Archivi tag: Dàimh

Outlander: Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh

Leggi in italiano

The “lost portrait” of Charles Edward Stuart is a portrait, painted in late autumn 1745 by Scottish artist Allan Ramsay,

“Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa”  (= Song to the Prince) or “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” was written 1745 by Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  Highlands bard and fervent Jacobite, to be addressed as a letter to Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, known as Bonnie Prince Charlie or The Young Pretender.

The Prince was in France in the vain expectation of a favorable sign by King Louis XV to help him to recover the throne of England and Scotland. But the question dragged on for long, Louis never received his poor relative at court, so the boy was also snubbed by the Parisian Nobility and certainly the words of encouragement of the supporters in Scotland could not but comfort him.
The original text of “Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa” is written in Scottish Gaelic, a language that the prince could not understand (having been born and raised in Rome ).

In “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (see) lyrics and tune  (#113) and the notes of the published edition for the School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edinburgh 2011 are “This stirring Jacobite song has been attributed to Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). The text and translation here are adapted from JLC, which has 17 couplets plus refrain. That text is derived from the 1839 edition (p.85) of Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair’s collection (ASE); the 1839 edition is identical with the 1834 edition, but the fact that the song does not appear in the first edition (1751) raises doubts as to the ascription (see JLC 42, n.1): in fact the text was almost certainly lifted into the 1834 edition from PT, where it is headed simply ‘LUINNEAG’ and is not ascribed. The 1834 or 1839 text of the Ais-Eiridh is doubtless the source of that in AO 102, which ascribes the song to Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair. Campbell prints the tune in 3/4 time (JLC 301).
JLC = CAMPBELL, John Lorne, ed.(1933, Rev.1984) Highland Songs of the Forty-Five … [With thirteen melodies] (Edinburgh: John Grant, 2nd ed. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press for the Scottish Gaelic Texts Society).

Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album entirely dedicated to the scottish gaelic songs that have been preserved in the Hebrides on the ruinous parable of the Jacobite rebellion led by Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1745

Dàimh in “Moidart to Mabou” 2000, a new generation group from the West Coast of Scotland, formed by musicians from Ireland, Scotland, Cape Breton and California
https://daimh.bandcamp.com/track/oran-eile-don-phrionnsa

Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince (1) comes
To the land of Clanranald(2)
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird

I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

NOTES

My hope is constant in thee

1) Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) The Macdonalds of Clanranald, are one of the branch clans of Clan Donald—one of the largest Scottish clans. in which “king of the isles and king of Argyll” was elected. At the time of the 1745 rebellion, the old chieftain was not in favor of the Stuard, but did not prevent his son from allying with the Young Pretender. The two met in Paris. The young Ranald was among the first to join the Jacobite cause by proselytizing the other clans.

OUTLANDER TV SERIES: “THE FOX’S LAIR”

The song has been brought back to popularity with the inclusion in Outlander TV series – second season- following in the footsteps of the great editorial success of the series written by Diana Gabaldon, as underlined by the artistic director Bear McCreary this is one of the few songs written just in the making of the Scottish rebellion.
To properly underscore these episodes, I needed a song that was written during the Jacobite uprising as opposed to after it, a song that makes no comment about loss, only promises of victory.
I turned to famed Scottish composer and music historian John Purser, who was gracious with his time and assembled a collection a historically-accurate songs for me. I was immediately drawn to the soaring melody in “Moch Sa Mhadainn,” a song composed by Alasdair mac Mghaighstir Alasdair. A celebrated poet of the Jacobite era, Alasdair composed this song upon hearing the news that Prince Charles Edward Stuart had landed at Glenfinnan. That was perfect!  When Jamie opens the letter in “The Fox’s Lair” and learns he has been roped into the revolution, this song was actually being composed somewhere in Scotland at that very moment.” (see).

Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) : “It is always difficult negotiating the gap between tradition and innovation but it is something I am becoming increasingly used to, “I performed the song at a much slower tempo than it would normally be performed traditionally but I think it worked to great effect with the rich string voicings and the percussive elements of the piece. I was also very pleased to work with my friend John Purser who helped direct my performance of the song to suit the arrangement.’

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.

I
Early in the morning as I awaken
Great is my joy and hearty laughter
Since I’ve heard of the Prince’s coming
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel (3), as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.

NOTE

Let Us Unite

3) Donald Cameron of Lochiel (c.1700 – October 1748) among the most influential chieftains traditionally loyal to the Stuart House. He joined Prince Charles in 1745 and later Culloden fled to France where he died in exile.
The family was rehabilitated and reinstated in the title with the amnesty of 1748.

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047

ORAN EILE DON PHRIONNSA

Read the post in English

Il Bonny Prince (Carlo Edoardo Stuart) ritratto da Allan Ramsay subito dopo la marcia su Edimburgo

Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa,  “Canzone per il Principe” (= Song to the Prince) ma anche dal primo verso “Moch sa Mhadainn ‘s Mi Dùsgadh” (in italiano “Appena mi sveglio”) venne scritta nel 1745 da Alexander McDonald (Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)  bardo delle Highlands e fervente giacobita, perché fosse indirizzata come missiva al Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart, noto più semplicemente come il Bonnie Prince Charlie o The Young Pretender. All’epoca il Principe si trovava in Francia nella vana attesa di un cenno di favore da parte del Re Luigi XV affinchè lo aiutasse a riprendersi il trono d’Inghilterra e Scozia. Ma la questione si trascinava per le lunghe, Luigi non ricevette mai a Corte il suo parente povero, così il ragazzo venne snobbato anche dalla Nobiltà parigina e di certo le parole d’incoraggiamento dei sostenitori in Scozia non potevano che dargli conforto. continua
Il testo originale di Oran Eile Don Phrionnsa ( anche “Moch Sa Mhadainn”, “Hùg Ò Laithill Ò” “Hùg Ò Laithill O Horo”), è scritto in gaelico scozzese, lingua che il principe non capiva (essendo nato e cresciuto a Roma).

Ne “The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript Original Highland Airs Collected at Raasay in 1812 By Elizabeth Jane Ross” (qui) sono riportati testo e melodia (#113) così nelle note dell’edizione pubblicata per lo School of Scottish Studies Archives, Edimburgo 2011 leggiamo “Questa toccante canzone giacobita è stata attribuita a Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald, c.1698–c.1770). Il testo e la traduzione di  JLC [John Lorne CAMPBELL(1933, Rev.1984)], riporta 17 strofe più il ritornello. Il testo deriva dall’edizione del 1839  (p.85) dalla collezione di Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (ASE); l’edizione del 1839 è identica a quella del 1834, ma il fatto che la canzone non appaia nella prima edizione (1751) solleva dubbi sull’attribuzione (vedi JLC 42, n.1): in effetti il testo è stato quasi certamente preso dall’edizione 1834 da PT, dov’è semplicemente intitolato ‘LUINNEAG’ senza alcuna attribuzione.

ASCOLTA Capercaillie in “Glenfinnan (Songs Of The ’45)” (1998) album interamente dedicato ai canti in gaelico che si sono conservati nelle Isole Ebridi sulla rovinosa parabola della ribellione giacobita capeggiata dal Bonnie Prince Charlie nel 1745

ASCOLTA Dàimh in Moidart to Mabou 2000, un gruppo di nuova generazione dalla West Coast della Scozia formato da musicisti  dall’Irlanda, Scozia, Capo Bretone e California.

Chi canta dopo aver impostato la prima strofa, prosegue riprendendo gli ultimi due versi come i primi della strofa successiva, e aggiunge altri due nuovi versi
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Thug o-ho-ro an aill libh
Thug ho-o, laithill ho-o
Seinn o-ho-ro an aill libh
I
Och ‘sa mhaduinn’s mi dusgadh
‘S mor mo shunnd’s mo cheol-gaire
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
II
O’n a chuala mi ‘m Prionnsa
Thighinn do dhuthaich Chlann Ra’ill
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
III
Grainne mullaich gach righ thu
Slan gum pill thusa, Thearlaich
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
IV
‘S ann th ‘n fhior-fhuil gun truailleadh
Anns a ghruadh is mor-naire
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
V
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle
‘G eirigh suas le deagh-nadur
Us nan tigeadh tu rithist
Bhiodh gach tighearn’ ‘n aite

The Elizabeth Ross Manuscript
I
Early as I awaken
Great my joy, loud my laughter
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
III
Thou art the choicest of all rulers
Here’s a health to thy returning
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
IV
His the royal blood unmingled
Great the modesty in his visage
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
V
With nobility overflowing
And endowed with all good nature
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird
Traduzione italiana Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Da quando seppi che il Principe verrà nella terra del Clanranald
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno
III
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
IV
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
V
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.

NOTE
1) Principe Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart
2) il Clan dei Macdonald di Clanranald (Clan RanaldClan Ronald) è uno dei rami più grandi dei clan scozzesi in cui si eleggeva il Re delle Isole e di Argyll. All’epoca delle ribellione del 1745 il vecchio capo clan non era favorevole agli Stuard, ma non impedì al figlio di allearsi con il Giovane Pretendente. I due si conobbero a Parigi. Ranald il giovane fu tra i primi ad aderire alla causa giacobita facendo proseliti presso gli altri clan.

LA SERIE OUTLANDER

Il brano è stato riportato alla popolarità con l’inserimento nella seconda stagione della serie televisiva Outlander (sulle orme del grandissimo successo editoriale dell’omonima serie scritta da Diana Gabaldon), come sottolinea lo stesso direttore artistico Bear McCreary questo è uno dei pochi canti scritti proprio nel farsi della ribellione scozzese.
“Quando Jamie apre la lettera nell’episodio  “The Fox’s Lair” e scopre di essere stato invischiato nella rivoluzione, questa canzone era contemporanea essendo stata composta da qualche parte in Scozia  proprio in quel preciso momento.” (qui).

ASCOLTA Griogair Labhruidh in Outlander: Season 2, (Original Television Soundtrack) il brano ha un andamento marziale  e Griogair racconta
“È sempre difficile mediare il divario tra tradizione e innovazione, ma è qualcosa a cui mi sto abituando sempre più spesso, ho eseguito la canzone ad un ritmo molto più lento di quello tradizionale, ma penso che abbia raggiunto un grande effetto con i ricchi cori dei violini e gli elementi percussivi. Sono stato anche molto contento di lavorare con il mio amico John Purser che ha contribuito a dirigere la mia esecuzione della canzone per adattarla all’arrangiamento.

Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Hùg hó o ró nàill i
Hùg hó ill a ill ó
Seinn oho ró nàill i.
I
Moch sa mhadainn is mi dùsgadh,
Is mòr mo shunnd is mo cheòl-gáire;
On a chuala mi am Prionnsa,
Thighinn do dhùthaich Chloinn Ràghnaill.
II
Gràinne-mullach gach rìgh thu,
Slàn gum pill thusa Theàrlaich;
Is ann tha an fhìor-fhuil gun truailleadh,
Anns a’ ghruaidh is mòr nàire.
III
Mar ri barrachd na h-uaisle,
Dh’ èireadh suas le deagh nàdar;
Is nan tigeadh tu rithist,
Bhiodh gach tighearna nan àite.
IV
Is nan càraicht an crùn ort
Bu mhùirneach do chàirdean;
Bhiodh Loch Iall mar bu chòir dha,
Cur an òrdugh nan Gàidheal.


I
Early as I awaken,
Great my joy, loud my laughter,
Since I heard that the Prince comes
To the land of Clanranald
II
Thou’rt the choicest of all rulers,
Here’s a health to thy returning,
His the royal blood unmingled,
Great the modesty in his visage.
III
With nobility overflowing,
And endowed with all good nature;
And shouldst thou return ever
At his post would be each laird.
IV
And thy friends would be joyful
If the crown were placed on thee,
And Lochiel, as he should be
Would be leading the Gaëls.
Traduzione italiano Cattia Salto
I
Appena mi sveglio
grande la gioia, forte il riso
da quando seppi che il Principe (1) verrà nella terra del Clanranald (2)
II
Voi che siete il migliore tra i re
bevo alla salute del vostro ritorno!
Suo il sangue reale puro
grande la modestia nel suo viso
III
Colmo di nobiltà
e dotato di natura gentile!
Se voi ritornerete
ogni laird sarà al vostro servizio.
IV
I vostri amici saranno pieni di gioia
se sarete incoronato,
e Lochiel (3), come si conviene, farà arrivare i Gaeli per la battaglia

NOTE

Fedeli agli amici

3) Donald Cameron di Lochiel (c.1700 – Ottobre 1748) tra i più influenti capoclan tradizionalmente fedele alla Casa Stuart. Si unì al Principe Carlo nel 1745 e dopo Culloden fuggì in Francia dove morì in esilio.
La famiglia fu riabilitata e reintegrata nel titolo con l’amnistia del 1748.

FONTI
https://terreceltiche.altervista.org/charlie-hes-my-darling/
http://www.ed.ac.uk/files/imports/fileManager/RossMS.pdf
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie1.htm
http://chrsouchon.free.fr/bonnie2.htm
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/capercaillie/oraneile.htm
http://www.bearmccreary.com/#blog/blog/outlander-return-to-scotland/
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/63749/3
http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/en/fullrecord/94215/5;jsessionid=40262AAD448EC6A5BD09862C091AD047