nel lago
immaginando che ero impazzito
CHORUS
Toora loora loora loo

che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito inglese
III
Il Sergente Heeley (1) se ne andò
sua moglie restò incinta (2)
e la sola cosa che potesse dire
era “E’ colpa dell’esercito inglese”
CHORUS
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
maledetti i Laburisti (3)
hanno portato via il mio amato ragazzo
che si è arruolato nell’esercito inglese
IV
Caporale Sheen si fa due passi (4)
dategli solo un paio di bicchieri di stout
farà del nemico un sol boccone (5)
per salvare l’esercito inglese

NOTE
3) “Labour-broo” anche scritto come brew o blu o too nelle note di MacColl “The reference to the “Labour-broo” (the Unemployment Exchange) in the refrain of the third stanza suggests that the song continued to grow during the 1920s.”
4) potrebbe anche voler dire “si guarda intorno”
5) l’unica frase sensata per una traduzione

FUCK THE BRITISH ARMY

Mentre i Dubliners la bippano gli Irish Rovers se ne infischiano altamente
ASCOLTA Irish Rovers

la versione testuale riportata è solo una parte di quanto cantato.


I
When I was young I used to be
as fine a man as ever you’d see;
The Prince of Wales, he said to me,
“Come and join the British army.”
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
they’re looking for monkeys up in the zoo “
If I had a face like you,
I would join the British army.
II
Sarah Camdon baked a cake;
it was all for poor old Slattery’s sake.
I threw meself into the lake,
pretending I was balmy.
III
Corporal Duff’s got such a drought,
just give him a couple of jars of stout;
He’ll kill the enemy with his mouth
and save the British Army.
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
Me curse is on the Labour crew 
They took your darling boy from you
to join the British army.
……
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto,
come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il principe del Galles mi disse
‘Vieni ed unisciti all’esercito inglese’
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano delle scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’esercito inglese!”.
II
Sara Camdon preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero vecchio Slattery
mi gettò nel lago
immaginando che fossi pazzo
III
Caporale Duff ha una sete terribile
dategli solo un paio di bicchieri di stout
e sconfiggerà il nemico a morsi
per salvare l’esercito inglese
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
maledetti i Laburisti
hanno portato via il vostro amato ragazzo
che si è arruolato nell’esercito inglese

US ARMY

I Booze Brothers ne hanno fatto una versione USA con il titolo “US Army” attualizzata, modificando ovviamente i personaggi ed ecco che il Principe del Galles diventa il presidente Bush e viene tirata in ballo Sarah Palin.

I
When I was young I used to be,
A finer man who e’er ya see,
Then President Bush came up to me,
Join the US Army
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
They’re lookin for monkeys up the zoo,
Says I if Id have a face like you,
I’d join the US Army
II
Sarah Conner baked a cake,
It’s all for poor slattery’s sake,
She threw meself into the lake,
Pretendin’ I was barmy,
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
I’ve made me mind with what to do,
I’ll work me ticket home to you,
And f*ck The US Army,
III
When I lived on to fight away,
Her wife got in the family way,
The only thing that she could say,
Was blame the US Army,
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
Me curse upon the labour blue,
That took my darlin boy from me,
To join the US Army,
IV
Sarah Palin(7) buy her way,
……………….
……………………
To save the US Army
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
I’d made up me mind on what to do,
I’ll work my ticket home to you,
And f*ck the US Army,
V
When I was young I had a twist,
For punchin raqi’s with me fist,
Though I thought I might enlist,
And join the US Army,
Ta-loo ra-loo ra-loo ra-loo,
I’d made up me mind on what to do,
I’ll work my ticket home to you,
And f*ck the US Army,
TRADUZIONE CATTIA SALTO
I
Quando ero giovane ero di bell’aspetto,
come pochi se ne vedono
finchè il presidente Bush venne da me:
‘Unisciti all’esercito americano’
Toora loora loora loo
sembrano delle scimmie dello zoo
“Se avessi la vostra faccia,
mi unirei all’esercito americano!”.
II
Sara Conner preparò il dolce
fu tutto per l’amore del povero Slattery,
mi gettò nel lago
immaginando che fossi pazzo
Toora loora loora loo
che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito americano
III
Allora continuavo a combattere
e sua moglie restò incinta (2)
e la sola cosa che potesse dire
era maledire l’esercito americano
Too ra loo ra loo ra loo,
maledetti i Laburisti
hanno portato via mio amato ragazzo
che si è arruolato nell’esercito americano
IV
Sarah Palin si comprò la salvezza
……………….
………………….
per salvare l’esercito americano
Toora loora loora loo
che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito americano
V
Quando ero giovane avevo
la smania di tirare cazzotti (6)
e pensai che potevo iscrivermi
e arruolarmi nell’esercito americano
Toora loora loora loo
che cosa mi resta da fare?
Andrò alla ricerca del biglietto per casa
e .. all’esercito americano

NOTE
6) uno che faceva a pugni fin da ragazzino
7) Sarah Louise Heath coniugata Palin diventata governatrice dell’Alaska nel 2006 (Wiki)

FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=618
https://www.antiwarsongs.org/canzone.php?lang=it&id=31758
http://www.irish-folk-songs.com/the-british-army-chords-and-lyrics.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/b/britishar.html
http://www.metrolyrics.com/join-the-british-army-lyrics-dubliners.html
https://www.musixmatch.com/it/testo/Booze-Brothers/Us-Army
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/song-midis/Join_the_British_Army.htm

YE MARINERS ALL OR A JUG OF THIS

sailor drinkingRaccolta sul campo agli inizi del Novecento dalla signora Marina Russell di Upwey, Dorset e pubblicata nel The Penguin Book of English Folk Songs (1959) “Ye Mariners All” è una drinking song dalla vena malinconica o caustica. Il testo compare in stampa verso il 1840 abbinato alla melodia “A Brisk Young Sailor Courted Me” ovvero “Died for Love” cioè il lamento di una fanciulla tradita da un marinaio.
La ballata è classificata per lo più nelle sea songs e non è propriamente una canzone irlandese sul bere anche se finisce nei repertori di alcuni gruppi di musica celtica -non manca certo di precedenti come Rosin the Beau. I Clancy Brothers l’hanno registrata con il titolo di “A Jug of this” l’effetto è una sorta di irish lament.
ASCOLTA Tommy Makem

ASCOLTA Seth Lakeman in The Punch Bowl 2002.

ASCOLTA Lehto&Wright live 2010

ASCOLTA Fairport Convention in Tipplers Tales 1978 con un lungo preambolo strumentale il canto inizia a 2:30

ASCOLTA Robin Holcomb & Jessica Kenny in Son Of Rogues Gallery ‘Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys ANTI 2013


I
Oh ye Mariners(1) as you pass by,
Well come into drink if you are dry.
Come and spend, my lads, your money brisk,
And pop your nose in (this one.
Drink another) jug of this(2).
II
Oh ye tipplers, have you that crown(3)?
For you are welcome all to sit down.
Come and spend, my lads, your money brisk,
And pop your nose in (this one.
In another) jug of this.
III
Now I’m old and I can scarcely crawl,
I’ve an old grey beard and a head that’s bald.
Crown my desire and fulfill my bliss,
With a pretty young girl
And a(nother) jug of this(4).
IV
Now I’m in my grave
and I am dead(5),
And all these sorrows are passed and fled.
Go and turn myself (transform me) into a fish(6),
And let me swim (around you)
In a(nother) jug of this.
traduzione italiano di Cattia Salto
I
Voi marinai di passaggio
entrate a bere se avete sete,
venite a spendere, ragazzi i vostri soldi alla svelta,
e infilate il naso in questa boccia(2)
II
Tu beone hai quella corona(3)?
Perchè siete tutti invitati a sedervi,
venite e spendete, ragazzi, i vostri soldi alla svelta,
e infilate il naso in questa boccia
III
Ora sono vecchio e riesco camminare a malapena, ho una vecchia barba grigia e una testa calva,
corono il mio desiderio e soddisfo la mia beatitudine
con una bella ragazzina
e questa boccia(4)
IV
Ora che sono nella tomba
e sono morto(5)
e tutti i dolori sono passati e finiti
mi trasformo in un pesce(6)
per poter nuotare (intorno a te)
in questa boccia

NOTE
1) nelle prime trascrizioni si riporta “mourners” come se gli invitati ad entrare nel pub per bere fossero quelli di un corteo funebre. In realta si tratta della parola mar’ners una forma dialettale per marinai
2) ovvero “e infilate il naso in questo, bevete un’altra boccia di questo“. Non è automatico tradurre in italiano il temine jug: in fiorentino si direbbe boccia, che richiama l’immagine delle bottiglie di vino da 5 litri (una bottiglia piuttosto grande con il collo stretto). Ma può essere anche una caraffa con tanto di manico e collo più svasato che assomiglia a una brocca. Potrebbe anche essere un vaso di vetro per conservare marmellate o ortaggi o il barattolo del miele. Un termine quanto mai generico che a me richiama l’orcio toscano, il recipiente di terracotta, panciuto e di forma allungata con il collo ristretto, spesso a due manici in cui si conservavano o trasportavano i liquidi. In antico era una unità di misura equivalente a circa 38 litri, ma rimpicciolito ecco che l’orcio era usato come una brocca.
jug= boccia, brocca, caraffa, bottiglia.
3) oppure “Oh mariners all, if you’ve half a crown”: la corona in senso di moneta
4) letteralmente “in un’altra boccia (brocca) di questo
5) evidentemente non tutti quelli che finiscono nella tomba possono considerarsi morti, così chi canta preferisce specificarlo!
6) mi piace l’idea della reincarnazione in un pesce anche se non so se ci siano intenzionali connotazioni verso simbologie cristiane, ma quale paradisiaca beatitudine per chi ama il bere!!

Per ravvivare l’atmosfera propongo una contraddanza in tema marinaresco “Row Well, Ye Mariners”

FONTI
http://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/yemarinersall.html
http://mysongbook.de/msb/songs/xyz/yemarine.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49380
http://celtic-lyrics.com/lyrics/279.html
http://shanty.rendance.org/lyrics/showlyric.php/mariners
http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/27.html

THE GERMAN CLOCKWINDER

clock-mender“The German Clockwinder” o “The German Clockmender” e anche “Newfie Clock Winder” è una classica ballata da pub a doppio senso, basata sugli stereotipi: nelle isole britanniche i tedeschi (ovvero  bavaresi) sono associati agli orologi e in particolare a quelli a cucù (in inglese cuckoos richiama il termine cuckolds – nell’accoppiata meno immediata dalla traduzione italiana di cucù-corna vedi); qui l’orologio non è solo un orologio e la sua ricarica equivale ad un amore adulterino; del resto è risaputo di come i lavoratori ambulanti (per non parlare del postino) siano sempre pronti a espletare urgenti “lavoretti” per le casalinghe vogliose..

Il sottinteso nella canzone è che l’ambulante tedesco si presta con solerte rapidità a soddisfare le voglie della moglie trascurata e la risposta che talvolta viene data al marito è prettamente da buon meccanico: c’era bisogno di una bella lubrificata al meccanismo perchè riprendesse il suo funzionamento!!

La melodia richiama “Little Brown Jug” (di moda nel 1869) e dal tono e dal contesto la canzone molto probabilmente è nata nell’ambito delle canzoni per il “music hall”, prendendo le mosse da canzoni a doppio senso come “The German Musicianer“, andata in stampa alla fine dell’ottocento nei “chapbooks of bawdy songs“. La canzone ha proseguito la sua trasmissione orale per conoscere un revival nel secondo dopoguerra.


I
A German clock-winder to Dublin(1) once came,
Benjamin Shnook(2) was the ould(3) German’s name;
And as he was making his way ‘round the Strand
He played on his banjo and the music was grand.
CHORUS
Singing Too-ra-lumma-lumma, too-ra-lumma-lumma, too-ra-lie-ay(4)
II
A Woman Came Out From Fitzwilliam Square(5)
She said her clock was in need of repair,
She Invited Him in and, to her delight,
In less than five minutes he had her clock right.
III
They sat down together just taking in stock
When all of a sudden there came a loud knock
In walked her husband oh lord what a shock
To see the ould German wind up his wife’s clock.
IV
“O wife Mary-Ann, Oh wife Mary-Ann
Why did you take in such an innocent man
To wind up your clock and leave me on the shelf;
If your oul’ clock needs winding, I’ll wind it meself!”(6)
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Tempo fa un ripara-orologi tedesco venne a Dublino(1)
Benjamin Shnook era il suo vecchio nome in tedesco(2)
e faceva il suo lavoro per lo Strand
suonando il banjo e la sua musica era proprio  forte
CORO
Nonsense
II
Una donna sbucò da Fitzwilliam Square
dicendo che il suo orologio aveva bisogno di una riparazione
e lo invitò a entrare e con somma gioia, in meno di cinque minuti aveva il suo orologio a posto.
III
Si sedettero insieme solo per parlare
quando tutto ad un tratto ecco un forte colpo
stava arrivando il marito e oddio che trauma
nel vedere il tedesco che ricaricava l’orologio della moglie!!
IV
“O Mary Ann moglie mia
perchè hai fatto entrare un tale ingenuo
per dare la carica al tuo orologio e hai lasciato il mio sulla mensola?!
Se il tuo vecchio orologio ha bisogno di una carica, lo caricherò io stesso”

NOTE
1) il nome della città cambia a seconda di chi canta
2) altro nome che va per la maggiore è quello di Benjamin Fuchs: ossia in tedesco il Signor Volpe (Fox), che con l’accento irlandese diventa “Fucks”. Erano i nomi da barzelletta con cui si appellavano i tedeschi; in altre versioni: Peter Von Gherkin, Sylvester Snooks
3) auld, ould ovvero old a Dublino si pronuncia Aul, come Owl, ovvero OW-will, o Ow-well. Non necessariamente si usa per identificare qualcosa di vecchio, quanto piuttosto come un intercalare affettuoso o bonario
4) il ritornello sembra un jodel
5) oppure Merrion Square
6) qui la reazione del marito  è molto da “gentleman”, in altre versioni passa invece subito alle mani, come ad esempio in questa registrazione di Charlie Wills (1971)

He got him hold by the back of his neck,
He shaked him about till his teeth fall out.
He made him promise no more in his life
He’d wind up the clock or another man’s wife.

ASCOLTA Belles of Bedlam


I
A German clockwinder to Dublin(1) once came,
Benjamin Fuchs(2) was the old(3) German’s name;
And as he was winding his way ‘round the strand,
He played on his flute and the music was grand.
CHORUS
Singing tour a loom a loom a,
Tour a loom looma, tour a lie ay,
Too-ra-lie, too-ra-lie, you-ra-lie-ay(4)
II
There was an old lady in Grosvenor Square(5),
Who said that her clock was in need of repair;
In walked the old German and to her delight,
In less than five minutes he had her clock right.
III
Now, as they were sitting down there on the floor,
There came a very loud knock on the door;
In walked her husband and great was his shock,
To see that old German wind up his wife’s clock.
IV
The husband said, “Now, look here Mary Ann,
Don’t let that old German come in here again;
He wound up your clock but left mine on the shelf;
If your old clock needs winding, I’ll wind it my self.”
V(7)
Then says the German, “Sure I meant you no harm,
But the spring wouldn’t work in your old wife’s alarm;
I pulled out me oil can and I gave it a squirt,
If you keep it well-oiled, your wife’s clock will work!”
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO DI CATTIA SALTO
I
Tempo fa un ripara orologi tedesco venne a Dublino
Benjamin Fuchs era il suo vecchio nome in tedesco
e faceva il suo lavoro per lo Strand
suonando il flauto e la sua musica era forte
CORO
Nonsense
II
C’era una signora  in Grosvenor Square
che diceva che il suo orologio aveva bisogno di una riparazione
il tedesco entrò e con somma gioia, in meno di cinque minuti le mise a posto l’orologio.
III
Ora mentre erano seduti là sul pavimento
arrivò un colpo molto forte alla porta
il marito entrò e grande fu il suo trauma
nel vedere il tedesco che ricaricava l’orologio della moglie.
IV
Il marito disse “vedi Mary Ann
non lasciare che il tedesco venga qui di nuovo,
ha dato la carica al tuo orologio, ma ha lasciato il mio sulla mensola, se il tuo vecchio orologio ha bisogno di una carica, lo caricherò io stesso”
V
Così parlò il tedesco “Di certo non avevo intenzione di nuocervi,
ma la carica non funzionava nella suoneria della vostra vecchia;
ho tirato fuori il mio lubrificatore e ho dato uno schizzo
se lo terrete ben oliato, l’orologio di vostra moglie funzionerà”

NOTE
7) in questa versione l’ambulante si giustifica, spiegando che con il suo intervento ha fatto del bene alla coppia; in altri finali giura di non farlo più, come in questa di Mike Harding

Our clock it was bent and knocked out of repair.
Well that poor old German, he got such a scare,
That never, oh never, for the rest of his life,
Would he wind up the clock of another man’s wife.

FONTI
https://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/germanyclockmaker.html
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8214
http://glostrad.com/german-clockmender-the-2/
http://goireland.about.com/od/irishtradandfolkmusic/qt/irishfolkgerman.htm
http://www.wtv-zone.com/phyrst/audio/nfld/05/clock.htm

THREE LOVELY LASSIES FROM KIMMAGE

Canzone tradizionale irlandese talvolta attribuita a Leo Maguire  che l’avrebbe scritta con lo pseudonimo di Sylvester Gaffney negli anni 50. Kimmage è una cittadina appena fuori Dublino (Dublin Southside) diventata un quartiere residenziale della capitale, ma a volte il luogo di provenienza delle tre belle è Bannion (come nella versione di Delia Murphy ASCOLTA) o Bunyan; “Three lovely lassies from Kimmage” è una old time song che richiama canzoni come “I wonder when I shall be married” che secondo Bruce Olson derivano da un’unica broadside ballad del 1600 dal titolo ‘The Maidens Sad Complaint for want of a Husband’ (qui). Quindi pur essendo ambientata nel secondo dopo-guerra la canzone ha un fascino d’altri tempi.

ASCOLTA Dubliners che interpretano con molto irish humour questa ancora popolare  drinking song


I
There were three lovely lasses from Kimmage,
From Kimmage, from Kimmage, from Kimmage
And whenever there with a bit of a scrimmage
Sure I was the toughest of all (x2)
II
Well the cause of the row is Joe Cashin
For he told me he thought I’d look smashin’
At a dance in Saint Anthony’s Hall(1),
III
Well the other two young ones were flippin’,
When they saw me and Joe and we trippin’
To the strains of the Tennessee Waltz(2),
IV
When he gets a few jars he goes frantic
But he’s tall and he’s dark and romantic
And I love him in spite of it all,
V
Well he told me he thought we should marry,
He said it was foolish to tarry,
So I lent him the price of the ring,
VI
Well me dad said he’ll give us a present,
A stool and a lousy stuffed pheasant,
And a picture to hang on the wall,
VII
I went down to the Tenancy Section(3)
The T.D. just before the election,
Said he’d get me a house near me ma,
VIII
Well we’re gettin’ a house, the man said it
When I’ve five or six kids to me credit
In the meantime we’ll live with me ma.
TRADUZIONE ITALIANO -CATTIA SALTO
I
C’erano tre belle ragazze
di Kimmage
e ovunque andassero c’era una zuffa
ed io ero la più tosta di tutte
II
La causa della lite è Joe Cashin,
mi disse di quanto pensava fossi da sballo
ad un ballo nel salone di Sant’Antonio.
III
Bene le altre due si erano lanciate
quando videro me e Joe saltellare
alla melodia di Tennessee Waltz.
IV
Quando beve qualche bicchiere si agita,
ma è alto e moro e romantico
e lo amo nonostante tutto-
V
Mi disse che pensava ci saremmo dovuti sposare, disse che era da stupidi tentennare
così gli ho prestato i soldi per l’anello
VI
Mio papà mi disse che ci avrebbe fatto un regalo, uno sgabello e un pessimo fagiano farcito e un quadro da appendere alla parete
VII
Andai alla Tenancy Section,
il T.D. proprio prima delle elezioni, mi disse che mi avrebbe trovato una casa vicino a mamma.
VIII
Stavamo per avere la casa, l’uomo disse che mi farà credito quando avrei avuto 5 o 6 bambini, nel frattempo vivremo con mia mamma.

NOTE
1) in Folk Songs and Ballads Popular in Ireland “Adelaide Hall”
2) popolare country song americana degli anni 1950 (musica scritta da Pee Wee King, parole di Redd Stewart) vedi
3) in Folk Songs and Ballads Popular in Ireland “Tenaney Section”: credo si riferisca all’assegnazione di case popolari
FONTI
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=28676
http://worldmusic.about.com/od/irishsonglyrics/p/Three-Lovely-Lasses-From-Kimmage.htm